UNIST
U N I V E R S I T Y   O F   S P L I T

FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

 

 

DETAILED PROPOSAL OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Undergraduate university studij

Chemical Technology

 

 

 
GENERAL INFORMATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

Name of higher education institution

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Address

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Phone

021/ 329-420

Fax

021/ 329-461

E-mail

dekanat@ktf-split.hr

Internet address

https://www.ktf.unist.hr/

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Name of the study programme

Chemical Technology

Provider of the study programme

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Other participants

Type of study programme

Level of study programm

Academic/vocational title earned at completion of study

University Bachelor of Chemical Engineering

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Reasons for starting the study programme

By the undergraduate study of chemical technology, the Faculty of Chemical Technology of Split, as a high-education and scientific institution, is trying to offer a new impetus for economic development and rational economizing on natural resources. This study provides knowledge required for designing, leading and developing of sustainable chemical processes, as well as the knowledge on the methods of quality investigations and their development at the process of analysis. Students are qualified for inclusion in the rapidly changing technological developments and to encourage small and medium businesses. During the study, special attention is paid to practical work which can enable studnets to incluse into industry process (chemical, metal processing, shipbuilding, construction, food, pharmaceutical and other related industries).The basic knowledge from the field of chemical engineering is applied in the manufacture and analysis of materials, in the investigations of various degradation processes and in the protection of construction materials in different surroundings. Sustainable development is closely connected with industry and environment. When they finish this study, the students can continue studing at the graduate study of chemical technology, the Faculty of Chemical Technology of Split or at other related Faculties. The proposed study programs are based on the scientific knowledge of chemistry, and chemical engineering, which significantly contributes to modern education of new experts.

1.2. Relationship with the local community (economy, entrepreneurship, civil society, etc.)

The possible partners outside high-school education system interested in continuation of the study of chemical technology are the economy and public services of the Split-Dalmatia County, as well as: cement industry, shipbuilding industry, processing of polymer materials, Institute for Oceanography and Fishing, Croatian Hydrographical Institute, Institute for Adriatic Cultures and Melioration of Karsts, Institute for Civil Engineering, Public Health Institute and other County and City public services. It is important to point out that due to the geographic position of Split there is a growing presence of students not only from Dalmatia but also from Bosnia and Herzegovina, so that such a trend is expected to continue in the future.

1.3. Compatibility with requirements of professional organizations

One of the basic assumptions for quality implementation of the proposed program is educational, professional and research cooperation of all relevant factors that may contribute to the process of the training and education of students. The teachers who teach at the undergraduate study of chemical technology are members of various professional associations and commitie (Croatian Society of Chemical Engineers, Association of Chemical Engineers Split, Croatian Chemical Society Parent Committee for Technical Sciences, Chemical Engineering field, Croatian Academy of Engineering , Croatian standard Institute, etc.).

1.4. Name possible partners outside the higher education system that expressed interest in the study programme

The possible partners outside high-school education system interested in continuation of the study of chemical technology are the economy and public services of the Split-Dalmatia County and beyond. Some of the specialized sites and laboratories with whom Faculty cooperates (usually for the purpose of student’s practical and field work and the preparation of undergraduate theses of students) are: companies from Dalmatia (eg. AD Plastik, Brodosplit, CEMEX, Cian), the entire Croatia (pharmaceutical industry, oil industry, food industry, cosmetics industry, paints and varnishes, the company dealing with the protection of the environment, etc.) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (eg. Aluminij Mostar). Faculty partners are also institutes as follows: Institute Ruđer Bošković, Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation, Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries.

1.5. Financing

The planned source of financing for the undergraduate study of chemical technology is the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports.

1.6. Comparability of the study programme with other accredited programmes in higher education institutions in the Republic of Croatia and EU countries

When elaborating the programs, special care was taken to harmonize the subjects and their teaching programs with related studies at other high-school institutions. In that way the programmes are mutually comparable and, also, they stimulate the student and teacher mobility. The proposed program can be compared with the programmes of the following high-school institutions:
- Politecnico di Torino, Italy (www.polito.it )
- University of Maribor, Slovenia (http://www.fkkt.uni-lj.si),
- University of Pardubice, Czech Republic (http://www.upce.cz/en/fcht/uechi.html),
- Politechnika Warszawska, Poland (http://www.ichip.pw.edu.pl/)
- Università degli Studi di Roma ”La Sapienza” ( http://www.chem.uniroma1.it/didattica/offerta-formativa/cdl-chimica-industriale), Rome, Italy;
- Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.

1.7. Openness of the study programme to student mobility (horizontal, vertical in the Republic of Croatia, and international)

The study programme is organized in one-semester courses, which is one of the important prerequisites of student mobility. The proposed programme of undergraduate study of chemical technology and its comparability with the related studies in the Republic of Croatia and the EU countries enables the student and teacher mobility. The mobility can be realized through the enrolment of particular subjects in other university studies, as well as of the whole semesters in the related studies, or through the work on the final project. Institutions with which it will be possible to achieve the mobility are constituents of the University of Split, other Croatian universities (Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology in Zagreb, Faculty of Food Technology in Zagreb, Faculty of Food Technology in Osijek, Faculty of Textile Technology in Zagreb, Faculty of Graphic Arts in Zagreb, etc.), and certain institutions from the European Union. The Faculty has signed the agreement for Erasmus mobility of teachers and students with the Universite Techniche Dresden, Dresden, Germany, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, Universita di Trieste, Trieste, Italy, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Polonia, Polytecnich institutes of Braganca, Braganca, Portugal, University of Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia, Polymer technology college, Maribor, Slovenia and others. The Faculty also participates in multilateral cooperation with the possibilities of mobility of students and teachers across the Central European Exchange Program for University Studies (CEEPUS). Through this program, the cooperation with the following foreign institutions is achived: 1) Faculty of Material Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland, 2) Institute für Analytische Chemie, Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz, Austria, 3) Department of Analytical Chemistry, Slovak University of Technology, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, 4) Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic, 5) Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Slovenia.

1.8. Compatibility of the study programme with the University mission and the strategy of the proposer, as well as with the strategy statement of the

The study program has been consolidated with the Strategy of the development of the Faculty, its mission and vision, as well with the strategy of the University of Split.

1.9. Current experiences in equivalent or similar study programmes

The Faculty of Chemical Technology of Split was founded in 1960, responding the economic demands of the region and aiming at fulfilling its personnel and professional needs. On the grounds of the acquired scientific knowledge and economic demands, the teaching programs have been continually improved and up-dated. Close cooperation between this region economy and the Faculty has resulted in great number of projects, expertise, elaborates and, in particular, in opening new study orientations on the undergraduate study, the content of which is just the result of this region needs.

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

2.1. General information

Scientific/artistic area of the study programme

Technical sciences

Duration of the study programme

3 years (6 semesters)

The minimum number of ECTS required for completion of study

180

Enrolment requirements and admission procedure

Completed 4-year secondary school and secondary school leaving exam.

2.2. Learning outcomes of the study programme (name 15-30 learning outcomes)

University bachelor of chemical technology will be able to:
- solve problems appying an appropriate engineering approach based on knowledge in the area of natural and technical sciences
- work in laboratory and plant facilities on professional and safe way
- design and conduct chemical and engineering experiment
- analyze and interpret the results of measurements in laboratory or plant facility using recent computer softwares
- understand the principles of unit operations and be familiar with corresponding processing equipment and processing parameters control
- identify the influence of process parameters on unit operations performance
- recognize basic construction materials and their application fields
- determine basic materials properties applying routine instrumental analyses
- perform routine manufacturing and processing operations with respect to sustainable development approach
- suggest appropriate environmental protection procedures
- recognize the importance of conventional and renewable energy resources
- understand the impact of enginnering solution on the economy, environment and society
- understand the professional and ethical responsibility
- function effectively in multidisciplinary team work and independently present the professional contents
- recognize the importance of life-long learning.

2.3. Employment possibilities

Graduates can be employed by the aforementioned business entities with which the faculty cooperates, as well at educational institutions, various inspection services at the national and regional level, etc. Employment opportunities in the region:
- Brodosplit, Split
- AD plastik, Split
- Omial, Omiš
- Cemex, Kaštel Sućurac
- Adriacink, Split
- Vodovod i kanalizacija, Split
- TOF, Drniš
- ALPRO ATT, Trogir...

2.4. Possibilities of continuing studies at a higher level

Higher level studies are possible at the graduate studies of Chemical Technology and Chemistry and at others institutes in Croatia and abroad as well.

2.5. Name lover level studies of the proposer or other institutions that qualify for admission to the proposed study

Not applicable.

2.6. Structure of the study

Conditions and modes of studying at Undergraduate Study of Chemical Technology are based on the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split which is in compliance with the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the University of Split. Undergraduate Study of Chemical Technology takes place during the three years, includes mandatory and elective courses, and it is based on active participation of students in all forms of studing (lectures, laboratory exercises, seminars, field trips, etc.). In general, students’ obligations include presence at lectures and exercises, independent learning, literature analysis, presentations, field work and the preparation and defense of the diploma thesis. The monitoring and evaluating student’s activities listed in the program are done by teachers. During the first year of study objective is focused on mastering basic knowledge of chemistry and related natural sciences, respectively. During the last three semesters of study the content of chemical engineering is gradually increased. In the final semester students have the option of choosing from a large number of elective courses. The study ends with the preparation and defense of the final thesis.

2.7. Guiding and tutoring through the study system

With the aim of providing advice, information and guidance to students during the course of study, the Faculty Council of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology appoints the head of study for student groups at each year of study

2.8. List of courses that the student can take in other study programmes

With the aim of continuing and extending their education, and strengthening and supporting professional training, especially in the context of raising awareness on the interrelation between faculties and universities, students may take elective courses from other study programmes that offer courses that relate or overlap with the topic of interest of this study programme. The procedure for selecting courses from other faculties is defined in the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

2.9. List of courses offered in a foreign language as well (name which language)

As a rule, the lectures and courses held at the study shall be provided in Croatian language. Since there are courses included in the programme that are proposed to be taught in English, as necessary these courses will be provided in English.

2.10. Criteria and conditions for transferring the ECTS credits

The criteria and requirements for the transfer of ECTS credits are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the University of Split, Statute of the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split and Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

2.11. Completion of study

Final requirement for completion of study



Requirements for final/diploma thesis or final/diploma/exam

Requirements for final thesis are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam and evaluation and defence of final/diploma thesis

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam is regulated by the Ordinance on final thesis/diploma thesis at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

 

2.12. List of mandatory and elective courses

Chemical Engineering

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA101 Mathematics 1 45 45 0 0 8.0
KTA102 Physics 1 45 30 0 0 8.0
KTA103 Exercises in Pysics 1 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA104 General Chemistry 45 30 0 0 7.0
KTA105 Exercises in General Chemistry 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTA113 Computer application 30 0 15 0 4.0
Total
165 105 60 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA106 Mathematics 2 45 30 0 0 6.0
KTA107 Physics II 30 15 0 0 3.5
KTA108 Exercises in Pysics II 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTA109 Inorganic Chemistry 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTA110 Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTA111 Analytical Chemistry 60 15 0 0 6.5
KTA112 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTA114 Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering 15 15 0 0 3.0
Total
180 90 105 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA201 Organic Chemistry 60 15 0 0 6.5
KTA202 Exercises in Organic Chemistry 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTA203 Physical Chemistry 60 15 0 0 6.5
KTA204 Exercises in Physical Chemistry 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTA205 Mass and Energy Balances 30 30 0 0 5.0
KTA206 Transport Phenomena 45 15 0 0 5.0
KTA207 Exercises in Transport Phenomena 0 0 15 0 1.0
Total
195 75 105 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA208 Electrochemistry 45 15 0 0 4.5
KTA209 Exercises in Electrochemistry 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTA210 Thermodynamics 45 30 0 0 6.5
KTA211 Unit Operations 45 15 0 0 4.5
KTA212 Exercises in Unit Operations 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTA213 Measurement and Process Control 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA214 Exercises in Measurement and Process Control 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA215 Catalysis 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTAOSP Professional Practice 0 0 0 0 2.5
Total
195 75 75 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 5.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA301 Reaction Engineering 30 15 0 0 3.5
KTA302 Exercises in Reaction Engineering 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA303 Construction Materials 30 0 0 0 2.5
KTA304 Evercises in Construction Materials 0 0 18 12 2.0
KTA305 Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry 45 15 0 0 5.5
KTA306 Exercises in Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTA307 Technological processes in organic industry 45 15 0 0 5.5
KTA308 Exercises in Technological Processes in Organic Industry 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTA309 Industry and the Environment 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA310 Exercises in Industry and Environment 0 0 15 0 1.0
Total
180 45 138 12 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 6.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTAOZR Final Thesis 0 0 0 0 12.0
Total
0 0 0 0 12
Elective  
Group A
         
KTA311 Inorganic Materials 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA312 Exercises in Inorganic Materials 0 0 10 5 1.0
KTA313 Electrodeposition 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA314 Exercises in Electrodeposition 0 0 12 3 1.0
KTA315 Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA316 Exercises in Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater 0 0 11 4 1.0
KTA317 Exercises in Construction Materials and Protection 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA318 Polymeric Materials 0 0 12 3 1.0
KTA319 Processing of Plastics and Rubber 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA320 Exercices in Processing of Plastics and Rubber 0 0 10 5 1.0
KTA321 Process of Precipitation and Crystallization 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA322 Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization 0 0 15 0 1.0
 
Group B
         
KTA323 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA324 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA325 Renewable Energy Sources 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA326 Exercises in Renewable Energy Sources 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA327 Preparation of Technological Waters 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA328 Exercises in Preparation of Technological Waters 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA329 Safety at Work 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA330 Exercises in Safety at Work 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA331 Water Protection 30 15 0 0 4.0

 

Environmental Protection

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTJ101 Mathematics 1 45 45 0 0 7.0
KTJ102 Physics 1 45 30 0 0 6.5
KTJ103 Exercises in Pysics 1 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTJ104 General Chemistry 45 30 0 0 6.5
KTJ105 Exercises in General Chemistry 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTJ111 General Biology 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTJ112 Computer application 30 0 15 0 3.0
Total
195 120 60 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA111 Analytical Chemistry 60 15 0 0 6.5
KTA112 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTJ106 Mathematics 2 45 30 0 0 7.0
KTJ107 Physics II 30 15 0 0 5.0
KTJ108 Exercises in Pysics II 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTJ109 Inorganic Chemistry 30 15 0 0 4.5
KTJ110 Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 0 0 30 0 2.0
Total
165 75 105 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA201 Organic Chemistry 60 15 0 0 6.5
KTA202 Exercises in Organic Chemistry 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTA203 Physical Chemistry 60 15 0 0 6.5
KTA204 Exercises in Physical Chemistry 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTA205 Mass and Energy Balances 30 30 0 0 5.0
KTA206 Transport Phenomena 45 15 0 0 5.0
KTA207 Exercises in Transport Phenomena 0 0 15 0 1.0
Total
195 75 105 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTJ201 Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering 30 15 0 0 3.5
KTJ202 Exercises in Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTJ203 General Microbiology 30 0 0 0 2.5
KTJ204 Exercises in General Microbiology 0 0 30 0 1.5
KTJ205 Chemistry and Air Protection 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTJ206 Exercises in Chemistry and Air Protection 0 0 24 6 2.0
KTJ207 Analytical Environmental Chemistry 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTJ208 Exercises in Analytical Environmental Chemistry 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTJ209 45 30 0 0 6.0
KTJOSP Professional Practice 0 0 0 0 2.5
Total
165 75 114 6 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 5.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTJ301 Waste management 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTJ302 Exercises in Waste Management 0 0 10 5 1.0
KTJ303 Disposal of Hazardous Waste 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTJ304 Exercises in Disposal of Hazardous Waste 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTJ305 Analysis and Optimization of Water Use 30 15 0 0 3.0
KTJ306 Exercises of Analysis and Optimization of Water Use 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTJ307 Polymers and the Environment 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTJ308 Exercises in Polymers and the Environment 0 0 12 3 1.0
KTJ309 Wastewaters Treatment 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTJ310 Exercises in Wastewaters Treatment 0 0 27 3 2.0
KTJ316 Construction Materials and Protection 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTJ317 0 0 18 12 2.0
Total
180 30 97 23 27
Elective KTJ311 Environmental Menagment Systems 30 15 0 0 3.0
KTJ312 Sustainable Development in Coastal Area 30 15 0 0 3.0
KTJ313 Chemistry and Marine Protection 30 0 0 0 2.0
KTJ314 Exercises in Chemistry and Marine Protection 0 0 15 0 1.0

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 6.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTJ318 Selected Processes of Chemical Industry 45 15 0 0 6.0
KTJ319 Exercises in Selected Processes of Chemical Industry 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTJOZR Final thesis 0 0 0 0 10.0
Total
45 15 30 0 18
Elective KTA311 Inorganic Materials 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA312 Exercises in Inorganic Materials 0 0 10 5 1.0
KTA323 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA324 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA325 Renewable Energy Sources 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA326 Exercises in Renewable Energy Sources 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA329 Safety at Work 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTA330 Exercises in Safety at Work 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA331 Water Protection 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTJ315 Basic Biotechnology 30 15 0 0 4.0

 

 

2.13. Course description

 

Mathematics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematics 1

Code

KTA101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScM Branka Gotovac

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Ružman

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

45

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic elements of calculus and linear algebra.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to be able to:
- identify and sketch graphs of elementary functions, to determine the domain of the given function
- find the derivative of the given function
- apply the dervative in practice (tangents and normals, maximum, minimum and inflection points) and to interpret the shape of graphs
- solve the system of linear equations (by matrix inversion, by Gaussian elimination)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Sets: Notion. Algebra of sets. Sets of numbers.
2. Functions: Notion. Composite functions. Inverse function.
3. Elementary functions.
4. Functions: Limits. Continuity.
5. Derivative and application: Notion. Interpretation. Derivative techniques.
6. Differential. Higher order derivatives.
7. Theorems of differential calculus. Maximum, minimum points.
8. Inflection points. Asymptotes. Graphs sketching.
9. Sequences: Notion. Limits.
10. Series: Convergence of numeric series. Power series. Taylor series.
11. Matrices and vectors: Matrix algebra. Determinants. Inverse matrix.
12. Linear systems of equations.
13. Vector algebra.
14. Solid analityc geometry.
15. Course review. Revision.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance of classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Examination: either by continuously checking and grading students’ progress during the semester or in exam terms by passing written and oral exam.
At the beginning of the course students will be informed of in detail elaborated rules for both models of examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bradić, R. Roki et. al., Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Element, Zagreb (više izdanja)

47

B.P. Demidovič, Zadaci i riješeni primjeri iz više matematike, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb (više izdanja)

5

I. Slapničar, Matematika 1, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje u Splitu, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2002. (http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat1)

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kurepa, Matematička analiza I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1997.
L. Krnić, Z. Šikić, Račun diferencijalni i integralni, I dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.
Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Physics 1

Code

KTA102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Matko Maleš
Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Introducing students to the knowledge and principles of physics in the field of mechanics
- Forming the proper view towards the interpretation of physics phenomena and their application
- Developing the level of cognitive processing required for further studies

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Physics I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the course, the student is expected to have mastered:
- Physical quantities, units and dimensional analysis;
- The characteristics of the exact approach to phenomena in both micro and macro world;
- The principles of the classic general mechanics;
- The basic principles of the special mechanics (mechanics of oscillations, waves and fluids);
- The use of calculus in mechanics contents;
- The application of the laws of mechanics in concrete physics examples;
- The application of the obtained knowledge in solving problem tasks;
- The application of the knowledge in professional situations.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Space, time, matter. Physical quantities, Laws of Physics. Plane and space geometry, using of vector algebra, differential and integral calculus.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
2nd week: Kinematics of particles
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
3rd week: Particles dynamics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
4th week: Work and energy
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
5th week: Conservative and nonconservative forces
Partial assessment (1st preliminary test) ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
6th week: Conservation of energy law
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
7th week: Systems of particles.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
8th week: Collisions; Conservation laws
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
9th week: Rigid body mechanics. Conservation laws. Restrictions of rigid body approximations and the theory of elasticity.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
10th Equilibrium. Restrictions of rigid body approximations and the theory of elasticity.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
Partial assessment (2nd preliminary test) ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course
11th week: Oscillations and waves
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
12th week: Many particle physics: gasses, liquids and solids. Internal energy, heat and heat disorder. Transport phenomena. Phase transition phenomena.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
13th week: Fluid mechanics: statics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
14th week: Fluid mechanics: dynamics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
15th week: Elastic waves. Sound.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
Partial assessment (3rd preliminary test ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.4

Oral exam

2.3

Written exam

2.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted via 3 midterm exams, related to lectures (theory) and seminars (solving problems), according to syllabus.
During the final examination period, the final theory exam shall be taken after passing the final problem’s solving exam.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Cindro, Fizika I, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1985

10

E. Babić, R. Krsnik, M. Očko, Zbirka riješenih zadataka iz fizike, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 199.

3

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, J. Walker, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1993;
Janko Herak, Osnove kemijske fizike, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2001.
V. Lopac, P. Kulišić, M. Pavičić, Zbirka zadataka iz fizike, FGZ Zagreb, 1983.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Pysics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Pysics 1

Code

KTA103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The fundamental and the inseparable part of all physics research is the experiment. The aim of this course is to introduce the students to various techniques of conducting experiments and methods of measuring the physics quantities in the field of mechanics. Additionally, the aim is to enable the development of skills needed to conduct experiments, gather data and master various numerical problems, which are related to measuring and testing physics quantities.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Physics I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Obtaining basic knowledge and skills needed to conduct experiments
- The knowledge of various methods and techniques of measurement
- Mastering the calculation of errors which occurred during the measurement
- Mastering the evaluation of errors which occurred during the measurement
- The skills of graphic representation of the measured data and the method of writing reports pertaining to the experiment and the results of measuring conducted

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

- Measurement of length, mass and density. (3 hours)
- Numeric and graphic processing of the measurement data. (2 hours)
- Measurements of characteristic quantities: the laws of forces (friction, Hooke´s law /conservation laws (energy, momentum). (3 hours)
- Measurements of characteristic quantities: rotation (moment of inertia, torque) (2)
- Oscillations (spring oscillations, mathematical, physical and torsional pendulum). (2 hours)
- Laws of hydrostatics (Archimedes law, surface tension). (3 hours)
- Compensating exercises
- Final revision test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.3

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.4

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Krpan Lisica, Praktikum iz fizike - I. dio, 2010, sveučilišni priručnik

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE General Chemistry

Code

KTA104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To familiarize students with the basic chemical laws and principles and to enable students to master the chemical items that follow General Chemistry. To develop students ability to think critically about the experiments performed in the laboratory and about the involvement of of chemistry in everyday life.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in General Chemistry
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in General Chemistry”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the the course students will be able to:
1) Understand the nature and properties of the substance differentiate elementary substances from compounds, distinguish homogeneous from heterogeneous mixtures, assume procedures for separating mixtures into pure substances.
2) Understand and applied the problem-solving approach to the balance of substances in chemical changes
3) Understand the structure of atoms and existing models of chemical bonds in such way that they can predict certain properties and reactivity of chemical elements and their ionic and covalent compounds
4) Discern the nature of certain chemical reactions.
5) Adopt the concept of pH, and assume direction of the chemical reactions on the basis of knowledge of chemical kinetics and equilibrium.
6) Independently and safely perform simple chemical experiments

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
1. Introduction - Natural sciences and chemistry. Units of measurement and measurement. Classification of matter. Pure substance. Decomposition of the substance to the pure substance.
2. Properties of pure substances, physical and chemical properties. Atom and chemical element. The chemical symbols of elements. The laws of chemical combination by weight and volume. The atomic theoryes from the early ideas to John Dalton. Avogadro’s hypothesis.
3. The discovery of the structure of atoms. The discovery of X-rays and radioactivity. Rutherford model of the atom. X-rays and crystal structure. Bragg equation. Isotopes and the structure of the atomic nucleus.
4. The structure of pure substances. The atomic structure of substances. Types of a crystal systems and crystal characteristics. Cubic crystal system. The molecular structure of substances. The nature of the gas. The nature of the fluid. The concept of temperature. The kinetic theory of gases.
5. Gas laws and the equation of state of an ideal gas. Real gases. Relative atomic and molecular weight. Methods for determining relative atomic (Dulong - Petit method, X-ray diffraction, mass spectrograph) and molecular weight (density of the gas, the method of Victor Mayer, Hoffman method). Periodic table of the elements and the periodic law.
6. Electronic structure of atoms - Bohr model of the atom, quantum numbers. Quantum theory of the electronic structure of atoms. Atomic orbitals.
7. Periodic Classification of elements and the periodic table. Periodic changes in physical properties. Atomic radius. Ionization energy. Electron affinity. Electronegativity.
8. Chemical bonding and molecular structure - Electronic valence theory, ionic and covalent compounds. Electronegativity and degree of oxidation. Writing Lewis structures and the octet rule. Formal charges. Exceptions from the octet rule. VSEPR model and geometry of the molecule.
9. Bond characteristics. Valence bond theory and theory of molecular orbitals.
10. Intermolecular forces. Dipole moment, Van der Waals and London forces, hydrogen bond.
11. The structure and properties of the liquid and solid. Physical properties of solutions. Types of solution. Expression of concentration.
12. The liquid in the liquid solution. Solutions of solids in liquids. Solutions of gases in liquids. Effect of temperature on the solubility. Effect of pressure on the solubility of gases. Colligative properties of solutions: nonelectrolyte and electrolyte solution.
13. Chemical reactions - types of chemical reactions, redox reactions, complex reactions (protolytic reactions and precipitation reactions and dissolution), complex reactions.
14. Chemical kinetics, reaction rate, reaction mechanism, the activation energy. Chemical equilibrium - term equilibrium, chemical equilibrium and chemical equilibrium constant. Factors that affect the chemical equilibrium.
15. Equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Balance in the electrolyte solutions - equilibrium in solutions of acids and bases , the equilibrium of the complex in solution, the equilibrium between the solution and the insoluble crystals, redox balance
Seminars:
1. The oxidation number: definition, rules for determining in ions and molecules. Examples and training.
2. Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry. Names of monoatomic cations and monoatomic anions. Names of poliatomic cations and anion. The names of the ligands. Names of complex ions. Names of oxo acid and their salts.
3. Naming of inorganic compounds - training.
4. Balancing chemical equations, balancing redox equations.
5. Writing redox equations - practice.
6. The stoichiometry: Qualitative and quantitative relationships in chemical reactions. Molar method.
7. Stoichiometry: Quantitative relationships. Yield in chemical reactions and processes: the relevant reactant, the reactant in excess of the theoretical amount of reactants, the theoretical amount of product, yield and loss.
8. The stoichiometry: volume and mass in chemical reactions.
9. Electronic configuration of atoms and ions
10. Lewis structural formula
11. Electronic structural formula
12. Chemical equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems
13. Chemical equilibrium in electrolyte solutions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars, and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students who obtain a signature from the course General Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows :
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right.
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through three partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija I dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

Brinić, Slobodan. Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Opće kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Grubač Z.: Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Opće kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Sikirica, M., Stehiometrija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb

0

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Darrell D. Ebbing and Steven D. Gammon, General Chemistry, 9th edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 2009.
Raymond Chang, Chemistry, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in General Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in General Chemistry

Code

KTA105

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Exercising, testing and confirm knowledge from lectures. Understanding with the methods of experimental work and the acquisition of skills necessary for independent work in the lab.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in General Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will upon completion of the course be able to:
1. Practically through experiments verify the theoretical assumptions
2. Gain independence in performing experiments
3. Design simple experiments to illustrate the chemical properties of the substance
4. Actively exploring ways in which this discipline has consequently impact on the outside world.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1
The basic rules of laboratory work, safety precautions and protection in the lab, basic laboratory equipment. Washing, cleaning and drying of dishes. Basic laboratory operations, chemicals and dealing with them. Decomposition of the substance to the pure substance. Decomposition of heterogeneous and homogeneous mixture
Exercise 2
Decomposition of the mixture to the pure substance, Decomposition of heterogeneous substances, Sedimentation, decanting, centrifuging, filtering, Buchner funnel, distillation and fractional distillation, sublimation of iodine. Extraction of iodine from aqueous solutions
Exercise 3
Physical and chemical changes, the law of conservation of weight, Gay - Lussac’s law of connected volumes. Exercise with models of unit cells. Determining the relative atomic mass of zinc. Determination of the empirical formula of copper chloride.
Exercise 4
Gas Laws: Determination of the molar volume of oxygen, Boyle’s law, Charles Gay - Lussac’s law, the pressure dependence of the temperature in gases.
Exercise 5
Solutions and their properties. Expressing of concentration. Preparation of the solution with given concentration. Solutions of liquids in liquids. Solutions of gases in liquids. Dependence of solubility on the nature (structure) of the substance. Dependence of solubility on temperature. Dissolution of liquids in liquids. Dissolving gases in liquids. Henry’s law. Determination of molar mass by freezing point depression. Illustration of electrolytic dissociation. Illustration of ions traveling to the electrodes. Electrical conductivity of the solution. Redox - reactions of sulfur and oxygen. Redox reaction of dilute nitric acid solution and iron (II) sulfate. Decomposition and formation reactions of complexes. Ligand substitution reaction. Protolytic reactions (acid- base titration).
Exercise 6
Chemical kinetic, effect of concentration of reactants on the rate of chemical reactions. Effect of temperature on the rate of chemical reactions. The catalytic effect on the rate of chemical reactions. Balance in electrolyte solutions. Moving the chemical balance. Determination of the acid dissociation constant, Ka . Determination of pH: Approximately determination of pH using indicators. Determination of pH using pH sensors. Electrolysis - Determination of Faraday’s constant. Electromotive force of galvanic cells - Daniell cell.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

10

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mathematics 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematics 2

Code

KTA106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScM Branka Gotovac

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Ružman

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic elements of integral calculus, differential calculus of several variables and the basic of differential equations.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to be able to:
- apply the techniques of integration (integration by substitution, integration by parts)
- use the definite integral in its geometrical applications
- solve the first-order differential equations (variables separable, homogeneous differential equations, linear differential equations, exact differential equations)
- solve the second-order linear nonhomogeneous differential equations with constant coefficients

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Indefinite integral. Table of integrals.
2. Integration by substitution. Integration by parts.
3. Integrating rational fractions. Integrating by algebraic substitution.
4. Definite integral.
5. Improper integrals.
6. Application of definite integral.
7. Functions of several variables. Limit and continuity.
8. Partial derivatives. Differential.
9. Tangent plane and normal line. Maxima and minima.
10. Double integrals.
11. Geometric application of double integrals.
12. Ordinary differential equations.
13. First-order differential equations.
14. Second-order differential equations.
15. Course review. Revision.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance of classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.3

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.5

Oral exam

1.1

Written exam

1.1

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bradić, R. Roki et. al., Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Element, Zagreb (više izdanja)

47

B.P. Demidovič, Zadaci i riješeni primjeri iz više matematike, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb (više izdanja)

5

I. Slapničar, Matematika 2, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2008.

0

http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kurepa, Matematička analiza I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1997.
Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.
McCallum, Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Multivariable Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2002.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physics II
NAME OF THE COURSE Physics II

Code

KTA107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

3.5

Associate teachers

Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Introducing students to the knowledge and principles of physics in the fields of electromagnetism, optics and elementary quantum physics
- Forming the proper view towards the interpretation of physics phenomena and their application
- Developing the level of cognitive processing required for further studies

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Pysics II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the course, the student is expected to have mastered
- The principles of electromagnetism and electromagnetic radiation
- The principles of geometrical and physical optics
- The basic principles of quantum physics
- The application of the obtained knowledge in concrete physics examples
- The application of the obtained knowledge in solving professional problem tasks
- Recognition of the application of the knowledge of physics in everyday situations

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Electric charges, electrostatic force and electrostatic field. Vector field flux and Gauss’s law (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
2nd week: Electric potential and potential difference. Moving and storing electric charges, electric circuits. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
3rd week: Charges in motion and their interactions, electric current. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. . (1.5 hours)
4th week: Magnetic field. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
5th week: Time depending electric and magnetic fields. Faraday’s law. Inductivity. Induction generators. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
Partial assessment (1st preliminary test) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course.
6th week: Alternating currents. Electric machines. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
7th week: Electromagnetic oscillating circuit and radiation. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
8th week: Electromagnetic waves and nature of light. (2 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
9th week: Interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter: absorption, refraction, reflection, polarization, scattering, photoelectric effect. Ideas of quantum physics. (4 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
10th week: Physical and geometric optics. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1.5 hours)
Partial assessment (2rd preliminary test ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted via 2 midterm exams, related to lectures (theory) and seminars (solving problems), according to curriculum.
During the final examination period, the final theory exam shall be taken after passing the final problem´s solving exam.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Cindro, Fizika II, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1985.

10

E. Babić, R. Krsnik, M. Očko, Zbirka riješenih zadataka iz fizike, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, Zagreb, 1990.

3

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley, New York 2003.
Janko Herak, Osnove kemijske fizike, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2001.
V. Lopac, P. Kulišić, M. Pavičić, Zbirka zadataka iz fizike, FGZ Zagreb, 1983.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Pysics II
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Pysics II

Code

KTA108

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

ScD Mirko Marušić
Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic and the inseparable part of all physics research is the experiment. The aim of this course is to introduce the students to various techniques of conducting experiments and methods of measuring the physics quantities fom the field of electromagnetism and optics. Additionaly, the aim is to enable the development of skills needed to conduct experiments, gather dana and master various numerical problems, which are related to measuring and testing physics quantities.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Physics II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Obtaining the basic knowledge and skills needed to conduct experiments in the field of electromagnetism and optics
- The knowledge of various methods and techniques of measurement
- Mastering the calculation of errors which occured during the measurement
- Mastering the evaluation of errors which occured during the measurement
- The skills of graphic representation of the measured data and the method of writing reports pertaining to the experiment and the results of measuring conducted.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

- Electric circuits: elements and instruments. (4 hours)
- Direct current ; Resistance and resistors.(4 hours )
- Alternating current; Capacitance and capacitors. (3 hours )
- Alternating current; Inductance and inductors. (3 hours )
- RLC circuits (3 hours )
- Laws of geometrical optics. (3 hours )
- Laws of physical optics. (3 hours )
- Optical instruments. (4 hours )
- Spectroscopy / quantization (3 hours )
- Compensating exercises
Final revision test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.6

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.6

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Weekly tests,
Grade of the written experiment report,
Final test.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Lučić Lavčević, Praktikum iz fizike II. dio, 2012, interna skripta

0

web portal KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Inorganic Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Inorganic Chemistry

Code

KTA109

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introduce students to the chemical reactivity of elements along the periodic table, and with the properties and composition of common chemicals. To develop students ability to notice similarities and differences between inorganic compounds and inorganic substances. Understanding of the changes in the various physical and chemical conditions

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students upon completion of the course:
1) will know the basic characteristics and producing of chemical elements for the major groups of periodic table of elements (PTE)
3) be able to identify the type and properties of chemical compounds of main group
3) be able to identify the type and properties of transition metal compounds
4) to classified compounds on the base of their characteristics
5) to predict acidic, basic and amphoteric properties of salts
6) to know common salt crystal structure
7) to predict the possible reaction mechanisms and outcomes of chemical reactions
8) to independently and safely perform simple chemical reactions

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
1. Hydrogen position in PTE, hydrogen properties and production, positive oxidation state and hydrides
2. Noble gases, properties of group, obtaining and using of xenon compounds
3. Introduction to halogens, elements properties in order to oxidation state
4. Fluorine production and properties, differences between the fluorine and the other members of the group, fluorine compounds. Chlorine producing and properties, compounds of chlorine, bromine and Iodine
5. Introduction to chalcogen elements, elements properties in order to oxidation state
6. Oxygen properties and production, the compounds of oxygen, oxides, water
7. Sulfur properties and production, oxides and sulfur acids, other sulfur compounds, compounds of selenium and tellurium,
8. A group of nitrogen, elements properties in order to oxidation state
9. Nitrogen, properties of the production, ammonia, nitric acid and other nitrogen compounds, nitrogen fixation
10. Phosphorus, properties and production, oxides and acids of phosphorus, arsenic, antimony and bismuth
11. A group of carbon, elements properties in order to oxidation state
12. Carbon allotropes, carbon properties and production, carbon oxides, carbides, carbonates and bicarbonates.
13. The compounds of silicon, germanium, tin and lead, semiconductor properties of silicon and germanium
14. A group of boron, elements properties in order to oxidation state, boranes, boric acid. Production and properties of aluminum, aluminum compounds, gallium, indium, thallium
15. Alkali and alkaline earth metals
Seminars :
1. Balancing chemical reactions, writing and balancing redox reactions in one line
2. Common reactions of hydrogen, the reducing action of hydrogen
3. Common reactions of chlorine, the disproportionation of chlorine in alkaline solutions, the oxidation activity of the halogens compounds
4. Common reactions of chalcogen elements, reaction of oxygen and ozone, the oxidizing action of oxygen,
5. The reaction of sulfur, the reactions which translate elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid, the oxidizing action of sulfuric acid, a dehydrating effect of sulfuric acid
6. Common reactions of nitrogen, the nitrogen production reactions, the reaction of ammonia oxidation to nitric acid, the oxidizing action of nitric acid.
7. Common reactions of phosphorus, oxidation reactions of phosphorus to phosphorus and phosphoric acid
8. Common reactions of carbon, oxides of carbon production, reducing effect of CO, binding of CO2 from the air, the precipitation of carbonates, cation hydrolysis
9. Common reactions of the boron group elements, reaction of boric acid production, dissolution of borax in water, production of crystalline boron acid, base properties of aluminum hydroxide,
10. Aluminum reducing action, aluminotermic reaction, common reactions of metals and metal production,
11. Common reactions of alkali and alkaline earth metals with water and their salts
12. Common reactions of transition metals, proving of peroxide with titanyl ion, oxidation states of vanadium, oxidative properties of permanganate, equilibrium between chromate and dichromate, iron compounds
13. Noble metals, zinc, cadmium and mercury
14. Sea - a mixture of inorganic substances. The chemical composition of sea water, salinity, pH and speciation
15. Mixed problems

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students who obtain a signature from the course Inorganic Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right .
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through three partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part .

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

Brinić, Slobodan. Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Grubač Z.: Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

F. Albert Cotton et al., Basic Inorganic Chemistry, New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry

Code

KTA110

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Exercising, testing and confirm knowledge from lectures. Understanding with the methods of experimental work and the acquisition of skills necessary for independent work in the lab.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Inorganic chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will upon completion of the course be able to:
1. Practically through experiments verify the theoretical assumptions
2. Gain independence in performing experiments
3. Design simple experiments to illustrate the chemical properties of the substance
4. Actively exploring ways in which this discipline has consequently impact on the outside world.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercises :
1. Exercise: HYDROGEN
2. Exercise: 17th GROUP (Halogens )
3. Exercise: 16th GROUP (Chalcogens)
4. Exercise: 15th GROUP
5. Exercise: 14th GROUP and 13th GROUP, 1st and 2nd groups (Alkali and earth alkali metals)
6. Exercise: TRANSITION ELEMENTS (groups 3 to 7)
7. Exercise: TRANSITION ELEMENTS (groups 8 to 12)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

F. Albert Cotton et al., Basic Inorganic Chemistry, New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analytical Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Analytical Chemistry

Code

KTA111

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

60

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring basic basic theoretical knowledge of analytical chemistry, the role and application of analytical chemistry in various fields

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Analytical Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will will be able to
- Define the concept of analytical chemistry
- Differentiate between the concepts of qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis
- Understand the concept of quantitative chemical reactions
- Understand the concept of gravimetric and volumetric determination
- Understand the precipitation, neutralization, complexometric and redox titrations
- Solving numerical problems from a qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

First week : Description and review of curriculum. Definitions of analytical chemistry. Division of Analytical Chemistry. The concept of the analytical signal. Seminar: Solving numerical problems from theoretical lecture
Second week : The concept and definition of chemical analysis - qualitative and quantitative. Seminar: Solving numerical problems; homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium in analytical chemistry..
3rd week : Qualitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of acids and bases. Consideration of acid-base balance. Seminar: Solving problems
.4th week : The concept and definition of complex ions., complexometric equilibrium . Seminar: Solving problems
5th week : The concept and definition of electrochemical reactions. Consideration of electrochemical equilibrium. Seminar: Solving problems
6th week: The concept and definition of heterogeneous equilibrium. process of dissolution and precipitation. Seminar: Solving problemsl
7th week .Recapitulation of theoretical and seminars lecture I partial exam .theoretical lecture and seminars
8th week . Quantitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of gravimetric determination. Seminar: Solving problems,
9th week . optimization of precipitationcondition. Seminar: Solving problems.
10th week : The concept and definition of standards and standard solutions - primary and secondary. The concept and definition of the volumetric determination; Seminar: Solving problems.
11th week : The concept and definition of volumetric determinations- Argentometric titration; Seminar: Solving problems.
12 weeks The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on neutralization reactions - acid-base titration; Seminar Solving problems
13th week . The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on the complex - complexometric titrations; Seminar Solving problems
14th week . The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on redox reactions. Seminar Seminar Solving problems
15th week : Recapitulation of theoretical and seminars lecture II partial exam .theoretical lecture and seminars.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 80% and completing exercises

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

3.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 50% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. A.Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Seventh Edition, Saunders College Publishing, New York, London, 1996. { šesto izdanje (englesko) 1992, prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.}.

6

A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 9th edition, Brooks&Cole, SAD, 2014.

0

na web-stranici Zavoda za analitičku kemiju

Nj. Radić, L. Kukoč-Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju, Redak, 2013.

0

D.C.Harris, Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Eighth Edition, W.H.Freeman and Company, New York, 2010.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Šoljić, Računanje u analitičkoj kemiji, Zagreb, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analytical Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Analytical Chemistry

Code

KTA111

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

60

15

0

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring basic basic theoretical knowledge of analytical chemistry, the role and application of analytical chemistry in various fields

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Analytical Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will will be able to
- Define the concept of analytical chemistry
- Differentiate between the concepts of qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis
- Understand the concept of quantitative chemical reactions
- Understand the concept of gravimetric and volumetric determination
- Understand the precipitation, neutralization, complexometric and redox titrations
- Solving numerical problems from a qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

First week : Description and review of curriculum. Definitions of analytical chemistry. Division of Analytical Chemistry. The concept of the analytical signal. Seminar: Solving numerical problems from theoretical lecture
Second week : The concept and definition of chemical analysis - qualitative and quantitative. Seminar: Solving numerical problems; homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium in analytical chemistry..
3rd week : Qualitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of acids and bases. Consideration of acid-base balance. Seminar: Solving problems
.4th week : The concept and definition of complex ions., complexometric equilibrium . Seminar: Solving problems
5th week : The concept and definition of electrochemical reactions. Consideration of electrochemical equilibrium. Seminar: Solving problems
6th week: The concept and definition of heterogeneous equilibrium. process of dissolution and precipitation. Seminar: Solving problemsl
7th week .Recapitulation of theoretical and seminars lecture I partial exam .theoretical lecture and seminars
8th week . Quantitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of gravimetric determination. Seminar: Solving problems,
9th week . optimization of precipitationcondition. Seminar: Solving problems.
10th week : The concept and definition of standards and standard solutions - primary and secondary. The concept and definition of the volumetric determination; Seminar: Solving problems.
11th week : The concept and definition of volumetric determinations- Argentometric titration; Seminar: Solving problems.
12 weeks The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on neutralization reactions - acid-base titration; Seminar Solving problems
13th week . The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on the complex - complexometric titrations; Seminar Solving problems
14th week . The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on redox reactions. Seminar Seminar Solving problems
15th week : Recapitulation of theoretical and seminars lecture II partial exam .theoretical lecture and seminars.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 80% and completing exercises

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

3.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 50% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Šoljić, Računanje u analitičkoj kemiji, Zagreb, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Computer application
NAME OF THE COURSE Computer application

Code

KTA113

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of computers and computer systems. Knowledge about the use of Internet content and protect your computer from malicious programs. Basic skills about the content management (folders and files) on PCs using the Windows operating system. Basic skills using programs offered in the MS Office software.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
1. Manage content on PC computer (files and folders)
2. Use the MS Word in the purpose of the editing the file according to the specified requirements (defining the shape and page layout, inserting the images, finished elements, tables, graphs ...)
3. Use the MS Excel for analysis, calculation, sorting, graphical presentation and format tables.
4. Use the MS PowerPoint to create presentations
5. Set up and use MS Outlook for editing and emailing
6. Find reliable sources of information on the Internet

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week L General information about the course and mode of examination, Introduction to computers application, Information activity and technology, Computerization, Computer applications in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
E
2. Week L Hardware (PC), Von Neumann’s model computers, Computer hardware, Computer types, Basic terms in the Computer Engineering and informatics, Basic parts (components) of the PC, Central processing unit (CPU), Computer memory, Motherboards and connectors, Input and Output devices
E
3. Week L Operating systems and applications, The BIOS (Basic Input / Output System), Preparing disks and drives for installation of the OS, File system (FAT, NTFS), Computer Programs, System programs, Application programs, Operating systems
E
4. Week L Basics commands for MS-DOS, GUI (Graphical User Interface), Properties GUI, History of developing the MS Windows OS, Example Installations operating systems (Windows OS), Customizing the User Interface, Library, Customize settings on PC computer, Firewall, Windows Defender, Windows Update, Action Center, Commercial antivirus programs
E
5. Week L Backup and Restore, Control Panel, Customize the computer, The Device Manager, Accounts, Network and Sharing Center, Troubleshooting, Personalization, BitLocker Drive Encryption, Region and Language, Programs and Features, Installing and uninstalling programs, Display, Devices and Printers, Default Programs, Help and Support, Accessories and system tools, Shortcuts in Window OS, Changing the language of Windows OS
E
6. Week L Malicious software (malware), Computer viruses, Computer worms, Trojan horses, Logic bombs, Spyware, Advertising Programs (Adware), INTERNET, History of the Internet, TCP / IP protocol
E
7. Week L First test
E
8. Week L Internet, Computer network and classification networks, Internet protocols: HTTP, HTTPS and FTP, Web browsers, Copyright Law
E
9. Week L MS Office, MS Word, How to start the MS Word, Layout MS Word window, The status bar, Tabs and tools, Copy and paste data, Special characters, Styles, Tabs, Sections, Creating a new document, Copy text, Headers and footers, Page numbers
E MS Word: How to insert and edit the text and its formatting. Paragraph formatting. Lists of lists. Working with documents. formatting documents
10. Week L How to insert and edit the formulas and equations, Application of the finished style characteristics, Input tables and formatting, input images in the document, the entry of bibliographic data entry page breaks and section breaks (define different sections of the document), display the contents of the document
E MS Word: Insert pictures, tables and SmartArt elements in the document. Formatting headers and footers document. Entering references and footnotes in the document. Insert the page break, Section break, Application of different style for document
11. Week L MS Excel, How to start MS Excel, Layout MS Excel windows, Toolbar for quick access, Status bar, Tabs and tools, Tabs formulas, Editing data within a worksheet, Graphic data presentation, Input data string in the table, Add the trend data, Sorting data set
E MS Excel: Working with the tables. Entering data into tables and data formatting. Entering a series of data. Entering data from different files. Displaying data graphically.
12. Week L Conditional Formatting Data, Creating and deleting equations, Addresses cells (relative, absolute, mixed), Types of functions, Logical operators, Boolean functions, Examples of application functions (IF, AND, OR, COUNTIF ..), MS PowerPoint, MS PowerPoint Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating presentations, add themes, Themes Edit, Insert object (images, tables, links, media content ...)
E MS Excel: Data processing, Calculating with tables, Input and syntax for creating mathematical equations. Showing the trend curve.
13. Week L MS Outlook, MS Outlook Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating a user account , Creating a new e-mail
E MS Power Point: Creating presentations. Choosing the design, How to make redesign of an existing template.
14. Week L Databases, What databases they are?, Fields in databases, How databases are developed?, Center for online databases, Bibliographic databases, Citation databases, Databases with full-text, Sciencedirect databases, Scopus databases, Web database, Bibliography
E
15. Week L Second Test
E

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.6

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The written exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Practical part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 20% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 20% and practical part of exam has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and practical exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam participates with a share of the 30% of the final grade and practical part of exam with a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 60%-71% - sufficient, 72%-81% - good, 82%-91% very good, 92%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D.Jozić, Predavanja iz kolegija:Primjena računala, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Interna skripta, Split, 2013.

1

Wallace Wang, Office 2010 For Dummies, Wiley Publishing Inc., Indiana, 2010.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

1. Tracking suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
2. Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering

Code

KTA114

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Željko Domazet

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Prof Lovre Krstulović-Opara

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

30 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Basic knowledge in technical drawing, strength of materials, and parts of machinery in chemical industry

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- being capable to read and understand technical drawing
- understanding the need for dimensioning machinery parts
- recognising basic machinery parts
- recognising basic parts in chemical industry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction to mechanical structures. National codes. Technical drawing – basics.
Week 2: Technical drawing – cross sections, displays, dimensions.
Week 3: Technical drawing – surface finishes, tolerances
Week 4: Technical drawing – CAD, rapid prototyping, 3D scanning
Week 5: Basics of mechanics (statics, kinematics, dynamics). Materials for mechanical design. (steel alloys, cast steel materials)
Week 6: Materials for mechanical design. (copper and aluminium alloys)
Week 7: Materials for mechanical design (sinter materials, polymers). Dimensioning of structures.
Week 8: 1st colloquium. Introduction to parts of machinery.
Week 9: Bolts, springs, welding and soldering
Week 10: Shafts and clutch
Week 11: Bearings and transmissions (belt drives, friction drives)
Week 12: Gearing and chain transmissions
Week 13: Mechanical parts in chemical industry (tubes and valves)
Week 14: Vessels and seals
Week 15: 2nd colloquium

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending 70% of courses

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Exam is written. Exam can be passed by partially by passing two colloquiums and gaining 50% (50 points of maximum 100). Minimum for passing exam is gaining 50% on colloquiums or regular exam. Requirement for attending second colloquium is gaining 25% (25 points) on first colloquium. Colloquiums can be repeated during first two exams.
Marks: 50%-61% - minimum (2), 62%-74% - good (3) ,75%-87% -very good (4), 88%-100% - excellant (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Ž. Domazet, L. Krstulović-Opara, Skripta iz Osnova strojarstva, KTF, Split, 2006.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V. Hrgešić i J. Baldani, ”Mehaničke Konstrukcije”, Sveučilište u Zagrebu - Elektrotehnički Fakultet, Zagreb, 1990.
E. Hercigonja, Tehnička grafika, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.
K.-H. Decker, Elementi strojeva, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb, 1980

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Student’s survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Organic Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Organic Chemistry

Code

KTA201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

60

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of basic organic chemistry that involves understanding the structure and properties of organic compounds and mechanisms of organic reactions as well as understanding identification by organic spectroscopy techniques.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Organic Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of organic chemistry, which includes:
- identifying and naming of organic compounds according to functional groups and compare their physico - chemical properties;
- learn about the organic compounds isomerism, stereochemical designations, features, and separation;
- learn about organic compounds structure determination by spectroscopy (MS, NMR, IR, and UV/Vis);
- analyze the reactivity of organic compounds with respect to their structure and stereochemistry;
- propose appropriate reaction mechanisms of organic molecules that include addition, substitution and elimination;
- identify and interpret division, structure and properties of natural organic compounds ( carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids ).

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

 LECTURES AND SEMINARS:
1. Introduction: What is organic chemistry? History of organic chemistry and its modern role. The main concepts of organic chemistry (functional groups, stereochemistry, curly arrows) (2 hours)
2. The nature of chemical bonds: Electronegativity. Bonds polarity, dipol, and formal charge. Lewis structure. Atomic orbitals. Molecular orbitals. Hybridization (sp3, sp2, sp). Length and energy of the bonds. The molecular geometry. The modified hybrid orbitals. VSEPR theory. (4 hours)
3. Physical properties and intermolecular connections: Van der Waals forces. Dipole - dipole. ”Hydrogen bond”. Solubility in solvents. (2+1 hours)
4. Nomenclature and classes of organic compounds. Hydrocarbons (alkanes, cycloalkanes). Functional groups and acronyms. The nomenclature of hydrocarbons (alkenes, alkynes). Nomenclature organohalogenated compounds, alcohols, amines. Nomenclature of aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives. Systematic (IUPAC) nomenclature. Examples. (7+2 hours)
5. Structure of molecules and isomerism. Constitutional isomers. Alkanes. Isomers. Shapes of molecules and IHD. Stereochemistry. Conformations of alkanes (ethane, butane) and rings (C3, C4, C5, cyclohexane). Mono-substituted cycloalkanes. (3+1 hours)
I. PARTIAL EXAM (written, 1hour and 10 min)
6. Configuration of the cis / trans and E / Z; CIP rule. Conformations of disubstituted cycloalkanes. Alkenes. Chirality and the plane of symmetry. Molecules with one stereocenter. Enantiomers and racemic mixtures. The properties of the enantiomers. Optical activity. Polarimeter. Determination of tetrahedral stereogenic center. Fischer projections. Relative configuration. Molecules with two stereocenter. The properties of enantiomers, diastereomers and meso compounds. The separation of the racemate. Chiral molecules without stereocenter. (9+2 hours)
7. Determining organic structures. Introduction. Mass spectrometry (MS). Resolution. Molecular ion. Isotopes. Fragmentation. Examples of mass spectra. Electromagnetic radiation. Ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis). Infrared spectroscopy (IR). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). 13C NMR. 1H NMR. Chemical shift. Spin-spin coupling. Examples of IR, and NMR spectra. (6+3 hours)
8. Organic reactions. Definitions of basic terms. The division of reactions to the change of structure and to the reaction type. Acidity, basicity, and pKa. Factors that enhance the acidity (the size of atoms, electronegativity, resonance, hybridization, inductive effects, charge, solvation, steric effects). Acid - base reactions. The rules for determining the oxidation state of carbon. Oxidation - reduction reactions. Usage of the curly arrows in the reaction mechanism. Intermediates. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. (4 hours)
II. PARTIAL EXAM (written, 1hour and 10 min)
9. Alkanes and cycloalkanes. Oxidation. Halogenation. Alkyl halides. Nucleophilic substitution at the saturated carbon (SN1 and SN2 mechanism). Elimination reactions (E1, E2 mechanisms). Alkenes and alkynes. Electrophilic additions and free radical, polymerization. Conjugated unsaturated compounds. 1,2 - and 1,4 - addition. Aromatic compounds. Electrophilic and nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Phenols. Alcohols and ethers. Organometallic compounds. Aldehydes and ketones. Nucleophilic addition to the carbonyl group. Carboxylic acids and derivatives. Nucleophilic substitution at the carbonyl group. Amines. Heterocyclic compounds. (18+5 hours)
10. Carbohydrates. Amino acids. Nucleic acid. Lipids. (5+1 hours)
III. PARTIAL EXAM (written, 1hour and 10 min)
IV. PARTIAL EXAM (oral, 30 min)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

4.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Course is divided into three sections that students take over 3 partial written and 1 oral exam or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The student pass the exam if achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. H. Pine: Organska kemija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.

9

Vodič kroz IUPAC-ovu nomenkalturu organskih spojeva, preveli:Bregovec, Horvat, Majerski, Rapić, Školska knjiga , Zagreb, 2002.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V.Rapić: Nomenklatura organskih spojeva, Školska knjiga , Zagreb, 2004.
S. E. Meislich, H. Meislich & J. Scharefkin, 3000 Solved Problems in Organic Chemistry, The McGraw-Hill, 1994.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Organic Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Organic Chemistry

Code

KTA202

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of basic organic chemistry that involves mastering practical laboratory techniques used in the synthesis, isolation, purification and identification of organic compounds.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Organic Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will be able to use laboratory techniques (such as recrystallization, distillation, extraction, reflux, chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, etc.), for
(i) purification,
(ii) isolation,
(iii) synthesis, and
(iv) identification of the organic compounds.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Laboratory safety and rules. Isolation and purification of organic compounds. Crystallization and melting point determination. Distillation. Extraction. Test. (4 hours)
Organic compounds synthesis.
2. Nucleophilic aromatic substitution. The preparation of phenol (diazotation). Test. (9 hours)
3. Nucleophilic addition. The preparation of benzyl-alcohol and benzoic acid (Cannizzaro reaction). Test. (4 hours)
4. Nucleophilic substitution. The preparation of acetanilide (acylation). Test. (4 hours)
5. Electrophylic aromatic substitution. The preparation of p-nitroacetanilide and p-nitroaniline (nitration and hydrolysis). Test. (5 hours)
6. Oxidation-reduction reaction. The preparation of 2-butanone. Test. (4 hours)
Chromatography.
7. Thin-layer chromatography. Column chromatography. Test. (5 hours)
Organic compounds characterization.
8. Characteristic reactions of functional groups. Test. (5 hours)
9. Methods of spectroscopic analysis. (UV/Vis, FTIR). Test. (4 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The student pass the exam if all tests are positive and all the laboratory exercises are performed. The final grade is based on the evaluation of tests and experimental work.
Test scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2009.

1

Da, na web stranicama KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V. Rapić: Postupci priprave i izolacije prirodnih spojeva, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.
S. Borčić, O. Kronja, Praktikum preparativne organske kemije, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 1991.
D. Kolbah, Priručnik za kemičare, Kemija u industriji, Zagreb,1986.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physical Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Physical Chemistry

Code

KTA203

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

60

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Student will acquire knowledge about principles of the thermodynamic and kinetic approach to physical and chemical changes.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Physical chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After successful completion of the course students will know the basic principles of physical chemistry, which include: 1) physical properties and structure of substances, 2) thermodynamics of mixing, 3) chemical equilibrium, 4) the rates of chemical reactions, 5) molecular motion in gases and the motion of molecules and ions in liquids, 6) electric and magnetic properties of molecules

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures
1st week: Introduction. Properties of gases. The perfect gas. The states of gases. The gas laws. Real gases. Van der Waals equation. The First Law of thermodynamics. The basic concepts. Work, heat and energy. The formal statment of the First Law
2nd week: Expansion work. Heat and enthalpy. Heat capacity. Thermochemistry. Standard enthalpy changes. Enthalpies of formation. The temperature dependence of reaction enthalpies.
3rd week: Work of adiabatic expansion. Perfect gas adiabats. The Second Law. The dispersal of energy. Entropy. Entropy change during the isothermal expansion of a perfect gas.
4th week: The entropy as a state function. The entropy of irreversible change. Entropy changes accompanying specific processes. The variation of entropy with temperature. The Third Law.
5th week: Third-Law entropies. The Helmholtz and Gibbs energies. Standard molar Gibbs energies. Combining the First and Second Laws. Properties of the internal energy. Properties of the Gibbs energy.
6th week: The chemical potential. Real gases – the fugacity. Standard states of real gases. The relation between fugacity and pressure. Physical transformations of pure substances. Phase boundaries. The dependence of stability on the conditions. The location of phase boundaries.
7th week: The first partial exam. The properties of simple mixtures. Partial molar quantities. The thermodynamics of mixing. The chemical potentials of liquids.
8th week: Liquid mixtures. Colligative properties. The sovent activity. The solute activity. The phase rule. Phase diagrams.
9th week: Two-component systems. Vapour pressure diagrams. Temperature-composition diagrams. Liquid-liquid phase diagrams. Liquid-solid phase diagrams. Three-component systems. Chemical equilibrium. The Gibbs energy minimum. The extent of reaction.
10th week: The reaction Gibbs energy. Exergonic and endergonic reactions. The composition of reactions at equilibrium - the thermodynamic equilibrium constant. Perfect gas equilibria. The general case of a reaction. Le Chatelier’s principle.
11th week: The second partial exam. The rates of chemical reactions. Rate laws and rate constants. Reaction order. The determination of the rate law. Integrated rate laws. First-order reactions. Half-lives. Second-order reactions.
12th week: Reactions approaching equilibrium. The temperature dependence of reaction rates. Elementary reactions. Consecutive elementary reactions. The rate-determing step. The steady-state approximation. Pre-equilibria. Third-order reactions. Unimolecular reactions. Molecules and ions in motion. Molecular motion in gases.
13th week: Viscosity. The conductivity of electrolyte solutions. Strong electrolytes. Weak electrolytes. The drift speed. Ion mobilities. Mobility and conductivity.
14th week: The measurement of transport numbers. Conductivities and ion-ion interactions. Spectroscopy. The electric and magnetic properties of molecules. Permanent and induced electric dipole moments. Polarization at high frequencies. The relative permittivity. Refractive index. Optical activity. Beer-Lambert law.
15th week: Atomic spectra. Molecular spectra. Infrared spectroscopy. Rotational and vibrational spectra. Measurement of IR spectra. Visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy. The Franck-Condon principle. Charge-transfer transitions.
Seminars
Solving numerical problems.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars 80%) and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.5

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into three units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The written exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied, 60-69% successful (2), 70-79% good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Atkins, J. de Paula, Atkins’ Physical Chemistry, 8th Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2006.

3

I. Mekjavić, Fizikalna kemija 1, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 1996.

10

I. Mekjavić, Fizikalna kemija 2, Golden marketing, Zagreb, 1999.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Tominić, Fizikalna kemija II, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Physical Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Physical Chemistry

Code

KTA204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to train students to work independently in the laboratory of physical chemistry, processing experimental data and presenting the results of data processing in written form.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Physical Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After successful completion of the course students will:
1) be acquainted with the fundamental operating procedures in the laboratory of physical chemistry 2) learn the principles of various laboratory instruments and devices 3) be able to independently perform measurements in the laboratory 4) know about how to process and present the collected data and measurement results using the computer 5) know to identify and independently solve engineering problems

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Vapour pressure of pure liquid.
2nd week: Refractometric determination of composition of two-component mixture. 3rd week: Viscosity.
4th week: Colligative properties.
5th week: Equilibrium constant of homogeneous reaction.
6th week: Phase diagram for three-component system.
7th week: Transport numbers by Hittorf method.
8th week: Conductometry and conductometric titration.
9th week: Rate constant of inversion of sucrose by polarimetric method.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to carry out all laboratory exercises. Before each exercise, students should take the oral partial exam. After each exercise, students should submit a report on the completed exercise. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade is based on the score of the partial oral examination before each exercise, practical work in the laboratory and submitted reports.
Scoring: <60% of the student is not satisfied; 60-69% is sufficient (2); 70-79% good (3); 80-89% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Radošević, Lj. Aljinović, Fizikalna kemija, Laboratorijske vježbe, Sveučilišna naklada Liber, Split, 1980.

30

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. M. Halpern, Experimental Physical Chemistry, A Laboratory Textbook, Second Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mass and Energy Balances
NAME OF THE COURSE Mass and Energy Balances

Code

KTA205

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gain knowledge of application of principles of conservation of mass and energy to chemical process systems. To acquire a basic knowledge of the systematic problem solving related to the quantity and composition of process input and outputs.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- explain the law of conservation of mass and write general material balance equation on (continuous) steady-state and (batch) unsteady-state processes,
- write material balances on unreactive and reactive processes,
- write a flowchart of single and multiple-unit processes and solve the system of mass balance equations in order to define amount and composition of material of each process stream,
- apply the law of conservation of energy and write energy balances for chemical processes,
- write energy balances on opened and closed steady-states systems,
- apply simultaneous material and energy balances.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introductions to engineering calculations.
2nd week: Processes and process variables
3th week: General material balance equation.
4th week: Material balances on continuous steady-states processes without chemical reaction.
5th week: Material balances on batch unsteady-states processes without chemical reaction.
6th week: Material balances on process with recycle and bypass.
7th week: Material balances on multiple-unit processes.
8th week: Material balances on reactive processes.
9th week: Balances on atomic and molecular species.
10th week: Balances on combustion processes.
11th week: Energy and energy balances. Instructional objectives.
12 th week: Energy balances on closed systems at steady-states.
13th week: Energy balances on opened systems at steady-states.
14th week: Energy balances on reactive processes.
15th week: Simultaneous material and energy balances.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend at least 80% of lectures and seminars.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester student may take the exam by two written tests. Tests are consisting of questions from lectures and seminars. Test passing score is 55%. After passing both tests the grade of theoretical part is determined from the average score by the following criteria: 55%-66% - satisfactory, 67%-78% - good, 79%-89% - very good, 90%-100% - excellent.
Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take a written exam in the regular examination periods. Final grade is determined by previously notated criteria.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R. M. Felder, R. W. Rousseau, Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, 3rd ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2005.

1

D. M. Himmelblau: Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical Engineering, 7th ed., Prentice-Hall Inc., New Jersey, 2003.

1

R.H. Perry, D.W. Green, J.O. Maloney, Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2007.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Luyben, W. L., Wenzel, L. A.: Chemical Process Analysis: Mass and Energy Balances, Prentice-Hall Inc., New Jersey, 1998.
T. Bradić, R. Roki, J. Pečarić, M. Strunje: Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Multigraf – Zagreb, Zagreb, 1994..

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Transport Phenomena
NAME OF THE COURSE Transport Phenomena

Code

KTA206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge about the principles of transfer of momentum, heat and mass transfer on the principle of a unified approach to transport phenomena. This knowledge forms the basis of chemical engineering unit operations, and they are therefore essential for a fuller understanding of process engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Transport Phenomena

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- how to apply the laws of conservation of the fluid flow
- about molecular and convective mechanisms of transport of momentum, energy and mass
- how to recognize the major resistance at transport phenomena and how to intensifying the observed transfer
- how to gain insight into the functional dependence of the characteristics of a given system by the use of similarity theory and dimensional analysis
- the analogy of transfer of momentum, energy and mass

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to physical transport phenomena. Conservation law. Molecular and convective transport mechanisms.
2nd week: Stationary and non-stationary processes. Rate of transport processes. Momentum, heat and mass fluxes. Fluid characteristics (density, relative density, specific weight...)
3rd week: Momentum transfer. Newton’s low of viscosity. Momentum flux. Application of momentum and mass balances in fluid mechanics.
4th week: Application of heat balance in fluid mechanics: Bernoulli equation and its application in process engineering.
5th week: Theories of similarity. Dimensional analysis. Flow phenomena. Laminar flow. Stationary laminar flow between two flat horizontal plates.
6th week: Stationary laminar flow through a horizontal circular tube. Hagen-Poiseuille law. Turbulent flow. Pressure drop in straight channels and in pipe systems. Moody diagram.
7th week: Flow around obstacles. Rate of sedimentation.
8th week: Flow through beds of particles. Fluidization.
9th week: Fundamental principles of heat transfer. Stationary heat conduction. Heat conduction through walls and through cylindrical walls.
10th week: Heat transfer by forced convection. Thermal boundary layer. Partial and overall heat transfer coefficients. Heat transfer during laminar and turbulent flows in pipes. Heat transfer during condensation.
11th week: Heat transfer during boiling. Heat transfer around obstacles. Heat transfer during natural convection.
12th week: Heat transport by radiation.
13th week: Fundamental principles of mass transfer. Stationary diffusion. Equimolar counterdiffusion and one-component diffusion.
14th week: Mass transfer with forced convection. Mass transfer by natural convection.
15th week: Interphase mass transfer. Analogy between heat and mass transfer.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.2

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Examination passing rate is 55%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of theoretical (oral) and written part. Minimum score is 55%. Written part will constitute 30% and the theoretical part of the exam 70 % of the test score.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. J. Beek, K. M. K. Muttzall, J. W. van Heuven, Transport Phenomena, 2nd ed., J. Wiley and Sons Inc., London, 1999.

3

N. Kuzmanić, Prijenos tvari i energije, Priručnik za predavanja (za unutarnju uporabu), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2012.

0

Web stranice KTF-a

R. Byron Bird, W. E. Stewart, E. N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, 2nd ed., J. Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, 2002.

2

J. Welty, J. W. Wicks, R. E. Wilson, G. L. Rorrer, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th ed., J. Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 2007.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Mitrović-Kessler: Prijenos tvari i energije, Tehnološki fakultet Split, Split, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Transport Phenomena
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Transport Phenomena

Code

KTA207

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge in application of basic measurements in process engineering, conducting measurements of fluid flow, pressure and temperature, analysis of experimental data and writing final reports, basic use of Microsoft Office Excel in data processing.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Transport Phenomena

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing the laboratory exercises, student is expected to know:
- how to determine and measure fluid flow
- how to calibrate an orifice plate and rotameter in order to use them as a flow meter in a pipeline
- how to measure a pressure drop in a pipeline and determine pipe roughness and friction coefficients
- how to conduct appropriate measurements needed to calculate particle sedimentation rate
- how fluidization is conducted and where can it be applied
- what are the major resistances in heat and transfer and know the basics in how to reduce them

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1: Determination of fluid flow type and the critical Reynolds number (1 hour)
Exercise 2: Applying the Bernoulli’s theorem: Dynamic and Surface Flow Meters - Calibration of orifice plate and rotameter (2 hours)
Exercise 3: Determination of pressure drop in the pipeline (2 hours)
Exercise 4: Determination of particle sedimentation rate in a stationary fluid (2 hours)
Exercise 5: Determination of fluidized bed characteristics (2 hours)
Exercise 6: Determination of partial and overall heat transfer coefficients (2 hours)
Exercise 7: Complex heat transfer by radiation and convection (2 hours)
Exercise 8: Interphase mass transfer. (2 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.1

Research

Practical training

0.2

Experimental work

0.2

Report

0.2

0.1

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.2

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Student is obligated to attend 100% of all laboratory exercises. During the semester and after a certain exercise, student is obligated to write a report consisted of description of exercise assignment, apparatus, calculations and graphs based on measurements conducted in laboratory and appropriate conclusions. Upon completion of all exercises, a final (written) test will be held. Minimum score is 50%.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Zavod za kem. inženjerstvo, Prijenos tvari i energije, priručnik za vježbe (za internu uporabu)

0

Web stranice Fakulteta

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Mitrović-Kessler: Prijenos tvari i energije, Tehnološki fakultet Split, Split, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Electrochemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Electrochemistry

Code

KTA208

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

4.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will learn the basic laws of electrolysis and electrochemical kinetics which play an important role in materials science and materials engineering, corrosion protection of materials, electroorganic and inorganic synthesis processes and also in modern and sustainable technologies.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Electrochemistry
The condition for taking the exam: Completed the course ”Exercises in Electrochemistry”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student is able to:
- explain the difference between chemical and electrochemical reactions
- describe the components and processes in the electrochemical reactor
- identify the types of conductors and conductivity
- define the concept of electrode potential
- explain the structure of electrified phase boundary
- differentiate between the concepts of polarization and overvoltage
- explain the causes of different overvoltage types
- recognize the important electrochemical processes
- introduce electrochemical aspects of environmental protection
- apply the acquired knowledge in solving numerical problems in electrochemistry.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Overview of the main problems in electrochemistry. Chemical and electrochemical reactions. Electrochemical systems. Basic concepts in electrochemistry. Types of conductivity. Electrochemical stoichiometry – Faraday law.
2nd week: Ionics. Ion-solvent interaction. Electrolyte definition. Solvent and dissolution process. Ion hydration. Ion-ion interaction. Concept of ionic atmosphere.
3rd week: Non-stationary phenomena in electrolyte solutions. Current flow through electrolyte solutions.
4th week: The modern theory of electronic conductors.
5th week: First test. Electrochemical thermodynamics. Equilibrium cell voltage. Redox reactions and electrochemical systems. Reversibility of electrochemical processes.
6th week: Electrode potentials. Absolute electrode potential. Volta potential, real potential and relative electrode potential. Electrode potential measurement. Nernst relation. Definition of standard electrode potential. Reference electrodes. Standard hydrogen potential scale.
7th week: Phase boundary. Ideally polarizable electrode and electrocapillarity. Adsorption. Nonspecific and specific adsorption. Double layer structure and models. Helmholtz model. Gouy-Chapman model. Stern model. Stern-Gram model.
8th week: Electrokinetic phenomena and zeta-potential. Electrooosmosis. Strearming potential. Electrophoresis. Dorn effect. Electrode kinetics. Electrochemical systems in non-equilibrium conditions.
9th week: Anodic and chatodic processes. Electrochemical reaction mechanism and rate determining step. Polarization and overpotential. Overvoltage types. Second test.
10th week: Electrochemical overpotential. Buttler-Volmer and Tafel equations. Diagnostic criteria.
11th week: Diffusion overpotential. Diffusion in stationary and non-stationary condition.
12th week: Reaction ovrepotential. Crystallization overpotential. Electrochemical measurement methods - stationary and non-stationary.
13th week: Analysis of mechanism selected electrode processes. Electrocatalysis - evolution and reduction of hydrogen and oxygen. Deposition and dissolution of metals. Corrosion of metals.
14th week: Nucleation and new phase formation. Passivity phenomena. Conversion and storage of energy.
15th week: Environmentally oriented electrochemistry. Third test.
Seminars (one hour weekly): Solving numerical problems in electrochemistry.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through three tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 33 %. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam. Grades: - 60% insufficient, 60-70% sufficient, 71-80% good, 81-92% very good, 93-100% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. Despić, Osnove elektrokemije 2000, Zavod za udžbenike i nastavna sredstva, Beograd, 2003.

0

J.O.M. Bockris, A.K.N. Reddy, M. Gamboa-Aldeco, Modern Electrochemistry 2A, Fundamentals of Electrodics, 2nd Edition, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, 2000.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C. H. Hamann, A. Hamnett, W. Vielstich, Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH Weinheim, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Electrochemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Electrochemistry

Code

KTA209

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective of this course is to develop the student’s abilities needed for experimental work and measurement processes. The course helps the student to understand the nature of the electrochemical reactions and the peculiarities of electrochemical kinetics.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Electrochemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- use theory to understand/predict experimental observations
- explain the nature of the electrochemical terms, the nature of electrochemical reactions, and the kinetics of electrochemical reactions
- plan and perform electrochemical experiments
- identify and demonstrate the safe and correct use of measurement and laboratory equipment
- perform measurements, analysis and testing in the laboratory with the appropriate lab equipments and software
- document scientific information and experimental data and write scientific reports, with graphical presentation of data
- demonstrate teamwork skills.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Eight laboratory exercises to accompany the course of lectures on Electrochemistry.
Ex. 1 Electrolyte decomposition voltage
Ex. 2 Electrogravimetric analysis
Ex. 3 Determination of the Tafel constants
Ex. 4 Electrochemical production of calcium gluconate
Ex. 5 Electrorefining of silver
Ex. 6 Electrochemical energy sorces
Ex. 7 Cyclic voltamerty of Fe3+/Fe2+ redox couple
Ex. 8 The influence of the salt solution composition on corrosion behaviour of
Al-2.5Mg alloy

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The mean (average grade) is the arithmetic of all positive grades obtained in examinations (Pre-Lab oral exam 45%, Experimental work 5%, and Lab report 50%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Radošević, Vježbe iz elektrokemije (za unutarnju uporabu), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Thermodynamics
NAME OF THE COURSE Thermodynamics

Code

KTA210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Vanja Martinac

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

ScD Jelena Jakić
Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The course of Thermodynamics covers the basics of general thermodynamic principles and their application in engineering. The goal is for students to master the knowledge of basic thermodynamic principles and their application in engineering, which will be helpful in their further studies as well as in their work.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students are expected to:
- specify and define the units of measurements of basic thermodynamic magnitudes and the state equation
- specify and correctly interpret the basic laws of thermodynamics
- specify and explain thermodynamic changes of the state of ideal gases
- define and explain the processes of expansion and compression
- define and explain cycles processes
- define and explain irreversible processes (throttling, mixing of gases)
- specify and describe heat properties and changes of the state of real gases
- discern and analyse processes in devices used to obtain low temperatures and processes in devices for gas liquefaction.
- discern standard state of solutions
- apply the knowledge acquired to solving tasks related to changes of the state of ideal and real gases and liquids, compression processes, cycles processes, processes in devices used to obtain low temperatures

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: General concepts. Heat and energy parameters in thermodynamic processes.
2nd week: Basic laws of thermodynamics. The first law of thermodynamics using internal energy and enthalpy. Thermodynamic changes of the state of ideal gases (isobaric, isochoric, isothermal, adiabatic and polytrophic changes of state).
3rd week: The second law of thermodynamics, reversibility, irreversibility, thermal diagram and changes of the state in thermal diagrams.
4th week: The second law of thermodynamics applied to the energetic transformation - exergy and anergy.
5th week: Maximum work of the system.
6th week: Cycles processes. Carnot and thermal efficiency degree.
7th week: Compression and expansion processes.
8th week: Processes with external and internal combustion.
Exam (I preliminary exam)
9th week: Real gases: liquid state, evaporation, wet and dry saturated steam, superheated steam, fundamental processes.
10th week: Thermal properties and changes of the state of real gases. Thermodynamics diagrams and tables for variables of state.
11th week: Water vapour – thermodynamic parameters of the state. Vapour power cycles
12th week: Thermodynamic fundamentals of the cooling process. Vapor-compression refrigeration. Coefficient of performance. Heat pump.
13th week: Processes in devices for gas liquefaction.
14th week: Thermodynamics of solutions – theory and application. Thermodynamic fundamentals of vapor-liquid equilibrium.
15th week: Standard state of solutions. Gibbs-Duhem equation for solutions.
Exam (II preliminary exam)
Numeric examples demonstrating the topics covered are analysed during the course, making an integral whole with the lectures.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.5

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Attendance to lectures and seminars is registered (not included in the rating). A written and an oral exam are held in the examination periods. The passing threshold is 60%. The oral exam is mandatory for all students, and the written exam is mandatory if a student is not exempt from it. Continuous assessment through partial preliminary exams (twice in a semester) allows for exemption from the written exam. The passing threshold is 60%. Partial preliminary exams are not mandatory. Preliminary exams are not eliminatory. Each passed preliminary exam participates with 25% in the rating. A passed preliminary exam also participates with 25% in the autumn examination period. The written exam participates with 25%, and the oral one with 50%. Students who have not passed the written exam through preliminary exams take the full exam (final exam) consisting of the written and the oral exam in regular examination periods. The passing threshold is 60%, and each exam form participates in the rating with 50%.
Ratings: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 71%-80% - good, 81%-90% - very good,
91%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. J. Moran, H. N. Shapiro, D. B. Daisie, M. B. Bailey, Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2010.

2

N. Petric, I. Vojnović, V. Martinac, Tehnička termodinamika, 2 izdanje, on line (2007-01-09), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2007.

0

On line

V. Martinac, Termodinamika i termotehnika (priručnik - formule i tablice), on line (2008-12-09), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2008.

0

On line

J. M. Smith, H. C. Van Hess, M. M. Abbott, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2005.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Y. A. Cengel, M. A. Boles, Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, 7th Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2011.
R. E. Sonntag, C. Borgnakke, G. J. Van Wylen, Fundamentals of thermodynamics, 8th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2012.
R. Budin, A. Mihelić-Bogdanić, Osnove tehničke termodinamike, III izdanje, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2012.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Unit Operations
NAME OF THE COURSE Unit Operations

Code

KTA211

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić

Credits (ECTS)

4.5

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To gain knowledge about the basic unit operations in the process engineering through theoretical expressions based on the mass and energy balances. Students are also acquainted with the working principles of the most used devices and selection of their optimum working conditions regarding minimization of energy consumption and product quality.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Transport Phenomena
Enrolled in or passed the course Transport Phenomena
Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Unit Operations

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- fundamental principles of mechanical and of heat and mass transfer operations,
- explain the laws that follow performance of individual operation,
- explain the influence of operating variable on each operation,
- explain their working principle of the most common used equipment for particular operation,
- for a given process, select the appropriate equipment,
- possible operating problems that may occur during operation performance.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to chemical engineering processes. Fluid transport.
2nd week: Centrifugal pumps. Characteristic curves of a centrifugal pump. Special purpose pumps. Gas transport.
3rd week: Classification. Classification equipment.
4th week: Separation. Separation equipment.
5th week: Filtration. General Consideration. Filtration equipment.
6th week: Mixing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Power consumption.
7th week: Mixing of particulate solids. Selection and dimensioning of mixing equipment.
8th week: Heat and mass transfer operations. Heat-exchange equipment.
9th week: Evaporation. Types of evaporators.
10th week: Gas absorption. Packings and packed tower design.
11th week: Principles of absorption.
12th week: Principle of drying. Use of psychometric charts.
13th week: Drying equipment.
14th week: Zeotropic and azeotropic mixtures Phase equilibrium. Batch distillation; flash and vacuum distillation. and boiling point diagram. .
15th week: Continuous distillation with reflux. Rectification and stripping. Number of ideal plates; McCabe -Thiele Method.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture and seminar attendance: 80 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester student may take the exam by two theoretical (oral) and two calculation (written) tests. Test passing score is 55%. After passing all tests the average score for oral and written parts is calculated and the grade of each part is determined by the following criteria: 55%-66% - satisfactory, 67%-78% - good, 79%-89% - very good, 90%-100% - excellent.
In the final grade theoretical part constitutes 67% of grade while written part 33%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take exam in the regular examination periods. Final grade is determined by previously notated criteria.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. L. McCabe, J. C. Smith, P. Harriot, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2004.

2

C. J. Geankoplis, Transport Prosesses and Separation Process Principles (Includes Unit Operations), 4th ed., Pearson Eucation, Inc.,New Jersey, 2007.

1

Hraste, Mehaničko procesno inženjerstvo, 2. izdanje, HINUS, Zagreb, 2003.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Welty, J. W. Wicks, R. E. Wilson, G. L. Rorrer, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th ed., J. Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, 2007.
R.H. Perry, D.W. Green, J.O. Maloney, Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1999.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester,
- - students evaluation organized by University.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Unit Operations
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Unit Operations

Code

KTA212

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be practically acquainted with functional dependence of process variables during the performance of individual experiment. They will acquire the sense of selection of the optimal process operating conditions. To educate students how to determine unknown process variables applying the theoretical expressions and values of process variables measured during the experiments.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Unit Operations

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing the laboratory exercises, student is expected to know:
- explain the purpose and the aim of each of experiment (exercise) conducted,
- describe the elementary parts of apparatus used during individual experiments,
- bring up the variable needed to be measured in order to determine specific (demanded) process variables or parameters,
- explain the functional dependence of measured process variables and their influence on the final result of the experiments,
- explain the main resistance and driving force for each of experiment conducted.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1: Classification of the particulate solids.
Exercise 2: Mixing - power consumption determination.
Exercise 3: Filtration - determination of filtration coefficient and filtration cake resistance.
Exercise 4: Heat exchanger - determination of partial and overall heat transfer coefficient.
Exercise 5: Gas absorption- determination of pressure drop and limiting flow rates.
Exercise 6: Drying rate determination.
Exercise 7: Distillation - determination of the number of theoretical plates.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.2

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.4

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

After each exercise, student is obligated to write a report. It consists of calculations based on an application of theoretical expressions and the values of process variables measured during the experiments. Beside calculation, student needs to draw the diagrams of process variable dependence, specific for individual operation. Upon completion of all exercises, a final (written) test will be held. Minimum score is 55%. Final grade from the exercise consists of grade from the practical work, report and final test.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Tehnološke operacije priručnik za vježbe (za internu uporabu)

0

Web stranice Fakulteta

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Mitrović-Kessler: Prijenos tvari i energije, Tehnološki fakultet Split, Split, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Measurement and Process Control
NAME OF THE COURSE Measurement and Process Control

Code

KTA213

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Jadranka Marasović

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Enable students to understand the importance of automated systems, to comprehend that the autonomous operation of such systems is the result of carefully thought and physically realized control procedures, and to be able to grasp the role of measuring equipment in that work. Enable students to gain basic knowledge on the use of computers as a support for the process control.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Measurement and Process Control

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing this course, students will be able to describe the different measuring transducers, as well as to analyze the importance and impact of individual measurements in process control. Students will be able to describe the basic concepts from the process management and control theory and to argue their choice of instrumentation. They will be able to describe the basic use of computers as a support for the control theory and to calculate the elementary data needed to control a simple system.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Significance and importance of instrumentation in chemical engineering. General characteristics of transducers. Pressure measurements. Temperature measurements. Fluid flow measurements. Level measurements. Humidity and moisture measurements. Introduction to process control principles. Systems and control. Process control objectives. Behavior of control process: mathematical modeling. Control theory basics: Laplace transformation, transfer function, block diagram algebra. Analysis of first and second order processes. First and second order processes in control loop, stability analysis, and synthesis of P - controller. Design and characteristics of instrumentation in control loop.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, there will be two mid-term exams. At the end of the semester, students will take a written exam. In order to get a positive grade from this course, students need to acquire minimum 50% of the total score on each of the mid-term exams or at the final exam.
The final grade is determined as follows:
Percentage Grade
50% to 61% sufficient (2)
62% to 74% good (3)
75% to 87% very good (4)
88% to 100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J, Božičević, Temelji automatike 1, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

0

R. Žanetić, Vođenje procesa u proizvodnji, Interna skripta, KTF, Split, 2006.

0

Web stranica KTF

R. Žanetič, R. Stipišić, Mjerni pretvornici u procesnoj industriji, Interna skripta, KTF, Split, 2005.

0

Web stranica KTF

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Božičević, Temelji automatike 1, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.
J. Marasović, Temeljni postupci u automatici, Interna skripta, FESB, Split, 2001.
D.E. Seborg, T.F. Edgar, D.A. Mallichamp, Process Dynamics and Control, J. Wiley, New York, 1989.
J.W. Dally, W.F. Riley, K.G. McConnell, Instrumentation for Engineering Measurements, J. Wiley, New York, 1994.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

During the semester, there will be two mid-term exams. At the end of the semester, students will take a written exam. Each mid-term exam and the final exam will consist of several short questions intended to evaluate the students’ understanding of the theory and their ability to describe the fundamental concepts, as well as to test students’ ability to apply the theory onto simple, practical examples.
Quality and accomplishment assurance will be performed at three separate levels: (1) University level, (2) Faculty level, by the Teaching Quality Control Committee, (3) Professor’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Measurement and Process Control
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Measurement and Process Control

Code

KTA214

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Renato Stipišić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of knowledge in working with measuring instruments to control the process.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Measurement and Process Control

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to know:
- Describe the basic principles of measuring instruments
- Select instrument needed to measure physical parameters essential for process
- Identify sources of error in measuring
- To measure certain physical quantity by measuring instrument

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

First week: Description and view the contents of the lecture. The principles of the measurement. General characteristics of the measuring instruments.
Second Week: Pressure Measurement.
3rd week: Liquid manometers.
4th week: Manometers with solid weights. Deformation manometers.
5th week: Vakuummeters.
6th week: Temperature measurement. Liquid thermometers.
7th week: Mechanical thermometers. Pressure thermometers.
8th week: Thermocouples.
9th week: Heat resistant thermometers. Radiation pyrometers.
10th week: Flow measurement. Turbine flowmeters. Ionization flowmeters. The ultrasonic flowmeters.
11th week: Level measurement of liquids and solids.
12th week: Application of computers in measurement.
13th week: A/D converters
14th week: D/A converters
15th week: Examination

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance in the amount of 80% of the hourly rate.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.3

Research

Practical training

0.3

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.2

Oral exam

0.2

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over written exams. Passing threshold is 60%. The examination periods shall be taken oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Rating: 60 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Božičević Temelji automatike I, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

16

J. Božičević Temelji automatike II, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

16

R. Žanetić, R. Stipišić, Mjerni pretvornici u procesnoj industriji, Skripta za internu upotrebu, KTF- Split, 2005.

3

web

R. Žanetić, Vođenje procesa u proizvodnji, Skripta za internu upotrebu, KTF- Split, 2006.

3

web

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Seborg, D. E., T. F. Edgar & D. A. Mellichamp, Process Dynamics and Control, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2010.
W. Altman, D. Macdonald, Practical Process Control for Engineers and Technicians, Elsevier, London, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Catalysis
NAME OF THE COURSE Catalysis

Code

KTA215

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Prof Matko Erceg

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- acquiring knowledge about the role of catalysts in chemical reaction
- identify the key variables for the preparation of better catalysts
- overview of the processes of catalysts preparation
- understanding the importance of catalysts in industry and sustainable development through the improvement of existing or development of new chemical, petrochemical and related processes

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- list and describe types of catalysts
- explain the principle of operation of the catalyst in a chemical reaction
- know the role of each component in catalyst system
- explain the processes of catalysts preparation
- explain deactivation, reactivation and regeneration of catalyst
- give examples of the catalyst application in real systems
- to argue the importance of a catalyst for industry and sustainable development

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: General concept of catalysis: the definition of catalysis and catalysts, the historical development of catalytic processes, the economic importance of the catalyst.
2nd week: Distribution of catalysis and katalizatora. Comparison of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts and the industrial značaj. General theory of catalysis. Effect of catalyst on reaction rates and the position of the chemical equilibrium. The activation energies.
3rd week: The mechanism of catalysis, inhibition, initiation. Basic features of the catalyst: activity, selectivity and stability.
4th week: Homogeneous catalysis in the gaseous and in the liquid phase. Homogeneous catalysis by acids and bases, by ions and transition metal compounds.
5th week: Coordination complexes as catalysts. Metallocenes.
6th week: Heterogeneous catalysis: the basic stages of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Physical and chemical adsorption and their comparison. The heat of adsorption (Lennard-Jones diagram).
7th week: Types of adsorption isotherms. The basic laws of adsorption. Mechanisms and kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the gas phase: Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism. Eley-Rideal mechanism.
8th week: Theories of the catalytic activity of heterogeneous catalysts: the theory of unstable intermediates, the theory of active centers, the theory of geometric factors.
9th week: Theory of electronic factors. The selectivity of catalysts.
10th week: Durability (stability) and resistance to deactivation. Poisoning and selectivity coefficient of toxicity. Deactivation of the catalyst layers on the surface. Deactivation by sintering and phase transformation. Loss of catalyst by evaporation. Mechanical disintegration of the catalyst. Prevention of deactivation. Reactivation and regeneration of the catalyst.
11th week: Zeolites: properties, catalytic properties, selectivity. Zeolite modification processes.
12th week: Design of heterogeneous catalysts: active components, carriers, promoters, moderators, inhibitors, activators.
13th week: Characterization of heterogeneous catalysts. Determination of physical properties of the catalyst: the volume and the pore size, the total area of the catalyst. Mechanical properties of the catalyst.
14th week: Methods of heterogeneous catalysis: the precipitated catalysts impregnated catalysts, skeletal catalysts, catalysts with active coating. Monolithic catalysts.
15th week: Biocatalysts. Final comments, discussion, conclusions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures and seminars in the 80% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.9

Oral exam

0.7

Written exam

0.9

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 45% in a final grade while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade. Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 40% and oral exam for 50%, respectively. Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 50% and oral exam for 50% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Kovačić, B. Andričić, Kataliza, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

5

WEB knjižnica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Zrnčević, Kataliza i katalizatori, Hinus, Zagreb, 2005.; J. Hagen, Industrial Catalysis-A Practical Approach, 2nd ed., Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2006.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University Level, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Reaction Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Reaction Engineering

Code

KTA301

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Davor Rušić

Credits (ECTS)

3.5

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To familiarize students with the principles of reactor designing.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Transport Phenomena
Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Reaction Engineering

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Kinetic analysis, analysis of reactor.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: The concept of chemical reactors.
Week 2: The mathematical description of the general equations of balance and mass transfer.
Week 3: Reactor models of ideal reactor types.
Week 4: The kinetics of chemical reactions in homogeneous systems.
Week 5: Goals of kinetic studies.
Week 6: Selection of the experimental reactor.
Week 7: Selection of kinetic models.
Week 8: Selection of methods for estimation of kinetic parameters.
Week 9: The systematization contents taught
Week 10: First test
Week 11: The kinetics of reactions in heterogeneous systems.
Week 12: The problem of the presence of physical processes accompanying a chemical reaction.
Week 13: Experimental methods in kinetic studies of reaction systems fluid-solid, gas-liquid and reaction with solid catalysts.
Week 14: The factors that determine the choice of the reactor.
Week 15: Second test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance and active participation at lectures, seminars and exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam:
A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-79% good (3); 80-92% very good (4); 93-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

O. Levenspiele, Chemical engineering

0

Z Gomzi, Kemijski reaktori

10

S.Slavica, D.Rušić, Interactive MathCad collection of task for reaction engineering

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences:
Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Reaction Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Reaction Engineering

Code

KTA302

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be acquainted with the basic knowledge of software Mathcad and use of this program for solving problems in reaction engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Reaction Engineering

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will be able to:
- calculate using Mathcad
- write a report for laboratory exercises in Mathcad
- find the best-fitting curve to a given set of experimental data (least squares method)
- use Mathcad for reactor design

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1. Mathcad basic - toolbars, calculator
Exercise 2. Mathcad basic - graph
Exercise 3. Mathcad basic - formatting, units, functions, matrix
Exercise 4. Solving a problems in reactor design using Mathcad
Exam

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance and active participation at exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.1

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass exam by taking a test at the end of the semester or in the regular examination term.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-79% good (3); 80-92% very good (4); 93-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Rušić, E. Bacci, Matematički alati - priručnik, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, 2011

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Construction Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Construction Materials

Code

KTA303

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Maja Kliškić

Credits (ECTS)

2.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective of this course is to achieve a knowledge and understanding of a wide variety of construction materials and their properties and their importance of practical applications; fundamentals of corrosion processes and corrosion protection, and methods of corrosion testing and prevention. This course will provide student to acquire an orderly pattern of thought in solving practical corrosion problems in a critical and creative manner.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Construction Materials
The condition for taking the exam: Completed the course ” Exercises in Construction Materials ”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- differentiate of various types of structural materials due to their composition, properties and applications
- explain the advantages and disadvantages of the main structural materials
- evaluate the resistance of materials for any given conditions
- define and classify the corrosion processes
- perform the corrosion tests
- ascertain and select the most effective corrosion protection system for any given conditions – project related and on-site if appropriate – and evaluate its durability

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Materials as the basis for the development of modern civilization. Economic and technological aspects. Distribution of construction materials with regard to the composition, properties and application.
2nd week: Structure of materials.
3rd week: Physical and chemical properties of construction materials.
4th week: Mechanical properties. Norms.
5th week: Behavior of materials under different conditions of exploatation.
6th week: The main metal materials and their applications. Iron, carbon and low alloy high alloyed steels. Non-ferrous metals and alloys.
7th week: Inorganic non-metallic materials. The organic construction materials. Composite materials.
8th week: First test
9th week: The definition of the economic importance of corrosion. Chemical corrosion of metals and alloys.
10th week: The types of corrosion attack.
11th week: Corrosion under specific conditions: in the atmosphere, water, soil, sea water, melt, biocorrosion, corrosion by stray currents.
12th week: Methods of protection. Ecological approach to the design of corrosion protection. Changing the properties of corrosion environment.
13th week: Protection by changing the electrode potential. Surface protection. Corrosion tests.
14th week: Classification and standardization of methods. Methods of testing in the laboratory. Tests on the model, the ongoing exploatation of the field.
15th week: Second test.
Monitor of atmospheric corrosion, Polarization of iron in sulphuric acid solution, Determination of efficiency of corrosion inhibitors by thermometric method, Cathodic protection of metal by protector, Investigation of oxide films formed on stainless steel, Field work in the laboratories of the Quality Insurance of Shipbuilding Industry Split, Field work in the company AD Plastik Split, Field work at the Institute IGH d.d.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 40% and exercises with 20%. On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: - 60% insufficient, 61 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Filetin, F. Kovačiček, J. Indof, Svojstva i primjena materijala, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje,Zagreb, 2007.

1

T. Filetin, Pregled razvoja i primjene suvremenih materijala, Hrvatsko društvo za materijale i tribologiju, Zagreb, 2000.

1

T. Filetin, Izbor materijala pri razvoju proizvoda, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje, Zagreb, 2006.

1

J.R. Davis, Corrosion – understanding the basic, ASM International, 2000.

1

B. Jarić, A. Rešetić, Korozija i katodna zaštita, Korexpres, Zagreb, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Uhlig’s Corrosion Handbook, 2nd edition, R.W. Revie (ed.), Pennington, New Yersey, 2000.
I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Tracking suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Evercises in Construction Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Evercises in Construction Materials

Code

KTA304

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

18

12

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Presentation of various types of construction materials and their properties relevant to their practical application; the fundamental processes of corrosion and protection of materials as well as methods for testing and control of corrosion processes. The course will teach students to acquire creative approach to solving the problems caused by corrosion in order to protect the environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Construction Materials

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completion of the training, students are expected to know:
- Select appropriate methods of testing mechanical properties of materials
- Distinguish practical methods to protect metals from corrosion
- Calculate the velocity of corrosion
- Graphic display test results, correctly interpret them and draw appropriate conclusions.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Monitor of atmospheric corrosion
2. Polarization of iron in sulphuric acid solution
3. Determination of efficiency of corrosion inhibitors by thermometric method.
4. Cathodic protection of metal by protector
5. Investigation of oxide films formed on stainless steel
6. Field work in the laboratories of the Quality Insurance of Shipbuilding Industry Split
7. Field work in the company AD Plastik Split.
8. Field work at the Institute IGH d.d.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

laboratory exercises, field work, writing reports

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Preliminary exams, writing reports.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Lj. Aljinović, Vježbe iz konstrukcijskih materijala i zaštite, Tehnološki fakultet, Split, 1991.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Martinez i I. Štern, Korozija i zaštita – eksperimentalne metode, Hinus, Zagreb 1999.
I Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Udžbenik Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb 2003.
M. Kliškić, L. Vrsalović, Vježbe iz tehnologije površinske zaštite, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Keeping records of student attendance; student survey in order to evaluate teachers, self-evaluation of teachers, feedback from students who have already graduated to relevance of curriculum.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry

Code

KTA305

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

5.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge about the basics of technological processes of inorganic industry and the significance of technological processes in the economy and the practical implementation, with particular emphasis on the economy and sustainable development setting.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students gain theoretical and practical knowledge of basic technological processes and allows them to be independent:
- Systematize the basic technological processes
- Interpret technological processes through conceptual, ideological and procedural and process diagrams
Knowledge of:
- Modes of combustion and fuel quality, and necessary calculations
- Basic catalytic inorganic processes
- Fundamentals of crystallization and precipitation of inorganic salts and obtaining, displays a two, three - and four component system using diagrams
- Procedures for the preparation of process water: flocculation and sedimentation, water softening, demineralization - ion exchange, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction, course content, basic definitions, basic technological processes and systematization display processes using diagrams, processes and sustainable development
Week 2: Oxidation and reduction processes during the combustion parameters of judgment of quality fuel stoichiometric ratio of fuel to air-surplus costs, the amount and composition of flue gas, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium processes and mechanisms at combustion
Week 3: Examples of industrial gases and combustion of liquid fuels, chemical
Breeding of solid fuel, the oxidation of sulfur, nitrogen and phosphorus, and obtaining of inorganic acids
Week 4: Processes of oxidation and reduction in electrochemical processes, electrolysis of molten electrolyte, basic catalytic inorganic processes;
Week 5: Seminar (tasks): fuel, industrial electrolysis, basic catalytic processes
Week 6: Hydrogenation processes and the synthesis of ammonia
Week 7: I. Partial colloquium, processes of dissolution and crystallization (precipitation) in aqueous systems
Week 8: Three-component systems and the balance in three component systems
Week 9: Four-component systems and their representations
10th week: Basic processes of extraction and separation of mineral salts, getting
of KNO3, kaustification of soda,
11th week: Aqueous dispersion of colloids, flocculation and sedimentation of colloids
Week 12: Basic processes in the procedures for the preparation of water in industry-depositional processes
13th week: Seminar (tasks): processes of melting and crystallization in multicomponent systems, decarbonisation and softening water demineralisation
Week 14: demineralization of water, processes with ion exchange, reverse
osmosis and electrodialysis
Week 15: II. Partial preliminary examination, repetition of important issues relevant to the course
oral exam

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
Written examination can be laid across two exams during the semester. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 20%, oral exam with 50% and the presence of lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of the final grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed one colloquium, it is recognized as part of the exam (20% score). The remaining part is laid in the regular examination periods.
Students who did not pass any colloquium, written exam in the regular examination periods laid the whole subject matter. Prague passing is 60% and a written examination form part of the assessment with 40%.
Rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Krolo, P. Dabić, D. Barbir, Praktikum iz tehnoloških procesa anorganske industrije, nastavni tekstovi za predavanja i vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet Split, 2014.

1

Web-KTF-a

R. Krstulović, Tehnološki procesi anorganske industrije, Sveučilište Split, Tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 1986.

3

J. A. Moulin, M. Makkee, A. E. Van Diepeen, Chemical Process Technology, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, 2013.

1

Encyclopedia of separation technology, vol I-II., Ed., D. M. Rurhven, A. Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1997.

1

Gray, N. F., Water Technology, 2nd ed., Elsevier Science & Technology Books, Amsterdam, 2005.

1

M. L. Souza-Santos, Solid fuels combustion and gasification: modeling, simulation, and equipment operations, CRC Press, New York, 2010.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. N. Lalena, D. A. Cleary, Principles of Inorganic Materials Design, John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey, 2005.
McAllister, S., Chen, J. Y., Fernandez-Pello, A. C., Fundamentals of Combustion Processes, Springer, New York, 2011.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Keeping records of class attendance
- Annual Performance analysis Examination
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry

Code

KTA306

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Damir Barbir

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Practical application of basic technological processes with the given conditions.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exercises student gets the basic knowledge on the:
- practical application and
- implementation of basic technological processes under the conditions of work with respect to
- conversion,
- spatial and
- temporal utilization of reactor control and analysis processes and
- analyzing the results.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Determination of calorific value of solid (liquid) fuel.
Electrolytic preparation of zinc in the form of a compact cathode product.
Obtaining of sodium chlorate by electrochemical oxidation.
Contact process for the catalytic oxidation of SO2 to SO3 to obtain sulfuric acid.
Processes of double excange - causticising soda and getting a base.
Chemical sedimentation with coagulation and decarbonization.
Water treatment processes of decarbonization with lime (fast reactor).
Decarbonization with lime and ion exchange with neutral Na-exchanger in the preparation or softening water.
Demineralization and deionization of water using ion exchangers.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at 100% of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Exercises can be activated after passing oral exams for every exercise. The assessment exercises included knowledge of oral exams (10%), report writing (10%) and commitment during the experimental work in the laboratory (80%). Laboratory work involved in assessing a share of 20%. Rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Krolo, P. Dabić, D. Barbir, Praktikum iz tehnoloških procesa anorganske industrije, Interna skripta, Split, 2014.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Teacher level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Technological processes in organic industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Technological processes in organic industry

Code

KTA307

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Credits (ECTS)

5.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to acquaint students with technological processes of refining of petroleum and natural gas for the production of fuels and lubricants and selected petrochemicals, as well as the processes of conversion of petrochemicals in the intermediate and/or final products with respect to economic, environmental and safety conditions in industrial production.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Technological processes in organic industry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student should be able to:
- explain the specifics of the organic chemical industry
- describe the of primary and secondary processes of petroleum processing
- describe the processes of petroleum products refining
- specify the basic petroleum products and their characteristics
- describe technological processes of conversion of selected petrochemicals in the intermediates and / or products
- sketch diagrams of selected technological processes
- synthesize chemical engineering knowledge on the examples of industrial processes in modern organic chemical industry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Characteristics and significance of the organic chemical industry. The development of the organic chemical industry
2nd week: Petrochemical raw materials and products. World production and consumption of oil and natural gas; an estimation of remaining oil reserves
3rd week: Classification and characteristics of chemical reactions and processes; Chemical reactors; optimization of chemical processes; economy and ecology of chemical processes
4th week: Petroleum: energent, petrochemicals source. Origin, exploration, drilling and transportation of petroleum. Chemical composition and properties of petroleum.
5th week: Processes and products of petroleum processing. The primary petroleum refining processes: distillation processes
Written test (first)
6th week: The secondary petroleum refining processes: thermal processes - cracking, visbreaking, coking;
7th week: Catalytic processes - cracking, hydrocracking, reforming, isomerization, oligomerization, alkylation)
8th week: Refining processes of petroleum fractions: specially treating of the fuels and lubricating oils (sweeting, deasphalting, dewaxing, furfural extraction, hydrofining process).
9th week: Oxidation processes-removal of sulfur compounds; Bitumen production.
10th week: The basic petroleum products.
Written test (second)
11th week: Natural gas: exploration and processing
12th week: Processes of production of components for organic synthesis: Production of alkanes. Methane. Syngas, production and applications. Methanol. Formaldehyde. Acetic acid. Fisher-Tropsch synthesis.
13th week: Production of alkenes: pyrolysis of hydrocarbons. Chemicals from C4 and C5 fraction. Oligomerization of ethylene. Uses of ethylene: acetaldehyde, ethylene oxide, ethylene glycol.
14th week: Uses of C4 hydrocarbons. Acetylene. Production of aromatic hydrocarbons. Separation BTX hydrocarbons. Uses of the aromatic hydrocarbons: phenol, styrene.
15th week: Polymers and polymerization processes (chain and step polymerization reactions). Production of polyethylene.
Written test (third)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

3.5

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

CONTINUOUS EVALUATION
The complete exam can be passed through three partial tests during semester.
Attendance on lectures, A1(successfulness =70 -100 %), share in grade, k1 =0,10
1st test, A2 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k3 =0,30
2nd test, A3 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k4 =0,30
3rd test, A4 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k4 =0,30
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,30A2 + 0,30A3+ 0,30A4
FINAL EVALUATION
Students who did not take or pass partial tests have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods.
Activitie A1 is evaluated in the same way as indicated above.
Written exam, A5 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k5 =0,45
Oral exam, A6 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k6 =0,45
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+ 0,45A5 + 0,45A6
FINAL GRADE: successful (60% – 70 %), good (71% – 80 %), very good (81% – 90 %), excellent (91% – 100 %).
In the case that student passed only one or two tests during continuous evaluation, he/she have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods. The passed test will be recognized by the end of the academic year as a part of the written exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Stipanelov Vrandečić, Tehnološki proces organske industrije, nastavni materijali u obliku PPT prezentacija, 2013.

0

web KTF-a

I. Klarić, (I. dio), interna skripta, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2008.

1

web knjižnica KTF-a

Z. Janović, Naftni i petrokemijski procesi i proizvodi, Hrvatsko društvo za goriva i maziva, Zagreb, 2005.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

N. P. Cheremisinoff, Handbook of Chemical Processing Equipment, Buterworth Heinemann, Boston, 2000.
S. Matar, L. F. Hatch, Chemistry of Petrochemical Processes, 2nd edition, Gulf Publ. Co., Boston, 2001.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Technological Processes in Organic Industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Technological Processes in Organic Industry

Code

KTA308

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The course prepares students to conduct the technological processes in laboratory scale with quality control of raw materials and products.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Technological Processes in Organic Industry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student should be able to:
- conduct technological process in laboratory scale
- perform an analysis of raw materials and products
- interpret collected data and measurement results
- participate in team work and to present results of investigation

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1: Fuels, lubricants and other petroleum products (standard testing methods)
Exercise 2: Intermediates and industrial chemicals (dehydrogenation of ethanol to acetaldehyde, oxidation of paraffin waxes in the fatty acids, esterification - synthesis of dibutylphthalate)
Exercise 3: The synthesis of dyes and dyeing of fibers (dyes analysis)
Exercise 4: Oils and fats, and surfactants (soap preparations; analysis of liquid and powder detergents)
Exercise 5: Polymers and polymerization: analysis of PVC powder, K-value, thermal degradation of PVC in the blends; synthesis of polymer (step polymerization and chain polymerization)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The student is required to pass a colloquium before each exercise.
The student is required to prepare a report after performed exercise.
Success threshold for each activity is 60%.
FINAL GRADE: successful (60% – 70 %), good (71% – 80 %), very good (81% – 90 %), excellent (91% – 100 %).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Kovačić: Vježbe iz Tehnoloških procesa organske industrije, (1 do 5) (dopunjeno izdanje), Zavod za organsku tehnologiju Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2000

1

web KTF-a

I. Klarić, Vježbe iz polimerizacije (za internu upotrebu), Tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split 1990.;

1

web KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Industry and the Environment
NAME OF THE COURSE Industry and the Environment

Code

KTA309

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The students get insight into the basic processes that take place in hydrosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere, and explain the basic physical, physico-chemical and biological processes as well as the selection of process equipment for processing waste streams from industry to protect the environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Industry and the Environment

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Explain the cycles processes of in hydrosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere
- Sources of air pollution
- Sources of pollution of the hydrosphere
- Methods and process equipment to prevent emissions from industrial sources in the environment
- Methods and procedures for waste management.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Industrial development and environment. Principles of sustainable development.
2nd week: Technology, raw materials and energy in the process of production planning.
3rd week: Ecosystems in nature. Industrial sources of pollutants in atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere.
4th week: Properties of atmosphere. Air pollutants and global climate changes.
5th week: Methods and equipment for prevention of atmospheric pollution.
6th week: Solid waste. Waste management.
7th week: Waste disposal. Recycling and recovery.
8th week: Mechanical and biological treatment.
9th week: Energetic value of solid wastes. Biogas production.
10th week: Hydrological cycle. Pollution and contamination of natural waters.
11th week: Depuration and eutrophication.
12th week: Physical, chemical and biological indicators of water pollution.
13th week: Sources of wastewaters. Methods and procedures of wastewater treatment.
14th week: Mechanical, physicochemical and biological treatments
15th week: Tertiary treatment. Examples of technological solutions for wastewater treatments in chemical industry.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.3

Oral exam

0.2

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Overall assessment can be applied over three written tests and one oral assessment. Written tests are related to material adopted on lectures. Ratings on the written exams: 60-69% is sufficient, 70-79% good, 80-89% is very good, 90-100% excellent. Students who have not passed the exam through the assessment should have the regular exam. Regular exam means written test and oral exam. The rating, which is entered in the index, is the mean score of written tests.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

H.D. Sharma and S.P. Lewis, Waste Containment System, Waste Stabilization, and Landfills, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 1994.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, HDGI, Zagreb, 1997

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

R.T. Wright, B.J. Nebel, Environmental Science, 9th edition, Prentice Hall Inc, New Jersey, 2004.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

N.G. Wung Jern, Industrial Wastewater Treatment, Imperial College Press, London, 2006.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Consultation with students
- Continuous writing assessment
- Results on the written knowledge tests
- Student’s questionnaire.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Industry and Environment
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Industry and Environment

Code

KTA310

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The students get insight into the basic laboratory methods of identification of environmental pollution.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Industry and the Environment

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Determine the content of organic matter in the water and wastewater
- Determine the physico-chemical parameters of water quality
- Assess the possibility of using solid waste for the purpose of obtaining energy
- Determine the content of harmful substances in the atmosphere.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1: Determination of dissolved oxygen in the water.
Exercise 2: Determination of COD and BOD values in different aqueous samples.
Exercise 3: Simulation of aerobic biodegradation of organic matter in wastewater.
Exercise 4: Testing the chemical stability of solid wastes of different origin.
Exercise 5. Visiting monitoring station for air pollution control, statistical data processing. Visiting of landfill. Visiting device (scrubber) to prevent emissions into the environment.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.7

Report

0.1

0.1

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The requirement for admission of laboratory exercises is passed oral exam for exercise. Overall rating of laboratory practice includes evaluating oral exams, exercise performance, and report writing. Ratings of oral exercise exams are: 60-69% - sufficient, 70-79% - good, 80-89% - very good, 90-100% -excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Internal material for laboratory exercises

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Consultation with students
- Continuous writing assessment
- Student’s questionnaire.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Inorganic Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Inorganic Materials

Code

KTA311

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be able to assess the relationship between structure and properties of selected inorganic non-metallic materials as an important prerequisite for their production, control and application with special emphasis on chemical engineering and environmental aspects, economic efficiency and sustainable development.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Inorganic Materials

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students will be able to:
1. Distinguish and explain the physical and chemical conditions of the genesis of mineral resources.
2. Classify ceramic materials with respect to their properties and applications.
3. Predict the inter-relationship between microstructure, properties and production of ceramic materials.
4. Explain the characteristics and behavior of clay minerals in a water-clay system depending on the structure of clay minerals.
5. Explain the difference in the structure of ceramics depending on the processes of drying and firing (sintering).
6. Distinguish and explain the mechanisms of hydration, setting and hardening of mineral binders.
7. Assess the impact of the environment (weathering) on the resistance and durability of technical glass and decorative stone, including historic and cultural heritage monuments.
8. Explain the difference between the natural and synthetic inorganic pigments.
9. Evaluate and propose protection measures in order to improve the durability of selected inorganic non-metallic materials.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Historical overview, development and meaning of the commercial inorganic non-metallic materials industry (clay wares, refractories, porcelain, technical glasses, cement, concrete, etc.).
2nd week: Sources of raw materials. The earth’s crust, rocks, minerals, the environment, conditions and processes of mineral genesis. Classification of minerals and rocks.
3rd week: Silicates, oxides and other minerals Structure and properties.
4th week: Ceramic materials. Traditional (classical) and advanced (high-tech) ceramics. Resemblances and differences.
5th week: Raw materials for traditional ceramics and demands for their quality. Phase diagrams of the systems important in ceramics.
6th week: Raw materials for advanced ceramics and demands for their quality. Pure oxide ceramics. Non-oxide ceramics. Bioceramics.
7th week: The water-clay system. Characterization of ceramic slurries (reological properties, thixotropy, plasticity, etc.). Forming processes (slip casting, pressing, jiggering, extrusion, etc.). Drying and firing (sintering).
8th week: A high-temperature reactions and sintering processes in the traditional and advanced ceramics production.
9th week: The written knowledge tests (I Colloquium).
10th week: Glass. Structure and classification of glass. A property of glass melts. Glass forming operations and equipment.
11th week: Overview and properties of particular types of ceramics (porcelain, cements, refractories, technical glass). Flow diagrams of chosen inorganic material production with special reference to the physical and chemical base of the processes, equipment and environmental aspects.
12th week: Technical and decorative stone. Stone types, properties and exploiting.
13th week: The impact of aggressive environment on the durabilty of ceramics, technical glass and decorative stone including historic and cultural heritage monuments.
14th week: Inorganic pigments. Natural and synthetic. Overview and properties of particular pigments.
15th week: The written knowledge tests (II Colloquium).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two (2) partial tests during the semester. Test passing score is 60%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of theoretical (oral) and written part. Exam passing score is 60%..
Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, 93% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013., (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

1

www.ktf-split.hr

J. Zelić, Engineering of Selected Inorganic Materials / Inženjerstvo odabranih anorganskih materijala (na engleskom jeziku), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013, (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali).

1

www.ktf-split.hr

J. Zelić, Engineering of Selected Inorganic Materials / Inženjerstvo odabranih anorganskih materijala (na engleskom jeziku), Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, 2014., u postupku recenzije.

0

J. Zelić, Z. Osmanović, Čvrstoća i trajnost cementnih kompozita, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, 2014., ISBN 978-953-7803-01-8.

1

www.ktf-split.hr

Z. Osmanović, J. Zelić, Proizvodnja Portland-cementa, Univerzitetski udžbenik, Univerzitet u Tuzli, B&H, Tuzla, 2010., ISBN 978-9958-897-04-7.

5

http://www.knjiga.ba/proizvodnja_portlandj_cementa-k7412.htm

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Kolumbić, M. Dunđer, Materijali, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Rijeci, 2011., ISBN 978-953-6104-85-7.
M. Tecilazić-Stevanović, Osnovi tehnologije keramike, Univerzitet u Beogradu, Tehnološko-metalurški fakultet, Beograd, 1990., YU ISBN 86-7401-065-2.
C. Saiz-Jimenez (Ed.), Air pollution and Cultural Heritage, Taylor & Francis Group, London, 2004, ISBN 90 5809 682 3.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) Faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Inorganic Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Inorganic Materials

Code

KTA312

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

10

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Qualifying students to analyze the chemical and physical processes at different stages of production of inorganic non-metallic materials including ecological aspects, quality control and quality assurance.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Inorganic Materials

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course the student will be able to:
1. Conduct experiments on laboratory measuring equipment.
2. Perform measurements independently and within a team.
3. To analyze the chemical and/or physical processes according to preset conditions and material properties.
4. Interpret the results of experiments.
5 Create systems, system components and processes under defined conditions.
6. Recommendation of process parameters in order to optimize processes in the particular phases of selected inorganic non-metallic materials production.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Determination of exchange capacity of clays. Characterisation of clay.
2. Application of thermal analysis (DTA-TG-DTG) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in the analysis of non-metallic materials.
3. Determination of porosity of the sintered ceramic body. Manufacturing ceramics by slip-casting technique in laboratory scale.
4. Determination of ”Mediterranean patinas” on the marble and limestone monuments including historic and cultural heritage monuments.
5. Determination of chemical resistance of inorganic pigments.
6. Field work - visit technological facilities of inorganic industry.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Implementation and analysis of selected processes according to preset conditions.
Each student is required to attend laboratory practice and field work (100%). On completion of all exercises the final written exam is obligated.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.2

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.3

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

0.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Successful completion of laboratory works has share 60% and the final written exam 40% score. Exam passing score is 60%. Grades: 60% - 70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, and 93% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

1

www.ktf-split.hr

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Kolumbić, M. Dunđer, Materijali, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Rijeci, 2011., ISBN 978-953-6104-85-7.
M. Tecilazić-Stevanović, Osnovi tehnologije keramike, Univerzitet u Beogradu, Tehnološko-metalurški fakultet, Beograd, 1990., YU ISBN 86-7401-065-2.
C. Saiz-Jimenez (Ed.), Air pollution and Cultural Heritage, Taylor & Francis Group, London, 2004, ISBN 90 5809 682 3.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) Faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Electrodeposition
NAME OF THE COURSE Electrodeposition

Code

KTA313

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To familiarize students with the basic principles of electrodeposition.
Introduce students with the practical problems and applications of electrodeposition.
Acquisition of basic theoretical and practical knowledge which are necessary for work in electroplating facilities.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Electrodeposition
The condition for taking the exam: Completed the course ”Exercises in Electrodeposition”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After successfully passing the exam, students will be able to:
1. Select the most appropriate metal coating for the corresponding metal surfaces.
2. Distinguish all process parameters that affect the quality of metal coatings.
3. Independently run or monitor the electroplating process.
4. Identify the causes of the occurrence of errors on the coating and find appropriate solutions.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction. Tehnological process of obtaining galvanic and chemical coatings. Metal deposition on cathode.
Week 2: electrocrystallization. The current distribution and metal deposits on the cathode.
Week 3: The sedimentary power of electrolytes.
Week 4: Preparation of specimen for metallic coatings deposition. Mechanical, chemical and electrochemical preparation.
Week 5: Electroplating. The composition of the bath. Material and shape of anodes for electroplating. Temperature and bath convection.
Week 6: Current types and current density. Sources of current and facilities for electroplating.
Week 7: The most important processes of metals electroplating. Tin electroplating.
Week 8: I partial knowledge test. Zinc electroplating.
Week 9: Nickel electroplating.
Week 10: Copper electroplating. Chrome electroplating.
Week 11: Causes of coating errors in metals plating. Electroplating with noble metals.
Week 12: Manufacturing of metallic coatings by hot metal coating processes. The coatings obtained by diffusion processes.
Week 13: Electroplating of non-metallic substrates. Electroplating objects made by plastic ABS-materials. Electroplating objects made by porous materials.
Week 14: Electroforming.
Week 15 Water in electrodeposition procesess. II. partial knowledge test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures, tests

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-78% good (3); 79-90% very good (4); 91-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Gojić, površinska obradba materijala, Metalurški fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Sisak, 2010.

2

E. Stupnišek Lisac, Korozija i zaštita konstrukcijskih materijala, FKIT Zagreb, 2007.

1

M. Schlesinger, M. Paunović, Modern electroplating, IV. edition, J. Wiley & Sons, USA, 2000.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Esih, Z. Dugi, Tehnologija zaštite od korozije, Školska knjiga, Zagreb,1990.
I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2003.
D.A. Jones, Principles and Prevention of Corrosion, 2nd Ed. Prentice Hall, Upper Sadle River, 1996.
M. Paunović, M. Schlesinger, Fundamentals of electrochemical deposition, J. Wiley & sons, USA 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Keeping record so students attendance; annual analysis of the exam results; students survey in order to evaluate teachers; self-evaluation of teachers, feedback from students who have already graduated to relevance of curriculum.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Electrodeposition
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Electrodeposition

Code

KTA314

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

12

3

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To familiarize students with the basic principles of electrodeposition.
To present students the practical problems and applications of electrodeposition.
Students will acquire the basic theoretical and practical knowledge important for a work in electroplating facilities.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Electrodeposition

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completion of the training, students are expected to know:
- Distinguish different methods of production metal coatings.
- Select the most suitable metalic coating for the corresponding metal surfaces.
- Independently calculate the required process parameters for conducting the electroplating.
- Determine the thickness of the obtained metallic coatings.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Nickel electroplating
2. Copper electroplating
3. Influence of additives on electrodeposition of bright nickel.
4. Determination of mechanisms of coumarin adsorption on Pt-electrode.
5. Electroless formation of metallic coatings.
6. Field work in hot dip galvanizing facility Adriacink d.o.o.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

laboratory exercises, field work, writing reports

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

0.5

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Preliminary exams, writing reports.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Radošević, S. Gudić, Procesi galvanotehnike, upute za vježbe, kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet 1999.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. A. Poyner, Electroplating, Argus Books Ltd., England 1991.;
I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje, Zagreb 2003.;
G. O. Mallory, J. B. Hajdu, Electroless plating: fundamentals and applications, Noyes Publications Mnlliam Andrew Publishing, LLC, New York, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Keeping records of student attendance; student survey in order to evaluate teachers, self-evaluation of teachers, feedback from students who have already graduated to relevance of curriculum.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater
NAME OF THE COURSE Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater

Code

KTA315

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Vanja Martinac

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Through the program of lectures the students master the knowledge of basic properties of seawater and methods of exploiting mineral raw materials from seawater.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students are expected to:
- explain and discern physical and chemical properties of seaware
- discern macro and micro constituents in seawater
- describe separation of certain salts at isothermal evaporation of seawater
- describe technological processes of extracting mineral raw materials (magnesium, sodium chloride, bromine and fresh water) from seawater

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. week: Seawater – a source of mineral raw materials.
2. week: The basic properties of seawater.
3. week: Physical and chemical characteristics of the seawater.
4. week: Composition of seawater. Classification of components dissolved in seawater.
5. week: Concentration and chemical forms of elements in seawater.
6. week: Constant ratios of major components of seawater.
7. week: Minor components of seawater.
8. week: Isothermal evaporation of seawater and separation of certain salts.
9. week: The effect of climactic and other factors on the evaporation process.
10. week: Evaporation of concentrated sea bittern.
11. week: Possibilities of technological exploitation of seawater.
12. week: Extraction of common salt.
13. week: Extraction of bromine from seawater.
14. week: Recovery of magnesium and magnesium compounds from seawater.
15. week: Extraction of fresh water from the seawater – desalination processes.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance to lectures for 80% of the total number of hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Attendance to lectures is registered (not included in the rating). An oral exam is held in the examination periods. The oral exam is mandatory for all students.
Ratings: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 71%-80% - good, 81%-90% - very good,
91%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

F. J. Millero, Chemical Oceanography, 3th Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2005.

1

V. Martinac, Magnezijev oksid iz morske vode, on line (2010-12-13), Sveučilišni priručnik, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

0

on line

Desalination, Trends and Technologies, Ed by M. Schorr (on line 2011-02-28), InTechOpen, 2011.

0

on line

M. J. Kennish, Practical Handbook of Marine Science, 3rd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2001.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

M. E. Q. Pilson, Introduction to the Chemistry of the Sea, 2st edition, Prentice Hall, 2013.
K. Stowe, Exploring Ocean Science, Wiley, New York, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater

Code

KTA316

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

11

4

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Through a program of exercises, students gain practical knowledge needed to master the laboratory techniques for chemical analysis of seawater, as well as practical knowledge of the methods of exploitation of mineral raw materals from seawater.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students are expected to:
- carry out the analysis of seawater for the content of calcium and magnesium independently according to work instructions
- carry out the analysis of seawater for the boron content independently according to work instructions
- determine the CO2 content in seawater independently according to work instructions
- describe technological processes of recovery of magnesium oxide from seawater
- describe technological processes of extraction of common salt from seawater

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

During exercises, seawater is chemically analysed for the content of calcium, magnesium, boron and free CO2. Practical knowledge is obtained of technological processes of extracting mineral raw materials (magnesium oxide and sodium chloride) from seawater. List of Exercises:
Exercise 1. Analysis of seawater for its content of magnesium oxide and calcium oxide,
Exercise 2. Analysis of seawater for its content of CO2,
Exercise 3. Determination of boron in seawater,
Exercise 4. Recovery of magnesium oxide from seawater (seawater pretreatment, precipitation with 80% of the stoichiometric quantity of dolomite lime, washing and filtration, calcinations of magnesium hydroxide, chemical analysis of magnesium oxide from seawater),
Exercise 5. The visit to industrial plant – salt works - extraction of common salt from seawater.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Full attendance to exercises and field work (100% of the total number of hours).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.2

Report

0.2

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

0.4

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester students have to perform exercises (lab and field work). After performing exercises followed by treatment of the experimental results and preparation of reports. Finally completed students take the oral examination of the material covered by the exercises. Experimental part of the work in the lab scored with 30% of the final assessment report after completion of the exercise with 2%, and the final oral exam with 60%.
Ratings: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 71%-80% - good, 81%-90% - very good,
91%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

V. Martinac, M. Labor, More kao izvor mineralnih sirovina, laboratorijske vježbe (on line 2011-01-18), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2011.

0

on line

V. Martinac, Magnezijev oksid iz morske vode (on line 2010-12-13), Sveučilišni priručnik, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

0

on line

M. E. Q. Pilson, Introduction to the Chemistry of the Sea, 2st edition, Prentice Hall, 2013.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Construction Materials and Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Construction Materials and Protection

Code

KTA317

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Presentation of various types of construction materials and their properties relevant to their practical application; the fundamental processes of corrosion and protection of materials as well as methods for testing and control of corrosion processes. The course will teach students to acquire creative approach to solving the problems caused by corrosion in order to protect the environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Construction Materials and Protection

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completion of the training, students are expected to know:
- Select appropriate methods of testing mechanical properties of materials
- Distinguish practical methods to protect metals from corrosion
- Calculate the velocity of corrosion
- Graphic display test results, correctly interpret them and draw appropriate conclusions.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Monitor of atmospheric corrosion
2. Polarization of iron in sulphuric acid solution
3. Determination of efficiency of corrosion inhibitors by thermometric method.
4. Cathodic protection of metal by protector
5. Investigation of oxide films formed on stainless steel
6. Field work in the laboratories of the Quality Insurance of Shipbuilding Industry Split
7. Field work in the company AD Plastik Split.
8. Field work at the Institute IGH d.d.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

laboratory exercises, field work, writing reports

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Preliminary exams, writing reports.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, HDKI-Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 1997.

5

B. Andričić, Polimerni materijali, predavanja.

1

Web knjižnica KTF-a

B. Andričić, Prirodni polimerni materijali, Priručnik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2008.

1

Web knjižnica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

T. A. Oswald, G. Menges, Material Science of Polymers for Engineers, Hanser Publ., Munich, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Keeping records of student attendance; student survey in order to evaluate teachers, self-evaluation of teachers, feedback from students who have already graduated to relevance of curriculum.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Polymeric Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Polymeric Materials

Code

KTA318

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

12

3

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining of basic theoretical and practical knowledge on origin and properties of polymeric materials, their structure, properties and application.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Polymeric Materials

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- be able to explain temperature dependent behaviour of polymers
- distinguish dissolving of polymers vs. low molecular substances
- be acquainted with common thermoplastics and thermoset materials
- distinguish synthetic and natural polymers
- be able to prepare simple polymer blend or composite
- explain the factors influencing degradation of polymers

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. World consumption of plastics. Historical development of plastic materials. Basic terms and classification of polymers.
2nd week: Molecular and supermolecular structure of polymers: configuration and conformations of polymers. Supermolecular structure and morphology.
3rd week: Physical and deformational states of polymers. Thermomechanical curve.
Mechanical properties of polymers. Stress-elongation curves. Temperature dependence of elongation.
4th week: Dissolving of polymers. Swelling of polymers. Polyelectrolytes and ionomers.
5th week: Classification of polymers based on origin. Synthetic organic polymers: application based classification, abbreviations, pyramid of thermoplastic materials.
6th week: PE, PP, EVA, PVC: properties and application.
7th week: PS and copolymers (HIPS, ABS, SAN, MBS): properties and application. First test.
8th week: Principles of impact strength modification by styrene copolymers and terpolymers. PET, PA: properties and application. Thermosets: epoxide resins, unsaturated polyester resins, vinyl-ester resins).
9th week: Phenol-formaldehide resins. Curing reaction of thermosets. Elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers. Naturally occurring polymers. Cellulose and derivates.
10th week: Starch and other polysaccharides. Protein structure. Natural caoutchouc and derivates. Vulcanization and mastication. Rubber.
11th week: Inorganic polymeric materials. Liquid crystalline polymers. Biodegradable polymers. High temperature polymers.
12th week: Cellulose fibres. Protein fibres. Synthetic fibres. Behaviour of fibres on burning. Adhesives. Polymer coatings.
13th week: Additives for polymers. Degradation of polymers: heat and UV stabilizers. Antioxidants. Plasticizers. Anti-static agents.
14th week: Polymer blends. Composites with polymer matrix. Recycling and reuse of plastics and rubber.
15th week: An overview. Second test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

0.3

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 50%. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%). Written exam is 50% and oral exam is 50%.
Grades: successful (60% – 70%), good (71% – 80%), very good (81% – 90%), excellent (91% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Svim studentima osigurana je interna skripta za vježbe.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Processing of Plastics and Rubber
NAME OF THE COURSE Processing of Plastics and Rubber

Code

KTA319

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Understanding the modern methods of plastics and rubber processing
- Understanding the modern methods of recovery of plastic and rubber waste
- Implementation of the adopted basic knowledge in finding optimal solutions in the processing and recycling of plastics and rubber

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Processing of Plastics and Rubber

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- identify and compare the properties and behavior of the polymers during processing and application
- explain the importance of polymer additives
- explain the most important methods of polymer processing
- explain the difference between plastic and rubber
- choose the optimal method for recovery of plastic and rubber waste

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Historical development plastics and rubber processing methods. The nomenclature of the polymer. Introduction to the structure and processing of polymers.
2nd week: Types of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers.
3rd week: Mechanical and thermal properties of polymers.
4th week: The rheological properties of the polymers.
5th week: Additives to polymers. Processing procedures.
6th week: Primary shaping procedures. Continuous processes: calendering, continuous coating.
7th week: Primary shaping procedures. Continuous processes: extrusion. coextrusion.
8th week: Primary shaping processes. Discontinuous: casting, sintering, compression molding, transfer molding.
9th week: Primary shaping processes. Discontinuous: injection molding. Specific injection molding procedures (gas assisted injection moulding, inserts in plastic mouldings, structural foam, pultrusion).
10th week: Secondary shaping procedures: warm and cold secondary shaping, blowing, drawing, shrinkage.
11th week: Bonding, welding. Surface improvement of plastics.
12th week: Production of foamed and reinforced (composite) plastics.
13th week: Methods of recovery of plastic waste: material (mechanical, chemical, a solvent) and energy. Disposal of plastic waste.
14th week: Rubber, elastomeric material, vulcanisate. Natural and synthetic rubber. Methods of rubber processing: mastication, vulcanization.
15th week: Design and manufacture of rubber tires. Recycling of tires and rubber regeneration.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.7

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.7

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 45% in a final grade while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 40% and oral exam for 50%, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 50% and oral exam for 50% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. Rogić, I. Čatić, D. Godec, Polimeri i polimerne tvorevine, Društvo za plastiku i gumu, Zagreb, 2008.

2

I. Čatić, Uvod u proizvodnju polimernih tvorevina, Društvo plastičara i gumaraca, Zagreb, 1990.

1

M. Šercer, D. Opsenica, G. Barić, Oporaba plastike i gume, mtg topograf d.o.o., Zagreb, 2000.

1

A. Azapagic, A. Emsley, I. Hamerton, Polymers, The Environment and Sustainable Development, Wiley, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

H. F. Gilles, Jr., J. R. Wagner, Jr., E. M. Mount, III., Extrusion: The Definitive Processing Guide and Handbook, William Andrew, Inc., New York, 2005.; I. Čatić, F. Johannaber, Injekcijsko prešanje polimera i ostalih materijala, DPG i Katedra za preradu polimera Fakulteta strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2004.; Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa, Zagreb, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University Level, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercices in Processing of Plastics and Rubber
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercices in Processing of Plastics and Rubber

Code

KTA320

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

10

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Through laboratory and field classes introduce students to the most important methods of processing and recycling plastics and rubber.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Processing of Plastics and Rubber

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- select appropriate procedure for plastic and rubber processing depending on the desired product
- define the basic parameters of plastics and rubber processing
- monitor the parameters during the processing and recovery
- sort plastic and rubber waste

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1. Extrusion.
Exercise 2. Separation and identification of additives in polymer materials.
Exercise 3. Classification of plastic waste (manual method, float-sink method, by infrared spectroscopy).
Field work: Visit to factories AD Plastik Inc. Solin, Fornix Ltd., Dugi Rat, GUMIIMPEX Inc., Varaždin

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending laboratory exercices in the 100% amount.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.4

Report

0.1

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

0.2

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Oral examination is done before each laboratory exercise. The student activity in the laboratory is monitored and evaluated as well as the reports from exercises. Oral examination, laboratory work and report account for 40%, 30% and 30% of the final grade, respectively.
Rating: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Erceg, Oporaba plastike, Interna skripta za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2014.

0

Zavod za organsku tehnologiju

T. Kovačić, B. Andričić, Struktura i svojstva polimera, Interna skripta za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2007.

0

Zavod za organsku tehnologiju

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University Level, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Process of Precipitation and Crystallization
NAME OF THE COURSE Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Code

KTA321

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students acquire the basics of the different crystalline states and their arrangements as well as the fundamentals of the processes of nucleation, precipitation and crystallization under different experimental conditions (water solution and melts). The knowledge acquired to allow students applying acquired knowledge in composing reaction mixtures as well as control of the experimental conditions for obtaining the final materials required physical and chemical properties.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
- Able to choose on the base of the physical and chemical properties suitable solvent
- Can choose a suitable precipitant agent for providing the process of precipitation
- Know the basic methods and procedures of dissolutions, precipitation and crystallization
- Known procedures and methods of recrystallization and purification of the product
- Basic knowledge about the industrial equipment for the crystallization process

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week. The crystalline state (Liquids crystals, Crystalline solids, Crystal symmetry, Crystal systems, Miller indices)
2. Week. Space lattice, Solid state bonding, Isomorphs and polymorphs, Enentiomorphs and chirality,
3. Week. Cristal habit, Dendrites, Composite crystals and twins, Imperfections in crystals
4. Week. Physical and thermal properties (Density, Viscosity, Surface tension, Diffusivity, Refractive index, Electrolytic conductivity),
5. Week. Physical and thermal properties (Crystal hardness, Unit of heat, Heat capacity, Thermal conductivity, Boiling freezing and melting points, Enthalpies of phase change, Heats of solution and crystallization, Size classification of crystals)
6. Week. Solution and solubility (Solutions and melts, Solvent selection, Expression of solution composition, Solubility correlations, Theoretical crystal yield, Ideal and non-ideal solutions, Particle size and solubility,),
7. Week. Solution and solubility (Effect of impurities on solubility, Measurement of solubility, Prediction of solubility, Solubility data sources, Supersolubility), Phase equilibria (The phase rule, One-component systems, Two-component systems, Enthalpy-composition diagrams, Phase change detection)
8. Week. The First colloquium
9. Week. Phase equilibria (Three-component systems, Four-component systems, Dynamic phase diagrams)
10. Week. Nucleation (Primary nucleation, Secondary nucleation, Metastable zone widths, Effect of impurities, Induction and latent periods, Interfacial tension, Ostwald’s rule of stages),
11. Week. Crystal growth (Crystal growth theories, Growth rate measurements, Crystal growth and dissolution, Crystal habit modification, Polymorphs and phase transformations, Inclusions),
12. Week. Recrystallization (Recrystallization schemes, Resolution of racemates, Isolation of polymorphs, Recrystallization from supercritical fluids, Zone refining, Single crystals),
13. Week. Industrial techniques and equipment (Precipitation, Crystallization from melts, Sublimation, Crystallization from solution),
14. Week. Crystallizer design and operation (Crystal size distribution, Kinetic data measurement and utilization, Crystallizer specification, Fluid-particle suspension)
15. Week. The Second colloquium

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance at the lecture in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.6

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 50% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 40% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 50% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 25% and verbal has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and oral exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam and oral part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 50%-61% - sufficient, 62%-74% - good, 75%-87% very good, 88%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.W. Mullin, Crystallization, Fourth Edition, University of London, Butterworth-Heinemann, Linacre House, Jordan Hill, Oxford, 2001.

0

van V. Markov, Crystal growth for beginners, Fundamentals of Nucleation, Crystal Growth and Epitaxy, Word Scientific Publishing Co.Pte.Ltd. London, 1995.

0

C.M.Van t Land, Industrial Crystallization of Melts, Marcel Dekker, New York, 2005.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Tracking suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Code

KTA322

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students acquire the basics of the different crystalline states and their arrangements as well as the fundamentals of the processes of nucleation, precipitation and crystallization under different experimental conditions (water solution and melts).

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
- Able to choose on the base of the physical and chemical properties suitable solvent
- Can choose a suitable precipitant agent for providing the process of precipitation
- Know the basic methods and procedures of dissolutions, precipitation and crystallization
- Known procedures and methods of recrystallization and purification of the product
- Basic knowledge about the industrial equipment for the crystallization process

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Exercise. The processes of dissolution of inorganic salts.
2. Exercise. Funding for the precipitation and separation.
3. Exercise. Deposition processes in heterogeneous reaction systems.
4. Exercise. Separation and removal of salt.
5. Exercise. Crystallization from the melt.
6. Exercise. Crystallization from the gaseous phase.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance at the lecture in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.3

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Perry’s Chemical Engineers’ Handbook Seventh Edition, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., New York, 1997.

0

A. Mersmann, Crystallization tchnology handbook, Marcell Dekker, New York, 2001.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Tracking suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Code

KTA322

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students acquire the basics of the different crystalline states and their arrangements as well as the fundamentals of the processes of nucleation, precipitation and crystallization under different experimental conditions (water solution and melts).

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
- Able to choose on the base of the physical and chemical properties suitable solvent
- Can choose a suitable precipitant agent for providing the process of precipitation
- Know the basic methods and procedures of dissolutions, precipitation and crystallization
- Known procedures and methods of recrystallization and purification of the product
- Basic knowledge about the industrial equipment for the crystallization process

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Exercise. The processes of dissolution of inorganic salts.
2. Exercise. Funding for the precipitation and separation.
3. Exercise. Deposition processes in heterogeneous reaction systems.
4. Exercise. Separation and removal of salt.
5. Exercise. Crystallization from the melt.
6. Exercise. Crystallization from the gaseous phase.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance at the lecture in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.3

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Tracking suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Code

KTA322

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students acquire the basics of the different crystalline states and their arrangements as well as the fundamentals of the processes of nucleation, precipitation and crystallization under different experimental conditions (water solution and melts).

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
- Able to choose on the base of the physical and chemical properties suitable solvent
- Can choose a suitable precipitant agent for providing the process of precipitation
- Know the basic methods and procedures of dissolutions, precipitation and crystallization
- Known procedures and methods of recrystallization and purification of the product
- Basic knowledge about the industrial equipment for the crystallization process

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Exercise. The processes of dissolution of inorganic salts.
2. Exercise. Funding for the precipitation and separation.
3. Exercise. Deposition processes in heterogeneous reaction systems.
4. Exercise. Separation and removal of salt.
5. Exercise. Crystallization from the melt.
6. Exercise. Crystallization from the gaseous phase.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance at the lecture in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.3

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Tracking suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Renewable Energy Sources
NAME OF THE COURSE Renewable Energy Sources

Code

KTA325

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will recognize the global importance of renewable energy sources and meet the possibilities of their exploitation. The knowledge gained will be applied to solve practical problems in the implementation of renewable energy sources.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Renewable Energy Sources
The condition for taking the exam: Completed the course ”Exercises in Renewable Energy Sources”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student is able to:
- describe the basic principles of renewable energy technologies
- be familiar with the legislation of renewable energy
- define the energy potential and economy application of certain renewable energy sources
- identify problems related to the implantation of each technology in existing energy systems
- apply the knowledge gained in the development and scientific research in this field of science.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Energy sources and forms. Characteristics of renewable energy sources. The current state of renewable energy.
2nd week: Renewable energy regulations. EU Directives.
3rd week: Renewable energy sources and Croatian energy legislation. Administrative barriers and incentives.
4th week: Solar energy. Solar energy conversion into heat and electricity: solar panels, photovoltaic cells, solar energy collectors.
5th week: Wind energy. Wind energy and power. Wind power plants.
6th week: Biomass. Types and properties of biomass. Energy production from biomass - technologies.
7th week: Use of biomass in cogeneration plants. Biogas, alcohol fuels and biodiesel. The impact of biomass on the environment. The price of energy from biomass.
8th week: First test. Hydropower. Potential of small hydropower plants.
9th week: Geothermal energy. Nature of geothermal energy. Direct use of geothermal energy for heating. Geothermal power plants. Heat pumps.
10th week: Wave power. Tidal power.
11th week: Energy storage technologies: primary batteries, accumulators, super capacitors, flywheel energy storage.
12th week: Hydrogen technologies and fuel cells. Hydrogen production. Hydrogen storage.
13th week: Use of hydrogen. Fuel cell: history, principles of operation. Fuel cells batteries. Types of fuel cells, operation temperatures, fuels.
14th week: Fuel cell cogeneration systems. Applications: stationary fuel cell power systems and portable fuel cell power systems. Hybrid systems.
15th week: Second test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.4

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 50 %. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam. Grades: - 60% insufficient, 60-70% sufficient, 71-80% good, 81-92% very good, 93-100% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

V. Potočnik, V. Lay, Obnovljivi izvori energije i zaštita okoliša u Hrvatskoj, MZOPU, Zagreb, 2003.

1

J. Twidell, T. Weir, Renewable Energy Resources, Taylor & Francis, New York, 2006.

0

M. Kalea, Obnovljivi izvori energije - Energetski pogled, Kiklos, Zagreb, 2014.

1

B. Labudović, Osnove primjene biomase, Energetika marketing d.o.o., Zagreb, 2012.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Lj. Majdandžić, Obnovljivi izvori energije, Graphis, Zagreb, 2008.
A.J. Appleby, Fuel Cells: Trends in Research and Applications, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, New York, 1987.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Renewable Energy Sources
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Renewable Energy Sources

Code

KTA326

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The course will allow students to complete five experimental studies of renewable energy technologies. In addition to the knowledge gained concerning the specific technologies studied, students will develop practical laboratory skills
and key skills of analysis concerning alternative/renewable energy sources and the issues associated with implementing them in existing energy networks.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Renewable Energy Sources

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- use theory to understand/predict experimental observations
- describe the underpinning scientific principles of renewable energy technologies
- plan and perform experiments
- identify and demonstrate the safe and correct use of measurement and laboratory equipment
- perform measurements, analysis and testing in the laboratory with the appropriate lab equipments and software
- provide quantitative information concerning the real world performance of each technology
- discuss the fundamental and practical factors that limit performance and be aware of the research efforts underway to make improvements
- identify of the issues associated with implementing each technology in existing energy networks
- document scientific information and experimental data and write scientific reports, with graphical presentation of data
- demonstrate teamwork skills.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Five laboratory exercises to accompany the course of lectures on Electrochemistry.
Ex. 1 Determining the characteristic curve of a wind generator
Ex. 2 The effectiveness of an anode material for Al/air sources of energy
Ex. 3 Quantitative analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen evolution rate using the photovoltaic converter
Ex. 4 Determination of efficiency of water electrolysis using the photovoltaic converter
Ex. 5 Efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.3

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

0.3

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The mean (average grade) is the arithmetic of all positive grades obtained in examinations (Pre-Lab oral exam 45%, Experimental work 5%, and Lab report 50%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Laboratorijske vježbe iz obnovljivih izvora energije (interna skripta).

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1)University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Preparation of Technological Waters
NAME OF THE COURSE Preparation of Technological Waters

Code

KTA327

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Damir Barbir

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge about the processes and procedures used for preparing water for specific technological applications.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Preaparation of Technological Waters

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students acquire knowledge of
- the properties of natural waters
- classification of pollution in water
- possible processes and
- procedures for preparing water for specific technological applications.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: The importance of water in production processes.
Week 2: Physico-chemical and thermodynamic properties of water.
Week 3: Usage and quality requirements for specific technological applications.
Week 4: Classification of pollution in the water. Origin and dispersion state of the natural waters.
Week 5: Processes and procedures for the preparation of water on the classification of ingredients.
Week 6: Physical and physico-chemical processes and processes based on ion exchange.
Week 7: Assessment (first colloquium).
Week 8: The coagulation and flocculation of colloids and chemical fining water.
Week 9: Ion exchangers in the process of preparing water.
10th week: Choice of ion exchange resin and the budget column ion exchange.
11th week: equipment and quality control of treated water.
Week 12: demineralization and deionization with decarbonization.
13th week: Membrane processes and procedures. Reverse osmosis and electrodialysis.
Week 14: Other methods of preparing water.
Week 15: Assessment (second colloquium).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

Written exam

0.2

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be applied over the two exams during the semester. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 45%. The presence of trainers mechanism in 80-100% amount is 10% of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed one colloquium, it is recognized as part of the exam (45% score). The remaining part is laid in the regular examination periods.
Students who did not pass any colloquim, written exam in the regular examination periods laid the whole subject matter. Pass rate threshold is 60%.
Rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. T. Powell, Water Conditioning for Industry, McGraw-Hill, New York-Toronto, 1980.

1

The NALCO Water Handbook, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1995.

1

Water Treatment Handbook, Degremont, Rueil-Malmaisons, 1991.

1

G. Belfort, Synthetic Membrane Processes, Findamentals and Water Applications, Academic Press, New York, 1984.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Mallevialle, P. E. Odendaal, M. R. Wiesner, Water treatment membrane processes, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1996.; A. P. Sincero, G. A. Sincero, Physical-Chemical Treatment of Water and Wastewater, CRC Press, New York, 2002.; J. Bartram, R. Ballance, Water Quality Monitoring, E & FN SPON, London, 1996.;R. Helmer, I. Hespanhol, Water Pollution Control, E & FN SPON, London, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Teacher level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Preparation of Technological Waters
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Preparation of Technological Waters

Code

KTA328

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Damir Barbir

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge about the processes and procedures used for preparing water for specific technological applications.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Preaparation of Technological Waters

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing exercises student will be able to:
- Self-determination of process parameters
- Determination of properties of substances
- Classification of pollutants in water
- Implementation of the water preparation process as required for specific technological applications.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Chemical sedimentation with coagulation and decarbonization.
Water treatment processes of decarbonization with lime (fast reactor).
Decarbonization with lime and ion exchange with neutral Na-exchanger in the preparation or softening water.
Demineralization and deionization of water using ion exchangers.
The choice of ion exchange resin and calculation of column ion exchange.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at 100% of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.8

Report

0.1

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Exercises can be activated after passing oral exams for every exercise. The assessment exercises included knowledge of oral exams (10%), report writing (10%) and commitment during the experimental work in the laboratory (80%). Laboratory work involved in assessing a share of 20%. Rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Krolo, P. Dabić, D. Barbir, Praktikum iz tehnoloških procesa anorganske industrije, Interna skripta, Split, 2014.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Teacher level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Safety at Work
NAME OF THE COURSE Safety at Work

Code

KTA329

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Knowledge of the potential hazards when working in a laboratory and plant.
- The basics of working in a safe manner, safeguards and protective devices and agents at work

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Safety at Work

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to know:
- Rules of conduct and work in a chemistry lab
- The primary hazards in a chemistry lab
- Ways of substances, meaning chemical cards (data on physico-chemical, physiological and toxicological properties of the substance)
- Self-interpretation and compilation of chemical cards
- Assessment of the potential dangers of certain chemicals and safly working with the apparatuses and methods

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: introductory lecture, legislation, codes of conduct in the laboratory
Week 2: safety devices in a chemistry lab
Week 3: Security and physico-chemical properties of the substance
Week 4: Classification of substances with similar properties and functional groups
Week 5: labeling of the substance - labels, graphic symbols, diamond hazard label at transport
Week 6: effect of pollutants on human health - basic concepts of toxicology and
physiological properties of matter, MDK, LD50
Week 7: chemical card harmful and dangerous substances
Week 8: assessment (first colloquium);
Week 9: effect of pollutants on human health - the distribution and characteristics of the substance to physiological properties
Week 10: processes of burning and fire danger
Week 11: appliances and equipment for fire fighting
Week 12: types of harmful atmosphere and breathing apparatus
Week 13: protection from electric shock
Week 14: dangerous products - formation, classification according to UN figures,
storage, recycling and waste
Week 15: assessment (2nd colloquium).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80 %, and laboratory exercises in the amount of 100 % of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be laid across two exams during the semester. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 45%. The presence of lectures in 80 -100% amount is 10% of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed one colloquium, it is recognized as part of the exam (45% score). The remaining part is laid in the regular examination periods.
Students who did not pass any colloquium, written exam in the regular examination periods laid the whole subject matter. Prague passing is 60% and a written examination form part of the assessment with the 90%.
Rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Dabić, Sigurnost pri radu, Autorizirana predavanja za preddiplomski studij, 2013.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

R. H. Hill, D.C. Finster, Laboratory Safety for Chemistry Students, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, New Jersey, 2010.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

P. Dabić, Vježbe iz kolegija sigurnost pri radu, KTF, Split, 2010.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

- B. Uhlik, Zaštita od požarno opasnih, toksičnih i reaktivnih tvari (I-IVI), Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera, Zagreb, 1998., 2000., 2003. i 2013.
- Zakon o zaštiti na radu, Zavod za istraživanje i razvoj sigurnosti, Zagreb, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Keeping records of class attendance
- Annual Performance analysis Examination
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Safety at Work
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Safety at Work

Code

KTA330

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Practical knowledge of the methods of determining the basic properties and identification of harmful and hazardous substances
- Assessment of potential health, fire and reactive hazards of certain substances

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Safety at work

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exercise, students may:
- Independently designate specific properties of matter - important safety parameters
- Estimate based on certain measures of potential health, fire and
reactive risk of certain substances

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1 Persistence of alkali metal
Exercise 2 Flammability of test material
Exercise 3 Determination of flash point by Marcusson
Exercise 4 Determination of the physico-chemical properties of the solution with
the aim of assessing potential hazards

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Laboratory exercises were done in 100%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.6

Report

0.1

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
Exercises can be activated after passing exams for each exercise. The exercises should be completed in 100% of the estimated amount of lessons. Once implemented exercise is necessary to write a report from exercises (paper).
Final evaluation:
The assessment exercises included knowledge of exams (20%), success of the experimental part (60%) and quality reports with exercise (calculations and conclusions) 20%.
Overall rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Dabić, Vježbe iz kolegija sigurnost pri radu, KTF, Split, 2010.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P. Dabić, Safty at work, Autorized lectures for undergraduate, 2013.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Keeping records of class attendance
- Annual Performance analysis Examination
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Water Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Water Protection

Code

KTA331

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will become familiar with the types, distribution and quality of water in nature, the properties of aquatic ecosystems, and the methods and legislation to preserve their quality.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- understanding the concepts ecosystem, biotope, biocenose, food chain
- cycling of matter and energy in the ecosystem
- abiotic and biotic ecological factors
- importance of water and its physico-chemical properties
- characteristics of fresh water and seawaters
- physical, chemical and biological indicators of water quality
- water resource management
- sustainable use of water
- water protection through preservation of good water condition, preventing the devastation of waters that are under risk, and remediation of degraded water status in order to preserve human health and the environment
- point and nonpoint sources of pollution
- protection from the harmful effects of water
- classification of fresh waters and coastal sea
- reuse of treated wastewater
- guidelines for water reuse
- legislation for wastewater and treated water
- final disposal of sludge generated in the wastewater treatment plant.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Ecosystem. Biotope. Ecological factors.
2nd week: Fresh waters. Seawater. Physicochemical properties of water.
3rd week: Water quality indicators.
4th week: Seminar. Checking the accuracy of the chemical analyzes.
5th week: Disorders in aquatic ecosystems quality. Eutrophication. (I written evaluation). Autopurification of water systems.
6th week: Water management. Water legislation. Classification of fresh waters and coastal seas.
7th week: Seminar: Water quality assessment in Dalmatia (part 1).
8th week: Seminar: Water quality assessment in Dalmatia (part 2).
9th week: The state plan for water protection. Planning and environment management.
10th week: Conservation and improvement of water quality.
11th week: Monitoring of natural waters quality. Legislation for effluent disposal.
12th week: Seminar. Monitoring of migration and distribution of pollution in the environment through pollution index ( part 1).
13th week: Seminar. Monitoring of migration and distribution of pollution in the environment through pollution index ( part 2).
14th week: Wastewaters treatment.
15th week: Waste management and conservation of aquatic environment.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed written evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 70%-80% - good, 80%-90% very good, 90%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, HDGI, Zagreb, 1997.

1

Strategija upravljanja vodama, Hrvatske vode, AKD Zagreb, 2009.

1

D. Mayer, Kvaliteta i zaštita podzemnih voda, HDZVM, Zagreb, 1993.

1

B. Tušar, Ispuštanje i procišcavanja otpadne vode, Croatija knjiga, Zagreb, 2004.

1

D. Dikic et al., Ekološki leksikon, Ministarstvo zaštite okoliša i prostornog uređenja RH, O.P. Springer (ur.), Zagreb, 2001.

1

N. Š. Giljanović, Vode Dalmacije, Nastavni zavod za javno zdravstvo Splitsko-dalmatinske županije, 2006.

1

Laboratorijske vježbe iz Zaštite voda (interna skripta)

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

H.D. Sharma and S.P. Lewis, Waste Containment System, Waste Stabilization, and Landfills, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 1994; D. Mayer, Voda od nastanka do upotrebe, Prosvjeta, Zagreb, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Professional Practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Professional Practice

Code

KTAOSP

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

2.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Final Thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Final Thesis

Code

KTAOZR

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

12.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mathematics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematics 1

Code

KTJ101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScM Branka Gotovac

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Ružman

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

45

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic elements of calculus and linear algebra.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to be able to:
- identify and sketch graphs of elementary functions, to determine the domain of the given function
- find the derivative of the given function
- apply the dervative in practice (tangents and normals, maximum, minimum and inflection points) and to interpret the shape of graphs
- solve the system of linear equations (by matrix inversion, by Gaussian elimination)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Sets: Notion. Algebra of sets. Sets of numbers.
2. Functions: Notion. Composite functions. Inverse function.
3. Elementary functions.
4. Functions: Limits. Continuity.
5. Derivative and application: Notion. Interpretation. Derivative techniques.
6. Differential. Higher order derivatives.
7. Theorems of differential calculus. Maximum, minimum points.
8. Inflection points. Asymptotes. Graphs sketching.
9. Sequences: Notion. Limits.
10. Series: Convergence of numeric series. Power series. Taylor series.
11. Matrices and vectors: Matrix algebra. Determinants. Inverse matrix.
12. Linear systems of equations.
13. Vector algebra.
14. Solid analityc geometry.
15. Course review. Revision.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance of classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.6

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.8

Oral exam

1.3

Written exam

1.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Examination: either by continuously checking and grading students’ progress during the semester or in exam terms by passing written and oral exam.
At the beginning of the course students will be informed of in detail elaborated rules for both models of examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bradić, R. Roki et. al., Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Element, Zagreb (više izdanja)

47

B.P. Demidovič, Zadaci i riješeni primjeri iz više matematike, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb (više izdanja)

5

I. Slapničar, Matematika 1, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje u Splitu, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2002.

0

http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kurepa, Matematička analiza I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1997.
L. Krnić, Z. Šikić, Račun diferencijalni i integralni, I dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.
Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Physics 1

Code

KTJ102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Matko Maleš
Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Introducing students to the knowledge and principles of physics in the field of mechanics
- Forming the proper view towards the interpretation of physics phenomena and their application
- Developing the level of cognitive processing required for further studies

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Physics I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the course, the student is expected to have mastered:
- Physical quantities, units and dimensional analysis;
- The characteristics of the exact approach to phenomena in both micro and macro world;
- The principles of the classic general mechanics;
- The basic principles of the special mechanics (mechanics of oscillations, waves and fluids);
- The use of calculus in mechanics contents;
- The application of the laws of mechanics in concrete physics examples;
- The application of the obtained knowledge in solving problem tasks;
- The application of the knowledge in professional situations.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Space, time, matter. Physical quantities, Laws of Physics. Plane and space geometry, using of vector algebra, differential and integral calculus.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
2nd week: Kinematics of particles
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
3rd week: Particles dynamics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
4th week: Work and energy
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
5th week: Conservative and nonconservative forces
Partial assessment (1st preliminary test) ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
6th week: Conservation of energy law
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
7th week: Systems of particles.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
8th week: Collisions; Conservation laws
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
9th week: Rigid body mechanics. Conservation laws. Restrictions of rigid body approximations and the theory of elasticity.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
10th Equilibrium. Restrictions of rigid body approximations and the theory of elasticity.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
Partial assessment (2nd preliminary test) ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course
11th week: Oscillations and waves
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
12th week: Many particle physics: gasses, liquids and solids. Internal energy, heat and heat disorder. Transport phenomena. Phase transition phenomena.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
13th week: Fluid mechanics: statics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
14th week: Fluid mechanics: dynamics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
15th week: Elastic waves. Sound.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
Partial assessment (3rd preliminary test ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.8

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.9

Oral exam

1.9

Written exam

1.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted via 3 midterm exams, related to lectures (theory) and seminars (solving problems), according to syllabus.
During the final examination period, the final theory exam shall be taken after passing the final problem’s solving exam.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Cindro, Fizika I, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1985;

10

E. Babić, R. Krsnik, M. Očko, Zbirka riješenih zadataka iz fizike, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 1990.

3

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, J. Walker, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1993;
Janko Herak, Osnove kemijske fizike, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2001.
V. Lopac, P. Kulišić, M. Pavičić, Zbirka zadataka iz fizike, FGZ Zagreb, 1983.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Pysics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Pysics 1

Code

KTJ103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The fundamental and the inseparable part of all physics research is the experiment. The aim of this course is to introduce the students to various techniques of conducting experiments and methods of measuring the physics quantities in the field of mechanics. Additionally, the aim is to enable the development of skills needed to conduct experiments, gather data and master various numerical problems, which are related to measuring and testing physics quantities.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Physics I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Obtaining basic knowledge and skills needed to conduct experiments
- The knowledge of various methods and techniques of measurement
- Mastering the calculation of errors which occurred during the measurement
- Mastering the evaluation of errors which occurred during the measurement
- The skills of graphic representation of the measured data and the method of writing reports pertaining to the experiment and the results of measuring conducted

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

- Measurement of length, mass and density. (3 hours)
- Numeric and graphic processing of the measurement data. (2 hours)
- Measurements of characteristic quantities: the laws of forces (friction, Hooke´s law /conservation laws (energy, momentum). (3 hours)
- Measurements of characteristic quantities: rotation (moment of inertia, torque) (2)
- Oscillations (spring oscillations, mathematical, physical and torsional pendulum). (2 hours)
- Laws of hydrostatics (Archimedes law, surface tension). (3 hours)
- Compensating exercises
- Final revision test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.3

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.4

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Krpan Lisica, Praktikum iz fizike - I.dio, 2010, sveučilišni priručnik

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE General Chemistry

Code

KTJ104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To familiarize students with the basic chemical laws and principles and to enable students to master the chemical items that follow General Chemistry. To develop students ability to think critically about the experiments performed in the laboratory and about the involvement of of chemistry in everyday life.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in General Chemistry
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in General Chemistry”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the the course students will be able to:
1) Understand the nature and properties of the substance differentiate elementary substances from compounds, distinguish homogeneous from heterogeneous mixtures, assume procedures for separating mixtures into pure substances.
2) Understand and applied the problem-solving approach to the balance of substances in chemical changes
3) Understand the structure of atoms and existing models of chemical bonds in such way that they can predict certain properties and reactivity of chemical elements and their ionic and covalent compounds
4) Discern the nature of certain chemical reactions.
5) Adopt the concept of pH, and assume direction of the chemical reactions on the basis of knowledge of chemical kinetics and equilibrium.
6) Independently and safely perform simple chemical experiments

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
1. Introduction - Natural sciences and chemistry. Units of measurement and measurement. Classification of matter. Pure substance. Decomposition of the substance to the pure substance.
2. Properties of pure substances, physical and chemical properties. Atom and chemical element. The chemical symbols of elements. The laws of chemical combination by weight and volume. The atomic theoryes from the early ideas to John Dalton. Avogadro’s hypothesis.
3. The discovery of the structure of atoms. The discovery of X-rays and radioactivity. Rutherford model of the atom. X-rays and crystal structure. Bragg equation. Isotopes and the structure of the atomic nucleus.
4. The structure of pure substances. The atomic structure of substances. Types of a crystal systems and crystal characteristics. Cubic crystal system. The molecular structure of substances. The nature of the gas. The nature of the fluid. The concept of temperature. The kinetic theory of gases.
5. Gas laws and the equation of state of an ideal gas. Real gases. Relative atomic and molecular weight. Methods for determining relative atomic (Dulong - Petit method, X-ray diffraction, mass spectrograph) and molecular weight (density of the gas, the method of Victor Mayer, Hoffman method). Periodic table of the elements and the periodic law.
6. Electronic structure of atoms - Bohr model of the atom, quantum numbers. Quantum theory of the electronic structure of atoms. Atomic orbitals.
7. Periodic Classification of elements and the periodic table. Periodic changes in physical properties. Atomic radius. Ionization energy. Electron affinity. Electronegativity.
8. Chemical bonding and molecular structure - Electronic valence theory, ionic and covalent compounds. Electronegativity and degree of oxidation. Writing Lewis structures and the octet rule. Formal charges. Exceptions from the octet rule. VSEPR model and geometry of the molecule.
9. Bond characteristics. Valence bond theory and theory of molecular orbitals.
10. Intermolecular forces. Dipole moment, Van der Waals and London forces, hydrogen bond.
11. The structure and properties of the liquid and solid. Physical properties of solutions. Types of solution. Expression of concentration.
12. The liquid in the liquid solution. Solutions of solids in liquids. Solutions of gases in liquids. Effect of temperature on the solubility. Effect of pressure on the solubility of gases. Colligative properties of solutions: nonelectrolyte and electrolyte solution.
13. Chemical reactions - types of chemical reactions, redox reactions, complex reactions (protolytic reactions and precipitation reactions and dissolution), complex reactions.
14. Chemical kinetics, reaction rate, reaction mechanism, the activation energy. Chemical equilibrium - term equilibrium, chemical equilibrium and chemical equilibrium constant. Factors that affect the chemical equilibrium.
15. Equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Balance in the electrolyte solutions - equilibrium in solutions of acids and bases , the equilibrium of the complex in solution, the equilibrium between the solution and the insoluble crystals, redox balance
Seminars:
1. The oxidation number: definition, rules for determining in ions and molecules. Examples and training.
2. Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry. Names of monoatomic cations and monoatomic anions. Names of poliatomic cations and anion. The names of the ligands. Names of complex ions. Names of oxo acid and their salts.
3. Naming of inorganic compounds - training.
4. Balancing chemical equations, balancing redox equations.
5. Writing redox equations - practice.
6. The stoichiometry: Qualitative and quantitative relationships in chemical reactions. Molar method.
7. Stoichiometry: Quantitative relationships. Yield in chemical reactions and processes: the relevant reactant, the reactant in excess of the theoretical amount of reactants, the theoretical amount of product, yield and loss.
8. The stoichiometry: volume and mass in chemical reactions.
9. Electronic configuration of atoms and ions
10. Lewis structural formula
11. Electronic structural formula
12. Chemical equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems
13. Chemical equilibrium in electrolyte solutions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars, and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students who obtain a signature from the course General Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows :
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right.
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through three partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija I dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

Brinić, Slobodan. Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Opće kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Grubač Z.: Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Opće kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Sikirica, M., Stehiometrija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb

0

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Darrell D. Ebbing and Steven D. Gammon, General Chemistry, 9th edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 2009.
Raymond Chang, Chemistry, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in General Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in General Chemistry

Code

KTJ105

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Exercising, testing and confirm knowledge from lectures. Understanding with the methods of experimental work and the acquisition of skills necessary for independent work in the lab.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in General Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will upon completion of the course be able to:
1. Practically through experiments verify the theoretical assumptions
2. Gain independence in performing experiments
3. Design simple experiments to illustrate the chemical properties of the substance
4. Actively exploring ways in which this discipline has consequently impact on the outside world.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1
The basic rules of laboratory work, safety precautions and protection in the lab, basic laboratory equipment. Washing, cleaning and drying of dishes. Basic laboratory operations, chemicals and dealing with them. Decomposition of the substance to the pure substance. Decomposition of heterogeneous and homogeneous mixture
Exercise 2
Decomposition of the mixture to the pure substance, Decomposition of heterogeneous substances, Sedimentation, decanting, centrifuging, filtering, Buchner funnel, distillation and fractional distillation, sublimation of iodine. Extraction of iodine from aqueous solutions
Exercise 3
Physical and chemical changes, the law of conservation of weight, Gay - Lussac’s law of connected volumes. Exercise with models of unit cells. Determining the relative atomic mass of zinc. Determination of the empirical formula of copper chloride.
Exercise 4
Gas Laws: Determination of the molar volume of oxygen, Boyle’s law, Charles Gay - Lussac’s law, the pressure dependence of the temperature in gases.
Exercise 5
Solutions and their properties. Expressing of concentration. Preparation of the solution with given concentration. Solutions of liquids in liquids. Solutions of gases in liquids. Dependence of solubility on the nature (structure) of the substance. Dependence of solubility on temperature. Dissolution of liquids in liquids. Dissolving gases in liquids. Henry’s law. Determination of molar mass by freezing point depression. Illustration of electrolytic dissociation. Illustration of ions traveling to the electrodes. Electrical conductivity of the solution. Redox - reactions of sulfur and oxygen. Redox reaction of dilute nitric acid solution and iron (II) sulfate. Decomposition and formation reactions of complexes. Ligand substitution reaction. Protolytic reactions (acid- base titration).
Exercise 6
Chemical kinetic, effect of concentration of reactants on the rate of chemical reactions. Effect of temperature on the rate of chemical reactions. The catalytic effect on the rate of chemical reactions. Balance in electrolyte solutions. Moving the chemical balance. Determination of the acid dissociation constant, Ka . Determination of pH: Approximately determination of pH using indicators. Determination of pH using pH sensors. Electrolysis - Determination of Faraday’s constant. Electromotive force of galvanic cells - Daniell cell.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

10

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mathematics 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematics 2

Code

KTJ106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScM Branka Gotovac

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Ružman

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic elements of integral calculus, differential calculus of several variables and the basic of differential equations.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to be able to:
- apply the techniques of integration (integration by substitution, integration by parts)
- use the definite integral in its geometrical applications
- solve the first-order differential equations (variables separable, homogeneous differential equations, linear differential equations, exact differential equations)
- solve the second-order linear nonhomogeneous differential equations with constant coefficients

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Indefinite integral. Table of integrals.
2. Integration by substitution. Integration by parts.
3. Integrating rational fractions. Integrating by algebraic substitution.
4. Definite integral.
5. Improper integrals.
6. Application of definite integral.
7. Functions of several variables. Limit and continuity.
8. Partial derivatives. Differential.
9. Tangent plane and normal line. Maxima and minima.
10. Double integrals.
11. Geometric application of double integrals.
12. Ordinary differential equations.
13. First-order differential equations.
14. Second-order differential equations.
15. Course review. Revision.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance of classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.6

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.8

Oral exam

1.3

Written exam

1.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bradić, R. Roki et. al., Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Element, Zagreb (više izdanja)

47

B.P. Demidovič, Zadaci i riješeni primjeri iz više matematike, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb (više izdanja)

5

I. Slapničar, Matematika 2, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2008. (http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat2)

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kurepa, Matematička analiza I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1997.
Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.
McCallum, Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Multivariable Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2002.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physics II
NAME OF THE COURSE Physics II

Code

KTJ107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Introducing students to the knowledge and principles of physics in the fields of electromagnetism, optics and elementary quantum physics
- Forming the proper view towards the interpretation of physics phenomena and their application
- Developing the level of cognitive processing required for further studies

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Pysics II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the course, the student is expected to have mastered
- The principles of electromagnetism and electromagnetic radiation
- The principles of geometrical and physical optics
- The basic principles of quantum physics
- The application of the obtained knowledge in concrete physics examples
- The application of the obtained knowledge in solving professional problem tasks
- Recognition of the application of the knowledge of physics in everyday situations

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Electric charges, electrostatic force and electrostatic field. Vector field flux and Gauss’s law (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
2nd week: Electric potential and potential difference. Moving and storing electric charges, electric circuits. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
3rd week: Charges in motion and their interactions, electric current. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. . (1.5 hours)
4th week: Magnetic field. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
5th week: Time depending electric and magnetic fields. Faraday’s law. Inductivity. Induction generators. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
Partial assessment (1st preliminary test) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course.
6th week: Alternating currents. Electric machines. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
7th week: Electromagnetic oscillating circuit and radiation. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
8th week: Electromagnetic waves and nature of light. (2 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
9th week: Interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter: absorption, refraction, reflection, polarization, scattering, photoelectric effect. Ideas of quantum physics. (4 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1.5 hours)
10th week: Physical and geometric optics. (3 hours).
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1.5 hours)
Partial assessment (2rd preliminary test ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.8

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.4

Oral exam

1.4

Written exam

1.4

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted via 2 midterm exams, related to lectures (theory) and seminars (solving problems), according to curriculum.
During the final examination period, the final theory exam shall be taken after passing the final problem´s solving exam.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Cindro, Fizika II, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1985.

10

E. Babić, R. Krsnik, M. Očko, Zbirka riješenih zadataka iz fizike, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, Zagreb, 1990.

3

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley, New York 2003.
Janko Herak, Osnove kemijske fizike, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2001.
V. Lopac, P. Kulišić, M. Pavičić, Zbirka zadataka iz fizike, FGZ Zagreb, 1983.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Pysics II
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Pysics II

Code

KTJ108

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

ScD Mirko Marušić
Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic and the inseparable part of all physics research is the experiment. The aim of this course is to introduce the students to various techniques of conducting experiments and methods of measuring the physics quantities fom the field of electromagnetism and optics. Additionaly, the aim is to enable the development of skills needed to conduct experiments, gather dana and master various numerical problems, which are related to measuring and testing physics quantities.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Physics II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Obtaining the basic knowledge and skills needed to conduct experiments in the field of electromagnetism and optics
- The knowledge of various methods and techniques of measurement
- Mastering the calculation of errors which occured during the measurement
- Mastering the evaluation of errors which occured during the measurement
- The skills of graphic representation of the measured data and the method of writing reports pertaining to the experiment and the results of measuring conducted.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

- Electric circuits: elements and instruments. (4 hours)
- Direct current ; Resistance and resistors.(4 hours )
- Alternating current; Capacitance and capacitors. (3 hours )
- Alternating current; Inductance and inductors. (3 hours )
- RLC circuits (3 hours )
- Laws of geometrical optics. (3 hours )
- Laws of physical optics. (3 hours )
- Optical instruments. (4 hours )
- Spectroscopy / quantization (3 hours )
- Compensating exercises
Final revision test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.6

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.6

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Weekly tests,
Grade of the written experiment report,
Final test.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Lučić Lavčević, Praktikum iz fizike II. dio, 2012, interna skripta

0

web portal KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Inorganic Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Inorganic Chemistry

Code

KTJ109

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

4.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introduce students to the chemical reactivity of elements along the periodic table, and with the properties and composition of common chemicals. To develop students ability to notice similarities and differences between inorganic compounds and inorganic substances. Understanding of the changes in the various physical and chemical conditions

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students upon completion of the course:
1) will know the basic characteristics and producing of chemical elements for the major groups of periodic table of elements (PTE)
3) be able to identify the type and properties of chemical compounds of main group
3) be able to identify the type and properties of transition metal compounds
4) to classified compounds on the base of their characteristics
5) to predict acidic, basic and amphoteric properties of salts
6) to know common salt crystal structure
7) to predict the possible reaction mechanisms and outcomes of chemical reactions
8) to independently and safely perform simple chemical reactions

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
1. Hydrogen position in PTE, hydrogen properties and production, positive oxidation state and hydrides
2. Noble gases, properties of group, obtaining and using of xenon compounds
3. Introduction to halogens, elements properties in order to oxidation state
4. Fluorine production and properties, differences between the fluorine and the other members of the group, fluorine compounds. Chlorine producing and properties, compounds of chlorine, bromine and Iodine
5. Introduction to chalcogen elements, elements properties in order to oxidation state
6. Oxygen properties and production, the compounds of oxygen, oxides, water
7. Sulfur properties and production, oxides and sulfur acids, other sulfur compounds, compounds of selenium and tellurium,
8. A group of nitrogen, elements properties in order to oxidation state
9. Nitrogen, properties of the production, ammonia, nitric acid and other nitrogen compounds, nitrogen fixation
10. Phosphorus, properties and production, oxides and acids of phosphorus, arsenic, antimony and bismuth
11. A group of carbon, elements properties in order to oxidation state
12. Carbon allotropes, carbon properties and production, carbon oxides, carbides, carbonates and bicarbonates.
13. The compounds of silicon, germanium, tin and lead, semiconductor properties of silicon and germanium
14. A group of boron, elements properties in order to oxidation state, boranes, boric acid. Production and properties of aluminum, aluminum compounds, gallium, indium, thallium
15. Alkali and alkaline earth metals
Seminars :
1. Balancing chemical reactions, writing and balancing redox reactions in one line
2. Common reactions of hydrogen, the reducing action of hydrogen
3. Common reactions of chlorine, the disproportionation of chlorine in alkaline solutions, the oxidation activity of the halogens compounds
4. Common reactions of chalcogen elements, reaction of oxygen and ozone, the oxidizing action of oxygen,
5. The reaction of sulfur, the reactions which translate elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid, the oxidizing action of sulfuric acid, a dehydrating effect of sulfuric acid
6. Common reactions of nitrogen, the nitrogen production reactions, the reaction of ammonia oxidation to nitric acid, the oxidizing action of nitric acid.
7. Common reactions of phosphorus, oxidation reactions of phosphorus to phosphorus and phosphoric acid
8. Common reactions of carbon, oxides of carbon production, reducing effect of CO, binding of CO2 from the air, the precipitation of carbonates, cation hydrolysis
9. Common reactions of the boron group elements, reaction of boric acid production, dissolution of borax in water, production of crystalline boron acid, base properties of aluminum hydroxide,
10. Aluminum reducing action, aluminotermic reaction, common reactions of metals and metal production,
11. Common reactions of alkali and alkaline earth metals with water and their salts
12. Common reactions of transition metals, proving of peroxide with titanyl ion, oxidation states of vanadium, oxidative properties of permanganate, equilibrium between chromate and dichromate, iron compounds
13. Noble metals, zinc, cadmium and mercury
14. Sea - a mixture of inorganic substances. The chemical composition of sea water, salinity, pH and speciation
15. Mixed problems

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students who obtain a signature from the course Inorganic Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right .
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through three partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part .

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

Brinić, Slobodan. Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Grubač Z.: Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

F. Albert Cotton et al., Basic Inorganic Chemistry, New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry

Code

KTJ110

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Exercising, testing and confirm knowledge from lectures. Understanding with the methods of experimental work and the acquisition of skills necessary for independent work in the lab.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Inorganic chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will upon completion of the course be able to:
1. Practically through experiments verify the theoretical assumptions
2. Gain independence in performing experiments
3. Design simple experiments to illustrate the chemical properties of the substance
4. Actively exploring ways in which this discipline has consequently impact on the outside world.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercises :
1. Exercise: HYDROGEN
2. Exercise: 17th GROUP (Halogens )
3. Exercise: 16th GROUP (Chalcogens)
4. Exercise: 15th GROUP
5. Exercise: 14th GROUP and 13th GROUP, 1st and 2nd groups (Alkali and earth alkali metals)
6. Exercise: TRANSITION ELEMENTS (groups 3 to 7)
7. Exercise: TRANSITION ELEMENTS (groups 8 to 12)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

F. Albert Cotton et al., Basic Inorganic Chemistry, New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General Biology
NAME OF THE COURSE General Biology

Code

KTJ111

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Nada Bezić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Valerija Dunkić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students learn to:
- Introduce students to the relationships of animate and inanimate nature
- Understand the basic principles of cell biology
- mastering the basics of genetics and ecological relationships among organisms

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will after the course unit power:
- Recognize the importance of living organisms in relation to the environment
- To master the basic knowledge of cell biology and evolution of organisms
- Know the basic genetic principles
- Know how environmental changes affect the ecosystem changes

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Animate and inanimate nature.
Prokaryotes, eukaryotes, relationships between plants-animals
Membranes and transport through the membrane, nucleus, nucleolus
DNA, RNA, CD-biology, Endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes
Mitochondria - breathing, chloroplasts - photosynthesis, peroxisomes
Cell cycle, mitosis, meiosis (spermatogenesis, oogenesis), fertilization
The embryonic development model operon differentiation in plants and animals
Aging and death, viruses (HIV), tumors
The basics of inheritance, Mendel’s laws, mutations
Ecological concepts and relationships of organisms in the biocenosis

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures of at least 70%, as well as seminars and seminar work in 100% of scheduled classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The obligation is to the students during the course of hearing preparation seminar that also must know the present. Upon completion of the lecture can be the time to take the entire test period courses in writing.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Autorizirana predavanja na webu PMF-a

0

G. M. Cooper, Stanica: molekularni pristup, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2004.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A.Delić i N. Vijtiuk, Prirodoslovlje, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Computer application
NAME OF THE COURSE Computer application

Code

KTJ112

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of computers and computer systems. Knowledge about the use of Internet content and protect your computer from malicious programs. Basic skills about the content management (folders and files) on PCs using the Windows operating system. Basic skills using programs offered in the MS Office software.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
1. Manage content on PC computer (files and folders)
2. Use the MS Word in the purpose of the editing the file according to the specified requirements (defining the shape and page layout, inserting the images, finished elements, tables, graphs ...)
3. Use the MS Excel for analysis, calculation, sorting, graphical presentation and format tables.
4. Use the MS PowerPoint to create presentations
5. Set up and use MS Outlook for editing and emailing
6. Find reliable sources of information on the Internet

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week L General information about the course and mode of examination, Introduction to computers application, Information activity and technology, Computerization, Computer applications in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
E
2. Week L Hardware (PC), Von Neumann’s model computers, Computer hardware, Computer types, Basic terms in the Computer Engineering and informatics, Basic parts (components) of the PC, Central processing unit (CPU), Computer memory, Motherboards and connectors, Input and Output devices
E
3. Week L Operating systems and applications, The BIOS (Basic Input / Output System), Preparing disks and drives for installation of the OS, File system (FAT, NTFS), Computer Programs, System programs, Application programs, Operating systems
E
4. Week L Basics commands for MS-DOS, GUI (Graphical User Interface), Properties GUI, History of developing the MS Windows OS, Example Installations operating systems (Windows OS), Customizing the User Interface, Library, Customize settings on PC computer, Firewall, Windows Defender, Windows Update, Action Center, Commercial antivirus programs
E
5. Week L Backup and Restore, Control Panel, Customize the computer, The Device Manager, Accounts, Network and Sharing Center, Troubleshooting, Personalization, BitLocker Drive Encryption, Region and Language, Programs and Features, Installing and uninstalling programs, Display, Devices and Printers, Default Programs, Help and Support, Accessories and system tools, Shortcuts in Window OS, Changing the language of Windows OS
E
6. Week L Malicious software (malware), Computer viruses, Computer worms, Trojan horses, Logic bombs, Spyware, Advertising Programs (Adware), INTERNET, History of the Internet, TCP / IP protocol
E
7. Week L First test
E
8. Week L Internet, Computer network and classification networks, Internet protocols: HTTP, HTTPS and FTP, Web browsers, Copyright Law
E
9. Week L MS Office, MS Word, How to start the MS Word, Layout MS Word window, The status bar, Tabs and tools, Copy and paste data, Special characters, Styles, Tabs, Sections, Creating a new document, Copy text, Headers and footers, Page numbers
E MS Word: How to insert and edit the text and its formatting. Paragraph formatting. Lists of lists. Working with documents. formatting documents
10. Week L How to insert and edit the formulas and equations, Application of the finished style characteristics, Input tables and formatting, input images in the document, the entry of bibliographic data entry page breaks and section breaks (define different sections of the document), display the contents of the document
E MS Word: Insert pictures, tables and SmartArt elements in the document. Formatting headers and footers document. Entering references and footnotes in the document. Insert the page break, Section break, Application of different style for document
11. Week L MS Excel, How to start MS Excel, Layout MS Excel windows, Toolbar for quick access, Status bar, Tabs and tools, Tabs formulas, Editing data within a worksheet, Graphic data presentation, Input data string in the table, Add the trend data, Sorting data set
E MS Excel: Working with the tables. Entering data into tables and data formatting. Entering a series of data. Entering data from different files. Displaying data graphically.
12. Week L Conditional Formatting Data, Creating and deleting equations, Addresses cells (relative, absolute, mixed), Types of functions, Logical operators, Boolean functions, Examples of application functions (IF, AND, OR, COUNTIF ..), MS PowerPoint, MS PowerPoint Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating presentations, add themes, Themes Edit, Insert object (images, tables, links, media content ...)
E MS Excel: Data processing, Calculating with tables, Input and syntax for creating mathematical equations. Showing the trend curve.
13. Week L MS Outlook, MS Outlook Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating a user account , Creating a new e-mail
E MS Power Point: Creating presentations. Choosing the design, How to make redesign of an existing template.
14. Week L Databases, What databases they are?, Fields in databases, How databases are developed?, Center for online databases, Bibliographic databases, Citation databases, Databases with full-text, Sciencedirect databases, Scopus databases, Web database, Bibliography
E
15. Week L Second Test
E

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.6

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The written exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Practical part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 20% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 20% and practical part of exam has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and practical exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam participates with a share of the 30% of the final grade and practical part of exam with a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 60%-71% - sufficient, 72%-81% - good, 82%-91% very good, 92%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Jozić, Predavanja iz kolegija:Primjena računala, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Interna skripta, Split, 2013.

1

Wallace Wang, Office 2010 For Dummies, Wiley Publishing Inc., Indiana, 2010.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

1. Tracking suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
2. Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering

Code

KTJ201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić

Credits (ECTS)

3.5

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students gain knowledge about the basic unit operations in the environmental engineering through theoretical expressions based on the mass and energy balances. Students are also acquainted with the working principles of the most used devices and selection of their optimum working conditions regarding minimization of energy consumption and environmental protection.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering
Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Transport Phenomena
Enrolled in or passed the course Transport Phenomena

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- fundamental principles of mechanical and of heat and mass transfer operations,
- explain the laws that follow performance of individual operation,
- explain the influence of operating variable on individual operation applied in the environment protection,
- explain the working principle of the most common used equipment for particular operation,
- bring up possible operating problems that may occur during operation performance.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction unit operations in environmental engineering. Fluid transport.
2nd week: Centrifugal pumps. Characteristic curves of a centrifugal pump.
3rd week: Coarse dispersion. Classification.
4th week: Separation. Classification and separation equipment.
5th week: Filtration. General Consideration. Filtration equipment.
6th week: Mixing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Power consumption.
7th week: Mixing of particulate solids. Selection of mixing equipment.
8th week: Heat and mass transfer operations. Heat-exchange equipment.
9th week: Evaporation. Types of evaporators.
10th week: Gas absorption. Packings and packed tower design.
11th week: Principles of absorption.
12th week: Principle of drying. Use of psychometric charts.
13th week: Drying equipment.
14th week: Zeotropic and azeotropic mixtures Phase equilibrium. Batch distillation; flash and vacuum distillation.
15th week: Continuous distillation with reflux. Rectification and stripping.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture and seminar attendance: 80 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.3

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester student may take the exam by two theoretical (oral) and two calculation (written) tests. Test passing score is 55%. After passing all tests the average score for oral and written parts is calculated and the grade of each part is determined by the following criteria: 55%-66% - satisfactory, 67%-78% - good, 79%-89% - very good, 90%-100% - excellent.
In the final grade theoretical part constitutes 67% of grade while written part 33%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take exam in the regular examination periods. Final grade is determined by previously notated criteria.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. L. McCabe, J. C. Smith, P. Harriot, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2004.

2

C. J. Geankoplis, Transport Prosesses and Separation Process Principles (Includes Unit Operations), 4th ed., Pearson Eucation, Inc.,New Jersey, 2007.

1

Hraste, Mehaničko procesno inženjerstvo, 2. izdanje, HINUS, Zagreb, 2003.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Welty, J. W. Wicks, R. E. Wilson, G. L. Rorrer, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th ed., J. Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, 2007.
R.H. Perry, D.W. Green, J.O. Maloney, Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1999.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester,
- students evaluation organized by University.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering

Code

KTJ202

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be practically acquainted with functional dependence of process variables during the performance of individual experiment. They will acquire the sense of selection of the optimal process operating conditions.
To educate students how to determine unknown process variables applying the theoretical expressions and values of process variables measured during the experiments.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Operations in Environmental Engineering

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing the laboratory exercises, student is expected to know:
- explain the purpose and the aim of each of experiment (exercise) conducted,
- describe the elementary parts of apparatus used during individual experiments,
- bring up the variable needed to be measured in order to determine specific (demanded) process variables or parameters,
- explain the functional dependence of measured process variables and their influence on the final result of the experiments,
- explain the main resistance and driving force for each of experiment conducted.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1: Classification of the particulate solids.
Exercise 2: Mixing - power consumption determination.
Exercise 3: Filtration - determination of filtration coefficient and filtration cake resistance.
Exercise 4: Heat exchanger - determination of partial overall heat transfer coefficient.
Exercise 5: Gas absorption- determination of pressure drop and limiting flow rates.
Exercise 6: Drying rate determination.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.2

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.4

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

After each exercise, student is obligated to write a report. It consists of calculations based on an application of theoretical expressions and the values of process variables measured during the experiments. Beside calculation, student needs to draw the diagrams of process variable dependence, specific for individual operation. Upon completion of all exercises, a final (written) test will be held. Minimum score is 55%. Final grade from the exercise consists of grade from the practical work, report and final test.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Tehnološke operacije priručnik za vježbe (za internu uporabu)

0

Web stranice Fakulteta

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Mitrović-Kessler: Prijenos tvari i energije, Tehnološki fakultet Split, Split, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General Microbiology
NAME OF THE COURSE General Microbiology

Code

KTJ203

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić

Credits (ECTS)

2.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

This course is designed to give students understanding of basic concepts in microbiology including various microorganisms their physiology, morphology, genetics, pathogenicity, ecology, and application of microbes in biotechnology and environmental engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in General Microbiology

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students completing this course should be able to:
- better understanding of the evolutionary relationships between structure, diversity and replication of different groups of microorganisms.
- learn about genetic mechanisms of adaptation of prokaryotic microorganisms in a variety of environmental conditions.
- applied methods of physiological and biochemical tests for the identification of the different groups of microorganisms.
- identify the mechanisms of pathogenicity of microorganisms that cause diseases in humans and animals as well as the mechanisms used by the hosts to defend themselves against pathogens.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction. Historical development of microbiology. (2 hours)
2. The distribution of microorganisms and their role in biogeochemical processes in nature. (2 hours)
3. Eukaryotes, Archaea and Bacteria; structure and function. Morphology, nomenclature and classification of microorganisms. (2 hours)
4. Basic structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (2 hours)
5. Microbial genetics, genome organization, mobile genetic elements. (2 hours)
6. The growth of microorganisms and the basic growth factors, nutrients, temperature, oxygen, pH and osmotic pressure. (2 hours)
7. Metabolic activity of microorganisms. Identification of microorganisms using various physiological and biochemical tests. (2 hours)
8. Microorganisms and diseases, resistance, relationship microorganisms and host immune responses to infection. (2 hours)
9. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics and other chemical substances. (2 hours)
10. Basic morphological characteristics of fungi, yeasts and molds and their pathogenicity. Diseases caused by fungi, and their toxins. (2 hours)
11. Application of microorganisms in biotechnology. (2 hours)
12. Basic morphological characteristics and development cycles of parasites.
13. The role of microorganisms in the biodegradation of heavy metals, nitrate, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. (2 hours)
14. Basic morphological characteristics of viruses, viroids and prions. Classification and nomenclature of viruses. Methods of studying properties of the viruses. (2 hours)
15. Control the growth of microorganisms by physical and chemical methods. (2 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures in the amount of at least 70% of the times scheduled. Completed all planned laboratory exercises and seminar essay.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade of the student is compiled from the combination of lecture, seminar, laboratory. Final course grade will be based on: Mid‐term exam 30%; End of term exam 35%; Seminar 10%; Lab course 15%. Course grade will be based upon a percentage of total points obtained using the following scale: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Duraković, S.Redžepović, Uvod u opću mikrobiologiju, Kugler, Zagreb, 2002.

5

e-learning portal

S. Kalenić, E. Mlinarić-Missoni i sur., Medicinska bakteriologija i mikologija, Merkur A.B.D., Zagreb, 2005.

5

Z. Brudnjak, Medicinska virologija, Merkur A.B.D., Zagreb, 2002.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.A. Harvey, P.C. Champe, B.D. Fisher, Microbiology, 2th ed., Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2007.
R.M. Patrick, S.R. Ken, A.P. Michael, Medical Microbiology, 5th ed. Elsevier/Mosby, Philadelphia, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at different levels: Keeping records of his attendance; Annual performance analysis examination; Student surveys in order to evaluate teachers; Self-evaluation of teachers; Feedback from students who have already graduated from the relevance of content items.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in General Microbiology
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in General Microbiology

Code

KTJ204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić

Credits (ECTS)

1.5

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ana Maravić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The laboratory component of the course provides hands-on experience with microbiology techniques, including aseptic technique, microbial growth, and diagnostic procedures. Evaluate how physical and chemical methods can be used to control microbial growth.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course General Microbiology

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students completing this course should be able to:
- Applied methods of physiological and biochemical tests for the identification of the different groups of microorganisms.
- Analyse the properties of microorganisms in terms of cellular anatomy and physiology.
- Summarize the properties of microorganisms in terms of biochemistry and genetics and correlate these concepts to applications in biotechnology.
- Demonstrate proper microbiology laboratory techniques involving microscopy, biochemical tests and diagnostic media to characterize microorganisms of significance to human health.
- Evaluate how physical and chemical methods can be used to control microbial growth.
- Determine the number of microorganisms in the sample and calculate the growth of microorganisms in controlled laboratory conditions.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Laboratory Safety. The use and care of the microscope. Microscopic measurements. (2 hours)
2. Introduction to principles and laboratory methods in microbiology.(2 hours)
3. Techniques in aseptic conditions, methods of preparation and staining of various preparations.(2 hours)
4. Bacterial culture characteristics. The use of general media for isolating pure cultures. (2 hours)
5. Pour plate and streak plate methods. The use of selective and differential media. (2 hours)
6. Isolation of pure cultures of microorganisms, preparation of culture media, and use of different methods of isolation and identification.(2 hours)
7. Biochemical activities - Carbohydrate fermentation, Triple sugar iron (TSI) agar, IMViC test, API strip.(2 hours)
8. Basic macro and micro morphological characteristics and yeasts and molds. Cultivation of yeasts and molds on nutrient media, isolation and identification.
(2 hours)
9. The main morphological features of the parasite. Sampling and preparation of samples for identification of parasites. (2 hours)
10. The effect of temperature and pH on microorganisms.(2 hours)
11. Atmospheric oxygen requirements. Cultivation of anaerobes.(2 hours)
12. The inhibitory action of heavy metals*. The inhibitory action of disinfectants.
(2 hours)
13. Antibiotic susceptibility testing: The antibiogram.(2 hours)
14. Methods for determining the number of bacteria in different samples of food,
dilution method, the spectrophotometric method and membrane filtration.
(2 hours)
15. Methods for determining the number of bacteria in different samples of water
and wastewater dilution method, the spectrophotometric method and membrane filtration. (2 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the planned laboratory exercises in the amount 100% of the times scheduled.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade of the student is compiled from the combination of lecture, seminar, laboratory. Final course grade will be based on: Mid‐term exam 30%; End of term exam 35%; Seminar 10%; Lab course 15%. Course grade will be based upon a percentage of total points obtained using the following scale: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Duraković, S.Redžepović, Uvod u opću mikrobiologiju, Kugler, Zagreb, 2002.

5

e-learning portal

S. Kalenić, E. Mlinarić-Missoni i sur., Medicinska bakteriologija i mikologija, Merkur A.B.D., Zagreb, 2005.

5

Z. Brudnjak, Medicinska virologija, Merkur A.B.D., Zagreb, 2002.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.A. Harvey, P.C. Champe, B.D. Fisher, Microbiology, 2th ed., Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2007.
R.M. Patrick, S.R. Ken, A.P. Michael, Medical Microbiology, 5th ed. Elsevier/Mosby, Philadelphia, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at different levels: Keeping records of his attendance; Annual performance analysis examination; Student surveys in order to evaluate teachers; Self-evaluation of teachers; Feedback from students who have already graduated from the relevance of content items.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemistry and Air Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry and Air Protection

Code

KTJ205

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo
Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScM Nenad Periš
Asst Prof Marin Ugrina
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The students get insight into the basic knowledge about the atmosphere; structure, chemical cycles, and pollution, and the means for preventing the emission of harmful substances into the environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Chemistry and Air Protection

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Explain the cycle processes of substances in the atmosphere
- Identify and explain the sources of air pollution
- Explain the reactivity of pollutants in the atmosphere
- Present the methods and process equipment to prevent emissions from industrial sources into the atmosphere.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Basic characteristics of the atmosphere. The structure of the atmosphere. The composition of the atmosphere.
Week 2: The atmosphere of a photochemical system. Incoming radiation - solar spectrum. The absorption coefficients of atmospheric gases.
Week 3: Reemisijska radiation - cooling the Earth’s surface. Chemical cycles in the atmosphere.
Week 4: Temperature inversions. The atmospheric content and cycles of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen.
Week 5: The kinetics and thermodynamics of formation of oxides and control their emissions.
Week 6: Sources of emissions of SOx, NOx and CO2. Chemical and photochemical reactions in the atmosphere. Acid-base reactions in the atmosphere.
Week 7: Acid rain. Greenhouse gases and global warming.
Week 8: The particles in the atmosphere. The processes of formation of particles.
Week 9: organic air pollution. Reactivity of hydrocarbons. Organohalidni, organosulfur compounds and organodušicni.
10th week: The destruction of the ozone layer. Anthropogenic changes to the atmosphere.
11th week: The most important industrial polluters of the atmosphere.
Week 12: Distribution of sources of pollution, secondary and primary pollutants.
13th week: Devices to prevent the emission of harmful substances into the air.
Week 14: Electrostatic precipitators, incinerators.
Week 15: Gravity precipitators, bag filters.
Seminar works: numerical problem solving based on the measurement parameters (calculation of the concentration of SOx, NOx, CO2, NH4 +, PM, metals and ozone, the statistical analysis of the data obtained)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Overall assessment can be applied over three written tests and one oral assessment. Written tests are related to material adopted on lectures. Ratings on the written exams: 60-69% is sufficient, 70-79% good, 80-89% is very good, 90-100% excellent. Students who have not passed the exam through the assessment should have the regular exam. Regular exam means written test and oral exam. The rating, which is entered in the index, is the mean score of written tests.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R.W.Boubel, D.L.Fox, D.B. Turner, A.C. Stern, Fundamentals of air pollution, AP, 1994.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

N. P. Cheremisinoff, Handbook of air pollution prevention and control, Elsevier Science (USA), 2002.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Mar Viana, Urban Air Quality in Europe, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

D.J. Jacob, Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 1999.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C. Baird, Environmental Chemistry, W. H. Freeman and Company, New York, 1999.
R.M. Harrison, Understanding Our Environment: An Introduction to Environmental Chemistry and Pollution, Second Edition, The Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, 1992.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Consultation with students
- Continuous writing assessment
- Results on the written knowledge tests
- Student’s questionnaire.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Chemistry and Air Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Chemistry and Air Protection

Code

KTJ206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo
Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

ScM Nenad Periš
Asst Prof Marin Ugrina
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

24

6

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The students get insight into the basic laboratory methods of identification of atmospheric pollution.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Chemistry and Air Protection

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
1. sampled air
2. Determine the content of ozone in the air
3. Determine the content of the gaseous pollutants in the air
4. Determine the content of particulate matter in the air
5. Determine the metal content in particulate matter
6. Assess the impact of waste incineration air pollution.
7. Develop network pollution examined areas

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1: Determination of SO2 in the flue gas (emission).
Exercise 2: Determination of CO2 in the flue gas (emission).
Exercise 3: Determination of NO2 in the flue gas (emission).
Exercise 4: Determination of ozone in the air
Exercise 5: Determination of metals in particulate matter
Exercise 6: Determination of PM10 and PM2.5
Exercise 7: Determination of immission of pollutants depending on the distance from industrial plants.
Exercise 8: Determination of heavy metals in the flue gas resulting from the incineration of solid waste.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

0.2

0.1

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.2

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The requirement for admission of laboratory exercises is passed oral exam for exercise. Overall rating of laboratory practice includes evaluating oral exams, exercise performance, and report writing. Guest exercises are: 60-69% - sufficient, 70-79% - good, 80-89% - very good, 90-100% -excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Internal material for laboratory exercises

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Consultation with students
- Continuous oral assessment
- Student’s questionnaire.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analytical Environmental Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Code

KTJ207

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic objective of the course is the application of analytical methods and techniques in environmental analysis.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. to know and explain the interactions that occur between different phases in the environment (water-to-air, ground-to-air, water-soil)
2. independently sampling plan (accidentally uozkovanje, stratified sampling, systematic sampling, intuitive sampling)
3. to sample (air, water, soil, sediment and biological samples).
4. prepare samples for analysis, use of modern methods of sample preparation
5. Use a variety of techniques for environmental analysis (classical methods, instrumental methods, the technique, other techniques.
6. exert biological control (environmental indicators, biomarkers)
7. process the results of analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction - environmental science and environmental analytical chemistry
Lecture 2: Chemical Principles in the environment. Sampling from the environment
Lecture 3: analytical separation, sample preparation for analysis
Seminar 1 (2 hours): interpretation and data processing. Standard deviations, errors
Lecture 4: The application of analytical methods and techniques in environmental analysis. Elektoroanalytical methods (potentiometry)
Seminar 2 (2 hours): Quantitatively the composition of solutions - expressing concentration
Lecture 5: Voltammetry, coulometry
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Calculating the pH of water of different composition and nature (sea, river, rain)
Lecture 6: Conductometry, spectrometric techniques
Lecture 7: Absorption Spectrometry, induced absorption spectrometry, emission spectrometry
Lecture 8: Instrumental separation techniques, gas chromatography
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): Calculations data spectrometric measurements
Lecture 9:. Liquid chromatography, the state and development of chromatographic techniques
Seminar 5 (2 hours): Calculations of trace metals in the environment
Lecture 10: Other techniques (thermal techniques, radiochemical techniques)
Seminar 6 (2 hours): The calculation of the concentration of particulate matter in the environment and display the result
Lecture 11: Trace elements in the environment: natural level and chemical form of pollution
Seminar 7 (2 hours): Statistical analysis of the results of the analysis of environmental samples (air, water, soil)
Lecture 12: Determination of trace organic compounds
Lecture 13: Biological indicators and methods
Lecture 14: The radiation and radioactivity in the environment. contamination of soil
Lecture 15: Evaluation and interpretation of analytical data from the environment. specific applications
Seminar 8 (1 hour): Correlations (Spearman, Pearson,)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Ašperger et al, Analitika okoliša, HINUS&FKIT, Zagreb 2013.

1

F.W. Fifield, P.J. Haines, Environmental Analytical Chemistry, Blackie academic& professional, London, 1996.

1

E. P. Popek Sampling and analysis of environmental chemical pollutants, AP, 2003.

1

Vježbe iz Analitičke kemije okoliša (interna skripta u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C.E. Kupchella, M. C. Hyland, Enviromental science, Massachusetts, 1989

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Analytical Environmental Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Code

KTJ208

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic objective of the course is the application of analytical methods and techniques in environmental analysis.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After performed laboratory exercises the learner is expected to know:
1. Properly to sample
2. Conduct analysis of samples from the environment: spectrometry, potencijometrijski, voltammetry
3. Determine the phosphorus in plant environmental samples
4. Determine the chemical characteristics of the soil

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lab course 1 (5 hours): Potentiometric determination of fluoride and chloride. Determination of iron in drinking water.
Lab course 2 (5 hours): Determination of the pH of various types of water (river, rain)
Lab course 3 (5 hours ): Determining the concentration of transition metal in the pure aqueous solutions of UV-VIS spectrophotometry
Lab course 4 (5 hours ): Determination of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium in wastewater by spectrophotometry
Lab course 5 (5 hours ): Determination of phosphorus in the solid plant
Lab course 6 (5 hours ): Voltammetric determination of ascorbic acid in multivitamins

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed all the exercises. The student has the right to be absent one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Vježbe iz Analitičke kemije okoliša (interna skripta u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Analytical Environmental Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Code

KTJ208

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic objective of the course is the application of analytical methods and techniques in environmental analysis.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After performed laboratory exercises the learner is expected to know:
1. Properly to sample
2. Conduct analysis of samples from the environment: spectrometry, potencijometrijski, voltammetry
3. Determine the phosphorus in plant environmental samples
4. Determine the chemical characteristics of the soil

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lab course 1 (5 hours): Potentiometric determination of fluoride and chloride. Determination of iron in drinking water.
Lab course 2 (5 hours): Determination of the pH of various types of water (river, rain)
Lab course 3 (5 hours ): Determining the concentration of transition metal in the pure aqueous solutions of UV-VIS spectrophotometry
Lab course 4 (5 hours ): Determination of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium in wastewater by spectrophotometry
Lab course 5 (5 hours ): Determination of phosphorus in the solid plant
Lab course 6 (5 hours ): Voltammetric determination of ascorbic acid in multivitamins

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed all the exercises. The student has the right to be absent one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Waste management
NAME OF THE COURSE Waste management

Code

KTJ301

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic principles of waste management and train them for solving problems in waste management in practice. Students will learn about modern concept of sustainable waste management with measures to avoid waste generation, based on material and energy recovery.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Waste Management
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in Waste Management”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students will be able to:
1. Define the basic concepts in the area of waste, name the main problems related to waste, their causes and significance of the impact on the environment.
2. Describe procedures for the treatment of solid waste and landfills.
3. Maintain documentation related to waste management.
4. Manage with the regulations for the purpose of proper and timely implementation of the legislation.
5. Understand the hierarchy of waste management in accordance with the principles of sustainable development.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Waste classification by origin, type, physico-chemical and biological characteristics.
Week 2: Municipal, industrial, metallurgical waste, waste from mining, agricultural waste, medical waste.
Week 3: Hazardous waste. The impacts of waste on the environment.
Week 4: Basic questions concerning removal of solid waste, environmental aspects and legislation in the field of waste management.
Week 5: Sustainable development and waste management. The hierarchy of waste management in accordance with the principles of sustainable development.
Week 6: Waste management: prevention and reduction of waste, processing, recycling, energy recovery, final disposal.
Week 7: Measures and procedures to waste reduction.
Week 8: Systems and organization of collection, transportation and treatment of solid waste. I. partial knowledge test.
Week 9: Technologies and waste treatment procedures.
Week 10: The procedures for solid waste disposal: sanitary disposal, composting, thermal processing.
Week 11: Biological, chemical and physical methods of processing of solid waste. New technologies.
Week 12: The collection and evaluation of secondary raw materials, recycling.
Week 13: Disposal methods for solid waste. Disposal on landscaped landfields. Types of landfills. Criteria for selection of landfill site. The construction of the landfill. Treatment of certain types of waste prior to disposal.
Week 14: The impact of landfills on the environment and environmental protection measures. Procedures for landfill remediation.
Week 15: Strategic planning of waste management in Croatia. II. partial knowledge test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures, tests

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.8

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient; 55-66% sufficient (2); 67-78% good (3); 79-90% very good (4); 91-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Kalambura, T. Krička, D. Kalambura, Gospodarenje otpadom, Veleučilište Velika Gorica, Velika Gorica 2011.

1

G. Tchobanoglous, F. Kreith, Handbook of Solid Waste Menagement, 2nd edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2002.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Chandrappa, D. B. Das, Solid waste management, Principles and prectice, Springer, UK, 2012.
M. K. Hill, Understanding Environmental Pollution, 2nd edition, Cambridge, University Press, 2004.
F. R. McDougal, P. R. White, M. Frenke, P. Hindle, Integrated solid waste management: a life circle inventory, Blackwell Publishing, UK, 2001.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Keeping record of students attendance; annual analysis of the exam results; students survey in order to evaluate teachers; self-evaluation of teachers, feedback from students who have already graduated to relevance of curriculum.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Waste Management
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Waste Management

Code

KTJ302

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

10

5

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be introduced with the basic principles of waste management and enable them to independently solve the problem of waste management in practice. Students will learn practically procedures for getting new products from the corresponding organic waste, and calculate the yield of the process. In the field works students will learn about work of landfills and waste treatment in a waste treatment companies.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Waste Management

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completion of the training, students are expected to know:
- Classified solid waste in appropriate category.
- Select appropriate treatment of solid waste.
- Calculate the efficiency of the waste treatment processes in order to obtain useful products.
- Describe different procedures for the solid waste treatment and characteristics of landfills.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Beneficial use of citrus peel
2. Ethanol production by distillation of fermenting grape pomace.
3. Production of Ca-tartarate.
4. Processing of recycling paper
5. Field work in the landfill Carepovac
6. Field work in the company Cijan d.d.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

laboratory exercises, field work, writing reports

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.3

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Preliminary exams, writing reports.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Kliškić, kruti otpad i recikliranje, Upute za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, 2000.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Keeping records of student attendance; student survey in order to evaluate teachers, self-evaluation of teachers, feedback from students who have already graduated to relevance of curriculum.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Disposal of Hazardous Waste
NAME OF THE COURSE Disposal of Hazardous Waste

Code

KTJ303

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Acquiring knowledge about the sources, types and amounts of hazardous waste materials
- The possibility of permanent and environmentally safe management of hazardous wastes
- Recycling and getting of new products

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Disposal of Hazardous Waste

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to know:
- Substances that make hazardous waste,
- Definitions and law prescribed limits
- Sources, types and amounts of hazardous wastes
- Recycling and getting of new products
- Permanent and environmentally safe disposal

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: introduction, legislation on hazardous waste, environmental impact
Week 2: sources, types and labeling of hazardous waste, the UN numbers
Week 3: transportation of hazardous waste, road, rail, ship and air
Week 4: technological processes which produce harmful waste products
Week 5: production, storage, installation and remains inorganic binders and building
materials
Week 6: oily waste, types, options for reuse or safe disposal methods
Week 7: construction waste, recycling and disposal opportunities
Week 8: assessment (1st colloquium);
Week 9: technological processes using industrial waste as raw material
Week 10: technological processes of solidification and stabilization of industrial
waste materials
Week 11: physico-chemical methods of characterization of wastes
Week 12: hydration and optimization of additives in cement matrix
Week 13: test methods for new construction products with addition of industrial
waste - use value
Week 14: methods of testing new products with industrial waste-ecological
acceptability - leaching tests (leaching)
Week 15: Final comments, discussion, conclusions. assessment (2nd colloquium).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80%, and laboratory exercises in 100% of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be laid across two exams during the semester. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing the worth 45%. The presence of lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed one colloquium, it is recognized as part of the exam (45% score). The remaining part is laid in the regular examination periods.
Students who did not pass any colloquium, written exam in the regular examination periods laid the whole subject matter. Prague passing the 60% and a written examination form part of the assessment with 90%.
Rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

K.Y. Show, X. Guo, Industrial Waste, InTech, Rijeka, 2012.

1

L.K. Wang, Y.T. Hung, H.H. Lo, C. Yapijakis, Handbook of Industrial and Hazardous Wastes Treatment, Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, 2004.

1

R. D. Spence, C. Shi, Stabilization and Solidification of Hazardous, Radioactive and Mixed Wastes, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2005.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. Al-Tabbaa, Stabilisation/Solidification Treatment and Remediation, Advances in S/S for Waste and Contaminated Land, A.A. Ballkema Publishers, London, 2005.
- I. Kisić, Sanacija onečišćenog tla, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2012.
- R. Siddique, Waste Materials and By-Products in Concrete, Springer, Berlin, 2008.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Keeping records of class attendance
- Annual Performance analysis Examination
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Disposal of Hazardous Waste
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Disposal of Hazardous Waste

Code

KTJ304

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Practical knowledge of the methods of determining the basic properties and identification of hazardous substances
- Evaluation of group

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Disposal of Hazardous Waste

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to know:
- Substances that constitute hazardous waste
- Definitions and law prescribed limits
- Sources, types and quantities of hazardous waste
- Recycling and getting of new products
- Permanent and environmentally safe disposal

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1 Leaching tests of hazardous solid waste
Exercise 2 Analysis of cement kiln dust and usability.
Exercise 3 Determination of heavy metals in the waste engine oil
Exercise 4 Recovery of solid materials - saturated zeolite. concrete, brick and
glass
Exercise 5 Solidification and stabilization of mud with hazardous waste

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Presence at all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.6

Report

0.1

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
Exercises can be activated after passing exams for each exercise. The exercises should be completed in 100% of the estimated amount of lessons. Once implemented exercise is necessary to write a report with exercises (paper).
Final evaluation:
The assessment exercises included knowledge of prelim (20%), success of the experimental part (60%) and quality reports with exercise (calculations and conclusions) 20%.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R. D. Spence, C. Shi, Stabilization and Solidification of Hazardous, Radioactive and Mixed Wastes, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2005.

1

G.R. Woolley, J.J.J. Goumans, P. J. Wainwright, Waste Materials in Construction, Pergamon Press, Amsterdam, 2000.,Industrial Waste, USEPA, 2012.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Keeping records of class attendance
- Annual Performance analysis Examination
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analysis and Optimization of Water Use
NAME OF THE COURSE Analysis and Optimization of Water Use

Code

KTJ305

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The students get insight water treatment and preparation depending of uses as well as the methods for multi uses of water in industrial process.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Analysis and Optimization of Water Use

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Explain the methods and techniques to reduce water consumption in the industrial process
- Apply methods of water conditioning in industry
- Implement the ”Water Pinch” technique in analyzing water network flows
- Explain the application of physico-chemical water treatment in the industry.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Aquifers in nature, surface water and groundwater.
Week 2: The quality of drinking water and quality requirements depending of application.
Week 3: Overview of water use in various industrial processes.
Week 4: Methods and techniques to reduce water consumption, graphical and analytical methods.
Week 5: Application of ”Water Pinch ’technique for the analysis of network flows - Part 1.
Week 6: Application of ”Water Pinch ’technique for the analysis of network flows - Part 2.
Week 7: Multiple use of water in the process, reduce the use of fresh and minimal generation of wastewater. Critical points of wastewater production in industry.
Week 8: The procedures and processes in the preparation of fresh water as well as for the regeneration and reuse of wastewater.
Week 9: Removing turbidity by coagulation / flocculation.
10th week: Organic pollutants, nutrients, metal ions and dissolved gases in the drinking water.
11th week: Methods of removal of dissolved metal ions.
12th week: Iron removal and manganese removal.
13th week: Disinfection of water; thermal, chemical, and irradiation methods
Week 14: Application of natural ion exchangers.
Week 15: Application of adsorbent in the processes of removing harmful substances from the water.
Seminar tasks:
Application of optimization of water use in the food industry, chemical industry, metal processing, industrial production of pulp and paper, aluminum industry, steel production.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.7

Tests

0.2

Oral exam

0.1

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Overall assessment can be applied over three written tests and one oral assessment. Written tests are related to material adopted on lectures and seminars. Ratings on the written exams: 60-69% is sufficient, 70-79% good, 80-89% is very good, 90-100% excellent. Students who have not passed the exam through the assessment should have the regular exam. Regular exam means written test and oral exam. The rating, which is entered in the index, is the mean score of written tests.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Interni nastavni materijal

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

D. Mayer, Voda od nastanka do upotrebe, Prosvjeta, Zagreb, 2004.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

J. G. Mann, Y. A. Liu, Industrial water reuse and wastewater minimization, Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester, 2005.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

D. Hendricks, Fundamentals of Water Treatment Unit Processes: Physical, Chemical, and Biological, CRC Press, 2010.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Consultation with students
- Continuous writing assessment
- Results on the written knowledge tests
- Student’s questionnaire.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises of Analysis and Optimization of Water Use
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises of Analysis and Optimization of Water Use

Code

KTJ306

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The students get insight determination of the water quality in environment, methods and techniques for preparation of water depending of its purpose.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Analysis and Optimization of Water Use

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- To evaluate natural water quality
- To propose water use in particular industrial process
- To perform removal of iron and manganese from natural water in order to apply in industry
- To optimize flocculation and coagulation in water conditioning and evaluate costs in industrial purposes.
- To optimize all costs in industrial use of natural water.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1: Determination of turbidity in natural water (from the source to the mouth of the river Jadro) removal of turbidity, process optimization.
Exercise 2: Iron and manganese removal in natural waters.
Exercise 3: Application of synthetic and natural adsorbents in water conditioning procedure.
Field work: Visit station for preparation of drinking water.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.7

Report

0.1

0.1

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The requirement for admission of laboratory exercises is passed oral exam for exercise. Overall rating of laboratory practice includes evaluating oral exams, exercise performance, and report writing. Ratings of oral exercise exams are: 60-69% - sufficient, 70-79% - good, 80-89% - very good, 90-100% -excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Interna skripta za laboratorijske vježbe.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

F. N. Kemer, Nalkov priručnik za vodu, AMB Grafika Novi Sad, 2005.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Consultation with students
- Continuous oral assessment
- Student’s questionnaire.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Polymers and the Environment
NAME OF THE COURSE Polymers and the Environment

Code

KTJ307

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Rational view of the influence of polymeric materials on the environment and vice versa.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Polymers and the Environment

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- distinguish commodity plastics and their application
- recognition of the structure and properties of polymers
- knowledge of the signs on plastic packaging and their meaning
- recognition of possible impact of polymerization processes on the environment
- recognition of environmental impact on polymers
- distinguish biodegradable poloymers
- perception of importance of plastic waste management toward lowering environmental pollution

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Historical overview and world consumption of polymeric materials. Basic terms principles of polymer chemistry.
2nd week: Molecular and supermolecular structure of polymers. Physical and phase states. Thermomechanical curve. Classification of polymers (thermoplastic, elastomeric and thermosetting).
3rd week: Commodity polymers (PE, PP, PVC, PS, PET) and their properties and application. Symbols on the plastics packaging and their importance.
4th week: Polymers and the environment, global and local importance.
Environmental impact during production and processing oh polymers. Air emissions.
5th week: Waste waters, hazardous materials, other waste. Emission prevention and control in polymerization processes (PVC and PE polymerization)..
6th week: Process improvement by implementation of ”green” chemistry. Polymers and energy consumption.
7th week: First test.
8th week: Environmental impact on polymers (insolation, temperature, moisture, oxygen, atmospheric pollutants). Degradation mechanisms in polymers.
9th week: Thermal degradation. Oxidative degradation. Atmospheric pollutants. Ageing of polymer in the environmental and laboratory conditions.
10th week: Flammability and burning of polymers. Burning mechanisms. Burning test methods. Toxic emission from plastics burning.
11th week: Polymers in marine environment. Biodegradable polymers from renewable resources and petrochemicals (PHB, PLLA) production, properties and application.
12th week: Biodegradable water soluble polymers (PEO, PVA), properties and application. Improvement of polymers (bio)degradability by modification. Standard biodegradability tests.
13th week: Plastic and rubber waste management system.
14th week: Recycling and regeneration of plastic and rubber.
15th week: Second test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance on lectures at least 80 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 50%. Correction of the one test can be performed in the first term of exam period. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%). Written exam is 35% and oral exam is 35%.
Grades: successful (60% – 70%), good (71% – 80%), very good (81% – 90%), excellent (91% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. L. Andrady, Plastics and the Environment, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New Jersey, 2003.;

1

J. D. Hamilton and R. Sutclife, Ecological Assessment of Polymers, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1997

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. Azapagic, A. Emsley, I. Hamerton, Polymers, the Environment and Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, 2003.; W. Tötsch and H. Gaensslen, Polyvinylchloride-Environmental Aspects of a Common Plastics, Elsevier Science Publishers Ltd, Barking, 1992.; članci iz znanstvenih i stručnih časopisa.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Polymers and the Environment
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Polymers and the Environment

Code

KTJ308

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

12

3

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Through laboratory and field classes introduce students to the importance of recycling plastics and how recycling affects the properties of the polymer.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Polymers and the Environment

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- sort mixed polymer waste
- identify the components of polymer waste
- determine the effect of multiple recovery on the properties of polymers
- explain the complexity of the process of recovery of the polymer
- write a report

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1. Identification of polymers: primary tests, infrared spectroscopy.
Exercise 2. Influence of aging on properties of polymers.
Exercise 3. Sorting of plastic waste.
Exercise 4. Influence of multiple recycling on the thermal properties of polymers.
Field work: Visit to factories AD Plastik Inc. Solin, Fornix Ltd., Dugi Rat, GUMIIMPEX Inc., Varaždin

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending laboratory exercices and field work in the 100% amount.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.1

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

0.1

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Oral examination is done before each laboratory exercise. The student activity in the laboratory is monitored and evaluated as well as the reports from exercises. Oral examination, laboratory work and report account for 40%, 30% and 30% of the final grade, respectively.
Rating: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Erceg, Oporaba plastike, Interna skripta za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2014.

0

Zavod za organsku tehnologiju

T. Kovačić, B. Andričić, Struktura i svojstva polimera, Interna skripta za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2007.

0

Zavod za organsku tehnologiju

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Scheirs, Polymer Recycling: Science, Technology and Applications, John Wiley&Sons, Chichester, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University Level, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Wastewaters Treatment
NAME OF THE COURSE Wastewaters Treatment

Code

KTJ309

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students get to know the types of wastewaters, the indicators of their quality, wastewater treatments and the methods of wastewater sludge disposal.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Wastewaters Treatment

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- the impact of pollution on developments in aquatic ecosystems
- the necessity of wastewater treatment and relationship with sustainable development
- calculating the state of oxygen in the ecosystem
- sources and characteristics of wastewater, pollution indicators
- calculation of wastewater loading by harmful substances and the number of population equivalent ES
- selection procedures and methods for wastewater treatment
- mechanical procedures for wastewater treatment
- physical and chemical processes for wastewater treatment
- mechanism and kinetics of biological wastewater treatment
- calculatin of basic parameters of process control with activated sludge
- methods of processing biological sludge and biogas production.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1 week: Introduction. Pollution of natural waters.
2 week: Pollution indicators: physical, chemical, biological, radiological. Specific and nonspecific quality indicators. Sampling methodology.
3 week: Autopurification process and carrying capacity. Oxygen levels in the water . The kinetics of the aerobic decomposition of organic matter in water. Numerical examples .
4 week: Quantity and quality of wastewater. Urban wastewater. Industrial effluents. Specifics of industrial wastewater .
5 week: Cooling wastewaters. Storm wastewater. Landfills leachate.
6 week: Loading of wastewater with harmful substances and the number of population equivalent ES. Numerical examples.
7 week: Wastewater treatment. Selection process and processing methods. Numerical examples. Mechanical methods of wastewater treatment.
8 week: Physico-chemical processes and practices for wastewater treatment: sedimentation, coagulation and flocculation, filtration, neutralization, chemical precipitation, oxidation, reduction, disinfection, membrane processes.
9 week: Physico-chemical processes for wastewater treatment. Numerical examples (part 1).
10 week: Physico-chemical processes for wastewater treatment. Numerical examples (part 2).
11 week: Biological processes for wastewater treatment. The factors of the biological activity of microorganisms. The types of microorganisms. The mechanism and kinetics of aerobic biological wastewater treatment.
12 week: Performance) of aerobic treatment processes: bioreactors, biofilters (biological trickling filters or rotating biodiscs), lagoons or stabilization ponds.
13 week: Technological performance of anaerobic wastewater treatment processes. The efficiency.
14 week: The parameters controlling the process of activated sludge. Numerical examples .
15 week: Treatment of sludge generated in the wastewater treatment: thickening , stabilization, dewatering, composting, conditioning, heat treating. Biogas production. Numerical examples.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed written evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 70%-80% - good, 80%-90% very good, 90%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Hendricks, Water treatment unit processes, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, 2006.

1

Metcalf & Eddy, Wastewater Engineering, Irwin McGraw-Hill, New York, 1991.

1

L. D. Benefield, et al., Process Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Treatment, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1982;

1

L. D. Benefield, et al., Process Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Treatment, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1982.

1

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, HDGI, Zagreb, 1997.

1

B. Tušar, Ispuštanje i pročišćavanje otpadne vode, Croatiaknjiga, Zagreb, 2004.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Exercises in Wastewaters Treatment
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Wastewaters Treatment

Code

KTJ310

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

27

3

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students get to know the types of wastewaters, the indicators of their quality, wastewater treatments and characterization of bioactive sludge.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Wastewaters Treatment

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- methods and techniques of identification of harmful substances in waste water
- selection procedures and methods for wastewater treatment
- the impact of various factors on the efficiency of the treatment process wastewater
- the calculation of unit capacity
- monitoring of biological treatment of wastewater sludge through the sudge index.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1. Determination of optimal pH for the precipitation of Zn(OH)2. The construction of solubility diagrams for the system Zn(OH)2-H2O.
Exercise 2. Removal of zinc from wastewater by chemical precipitation. Calculation of addition of hydrated lime and material balance.
Exercise 3. Testing of coagulation / flocculation of dispersed colloidal particles in water JAR-test. Determination of the optimal addition of coagulant / flocculant.
Exercise 4. Characterization of waste water using oxygen as an indicator. Determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using Dichromate method.
Exercise 5. Characterization of waste water using oxygen as an indicator. Determination of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) using Winkler method.
Exercise 6. Sedimentation of bioactive sludge in Imhofe and determination of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) of active sludge.
Fieldtrips for visiting of wastewater treatment plants.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Exercise 1. Determination of optimal pH for the precipitation of Zn(OH)2. The construction of solubility diagrams for the system Zn(OH)2-H2O.
Exercise 2. Removal of zinc from wastewater by chemical precipitation. Calculation of addition of hydrated lime and material balance.
Exercise 3. Testing of coagulation / flocculation of dispersed colloidal particles in water JAR-test. Determination of the optimal addition of coagulant / flocculant.
Exercise 4. Characterization of waste water using oxygen as an indicator. Determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using Dichromate method.
Exercise 5. Characterization of waste water using oxygen as an indicator. Determination of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) using Winkler method.
Exercise 6. Sedimentation of bioactive sludge in Imhofe and determination of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) of active sludge.
Fieldtrips for visiting of wastewater treatment plants.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Every laboratory exercises include oral exam before exercise and writing of final report. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 70%-80% - good, 80%-90% very good, 90%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Laboratorijske vježbe iz kolegija Obrada otpadnih voda (interna skripta)

0

kod nastavnog predavača

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Hendricks, Water treatment unit processes, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, 2006.; Metcalf & Eddy, Wastewater Engineering, Irwin McGraw-Hill, New York, 1991; L.D. Benefield, et al., Process Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Treatment, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1982; S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, HDGI, Zagreb, 1997.; B. Tušar, Ispuštanje i pročišćavanje otpadne vode, Croatiaknjiga, Zagreb, 2004.; R.T. Wright and B.J. Nebel, Environmental Science, 9th edition, Prentice Hall Inc, New Jersey, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.
 

 

 

Environmental Menagment Systems
NAME OF THE COURSE Environmental Menagment Systems

Code

KTJ311

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The main objective of this course is an introducing students to the steps and processes during the implementation of the ISO 14001 standard in business subjects and in possible problems that arising from the implementation process and to resolve issue. Furthermore, one of the goals of this course is to introduce students to the development and future trends in the development of international norms that it is needed for understanding and applying them in various systems.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Students will understand the concept of integrated environmental protection, sustainable development, and will have ability to measure and proceed for the protection of the environment.
2. Based on the previous point, students will be able to participate in area planning, according to principles of sustainable development and to be able to estimate the impact on the environment (either Strategic Impact Assessment or any estimation of the environmental impact).
3. Students will have the ability to estimate risk and to manage it, as well as its the quantitative and qualitative representation.
4. Students will be able to participate in the process of planning and management of environment, relating to the study of the environmental impact, and therefore in the Commission for Strategic Studies and Environmental Strategy.
5. By discussing about the Regulations on Environmental Impact Estimation and the steps in the preparation of studies, students will gain knowledge that is inevitable in implementation of various Estimation and Environmental Programme.
6. Students will acquire the competencies that will provide them as experts in selecting the best available technique for a specific activity according to the European guidelines . They will be able to identify and resolve nonconformities that occur during this process .
7. Students will be able to apply the knowledge in organizations that have implemented an Environmental Management System ISO 14001 , and in the segment with its maintenance and improvement.
8. Students will acquire knowledge that will enable them to be an important subjects and managers to establish the system of ISO 14001 in various subjects.
9. Students will be able to apply the knowledge for implementation, maintenance and development of EMS.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: The definition of technology ; similarities and differences ; historical development of the term . Impacts and Challenges of technology . The separations technology.
Lecture 2: Definition ecosystem, classification. Environment Protecting the environment. Pollution and contamination. Legal provisions in the RH.
Lecture 3: Sustainable Development; concepts, vision, future. Sustainable development laws of thermodynamics. The path towards sustainable development.
Lecture 4: Types of Environmental Protection. Integrated approach. The measures and procedures to protect the environment. The political and sociological approach, legal measures.
Lecture 5: Planning and management of the area. Basic documents of Environmental Protection. The environmental impact assessment. Risk management. Cost-benefit analysis.
Seminar 1 ( 2 hours): Consideration and discussion of objectives and approach strategies, programs, studies on the process of planning and environment management.
Lecture 6: A study of the environmental impact - steps in the preparation . Legal provisions.
Seminar 2 ( 2 hours): Consideration and discussion of goals and approach to the study of the environmental impact. The debate about the roles of various professionals, overlapping powers and competencies, and suggestions dismissal of the non-compliance! The interest of the community vs. capital interest.
Lecture 7: Methodology of the best available techniques.
Seminar 3 ( 2 hours): A critical review of the methodology for the assessment of best available techniques - debates , discussions, debates , proposals . Development of algorithms and schemes for assessing best available techniques.
Seminar 4 ( 2 hours): Evaluating and choosing the best available techniques for different procedures with the help of the guidelines . Landfills, waste gases , waste incinerators , cement industry , etc ....
Lecture 8: Systems - definition. Standards and Standardization. Croatian Standards Institute. Accreditation and certification. Types of norms.
Lecture 9: ISO. ISO 14001 Environmental Policy. Plan.
Seminar 5 ( 2 hours): Development of ISO 14001 on examples of different organizations. Environmental policy. Plan.
Lecture 10: ISO 14001 Implementation and operational phases. Testing and verification.
Seminar 6 ( 2 hours): Development of ISO 14001 on examples of different organizations. Implementation and operational phases. Testing and verification.
Lecture 11: The definition of quality. Family 9001 standard procedure of introducing a system of quality.
Lecture 12: General requirements of quality management systems and requirements relating to documentation.
Lecture 13: ISO 9001 Document Control and inspection records. Management responsibility and quality policy.
Lecture 14: Planning Quality Management System. Resource management. Control and improve the system. Self-evaluation.
Lecture 15: Integration of standards 14001 and 9001 in a joint management system. Similarities and differences .
Seminar 7 ( 3 hours): Integration of standards 14001 and 9001 in a joint management system for the various economic operators.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester two exams will be performed. Final examinations will be administered during formal examination periods. The following percentage equivalents apply to final grade: <55% Failure; 56%-66% (2); 67%-78% (3); 79%-90% (4);> 90% (5). After written exam, student will attend to oral exam. Lecturers do not give grades. Students earn grades.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Buzuk, Sustavi upravljanja okolišem (u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

osobno

Tonći Lazibat, Poznavanje robe i upravljanje kvalitetom, Sinergija, Zagreb, 2005.

0

poštom

Smjernice za najbolje raspoložive tehnike_MZOIP

0

mreža

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Sustainable Development in Coastal Area
NAME OF THE COURSE Sustainable Development in Coastal Area

Code

KTJ312

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will learn about the sustainable development of coastal activities with purpose to achieving a balance between economic, social and environmental requirements to meet the needs of present generations without compromising the ability of future generations to realize them for yourself.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- meaning and understanding of the term ”sustainable development”
- indicators of sustainable development
- sources of pressures on resources and the quality of life in coastal areas
- importance of implementation of sustainable development in coastal area
- implementation of Integrated Coastal Zone Management
- implementation of sustainable development in different braches of economy in coastal area.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: The history of sustainable development. Legal basis. The principles of sustainable development.
2nd week: The meaning of sustainable development in the coastal area. The impact of public education on the implementation of sustainable development. Preparation of environmental impact studies.
3rd week: Local Agenda 21. Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM). Mediterranean Action Plan.
4th week: The principle of carrying capacity of the environment. Fresh water as a basic resource. Sustainable management of water resources and energy, ensuring the reproducibility.
5th week: Rationalization of energy consumption through the use of renewable sources.
6th week: Sustainable transport management. (I written evaluation)
7th week: Sustainable Tourism. Solving the problem of increased pressure in the tourist season.
8th week: Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development. Sustainable Urban Development.
9th week: Sustainable management of the sea, coastal zone and marine resources.
10th week: Assessment of the success of Coastal Zone Management. Croatian coast and islands, the current state. (II written evaluation)
11th week: Seminar - Case study of good and bed practice. Seminar with examples of good and bed practice is given to student.
12th week: Seminar - Case study of good and bed practice.
13th week: Seminar - Case study of good and bed practice.
14th week: Seminar - Case study of good and bed practice.
15th week: Seminar: Oral presentation of student seminars (III oral evaluation)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire exam can be applied over the two written evaluation and one oral evaluation of seminar during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 70% -80% - good, 80% -90% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Strategija održivog razvitka RH, NN 110/07

1

web

L. Pavičić-Rogošić, Održivi razvoj, Odraz, 2010.

1

Ekološki leksikon, Ministarstvo zaštite okoliša i prostornog uređenja RH, O.P. Springer (ur.), Zagreb, 2001.

1

V. Jelić-Muck, L. Pavić-Rogošić, Pregled i ocjena napretka provedbe Agende 21 u Hrvatskoj, Ministarstvo zaštite okoliša i prostornog uređenja, 2002.

1

web

Strategija razvoja hrvatskog turizma do 2010. godine, Ministarstvo razvoja Hrvatskog turizma, 2003.

1

D. Damić, Pomorski promet i održivi razvoj u prometnoj politici, Naše more 56, 2009, 99-107.

1

web

Hrvatska i održivi razvitak, Gospodarstvo - Stanje i procjena mogućnosti, Ministarstvo razvitka i obnove, Republika Hrvatska, Zagreb, 1998.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Scientific and professional paper

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 Records of lecture attendance.
Annual performance analysis evaluation.
Student questionnaire.
Selfevaluation of teacher.
Feedback from students who have already graduated about the relevance of content items.

 

 

Chemistry and Marine Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry and Marine Protection

Code

KTJ313

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge of the sea; chemical composition and contamination, and the ways to prevent pollution of the marine environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Chemistry and Marine Protection

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to know:
1. fundamental properties of seawater
2. basic physical properties of the sea
3. chemical composition of seawater
4. marine pollution, sources and types of pollution
5. interactive impact of pollutants on the marine environment
6. chemicals in the sea and the manner of their removal

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction to marine chemistry. The fundamental properties of sea water, the origin of water and salt.
Lecture 2: The composition of the oceans and marine sediments.
Lecture 3: The basic physical properties of the sea.
Lecture 4: Chemical composition of seawater. Salinity and density.
Lecture 5: The chemical species in the sea (macro-constituents and micro-constituents).
Lecture 6: Gases in the sea.
Lecture 7: Dissolved organic matter in seawater.
Lecture 8: Marine pollution, sources and types
Lecture 9: Metals in the sea.
Lecture 10: Biodegradable and durable organic compounds.
Lecture 11: The impact of pollutants on the marine environment (persistence in the marine environment, toxicity and other adverse effects, accumulation in marine organisms and sediments, adverse effects on the oxygen content in the sea)
Lecture 12: The chemicals in the sea and ways to remove them.
Lecture 13: Plant Protection (cleaning) must
Lecture 14: Preventing contamination / pollution from vessels.
Lecture 15: Legal regulations on marine environmental protection.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Buljan, M. Zore-Armanda: Osnovi oceanografije i pomorske meteorologije, Institut za oceanografiju i ribarstvo-Split, Split, 1971.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

R.B. Clark: Marine Polution, Clarenddon Press, Oxford, 1986.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

B.A. Duxbury, A.C. Duxbury, Fundamental of oceanography, WCB, Melbourn, Oxford, 1993.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Z. Bičanić: Zaštita mora i morskog okoliša; Z. Bičanić-vlastita naklada, Split, 2004

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E Prohić: Geokemija, Targa, Zagreb, 1998.
Stumm, J.J. Morgan, Aquatic Chemistry: Chemical Equilibria and Rates in Natural Waters, John Wiley&Sons, New York, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Chemistry and Marine Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Chemistry and Marine Protection

Code

KTJ314

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge of the sea; chemical composition and contamination, and the ways to prevent pollution of the marine environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Chemistry and Marine Protection

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Assuming the exercise of the students are expected to know:
- determination of salinity of sea water and chlorinity
- methods for the determination of heavy metals in marine sediments
- determination of organic matter in marine sediments
- determination of pH and oxygen in the sea
- . determination of nutrients in the sea
- determination of carbonate in marine sediments

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Determination of the salinity and chlorinity of seawater.
2. Determination of the pH and alkalinity.
3. Scoping oxygen.
4. Determination of nutrients.
5. Designation of metals in marine sediments.
6. Determination of organic matter in marine sediments.
7. Determination of carbonate in marine sediments.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The requirement for access to a laboratory exercise is passing an oral colloquium for exercise. Overall rating laboratory practice includes evaluating oral tests exercise performance and writing papers. Guest exercises are:<55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Kemija i zaštita mora – interna skripta, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Basic Biotechnology
NAME OF THE COURSE Basic Biotechnology

Code

KTJ315

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining of basic theoretical knowledge in biotechnology as well as the role and application of microorganisms and enzymes in different areas.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- definition of term biotechnology
- differentiate the primary and secondary cell metabolism and its application in biotechnology
- explain of microbe cell growth diagram
- explain the advantages of isolated enzymes in biotechnology
- describe of basic bioreactor design
- describe the basic methods of intracellular products isolation
- outline some examples of biotechnological processes

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Description and overview of the course. Definitions of biotechnology, interdisciplinary of the field, history development, application areas.
2nd week: Perception of biotechnology in society. Metabolism and control of metabolic processes; primary and secondary metabolism, substrates.
3rd week: Anaerobic and aerobic metabolism. Microorganisms in biotechnology (bacterial, fungi (yeasts and moulds). Microbial growth kinetics. Determination of specific growth rate and Monod constant.
4th week: Enzyme technology (enzyme characteristics as the biocatalysts, advantages and disadvantages compared to whole cells). Enzyme kinetics.
5th week: Enzyme sources. Selection, production and immobilization of enzymes.
6th week: Biocatalysts in non-conventional processes. Bioreactors, photo-bioreactors, design.
7th week: Oxygen transfer and oxygen concentration determination. Heat transfer in bioreactor. An overview of the previous lecture for the test.
First test.
8th week: Extracellular, periplasmic and extracellular products of metabolism. Down-stream processing: separation solid-liquid, isolation of intracellular products.
9th week: Concentration and purification of products from bioreactor. Purification process control.
10th week: Process economy: cost estimation and an example of process design. An overview of biotechnological processes – basic scheme of biotechnological process.
11th week: Alcohol fermentation and its application in industry.
12th week: Lactic acid fermentation and its application in industry. Anaerobic biomass fermentation.
13th week: Biotechnology in pharmacy. Bacterial polymers.
14th week: Biotechnology in environmental protection and waste water treatment. Biosensors.
15th week: An overview of the previous lecture for the test. Second test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.6

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 45%. Attendance on lectures (80-100%) and seminar report make 10% of final grade. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%). Previous activity (one passed test) is valid in summer exam period with fraction of 10%. Written exam is 40% and oral exam is 50%. Students without any successful previous activity attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%) both with fraction of 50%.
Grades: successful (60% – 70%), good (71% – 80%), very good (81% – 90%), excellent (91% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

C. Ratlege, B. Kristiansen, Eds. Basic Biotechnology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2006.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J.E. Smith, Biotechnology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Construction Materials and Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Construction Materials and Protection

Code

KTJ316

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Maja Kliškić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective of this course is to achieve a knowledge and understanding of a wide variety of construction materials and their properties and their importance of practical applications; fundamentals of corrosion processes and corrosion protection, and methods of corrosion testing and prevention. This course will provide student to acquire an orderly pattern of thought in solving practical corrosion problems in a critical and creative manner.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Construction Materials and Protection
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in Construction Materials and Protection”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- differentiate of various types of structural materials due to their composition, properties and applications
- explain the advantages and disadvantages of the main structural materials
- evaluate the resistance of materials for any given conditions
- define and classify the corrosion processes
- perform the corrosion tests
- ascertain and select the most effective corrosion protection system for any given conditions – project related and on-site if appropriate – and evaluate its durability

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Materials as the basis for the development of modern civilization. Economic and technological aspects. Distribution of construction materials with regard to the composition, properties and application.
2nd week: Structure of materials.
3rd week: Physical and chemical properties of construction materials.
4th week: Mechanical properties. Norms.
5th week: Behavior of materials under different conditions of exploatation.
6th week: The main metal materials and their applications. Iron, carbon and low alloy high alloyed steels. Non-ferrous metals and alloys.
7th week: Inorganic non-metallic materials. The organic construction materials. Composite materials.
8th week: First test
9th week: The definition of the economic importance of corrosion. Chemical corrosion of metals and alloys.
10th week: The types of corrosion attack.
11th week: Corrosion under specific conditions: in the atmosphere, water, soil, sea water, melt, biocorrosion, corrosion by stray currents.
12th week: Methods of protection. Ecological approach to the design of corrosion protection. Changing the properties of corrosion environment.
13th week: Protection by changing the electrode potential. Surface protection. Corrosion tests.
14th week: Classification and standardization of methods. Methods of testing in the laboratory. Tests on the model, the ongoing exploatation of the field.
15th week: Second test.
Monitor of atmospheric corrosion, Polarization of iron in sulphuric acid solution, Determination of efficiency of corrosion inhibitors by thermometric method, Cathodic protection of metal by protector, Investigation of oxide films formed on stainless steel, Field work in the laboratories of the Quality Insurance of Shipbuilding Industry Split, Field work in the company AD Plastik Split, Field work at the Institute IGH d.d.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 40% and exercises with 20%. On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: - 60% insufficient, 61 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Filetin, F. Kovačiček, J. Indof, Svojstva i primjena materijala, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje,Zagreb, 2007.

1

T. Filetin, Pregled razvoja i primjene suvremenih materijala, Hrvatsko društvo za materijale i tribologiju, Zagreb, 2000.

1

T. Filetin, Izbor materijala pri razvoju proizvoda, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje, Zagreb, 2006.

1

J.R. Davis, Corrosion – understanding the basic, ASM International, 2000.

1

B. Jarić, A. Rešetić, Korozija i katodna zaštita, Korexpres, Zagreb, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Uhlig’s Corrosion Handbook, 2nd edition, R.W. Revie (ed.), Pennington, New Yersey, 2000.
I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Tracking suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Construction Materials and Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Construction Materials and Protection

Code

KTJ316

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective of this course is to achieve a knowledge and understanding of a wide variety of construction materials and their properties and their importance of practical applications; fundamentals of corrosion processes and corrosion protection, and methods of corrosion testing and prevention. This course will provide student to acquire an orderly pattern of thought in solving practical corrosion problems in a critical and creative manner.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Construction Materials and Protection
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in Construction Materials and Protection”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- differentiate of various types of structural materials due to their composition, properties and applications
- explain the advantages and disadvantages of the main structural materials
- evaluate the resistance of materials for any given conditions
- define and classify the corrosion processes
- perform the corrosion tests
- ascertain and select the most effective corrosion protection system for any given conditions – project related and on-site if appropriate – and evaluate its durability

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Materials as the basis for the development of modern civilization. Economic and technological aspects. Distribution of construction materials with regard to the composition, properties and application.
2nd week: Structure of materials.
3rd week: Physical and chemical properties of construction materials.
4th week: Mechanical properties. Norms.
5th week: Behavior of materials under different conditions of exploatation.
6th week: The main metal materials and their applications. Iron, carbon and low alloy high alloyed steels. Non-ferrous metals and alloys.
7th week: Inorganic non-metallic materials. The organic construction materials. Composite materials.
8th week: First test
9th week: The definition of the economic importance of corrosion. Chemical corrosion of metals and alloys.
10th week: The types of corrosion attack.
11th week: Corrosion under specific conditions: in the atmosphere, water, soil, sea water, melt, biocorrosion, corrosion by stray currents.
12th week: Methods of protection. Ecological approach to the design of corrosion protection. Changing the properties of corrosion environment.
13th week: Protection by changing the electrode potential. Surface protection. Corrosion tests.
14th week: Classification and standardization of methods. Methods of testing in the laboratory. Tests on the model, the ongoing exploatation of the field.
15th week: Second test.
Monitor of atmospheric corrosion, Polarization of iron in sulphuric acid solution, Determination of efficiency of corrosion inhibitors by thermometric method, Cathodic protection of metal by protector, Investigation of oxide films formed on stainless steel, Field work in the laboratories of the Quality Insurance of Shipbuilding Industry Split, Field work in the company AD Plastik Split, Field work at the Institute IGH d.d.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 40% and exercises with 20%. On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: - 60% insufficient, 61 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Uhlig’s Corrosion Handbook, 2nd edition, R.W. Revie (ed.), Pennington, New Yersey, 2000.
I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Tracking suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Selected Processes of Chemical Industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Selected Processes of Chemical Industry

Code

KTJ318

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Miće Jakić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Qualifying students for the adoption and application of the fundamental principles of chemical processes in technological processes of inorganic and organic industry with special emphasis on techno-economic and environmental aspects.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Exercises in Selected Processes of Chemical Industry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course the student will be able to:
1. Classify and apply the basic principles of chemical processes in technological processes of inorganic and organic industry.
2. To explain the process and apply methods for the preparation of process water.
3. Categorize energy sources for inorganic processes and describe the processes of combustion of solid fuels.
4. Describe catalytic processes and influential factors in production processes basic inorganic chemical industry (ammonia, sulfuric acid, nitric acid).
5. Explain the basic processes (hydration, sintering) and the influential factors in the production of ceramic materials.
6. Distinguish metallurgical, electrothermical and electrochemical processes in relation to the implementation of the process, equipment, quality assurance, the possibility of using secondary raw materials and by-products of inorganic processes.
7. Compute important parameters for the phases of the production process.
8. Explain the basic processes (primary and secondary) of the processing of petroleum.
9. Distinguish and explain processes for production of components for organic synthesis (alkanes, alkenes, acetylene, aromatic hydrocarbons, synthesis gas) from the petrochemical sources (natural gas, petroleum).
10. Describe technological processes in organic synthesis.
11. Explain the processes of polymerisation.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Elementary principles of chemical processes.
2nd week: Water in the technological processes. The precipitation agents, ion exchangers and membranes in the waters-treatment process (basic processes and reactions, equipment and process control).
3rd week: Energy sources for inorganic processes. Fuels and burning processes of solid fuels. Gas generator.
4th week: The most important examples of catalytic processes of the basic inorganic chemical industry (synthesis of ammonia, production of nitric and sulphuric acids). The written knowledge tests (I Colloquium).
5th week: The high-temperatures reaction in the solid state and sintering processes in the production of ceramic materials.
6th week: Forming processes of dispersion systems with water. Clay-water system.
7th week: Hydration processes and hardening of mineral binders.
8th week: Metallurgical and electrothermical processes. Electrochemical industrial processes, electrolyses of aqueous solutions and melting salts. The written knowledge tests (II Colloquium).
9th week: Primary and secondary processes of the processing of petroleum.
10th week: Processes for production of components for organic synthesis (alkanes, alkenes, acetylene, aromatic hydrocarbons, synthesis gas) from the petrochemical sources (natural gas, petroleum).
11th week: Alternative (no conventional) methods for raw materials production for organic synthesis.
12th week: Technological processes in organic synthesis according the criteria of similar chemical reactions (thermodynamics and kinetics, catalysts). The written knowledge tests (III Colloquium).
13th week: The production of fine chemicals. The processes of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, hydroformilation and oxidation reactions.
14th week: The production of fine chemicals. The processes of alkylation, esterification and nitration.
15th week: The production of fine chemicals. The processes of sulfonation and sulphating, hydrolysis and polymerisation. The written knowledge tests
(IV Colloquium).
SEMINARS:
During the semester are processed numerical examples (tasks) from lectures and the flow diagram presentation of selected technological processes (physical and chemical base processes, equipment and environmental impact), which together with lectures seems a whole.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking four (4) partial tests during the semester, i.e., two (2) partial tests from the inorganic part, and two (2) partial tests from the organic part. Test passing score is 60%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of theoretical (oral) and written part. Exam passing score is 60%.
Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, and 93% 100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R. Krstulović, Tehnološki procesi anorganske industrije, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 1986.

5

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

1

www.ktf-split.hr

Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa, Zagreb, 1997.

6

I. Klarić, Tehnološki procesi organske industrije (I. dio), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2008., (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

0

www.ktf-split.hr

Z. Janović, Naftni i petrokemijski procesi i proizvodi, Hrvatsko društvo za goriva i maziva, Zagreb, 2011.

15

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Zelić, Z. Osmanović, Čvrstoća i trajnost cementnih kompozita, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, 2014., ISBN 978-953-7803-01-8.
Z. Osmanović, J. Zelić, Proizvodnja Portland-cementa, Univerzitetski udžbenik, Univerzitet u Tuzli, B&H, Tuzla, 2010., ISBN 978-9958-897-04-7.
http://www.knjiga.ba/proizvodnja_portlandj_cementa-k7412.html

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) Faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Selected Processes of Chemical Industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Selected Processes of Chemical Industry

Code

KTJ319

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Miće Jakić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Qualifying students how to implement experiments in the laboratory and semi-industrial scale, and how to analysis the chemical and/or physical process in particular phases of technological processes of selected inorganic and organic industry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the cours Selected Processes of Chemical Industry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course the student will be able to:
1. Conduct experiments in the laboratory and industry.
2. Perform measurements independently and teamwork.
3. Interpret the collected data and measurement results using the methodology of chemical engineering.
4. To analyze the chemical and / or physical processes according to present conditions and material properties.
5. Recommendation of process parameters in order to optimize processes in particular phases of production and application of selected inorganic and polymeric materials.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Water treatment. Water softening processes. Lime-Soda process. Ion-exchange process.
2. Electrochemical processes. Electrolysis of sodium chloride solution.
3. Catalytic processes. Contact oxidation of sulphur dioxide.
4. Hydration processes. Physical and chemical properties of silicate cement (density, specific surface area, normal consistency, sitting time, heat of hydration).
5. Chemical resistance of soda-lime-silica glass.
6. Physical and chemical properties of petroleum products (fuels and lubricants).
7. Dehydration of ethanol to acetaldehyde.
8. Esterification of phthalic anhydride with n-butanol (Synthesis of di-butyl phthalate).
9. Manufacture of soap.
10. Synthesis of azo dyes.
11. The sulphonation of styrene / divinyl benzene.
12. Step polymerization (synthesis of polyester or polyamide).
13. The radical chain polymerization (suspension polymerization of styrene emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate).
For the proposed exercises pertaining to organic part of the student will make four (4).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Implementation and analysis of selected processes according to preset conditions.
Each student is required to do the entire exercises planned program. On completion of all exercises the final written exam is obligated.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.6

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Successful completion of laboratory works has share 60% and the final written exam 40% score. Exam passing score is 60%. Grades: 60% - 70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, and 93% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

1

www.ktf-split.hr

I. Klarić, Vježbe iz polimerizacije (za internu upotrebu), Tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 1990.

10

I. Klarić, Vježbe iz tehnoloških procesa organske industrije (za internu upotrebu), Tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 1990.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Krstulović, Tehnološki procesi anorganske industrije, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 1986.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) Faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Professional Practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Professional Practice

Code

KTJOSP

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

2.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Final thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Final thesis

Code

KTJOZR

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

10.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

3. STUDY PERFORMANCE CONDITIONS

3.1. Places of the study performance

Buildings of the constituent part (name existing, under construction and planned buildings)

Identification of building

Zgrada tri fakulteta

Location of building

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Year of completion

2015

Total square area in m2

29500

Identification of building

Zgrada u Kaštel Sućurcu

Location of building

Kaštel Sućurac

Year of completion

1961

Total square area in m2

3000

3.2. List of teachers and associate teachers

 

Course Teachers and associate teachers

Prof Davor Rušić

Prof Vanja Martinac
ScD Jelena Jakić
Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Prof Davor Rušić

Analysis and Optimization of Water Use

Prof Marina Trgo
Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Analytical Chemistry

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Basic Biotechnology

Prof Branka Andričić

Catalysis

Prof Branka Andričić
Prof Matko Erceg

Chemistry and Air Protection

Prof Marina Trgo
Prof Marija Bralić
ScM Nenad Periš
Asst Prof Maša Buljac
Asst Prof Marin Ugrina

Chemistry and Marine Protection

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Computer application

Prof Dražan Jozić

Computer application

Prof Dražan Jozić

Construction Materials

Prof Maja Kliškić

Construction Materials and Protection

Prof Maja Kliškić

Disposal of Hazardous Waste

Prof Pero Dabić

Electrochemistry

Prof Senka Gudić

Electrodeposition

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Environmental Menagment Systems

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Evercises in Construction Materials

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Exercices in Processing of Plastics and Rubber

Prof Matko Erceg

Exercises in Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Exercises in Chemistry and Air Protection

Prof Marina Trgo
Prof Marija Bralić
ScM Nenad Periš
Asst Prof Maša Buljac
Asst Prof Marin Ugrina

Exercises in Chemistry and Marine Protection

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Exercises in Construction Materials and Protection

Prof Branka Andričić

Exercises in Disposal of Hazardous Waste

Prof Pero Dabić

Exercises in Electrochemistry

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko

Exercises in Electrodeposition

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Exercises in General Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Exercises in General Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Exercises in General Microbiology

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić
Asst Prof Ana Maravić

Exercises in Industry and Environment

Prof Marina Trgo
Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Exercises in Inorganic Materials

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Exercises in Measurement and Process Control

Renato Stipišić

Exercises in Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater

Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Exercises in Organic Chemistry

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Exercises in Physical Chemistry

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Exercises in Polymers and the Environment

Prof Matko Erceg

Exercises in Preparation of Technological Waters

Prof Pero Dabić
Asst Prof Damir Barbir

Exercises in Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Prof Dražan Jozić

Exercises in Pysics 1

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Exercises in Pysics 1

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Exercises in Pysics II

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
ScD Mirko Marušić
Lucija Matković

Exercises in Pysics II

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
ScD Mirko Marušić
Lucija Matković

Exercises in Reaction Engineering

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Exercises in Renewable Energy Sources

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko

Exercises in Safety at Work

Prof Pero Dabić

Exercises in Selected Processes of Chemical Industry

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Miće Jakić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Exercises in Technological Processes in Organic Industry

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Exercises in Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry

Prof Pero Dabić
Asst Prof Damir Barbir

Exercises in Transport Phenomena

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić
ScD Antonija Čelan

Exercises in Unit Operations

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić
ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Exercises in Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić
ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Exercises in Waste Management

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Exercises in Wastewaters Treatment

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović
Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Exercises of Analysis and Optimization of Water Use

Prof Marina Trgo
Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Final Thesis

 

Final thesis

 

Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering

Prof Željko Domazet
Prof Lovre Krstulović-Opara

General Biology

Prof Nada Bezić
Assoc Prof Valerija Dunkić

General Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

General Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

General Microbiology

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić

Industry and the Environment

Prof Marina Trgo

Inorganic Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Inorganic Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Inorganic Materials

Prof Jelica Zelić

Mass and Energy Balances

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić
Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Mathematics 1

ScM Branka Gotovac
Lucija Ružman

Mathematics 1

ScM Branka Gotovac
Lucija Ružman

Mathematics 2

ScM Branka Gotovac
Lucija Ružman

Mathematics 2

ScM Branka Gotovac
Lucija Ružman

Measurement and Process Control

Prof Jadranka Marasović

Mineral Raw Materials from Seawater

Prof Vanja Martinac

Organic Chemistry

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Physical Chemistry

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Physics 1

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
Lucija Matković
Matko Maleš

Physics 1

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
Lucija Matković
Matko Maleš

Physics II

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
Lucija Matković

Physics II

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
Lucija Matković

Polymeric Materials

Prof Branka Andričić

Polymers and the Environment

Prof Branka Andričić

Preparation of Technological Waters

Prof Pero Dabić
Asst Prof Damir Barbir

Process of Precipitation and Crystallization

Prof Dražan Jozić

Processing of Plastics and Rubber

Prof Matko Erceg

Professional Practice

 

Professional Practice

 

Reaction Engineering

Prof Davor Rušić
Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Renewable Energy Sources

Prof Senka Gudić

Safety at Work

Prof Pero Dabić

Selected Processes of Chemical Industry

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Miće Jakić

Sustainable Development in Coastal Area

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Technological processes in organic industry

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Technological Processes of Inorganic Industry

Prof Pero Dabić

Thermodynamics

Prof Vanja Martinac
ScD Jelena Jakić
Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Transport Phenomena

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić
ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Unit Operations

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić
ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić
ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Waste management

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Wastewaters Treatment

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Water Protection

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

 

3.4. Optimal number of students

The optimal number of students in the Undergraduate Study of Chemical Tech in terms of space, equipment and number of full-time teachers is 90 and represents the proposed admission quota.

3.5. Estimate of costs per student

Average annual tuition fee per student amount about 31,500.00 kunas.

3.6. Plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance

In keeping with the European standards and guidelines for internal quality assurance in higher education institutions (according to “Standards and Guidelines of Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area”) on the basis of which the University of Zagreb defines procedures for quality assurance, the proposer of the study programme is obliged to draw up a plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance.

Documentation on which the quality assurance system of the constituent part of the University is based:

- Regulations on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if existing)
- Handbook on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if it exists)

Description of procedures for evaluation of the quality of study programme implementation

  • Fore each procedure the method needs to be described (most often questionnaires for students or teachers, and self-evaluation questionnaire), name the body conducting evaluation (constituent part, university office), method of processing results and making information available, and timeframe for carrying out evaluation
  • If procedure is described in an attached document, name the document and the article.

Evaluation of the work of teachers and part-time teachers

The process of student evaluation of the teaching quality is conducted by the Quality Enhancement Centre (at the level of the University) and the Quality Enhancement Committees (at the level of constituents). The procedure consists of informing students and teachers, student survey questionnaire, the processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results, the adoption of measures to improve quality. The procedure is described in detail in the Regulations on the procedure for student evaluation of teaching at the University of Split. The processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results are under jurisdiction of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Summary results for the each constituent are submitted to the Dean and the leader of the Quality Enhancement Committee.

Monitoring of grading and harmonization of grading with anticipated learning outcomes

Procedures, rules and criteria for grading of students include: method for taking the exams, requirements for taking the exams, method of evaluation through colloquia, seminars, active participation in classes, exams and other obligations, conditions for signature, a list of references for exam preparation, and data about the teacher, assistant, etc. Informations about procedures, rules and criteria for grading students can found on the website of the Faculty and at the introductory lectures.

Evaluation of availability of resources (spatial, human, IT) in the process of learning and instruction

The Faculty provides adequate and appropriate educational resources for the study program and support for teaching and non-teaching activities of students, which are consistent with the specific programs and student needs and readily accessible to students (equipped classrooms, library, computer classrooms, and support for students with disabilities.

Availability and evaluation of student support (mentorship, tutorship, advising)

Student evaluation of the teaching quality, student survey questionnaire.

Monitoring of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole

Analysis of student success at the study is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre of the University of Split. The analysis is carried annually by survey questionnaire at the beginning of the academic year for the previous academic year. The results of the analysis and measures to improve student success are presented to the Senate of the University of Split by leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Likewise, ISVU system allows the student service and ISVU coordinator to keep track of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole.

Student satisfaction with the programme as a whole

Quality Improvement Centre of the University of Split has defined the procedure for conducting a survey on the evaluation of the overall study. The student survey questionnaire for evaluation of the study is conducted by the platform Evasys but after the student has passed the final exam. The aim of the survey is to hear the opinion of students on various aspects of the study which they have completed and to determine flaws in order to increase the quality of the content and implementation of the study. Data is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre and results are submitted to the Head of Department and to leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre.

Procedures for obtaining feedback from external parties (alums, employers, labour market and other relevant organizations)

Former students are contacted in order to express their assessment of the qualifications for the professional requirements. Selected employers can be contacted as well in order to assess their satisfaction with students which have been studing at this the study program. Regular exchange of information at conferences organized by the ALUMNI of the Faculty (AMACTFS).

Evaluation of student practical education (where this applies)

Evaluation of student training is conducted orally by the course teacher. At the same time the student must submit the log and seminar about selected topic of professional practice.

Other evaluation procedures carried out by the proposer

Formal and informal consultation with colleagues in the profession at the Faculty level and beyond.

Description of procedures for informing external parties on the study programme (students, employers, alums)

Results are available on the official web site of the Faculty (https://www.ktf.unist.hr) Brochure (revised annually) The University review. Universitas – supplement of the Slobodna Dalmacija about the University of Split. The participation of staff and students ot the Faculty at the Science Festival and similar events.