Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering

NAME OF THE COURSE Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering

Code

KTJ201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić

Credits (ECTS)

3.5

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

P S V T

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students gain knowledge about the basic unit operations in the environmental engineering through theoretical expressions based on the mass and energy balances. Students are also acquainted with the working principles of the most used devices and selection of their optimum working conditions regarding minimization of energy consumption and environmental protection.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering
Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Transport Phenomena
Enrolled in or passed the course Transport Phenomena

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- fundamental principles of mechanical and of heat and mass transfer operations,
- explain the laws that follow performance of individual operation,
- explain the influence of operating variable on individual operation applied in the environment protection,
- explain the working principle of the most common used equipment for particular operation,
- bring up possible operating problems that may occur during operation performance.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction unit operations in environmental engineering. Fluid transport.
2nd week: Centrifugal pumps. Characteristic curves of a centrifugal pump.
3rd week: Coarse dispersion. Classification.
4th week: Separation. Classification and separation equipment.
5th week: Filtration. General Consideration. Filtration equipment.
6th week: Mixing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Power consumption.
7th week: Mixing of particulate solids. Selection of mixing equipment.
8th week: Heat and mass transfer operations. Heat-exchange equipment.
9th week: Evaporation. Types of evaporators.
10th week: Gas absorption. Packings and packed tower design.
11th week: Principles of absorption.
12th week: Principle of drying. Use of psychometric charts.
13th week: Drying equipment.
14th week: Zeotropic and azeotropic mixtures Phase equilibrium. Batch distillation; flash and vacuum distillation.
15th week: Continuous distillation with reflux. Rectification and stripping.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture and seminar attendance: 80 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

0.0

Practical training

0.0

Experimental work

0.0

Report

0.0

 

 

Essay

0.0

Seminar essay

0.0

 

 

Tests

0.0

Oral exam

1.3

 

 

Written exam

0.8

Project

0.0

 

 

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester student may take the exam by two theoretical (oral) and two calculation (written) tests. Test passing score is 55%. After passing all tests the average score for oral and written parts is calculated and the grade of each part is determined by the following criteria: 55%-66% - satisfactory, 67%-78% - good, 79%-89% - very good, 90%-100% - excellent.
In the final grade theoretical part constitutes 67% of grade while written part 33%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take exam in the regular examination periods. Final grade is determined by previously notated criteria.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. L. McCabe, J. C. Smith, P. Harriot, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2004.

2

C. J. Geankoplis, Transport Prosesses and Separation Process Principles (Includes Unit Operations), 4th ed., Pearson Eucation, Inc.,New Jersey, 2007.

1

Hraste, Mehaničko procesno inženjerstvo, 2. izdanje, HINUS, Zagreb, 2003.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Welty, J. W. Wicks, R. E. Wilson, G. L. Rorrer, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th ed., J. Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, 2007.
R.H. Perry, D.W. Green, J.O. Maloney, Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1999.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester,
- students evaluation organized by University.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)