UNIST
U N I V E R S I T Y   O F   S P L I T

FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

 

 

DETAILED PROPOSAL OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Undergraduate university studij

Chemistry

 

 

 
GENERAL INFORMATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

Name of higher education institution

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Address

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Phone

021/ 329-420

Fax

021/ 329-461

E-mail

dekanat@ktf-split.hr

Internet address

https://www.ktf.unist.hr/

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Name of the study programme

Chemistry

Provider of the study programme

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Other participants

Type of study programme

Level of study programm

Academic/vocational title earned at completion of study

Bachelor of Chemistry

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Reasons for starting the study programme

Chemistry permeating the entire modern society, are represented in all developed regions of the EU countries and, therefore, need to take an appropriate position in the Split-Dalmatia County and beyond through the activities of University education institutions.
Chemistry, as a fundamental field of natural sciences and one of the oldest scientific disciplines, has grown up on three mutually related contents: theory, synthesis and analysis. In the global development of contemporary society chemistry was and has remained an unavoidable widely applicable scientific field focusing on industry, environmental protection, pharmacy and nutrition. It is necessary to foster, promote and develop the educational programmes of chemistry at all levels for the purposes of continual extending of knowledge of chemistry and the realization of educational support for the future superstructure of graduate and postgraduate study programmes from other scientific fields like chemical engineering and technology, environmental protection, biology, pharmacy, medicine, agronomy, food technology, agronomy, forensics, etc.

1.2. Relationship with the local community (economy, entrepreneurship, civil society, etc.)

Possible partners outside the high school system who have so far expressed interest and established cooperation (some are teaching base of the Faculty and the University of Split), and planned employment of young people who have completed university undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate study program in chemistry are: companies from Dalmatia ( eg. AD Plastik, Brodosplit, CEMEX, Cian), the entire Croatian (the pharmaceutical industry (eg., PLIVA Croatia, Adriatic galenic laboratory), the oil industry (INA), the food industry, cosmetics industry, paints and varnishes, the company dealing with the protection environment, etc.) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (eg. aluminum), institutes (eg, Institute for Adriatic Crops and karst Reclamation, Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Mediterranean Institute for life Sciences), educational institutions of different levels (high school, polytechnic) VIK, County Institute of public health, the Croatian army and police, various inspection services at the national and regional level, ect.

1.3. Compatibility with requirements of professional organizations

One of the basic preconditions for quality implementation of the proposed program is educational, professional and research cooperation of all relevant factors that may contribute to the process of training and education of students. Teachers who teach in the study Chemistry are members of various professional associations and bodies in Croatia (Croatian Chemical Society, Association of Chemical Engineers Split, Croatian Society of Chemical Engineers, Parent Committee for the natural sciences, field chemistry, Regional scientific council for natural Science, Croatian Academy of Engineering, Croatian standards Institute, etc.) and abroad (eg. American Chemical Society).

1.4. Name possible partners outside the higher education system that expressed interest in the study programme

Some of the specialized industry places and laboratories, teaching bases and the so-called places with whom Faculty of Chemical Technology cooperates (usually for the purpose of maintaining the placement of students - practical and field work and the preparation of the final work of students) are: companies from Dalmatia (eg. AD Plastik, Brodosplit, CEMEX, Cian), the entire Croatian (pharmaceutical industry, oil industry, food industry, cosmetics industry, paints and varnishes, the company dealing with the protection of the environment, etc.) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (eg. aluminum) and others. Partners faculties and institutes are as follows: Ruder Boskovic, Institute for Adriatic Crops and karst Reclamation, Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Mediterranean Institute for life Sciences.

1.5. Financing

Undergraduate study program Chemistry financed as all other study programs at the Faculty of Chemical Technology in Split (earmarked funds MZOS).

1.6. Comparability of the study programme with other accredited programmes in higher education institutions in the Republic of Croatia and EU countries

In developing the curriculum of undergraduate study Chemistry analyzed the comparability with similar programs of university studies in the world, including comparable programs exist in the following institutions University of Maribor (http://www.fkkt.um.si/sl/node/1462), Maribor , Slovenia, University of Ljubljana (http://www.fkkt.uni-lj.si/sl/studij/), Ljubljana, Slovenia, Universite de Geneve (http://www.unige.ch/sciences/Enseignements/ProgrammeCours_en .html), Geneva, Switzerland, Universite de Provence (http://chimie-sciences.univ-amu.fr/master-chimie), Marseille, France, University of Oxford (https://www.ox.ac.uk / admissions / undergraduate / courses-listing / chemistry? WSSS = 1), Oxford, United Kingdom, etc.

1.7. Openness of the study programme to student mobility (horizontal, vertical in the Republic of Croatia, and international)

The study is organized through one semester courses, which is one of the important preconditions for mobility. Compliance programs Chemistry with similar studies in the Republic of Croatia and the EU allows mobility of students and teaching staff. Mobility can be achieved through enrollment in certain courses in studies of other faculties, the whole semester at similar colleges or through the development of the final project.
The Faculty has signed the agreement for Erasmus mobility of teachers and students from the Universite Techniche Dresden, Dresden, Germany, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, Universita di Trieste, Trieste, Italy, AGH University of Science ant Technology, Krakow, Polonia, Polytecnich institutes of Braganca, Braganca, Portugal, University of Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia, Polymer technology college, Maribor, Slovenia and others. Chemistry and technology in Split participate in multilateral cooperation with the possibilities of mobility of students and teachers across the Central European Exchange Program for University Studies ( CEEPUS). Through this program, the cooperation with the following foreign institutions: 1) Faculty of Material Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland, 2) Institute für Analytische Chemie, Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz, Austria, 3) department of Analytical Chemistry, Slovak University of Technology, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, 4) Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic, 5) Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Slovenia.

1.8. Compatibility of the study programme with the University mission and the strategy of the proposer, as well as with the strategy statement of the

Program is aligned with the Strategy of Faculty of Cemistry and Technology, University of Split, and its mission and vision, but also the strategy of the University of Split.

1.9. Current experiences in equivalent or similar study programmes

Faculty of Cemistry and Technology in Split was founded in 1960. During the last period, the Faculty has made a mark in the scientific production of Croatian and is thus confirmed his college education and maturity level. After his scientific productivity has become a major research institution located outside the Croatian Zagreb. The Faculty of Medicine published a considerable number of scientific papers, of which a significant number covered by the scientific bases Web of Science and Current Contents.
University teaching activity Faculty since its foundation is based on two scientific fields: chemistry and chemical engineering, which belong to different scientific fields (natural and technical).
Undergraduate study program Chemistry grew out of the former 45-year-old teaching and research experience of the faculty. Teachers College for many years involved in the teaching of chemistry in other faculties and departments of the University of Split, as well as at other universities abroad.

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

2.1. General information

Scientific/artistic area of the study programme

Natural sciences

Duration of the study programme

3 years (6 semesters)

The minimum number of ECTS required for completion of study

180

Enrolment requirements and admission procedure

Completed 4-year secondary school and secondary school leaving exam.

2.2. Learning outcomes of the study programme (name 15-30 learning outcomes)

University bachelor of chemistry will be able to:
- solve problems applying knowledge of mathematical and physical principles
- apply major concepts, theoretical principles and experimental findings in chemistry to the solution of problems
- apply proper procedures and regulations for safe handling and use of chemicals
- use common computer programs for chemical computations, data acquisition and data base searching
- carry out, record and analyze the results of chemical experiments
- use modern instrumentation and classical techniques and properly record the results of their experiment
- understand the basic principles of unit operations
- solve problems using critical thinking and analytical reasoning
- perform a literature review to find the informations necessary for their work
- present written and oral reports of technical information clearly and concisely
- understand the impact of their work on the economy, environment and society
- understand the professional and ethical responsibility
- function effectively in multidisciplinary team
- present the professional contents independently
- recognize the importance of life-long learning.

2.3. Employment possibilities

Graduates students can be employed by the aforementioned business entities with which the faculty cooperates, as well as in educational institutions, various inspection services at the national and regional leve, ect.

2.4. Possibilities of continuing studies at a higher level

At the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology are graduate study Chemistry and Chemical Technology, and besides opportunities to continue studying at the Faculty, graduates of university undergraduate study Chemistry can continue their studies at other universities at home and abroad, especially in the field of European Higher Education.

2.5. Name lover level studies of the proposer or other institutions that qualify for admission to the proposed study

Not applicable.

2.6. Structure of the study

Terms and method of studying at a university undergraduate degree in chemistry are based on the Regulations on the Study and Study System Chemical Technology that complies with the Rules of Study and Study System of the University of Split. For example, mention rules detailed provision requirements for enrollment in the next academic year, regular or compulsory exams and exam dates and the like.

2.7. Guiding and tutoring through the study system

At the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology there is a model teacher-mentor through which students can get help, advice and support. There is also a mentoring system when creating the final work.

2.8. List of courses that the student can take in other study programmes

For undergraduate study Chemistry students may choose electives for a small number of cases (eg, English, sports activities) from other studies at the University of Split in accordance with the rules of the University who may or may not enter the workload which yields a specific decision for each student.

2.9. List of courses offered in a foreign language as well (name which language)

Teaching at undergraduate level of Chemistry, generally will run in the Croatian language. Since the program there are objects which carries a possibility of realization of teaching in English, it is possible that in these courses as needed realizes teaching in English.

2.10. Criteria and conditions for transferring the ECTS credits

Criteria and transfer credits shall be prescribed by agreement between the institutions of higher education, the Rules on Study and Study System at the University of Split, the Statute of Chemical Technology in Split and the Regulations on Study and Study System of Chemical Technology in Split.

2.11. Completion of study

Final requirement for completion of study



Requirements for final/diploma thesis or final/diploma/exam

Requirements for final thesis are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam and evaluation and defence of final/diploma thesis

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam is regulated by the Ordinance on final thesis/diploma thesis at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

 

2.12. List of mandatory and elective courses

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA101 Mathematics 1 45 45 0 0 8.0
KTA102 Physics 1 45 30 0 0 8.0
KTA103 Exercises in Pysics 1 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTA104 General Chemistry 45 30 0 0 7.0
KTA113 Computer application 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTG101 Exercises in General Chemistry 0 0 45 0 2.0
Total
165 105 75 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTA106 Mathematics 2 45 30 0 0 6.0
KTG102 Physics 2 45 15 0 0 6.0
KTG103 Exercises in Pysics 2 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTG104 Inorganic chemistry 1 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTG105 Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 1 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTG106 Analytical Chemistry 1 45 15 0 0 6.0
KTG107 Exercises in Analytical Chemistry 1 0 0 45 0 3.0
Total
165 75 120 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTG201 Inorganic Chemistry 2 30 30 0 0 5.0
KTG202 Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 2 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTG203 Analytical Chemistry II 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTG204 Exercises in Analytical Chemistry II 0 0 60 0 4.0
KTG205 60 15 0 0 6.5
KTG206 Organic chemistry 1 60 15 0 0 6.5
KTG207 Laboratory exercises in organic chemistry 1 0 0 30 0 2.0
Total
180 75 120 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTG208 Organic Chemistry 2 30 15 0 0 5.0
KTG209 Exercises in Organic Chemistry 2 0 0 45 0 3.0
KTG210 Physical Chemistry 2 30 15 0 0 5.0
KTG211 Exercises in Physical Chemistry 0 0 60 0 4.0
KTG212 Catalysis 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTG213 Natural Products 45 0 0 0 4.0
KTG214 Exercises in Natural Products 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTGOSP Proffesional practice 0 0 0 0 3.0
Total
135 45 135 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 5.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTG302 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 30 15 0 0 4.5
KTG303 Exercises in Instrumental Methods of Analysis 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTG304 Biochemistry 1 45 15 0 0 5.0
KTG305 Exercises in Biochemistry 1 0 0 60 0 4.0
KTG306 Analysis of Real Samples 30 15 0 0 3.5
KTG307 Exercise in Analysis of Real Samples 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTG308 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTG309 Exercises in elementary chemical engineering 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTG313 Environmental Chemistry 30 15 0 0 4.0
Total
165 75 135 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 6.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTG310 30 15 0 0 6.0
KTG311 Selected processes of chemical industry 45 15 0 0 5.5
KTG312 Elementary Chemical Engineering 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTGOZR Final work 0 0 0 0 8.0
Total
75 30 30 0 21.5
Elective KTG301 General Biology 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTG315 Enzyme kinetics 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTG316 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTG317 Perfumes and Cosmetics 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTG318 Experimental in Perfumes and Cosmetics 0 0 15 0 1.0
KTG319 Chemistry in pharmacology 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTG320 Exercise of chemistry in pharmacology 0 0 25 5 2.0
KTG321 Chemistry of polymers 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTG322 Exercises in polymer chemistry 0 0 30 0 2.0
KTG323 Nanochemistry 30 0 0 0 3.0

 

 

2.13. Course description

 

Mathematics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematics 1

Code

KTA101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScM Branka Gotovac

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Ružman

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

45

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic elements of calculus and linear algebra.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to be able to:
- identify and sketch graphs of elementary functions, to determine the domain of the given function
- find the derivative of the given function
- apply the dervative in practice (tangents and normals, maximum, minimum and inflection points) and to interpret the shape of graphs
- solve the system of linear equations (by matrix inversion, by Gaussian elimination)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Sets: Notion. Algebra of sets. Sets of numbers.
2. Functions: Notion. Composite functions. Inverse function.
3. Elementary functions.
4. Functions: Limits. Continuity.
5. Derivative and application: Notion. Interpretation. Derivative techniques.
6. Differential. Higher order derivatives.
7. Theorems of differential calculus. Maximum, minimum points.
8. Inflection points. Asymptotes. Graphs sketching.
9. Sequences: Notion. Limits.
10. Series: Convergence of numeric series. Power series. Taylor series.
11. Matrices and vectors: Matrix algebra. Determinants. Inverse matrix.
12. Linear systems of equations.
13. Vector algebra.
14. Solid analityc geometry.
15. Course review. Revision.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance of classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Examination: either by continuously checking and grading students’ progress during the semester or in exam terms by passing written and oral exam.
At the beginning of the course students will be informed of in detail elaborated rules for both models of examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bradić, R. Roki et. al., Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Element, Zagreb (više izdanja)

47

B.P. Demidovič, Zadaci i riješeni primjeri iz više matematike, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb (više izdanja)

5

I. Slapničar, Matematika 1, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje u Splitu, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2002. (http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat1)

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kurepa, Matematička analiza I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1997.
L. Krnić, Z. Šikić, Račun diferencijalni i integralni, I dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.
Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Physics 1

Code

KTA102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Matko Maleš
Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Introducing students to the knowledge and principles of physics in the field of mechanics
- Forming the proper view towards the interpretation of physics phenomena and their application
- Developing the level of cognitive processing required for further studies

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Physics I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the course, the student is expected to have mastered:
- Physical quantities, units and dimensional analysis;
- The characteristics of the exact approach to phenomena in both micro and macro world;
- The principles of the classic general mechanics;
- The basic principles of the special mechanics (mechanics of oscillations, waves and fluids);
- The use of calculus in mechanics contents;
- The application of the laws of mechanics in concrete physics examples;
- The application of the obtained knowledge in solving problem tasks;
- The application of the knowledge in professional situations.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Space, time, matter. Physical quantities, Laws of Physics. Plane and space geometry, using of vector algebra, differential and integral calculus.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
2nd week: Kinematics of particles
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
3rd week: Particles dynamics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
4th week: Work and energy
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
5th week: Conservative and nonconservative forces
Partial assessment (1st preliminary test) ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
6th week: Conservation of energy law
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
7th week: Systems of particles.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
8th week: Collisions; Conservation laws
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
9th week: Rigid body mechanics. Conservation laws. Restrictions of rigid body approximations and the theory of elasticity.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
10th Equilibrium. Restrictions of rigid body approximations and the theory of elasticity.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
Partial assessment (2nd preliminary test) ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course
11th week: Oscillations and waves
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
12th week: Many particle physics: gasses, liquids and solids. Internal energy, heat and heat disorder. Transport phenomena. Phase transition phenomena.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
13th week: Fluid mechanics: statics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
14th week: Fluid mechanics: dynamics
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course
15th week: Elastic waves. Sound.
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course.
Partial assessment (3rd preliminary test ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.4

Oral exam

2.3

Written exam

2.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted via 3 midterm exams, related to lectures (theory) and seminars (solving problems), according to syllabus.
During the final examination period, the final theory exam shall be taken after passing the final problem’s solving exam.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Cindro, Fizika I, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1985

10

E. Babić, R. Krsnik, M. Očko, Zbirka riješenih zadataka iz fizike, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 199.

3

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, J. Walker, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1993;
Janko Herak, Osnove kemijske fizike, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2001.
V. Lopac, P. Kulišić, M. Pavičić, Zbirka zadataka iz fizike, FGZ Zagreb, 1983.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Pysics 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Pysics 1

Code

KTA103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The fundamental and the inseparable part of all physics research is the experiment. The aim of this course is to introduce the students to various techniques of conducting experiments and methods of measuring the physics quantities in the field of mechanics. Additionally, the aim is to enable the development of skills needed to conduct experiments, gather data and master various numerical problems, which are related to measuring and testing physics quantities.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Physics I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Obtaining basic knowledge and skills needed to conduct experiments
- The knowledge of various methods and techniques of measurement
- Mastering the calculation of errors which occurred during the measurement
- Mastering the evaluation of errors which occurred during the measurement
- The skills of graphic representation of the measured data and the method of writing reports pertaining to the experiment and the results of measuring conducted

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

- Measurement of length, mass and density. (3 hours)
- Numeric and graphic processing of the measurement data. (2 hours)
- Measurements of characteristic quantities: the laws of forces (friction, Hooke´s law /conservation laws (energy, momentum). (3 hours)
- Measurements of characteristic quantities: rotation (moment of inertia, torque) (2)
- Oscillations (spring oscillations, mathematical, physical and torsional pendulum). (2 hours)
- Laws of hydrostatics (Archimedes law, surface tension). (3 hours)
- Compensating exercises
- Final revision test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.3

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.4

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Krpan Lisica, Praktikum iz fizike - I. dio, 2010, sveučilišni priručnik

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE General Chemistry

Code

KTA104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To familiarize students with the basic chemical laws and principles and to enable students to master the chemical items that follow General Chemistry. To develop students ability to think critically about the experiments performed in the laboratory and about the involvement of of chemistry in everyday life.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in General Chemistry
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in General Chemistry”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the the course students will be able to:
1) Understand the nature and properties of the substance differentiate elementary substances from compounds, distinguish homogeneous from heterogeneous mixtures, assume procedures for separating mixtures into pure substances.
2) Understand and applied the problem-solving approach to the balance of substances in chemical changes
3) Understand the structure of atoms and existing models of chemical bonds in such way that they can predict certain properties and reactivity of chemical elements and their ionic and covalent compounds
4) Discern the nature of certain chemical reactions.
5) Adopt the concept of pH, and assume direction of the chemical reactions on the basis of knowledge of chemical kinetics and equilibrium.
6) Independently and safely perform simple chemical experiments

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
1. Introduction - Natural sciences and chemistry. Units of measurement and measurement. Classification of matter. Pure substance. Decomposition of the substance to the pure substance.
2. Properties of pure substances, physical and chemical properties. Atom and chemical element. The chemical symbols of elements. The laws of chemical combination by weight and volume. The atomic theoryes from the early ideas to John Dalton. Avogadro’s hypothesis.
3. The discovery of the structure of atoms. The discovery of X-rays and radioactivity. Rutherford model of the atom. X-rays and crystal structure. Bragg equation. Isotopes and the structure of the atomic nucleus.
4. The structure of pure substances. The atomic structure of substances. Types of a crystal systems and crystal characteristics. Cubic crystal system. The molecular structure of substances. The nature of the gas. The nature of the fluid. The concept of temperature. The kinetic theory of gases.
5. Gas laws and the equation of state of an ideal gas. Real gases. Relative atomic and molecular weight. Methods for determining relative atomic (Dulong - Petit method, X-ray diffraction, mass spectrograph) and molecular weight (density of the gas, the method of Victor Mayer, Hoffman method). Periodic table of the elements and the periodic law.
6. Electronic structure of atoms - Bohr model of the atom, quantum numbers. Quantum theory of the electronic structure of atoms. Atomic orbitals.
7. Periodic Classification of elements and the periodic table. Periodic changes in physical properties. Atomic radius. Ionization energy. Electron affinity. Electronegativity.
8. Chemical bonding and molecular structure - Electronic valence theory, ionic and covalent compounds. Electronegativity and degree of oxidation. Writing Lewis structures and the octet rule. Formal charges. Exceptions from the octet rule. VSEPR model and geometry of the molecule.
9. Bond characteristics. Valence bond theory and theory of molecular orbitals.
10. Intermolecular forces. Dipole moment, Van der Waals and London forces, hydrogen bond.
11. The structure and properties of the liquid and solid. Physical properties of solutions. Types of solution. Expression of concentration.
12. The liquid in the liquid solution. Solutions of solids in liquids. Solutions of gases in liquids. Effect of temperature on the solubility. Effect of pressure on the solubility of gases. Colligative properties of solutions: nonelectrolyte and electrolyte solution.
13. Chemical reactions - types of chemical reactions, redox reactions, complex reactions (protolytic reactions and precipitation reactions and dissolution), complex reactions.
14. Chemical kinetics, reaction rate, reaction mechanism, the activation energy. Chemical equilibrium - term equilibrium, chemical equilibrium and chemical equilibrium constant. Factors that affect the chemical equilibrium.
15. Equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Balance in the electrolyte solutions - equilibrium in solutions of acids and bases , the equilibrium of the complex in solution, the equilibrium between the solution and the insoluble crystals, redox balance
Seminars:
1. The oxidation number: definition, rules for determining in ions and molecules. Examples and training.
2. Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry. Names of monoatomic cations and monoatomic anions. Names of poliatomic cations and anion. The names of the ligands. Names of complex ions. Names of oxo acid and their salts.
3. Naming of inorganic compounds - training.
4. Balancing chemical equations, balancing redox equations.
5. Writing redox equations - practice.
6. The stoichiometry: Qualitative and quantitative relationships in chemical reactions. Molar method.
7. Stoichiometry: Quantitative relationships. Yield in chemical reactions and processes: the relevant reactant, the reactant in excess of the theoretical amount of reactants, the theoretical amount of product, yield and loss.
8. The stoichiometry: volume and mass in chemical reactions.
9. Electronic configuration of atoms and ions
10. Lewis structural formula
11. Electronic structural formula
12. Chemical equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems
13. Chemical equilibrium in electrolyte solutions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars, and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students who obtain a signature from the course General Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows :
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right.
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through three partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija I dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

Brinić, Slobodan. Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Opće kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Grubač Z.: Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Opće kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Sikirica, M., Stehiometrija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb

0

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Darrell D. Ebbing and Steven D. Gammon, General Chemistry, 9th edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 2009.
Raymond Chang, Chemistry, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mathematics 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematics 2

Code

KTA106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScM Branka Gotovac

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Ružman

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic elements of integral calculus, differential calculus of several variables and the basic of differential equations.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to be able to:
- apply the techniques of integration (integration by substitution, integration by parts)
- use the definite integral in its geometrical applications
- solve the first-order differential equations (variables separable, homogeneous differential equations, linear differential equations, exact differential equations)
- solve the second-order linear nonhomogeneous differential equations with constant coefficients

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Indefinite integral. Table of integrals.
2. Integration by substitution. Integration by parts.
3. Integrating rational fractions. Integrating by algebraic substitution.
4. Definite integral.
5. Improper integrals.
6. Application of definite integral.
7. Functions of several variables. Limit and continuity.
8. Partial derivatives. Differential.
9. Tangent plane and normal line. Maxima and minima.
10. Double integrals.
11. Geometric application of double integrals.
12. Ordinary differential equations.
13. First-order differential equations.
14. Second-order differential equations.
15. Course review. Revision.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance of classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.3

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.5

Oral exam

1.1

Written exam

1.1

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bradić, R. Roki et. al., Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Element, Zagreb (više izdanja)

47

B.P. Demidovič, Zadaci i riješeni primjeri iz više matematike, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb (više izdanja)

5

I. Slapničar, Matematika 2, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2008.

0

http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kurepa, Matematička analiza I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1997.
Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.
McCallum, Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Multivariable Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2002.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Computer application
NAME OF THE COURSE Computer application

Code

KTA113

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of computers and computer systems. Knowledge about the use of Internet content and protect your computer from malicious programs. Basic skills about the content management (folders and files) on PCs using the Windows operating system. Basic skills using programs offered in the MS Office software.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
1. Manage content on PC computer (files and folders)
2. Use the MS Word in the purpose of the editing the file according to the specified requirements (defining the shape and page layout, inserting the images, finished elements, tables, graphs ...)
3. Use the MS Excel for analysis, calculation, sorting, graphical presentation and format tables.
4. Use the MS PowerPoint to create presentations
5. Set up and use MS Outlook for editing and emailing
6. Find reliable sources of information on the Internet

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week L General information about the course and mode of examination, Introduction to computers application, Information activity and technology, Computerization, Computer applications in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
E
2. Week L Hardware (PC), Von Neumann’s model computers, Computer hardware, Computer types, Basic terms in the Computer Engineering and informatics, Basic parts (components) of the PC, Central processing unit (CPU), Computer memory, Motherboards and connectors, Input and Output devices
E
3. Week L Operating systems and applications, The BIOS (Basic Input / Output System), Preparing disks and drives for installation of the OS, File system (FAT, NTFS), Computer Programs, System programs, Application programs, Operating systems
E
4. Week L Basics commands for MS-DOS, GUI (Graphical User Interface), Properties GUI, History of developing the MS Windows OS, Example Installations operating systems (Windows OS), Customizing the User Interface, Library, Customize settings on PC computer, Firewall, Windows Defender, Windows Update, Action Center, Commercial antivirus programs
E
5. Week L Backup and Restore, Control Panel, Customize the computer, The Device Manager, Accounts, Network and Sharing Center, Troubleshooting, Personalization, BitLocker Drive Encryption, Region and Language, Programs and Features, Installing and uninstalling programs, Display, Devices and Printers, Default Programs, Help and Support, Accessories and system tools, Shortcuts in Window OS, Changing the language of Windows OS
E
6. Week L Malicious software (malware), Computer viruses, Computer worms, Trojan horses, Logic bombs, Spyware, Advertising Programs (Adware), INTERNET, History of the Internet, TCP / IP protocol
E
7. Week L First test
E
8. Week L Internet, Computer network and classification networks, Internet protocols: HTTP, HTTPS and FTP, Web browsers, Copyright Law
E
9. Week L MS Office, MS Word, How to start the MS Word, Layout MS Word window, The status bar, Tabs and tools, Copy and paste data, Special characters, Styles, Tabs, Sections, Creating a new document, Copy text, Headers and footers, Page numbers
E MS Word: How to insert and edit the text and its formatting. Paragraph formatting. Lists of lists. Working with documents. formatting documents
10. Week L How to insert and edit the formulas and equations, Application of the finished style characteristics, Input tables and formatting, input images in the document, the entry of bibliographic data entry page breaks and section breaks (define different sections of the document), display the contents of the document
E MS Word: Insert pictures, tables and SmartArt elements in the document. Formatting headers and footers document. Entering references and footnotes in the document. Insert the page break, Section break, Application of different style for document
11. Week L MS Excel, How to start MS Excel, Layout MS Excel windows, Toolbar for quick access, Status bar, Tabs and tools, Tabs formulas, Editing data within a worksheet, Graphic data presentation, Input data string in the table, Add the trend data, Sorting data set
E MS Excel: Working with the tables. Entering data into tables and data formatting. Entering a series of data. Entering data from different files. Displaying data graphically.
12. Week L Conditional Formatting Data, Creating and deleting equations, Addresses cells (relative, absolute, mixed), Types of functions, Logical operators, Boolean functions, Examples of application functions (IF, AND, OR, COUNTIF ..), MS PowerPoint, MS PowerPoint Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating presentations, add themes, Themes Edit, Insert object (images, tables, links, media content ...)
E MS Excel: Data processing, Calculating with tables, Input and syntax for creating mathematical equations. Showing the trend curve.
13. Week L MS Outlook, MS Outlook Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating a user account , Creating a new e-mail
E MS Power Point: Creating presentations. Choosing the design, How to make redesign of an existing template.
14. Week L Databases, What databases they are?, Fields in databases, How databases are developed?, Center for online databases, Bibliographic databases, Citation databases, Databases with full-text, Sciencedirect databases, Scopus databases, Web database, Bibliography
E
15. Week L Second Test
E

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.6

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The written exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Practical part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 20% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 20% and practical part of exam has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and practical exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam participates with a share of the 30% of the final grade and practical part of exam with a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 60%-71% - sufficient, 72%-81% - good, 82%-91% very good, 92%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D.Jozić, Predavanja iz kolegija:Primjena računala, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Interna skripta, Split, 2013.

1

Wallace Wang, Office 2010 For Dummies, Wiley Publishing Inc., Indiana, 2010.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

1. Tracking suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
2. Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in General Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in General Chemistry

Code

KTG101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Exercising, testing and confirm knowledge from lectures. Understanding with the methods of experimental work and the acquisition of skills necessary for independent work in the lab.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course General Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will upon completion of the course be able to:
1. Practically through experiments verify the theoretical assumptions
2. Gain independence in performing experiments
3. Design simple experiments to illustrate the chemical properties of the substance
4. Actively exploring ways in which this discipline has consequently impact on the outside world.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1
The basic rules of laboratory work, safety precautions and protection in the lab, basic laboratory equipment. Washing, cleaning and drying of dishes. Basic laboratory operations, chemicals and dealing with them. Decomposition of the substance to the pure substance. Decomposition of heterogeneous and homogeneous mixture
Exercise 2
Decomposition of the mixture to the pure substance, Decomposition of heterogeneous substances, Sedimentation, decanting, centrifuging, filtering, Buchner funnel, distillation and fractional distillation, sublimation of iodine. Extraction of iodine from aqueous solutions
Exercise 3
Physical and chemical changes, the law of conservation of weight, Gay - Lussac’s law of connected volumes. Exercise with models of unit cells. Determining the relative atomic mass of zinc. Determination of the empirical formula of copper chloride.
Exercise 4
Gas Laws: Determination of the molar volume of oxygen, Boyle’s law, Charles Gay - Lussac’s law, the pressure dependence of the temperature in gases.
Exercise 5
Solutions and their properties. Expressing of concentration. Preparation of the solution with given concentration. Solutions of liquids in liquids. Solutions of gases in liquids. Dependence of solubility on the nature (structure) of the substance. Dependence of solubility on temperature. Dissolution of liquids in liquids. Dissolving gases in liquids. Henry’s law. Determination of molar mass by freezing point depression. Illustration of electrolytic dissociation. Illustration of ions traveling to the electrodes. Electrical conductivity of the solution. Redox - reactions of sulfur and oxygen. Redox reaction of dilute nitric acid solution and iron (II) sulfate. Decomposition and formation reactions of complexes. Ligand substitution reaction. Protolytic reactions (acid- base titration).
Exercise 6
Chemical kinetic, effect of concentration of reactants on the rate of chemical reactions. Effect of temperature on the rate of chemical reactions. The catalytic effect on the rate of chemical reactions. Balance in electrolyte solutions. Moving the chemical balance. Determination of the acid dissociation constant, Ka . Determination of pH: Approximately determination of pH using indicators. Determination of pH using pH sensors. Electrolysis - Determination of Faraday’s constant. Electromotive force of galvanic cells - Daniell cell.
Exercise 7
Protolytic reactions and titration curves obtained with the help of computers
Determination of the acid dissociation constant, Ka. Hydrolysis. Buffers.
Exercise 8
Vacuum distillation. Determination of the molar mass of easily volatile liquids.
Determination of molar mass by freezing point depression

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

10

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physics 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Physics 2

Code

KTG102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Introducing students to the knowledge and principles of physics in the fields of electromagnetism, optics and elementary quantum physics
- Forming the proper view towards the interpretation of physics phenomena and their application
- Developing the level of cognitive processing required for further studies

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Pysics II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the course, the student is expected to have mastered
- The principles of electromagnetism and electromagnetic radiation
- The principles of geometrical and physical optics
- The basic principles of quantum physics
- The application of the obtained knowledge in concrete physics examples
- The application of the obtained knowledge in solving professional problem tasks
- Recognition of the application of the knowledge of physics in everyday situations

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Electric charges, electrostatic force and electrostatic field. Vector field flux and Gauss’s law. Application of Gauss law. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course. (1 hour)
2nd week: Electric potential and potential difference. Moving and storing electric charges, electric circuits. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
3rd week: Charges in motion and their interactions, electric current. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
4th week: Magnetic field. Gauss law. Ampere’s law. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
5th week: Time depending electric and magnetic fields. Faraday’s law. Inductivity. Induction generators. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
Partial assessment (1st preliminary test) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course.
6th week: Vector field circulation. Applications. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
7th week: Maxwell equations. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
8th: week: Alternating currents. Electromagnetic oscillating circuit and radiation. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
9th week: Energy of electric and magnetic fields. Electromagnetic waves and nature of light. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
10th week: Electric and magnetic field in matter. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
Partial assessment (2nd preliminary test) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course.
11th week: Physical optics (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
12th week: Geometric optics. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
13th week: Optical systems and instruments. Eye physics. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
14th week: Wave properties of matter. Concepts of quantum physics (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
15th week: Concepts of quantum physics - applications. (3 hours)
Seminar: Solving the numerical examples pertaining to the theoretical content addressed during the course (1 hour)
Partial assessment (3rd preliminary test ) related to seminars and theory addressed during the course

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.9

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.7

Oral exam

1.7

Written exam

1.7

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted via 3 midterm exams, related to lectures (theory) and seminars (solving problems), according to curriculum.
During the final examination period, the final theory exam shall be taken after passing the final problem’s solving exam.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Cindro, Fizika II, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1985.

10

E. Babić, R. Krsnik, M. Očko, Zbirka riješenih zadataka iz fizike, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, Zagreb, 1990.

3

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley, New York 2003.
Janko Herak, Osnove kemijske fizike, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2001.
V. Lopac, P. Kulišić, M. Pavičić, Zbirka zadataka iz fizike, FGZ Zagreb, 1983.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Pysics 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Pysics 2

Code

KTG103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

ScD Mirko Marušić
Lucija Matković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic and the inseparable part of all physics research is the experiment. The aim of this course is to introduce the students to various techniques of conducting experiments and methods of measuring the physics quantities from the field of electromagnetism and optics. Additionally, the aim is to enable the development of skills needed to conduct experiments, gather data and master various numerical problems, which are related to measuring and testing physics quantities.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Pysics II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Obtaining the basic knowledge and skills needed to conduct experiments in the field of electromagnetism and optics
- The knowledge of various methods and techniques of measurement
- Mastering the calculation of errors which occurred during the measurement
- Mastering the evaluation of errors which occurred during the measurement
- The skills of graphic representation of the measured data and the method of writing reports pertaining to the experiment and the results of measuring conducted.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

- Electric circuits: elements and instruments. (4 hours)
- Direct current ; Resistance and resistors.(4 hours )
- Alternating current; Capacitance and capacitors. (3 hours )
- Alternating current; Inductance and inductors. (3 hours )
- RLC circuits (3 hours )
- Laws of geometrical optics. (3 hours )
- Laws of physical optics. (3 hours )
- Optical instruments. (4 hours )
- Spectroscopy / quantization (3 hours )
- Compensating exercises
- Final revision test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.6

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.6

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Weekly tests,
Grade of the written experiment report,
Final test.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Lučić Lavčević, Praktikum iz fizike II. dio, 2012, interna skripta

0

web portal KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Inorganic chemistry 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Inorganic chemistry 1

Code

KTG104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introduce students to the chemical reactivity of elements along the periodic table, and with the properties and composition of common chemicals. To develop students ability to notice similarities and differences between inorganic compounds and inorganic substances. Understanding of the changes in the various physical and chemical conditions

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry
The condition for taking the exam: Passed the course ”Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry I”

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students upon completion of the course:
1) will know the basic characteristics and producing of chemical elements for the major groups of periodic table of elements (PTE)
3) be able to identify the type and properties of chemical compounds of main group
3) be able to identify the type and properties of transition metal compounds
4) to classified compounds on the base of their characteristics
5) to predict acidic, basic and amphoteric properties of salts
6) to know common salt crystal structure
7) to predict the possible reaction mechanisms and outcomes of chemical reactions
8) to independently and safely perform simple chemical reactions

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
1. Hydrogen position in PTE, hydrogen properties and production, positive oxidation state and hydrides
2. Noble gases, properties of group, obtaining and using of xenon compounds
3. Introduction to halogens, elements properties in order to oxidation state
4. Fluorine production and properties, differences between the fluorine and the other members of the group, fluorine compounds. Chlorine producing and properties, compounds of chlorine, bromine and Iodine
5. Introduction to chalcogen elements, elements properties in order to oxidation state
6. Oxygen properties and production, the compounds of oxygen, oxides, water
7. Sulfur properties and production, oxides and sulfur acids, other sulfur compounds, compounds of selenium and tellurium,
8. A group of nitrogen, elements properties in order to oxidation state
9. Nitrogen, properties of the production, ammonia, nitric acid and other nitrogen compounds, nitrogen fixation
10. Phosphorus, properties and production, oxides and acids of phosphorus, arsenic, antimony and bismuth
11. A group of carbon, elements properties in order to oxidation state
12. Carbon allotropes, carbon properties and production, carbon oxides, carbides, carbonates and bicarbonates.
13. The compounds of silicon, germanium, tin and lead, semiconductor properties of silicon and germanium
14. A group of boron, elements properties in order to oxidation state, boranes, boric acid. Production and properties of aluminum, aluminum compounds, gallium, indium, thallium
15. Alkali and alkaline earth metals
Seminars :
1. Balancing chemical reactions, writing and balancing redox reactions in one line
2. Common reactions of hydrogen, the reducing action of hydrogen
3. Common reactions of chlorine, the disproportionation of chlorine in alkaline solutions, the oxidation activity of the halogens compounds
4. Common reactions of chalcogen elements, reaction of oxygen and ozone, the oxidizing action of oxygen,
5. The reaction of sulfur, the reactions which translate elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid, the oxidizing action of sulfuric acid, a dehydrating effect of sulfuric acid
6. Common reactions of nitrogen, the nitrogen production reactions, the reaction of ammonia oxidation to nitric acid, the oxidizing action of nitric acid.
7. Common reactions of phosphorus, oxidation reactions of phosphorus to phosphorus and phosphoric acid
8. Common reactions of carbon, oxides of carbon production, reducing effect of CO, binding of CO2 from the air, the precipitation of carbonates, cation hydrolysis
9. Common reactions of the boron group elements, reaction of boric acid production, dissolution of borax in water, production of crystalline boron acid, base properties of aluminum hydroxide,
10. Aluminum reducing action, aluminotermic reaction, common reactions of metals and metal production,
11. Common reactions of alkali and alkaline earth metals with water and their salts
12. Common reactions of transition metals, proving of peroxide with titanyl ion, oxidation states of vanadium, oxidative properties of permanganate, equilibrium between chromate and dichromate, iron compounds
13. Noble metals, zinc, cadmium and mercury
14. Sea - a mixture of inorganic substances. The chemical composition of sea water, salinity, pH and speciation
15. Mixed problems

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students who obtain a signature from the course Inorganic Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right .
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through three partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part .

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

Brinić, Slobodan. Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Grubač Z.: Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

F. Albert Cotton et al., Basic Inorganic Chemistry, New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 1

Code

KTG105

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Exercising, testing and confirm knowledge from lectures. Understanding with the methods of experimental work and the acquisition of skills necessary for independent work in the lab.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Inorganic Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will upon completion of the course be able to:
1. Practically through experiments verify the theoretical assumptions
2. Gain independence in performing experiments
3. Design simple experiments to illustrate the chemical properties of the substance
4. Actively exploring ways in which this discipline has consequently impact on the outside world.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercises :
1. Exercise: HYDROGEN
2. Exercise: 17th GROUP (Halogens )
3. Exercise: 16th GROUP (Chalcogens)
4. Exercise: 15th GROUP
5. Exercise: 14th GROUP and 13th GROUP, 1st and 2nd groups (Alkali and earth alkali metals)
6. Exercise: TRANSITION ELEMENTS (groups 3 to 7)
7. Exercise: TRANSITION ELEMENTS (groups 8 to 12)
8. Exercise: Synthesis of double salts, alums and Tutton salts, Synthesis of Mohr’s salt
9. Exercise: Synthesis of nickel complexes

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

10

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analytical Chemistry 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Analytical Chemistry 1

Code

KTG106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring basic basic theoretical knowledge of analytical chemistry, the role and application of analytical chemistry in various fields of human activity. Being able to access the chemical analysis of the sample by applying the laws of chemistry chemical balance for identification of an analyte in a sample in order to obtain useful information.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercise of Analytical Chemistry I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will will be able to
- Define the concept of analytical chemistry
- Differentiate between the concepts of qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis
- Define the concept of analyte, the analytical signal and information.
- Understanding the basic laws of chemical analysis.
- Define the equilibrium constants of chemical reactions, the law of mass action and the principle according to Le Chatelier.
- . Implement the principle of chemical equilibrium chemical reactions for identification and separation of analytes from complex matrix.
5. Distinguish the heterogeneous from homogeneous chemical equilibrium systems.
6. Predict the behavior of a chemical reaction due to the change in pH and due to the effect of the foreign ions.
7. Capacity to apply knowledge in practice, especially in problem solving based on information from systems.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: The description and view the contents of the object. Definitions of analytical chemistry. Division of Analytical Chemistry. The concept and the formation of the analytical signal. Seminar: Solving problems.
Week 2: Definition of chemical analysis - qualitative and quantitative. Seminar: Solving problems.
Week 3: Constants homogeneous equilibrium of importance in analytical chemistry. Seminar: Solving problems.
Week 4: Constants of heterogeneous equilibrium of importance in analytical chemistry. Seminar: Solving problems.
Week 5: Qualitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of acids and bases. Consideration of acid-base balance. Seminar: Solving problems.
Week 6: Acid-base equilibrium, acidity, pH buffers. Seminar: Solving problems
Week 7: I. Partial test (theoretical and seminar materials). Solving test
Week 8: Concept and definition of complex ions, complexometric equilibrium, kinetics of complex formation. Seminar: Solving problems
Week 9. Consideration of complexometric equilibrium. Seminar: Solving problems.
Week 10: Concept and definition of the electrochemical reaction. Consideration of equilibrium electrochemical reactions. Seminar: Solving problems
Week 11: Concept and definition of the redox reaction. Consideration of equilibrium electrochemical reactions. Seminar: Solving problems.
Week 12: Concept and definition of heterogeneous equilibrium. Consideration of the process of dissolution and precipitation. Seminar: Solving problems
Week 13: Concept and definition of extraction. Simple and complex extraction. Extraction of weak acids and metal cations from solution. Seminar: Solving problems
Week 14: Concept and definition of chromatography. Analytical separation by chromatography. Seminar: Solving problems
15th week: II. Partial test (theoretical and seminar materials). Solving test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

3.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 30% , written-oral with 60% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2016.

4

D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, šesto izdanje (englesko), prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.

18

M. Kaštelan-Macan, Kemijska analiza u sustavu kvalitete, Školska knjiga, Zagreb 2003.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

1. Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju I. dio, Redak, Split, 2013.
2. R. Kellner, J. M. Mermet, M. Otto, M. Valcarcel and H. M. Widmer (Urednici), Analytical Chemistry (A Modern Approach to Analytical Science, Second Edition) Wiley-VCHVerlag Gmbh & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2004.
3. D. A. Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler and S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Eighth Edition, Thompson Brooks/Cole, Belmont, USA, 2004.
4. G. D.Christian, Analytical Chemistry, Sixth Edition, John Willey & Sons, INC, 2004.
5. D. Harvey, Modern Analytical Chemistry, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, New York, London, 2000.
6. F. W. Fifield & D. Kealey, Principles and Practice of Analytical Chemistry, Blackwell Science Ltd, Malden MA, London, 2000.
7. M. Kaštelan-Macan, Enciklopedijski rječnik analitičkog nazivlja, FKIT, Mentor, Zagreb 2014.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Analytical Chemistry 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Analytical Chemistry 1

Code

KTG107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim is to familiarize students with the mechanisms and equilibrium of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions and their application in analytical methods and qualitative determination.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Analytical Chemistry I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Plan and conduct chemical experiments on the basis of theoretical knowledge and predictions based on calculations, Systematics cations and anions

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week: Introduction in laboratory work, Basic laboratory operations. (3 hours)
2. Week: Qualitative chemical analysis – determination of groups of cations. (3 hours)
3. Week: Qualitative chemical analysis – determination of cations in groups (6 hours)
4. Week: Determination of cations in the mixture. (hours)
5. Week: Qualitative chemical analysis – determination of groups of anions (3 hours)
6. Week: Qualitative chemical analysis – determination of anions in groups (6 hours)
7. Week: Determination of aniona in the mixture (6 hours)
8. Week: extraction (4 hours)
9. Week: chromatography (4 hours)
10. Week: ionic exchange (4 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

2.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Completed all laboratory exercises and tests (100 %).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Giljanović, Praktikum iz kvalitativne analize, sveučilišni priručnik,2010

20

na web-stranici Zavoda za analitičku kemiju

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

1. Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2016.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Completed all laboratory exercises
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Inorganic Chemistry 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Inorganic Chemistry 2

Code

KTG201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Introduce students to the chemistry of transition metals and to the structure and properties of their compounds. Applying important theoretical principles of atomic theory and chemical bonding in explanation of structure of complex compounds with examples of their use and importance in bioinorganic and organometallic chemistry.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

At the end of the course students will:
- know the characteristic properties and reactions of transition metal
- be able to predict physical and chemical properties of transition metals compounds based on the knowledge of their structure
- be able to determine the structure and predict the properties of complex ions and their compounds
- be able to predict the influence of ligands on the properties of complex ions and their compounds
- understand the basic problems in bioinorganic and organometallic chemistry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. lecture: Introduction to the Chemistry of transition elements
2. lecture: Group III PSE, lanthanides and actinides
3. lecture: IV and V groups PSE
4. lecture VI and VII of the PSE Group
5. lecture: VIII and IX of the PSE Group
6. lecture: X, XI and XII PSE group
7. lecture: Complex compounds, types of ligands, isomerism, the application of valence bond theory
8. lecture: Theory of crystal field
9. lecture: Theory of molecular orbitals (LCAO) and photoelectron spectroscopy, symmetrical operations
10. lecture: ligand field theory.
11. lecture: The stability of complex compounds, thermodynamic and kinetic
12. lecture: Spectroscopic and magnetokemijsko behavior of complex compounds.
13. lecture: Organometallic compounds.
14. lecture: Bioinorganic Chemistry.
1. seminar: Transition elements,
2. seminar: Elements of 4th-5th PSE group
3. seminar: Elements 5th-6th PSE group
4. seminar: Elements of 7th-8th PSE group
5. seminar: Elements of 9th-10th PSE group
6. seminar: Elements of 11th-12th PSE group
7. seminar: Coordination nomenclature
8. seminar: isomerion complex compounds
9. seminar: The structure of complex ions, magnetic properties
10. seminar: Forecasting the colors of the complex based on the type of ligand and cleavage d orbitals of the metal ion
11. seminar: Determining the structure of a complex compound on the basis of experimental results
12. seminar: Identifying stable complexes
13. seminar: Organometallic Compounds
14. seminar: Bioinorganic Chemistry

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars, and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students who obtain a signature from the course Inorganic Chemistry II can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows :
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right.
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through two partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

F. Albert Cotton et al., Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1999.

0

W. Kaim, B. Schwederski, Bioinorganic Chemistry: Inorganic Elements in the Chemistry of Life, J. Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 1994.

0

Brinić, Slobodan: "Predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije II"

0

web, http://www.ktf-split.hr

Grubač, Zoran: "Predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije II"

0

web, http://www.ktf-split.hr

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije II (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2008.

0

web, http://www.ktf-split.hr

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 2

Code

KTG202

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Exercising, testing and confirm knowledge from lectures. Understanding with the methods of experimental work and the acquisition of skills necessary for independent work in the lab.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Inorganic Chemistry II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will upon completion of the course be able to:
1. Practically through experiments verify the theoretical assumptions
2. Gain independence in performing experiments
3. Design simple experiments to illustrate the chemical properties of the substance
4. Actively exploring ways in which this discipline has consequently impact on the outside world.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

In the frame of laboratory exercises students will perform exercises independently from the content of these topics:
Exercises :
Exercise 1
Changing the coordination number of compounds - Complexes of nickel
Exercise 2
Preparation of potassium trioxalatoferrate(III) trihydrate and preparation of potassium tetraperoxochromate(V)
Exercise 3
Determination of composition of the potassium trioxalatoferrate(III) trihydrate and potassium tetraperoxochromate(V).
Exercise 4
Preparation of ammonium manganese(II) phosphate monohydrate; Preparation of ferric(III) chloride; Preparation of chromium (III) oxide
Exercise 5
Preparation of [CoCl(NH3)5]2+ complex.
Exercise 6
Hydration of [CoCl(NH3)5]2+ complex.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

3.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije II (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2008.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analytical Chemistry II
NAME OF THE COURSE Analytical Chemistry II

Code

KTG203

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScD Maja Biočić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

The goal of course is to familiarize students with the mechanisms and equilibrium of homogenous and heterogeneous chemical reactions and their applications in analytical methods for determining process. Theoretical basis of kinetic methods of analysis will be explained.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Calculate and predict the acid-base titration curve. Apply acid-base titration based on theoretical predictions.
2. Explain the method of calculating pM values different parts of the EDTA titration curves, based on the application of knowledge of the equilibrium of complex formation.
3. Construct the redox titration curve and anticipate the possibility of using visual redox indicators based on theoretical predictions.
4. Define and apply the precipitation requirements.
5. Calculate and predict the precipitation titration curve.
6. Compare kinetic methods of analysis and classical analytical methods based on thermodynamic equilibrium, in terms of selectivity and application options.
7. Solve numerically analytical problems.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week
Lectures: Gravimetric analysis.
Seminars: Gravimetric analysis (numerical examples).
2nd week
Lectures: Precipitation gravimetry, properties of precipitate and precipitation requirements.
Seminars: Gravimetric analysis (numerical examples).
3rd week
Lectures: Quantitative determination, titrations, standard preparation.
Seminars: Quantitative determination, titrations, standard preparation (numerical examples).
4th week
Lectures: Precipitation titrations.
Seminars: Precipitation titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet).
5th week
Lectures: Precipitation titration, End –point detection.
Seminars: Precipitation titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet)
6th week
Lectures: Acid-base titrations, titration of the strong acid with strong base and strong base with strong acid. Titration of the weak acid with strong base and weak base with strong acid.
Seminars: Acid-base titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet)..
7th week
Lectures: Titrations in polyprotic systems. Finding the end point with pH electrode.
Seminars: Acid-base titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet)..
8th week
Lectures: Finding the end point with visual indicators. Titration in nonaqueous solvents.
Seminars: Acid-base titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet).
9th week
Lectures: EDTA titrations. The impact of conditional formation constants on the inflection of the EDTA titration curves.
Seminars: EDTA titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet).
10th week
Lectures: Auxilary complexing agents. Metal ion indicators.
Seminars: EDTA titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet).
11th week
Lectures: Redox titrations. Redox titration based on the simple stochiometry redox reaction.
Seminars: Redox titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet).
12th week
Lectures: Redox titration based on the complex stochiometry redox reaction, the effect of pH value.
Seminars: Redox titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet).
13th week
Lectures: Analysis of a mixture. Finding the end point of redox titrations.
Seminars: Redox titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet).
14th week
Lectures: Adjustment of analyte oxidation state. Preparation and standardization of titration standards.
Seminars: Redox titrations (numerical examples, titration curve construction, using of the Excel spreadsheet).
15th week
Lectures: Kinetic method analysis.
Seminars: Kinetic method analysis (numerical examples).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 70% presence at lectures and seminars

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

1.2

Essay

Seminar essay

2.2

Tests

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Scoring at the exam consists of two basic parts, test of numerical example (minimum score: 18; maximum score: 30) and test of theoretical part (minimum score: 42; maximum score: 70).
Students who had attended lectures and seminar in 70 % can take the exam through partial tests: 2 tests of numerical examples (minimum score: 9; maximum score: 15) and 2 tests of theoretical part (minimum score: 21; maximum score: 35)
The rating is formed in accordance with the score ranges: sufficient ( 60 - 70 points) , good ( 71-80 points) , very good ( 81-90 points) , excellent ( ≥91points )

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2016.

4

D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, šesto izdanje (englesko), prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999

18

M. Kaštelan-Macan, Kemijska analiza u sustavu kvalitete, Školska knjiga, Zagreb 2003.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

1. Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju I. dio, Redak, Split, 2013.
2. R. Kellner, J. M. Mermet, M. Otto, M. Valcarcel and H. M. Widmer (Urednici), Analytical Chemistry (A Modern Approach to Analytical Science, Second Edition) Wiley-VCHVerlag Gmbh & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2004.
3. D. A. Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler and S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Eighth Edition, Thompson Brooks/Cole, Belmont, USA, 2004.
4. G. D.Christian, Analytical Chemistry, Sixth Edition, John Willey & Sons, INC, 2004.
5. D. Harvey, Modern Analytical Chemistry, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, New York, London, 2000.
6. F. W. Fifield & D. Kealey, Principles and Practice of Analytical Chemistry, Blackwell Science Ltd, Malden MA, London, 2000.
7. M. Kaštelan-Macan, Enciklopedijski rječnik analitičkog nazivlja, FKIT, Mentor, Zagreb 2014.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Analytical Chemistry II
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Analytical Chemistry II

Code

KTG204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScD Maja Biočić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

60

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students gain basic knowledge of working in the analytical laboratory, the proper approach to chemical analysis of samples, the possibility of critical reasoning based on knowledge, the chemical changes in the experimental work , correct writing lab reports in accordance with good laboratory practices.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Analytical Chemistry II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Apply standard laboratory procedures in gravimetric analysis.
2. Apply titration based on homogenous or heterogeneous equilibrium with previous theoretical predictions.
4. Apply the principles of good laboratory practice.
5. Properly collect and process numerical data.
6. Write the appropriate laboratory report.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. (6 hours) Determinations based on heterogeneous equilibrium. Argentometric titration.
2. (6 hours) Potentiometric titration.
3. (6 hours) Gravimetric determination of sulphate ion.
4. (6 hours) Gravimetric determination of nickel ion.
5. (4 hours) Preparing standard solution, acid-base titration.
6. (6 hours) Acid-base titration, determination of H2C2O4.
7. (6 hours) Finding the end point with pH electrode.
8. (4 hours) Preparing standard solution, EDTA titration.
9. (6 hours) EDTA titration, determination of Fe3+.
10. (4 hours) Preparing standard solution, redox titration.
11. (6 hours) Redox titration, determination of Cu2+.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students must attend classes regularly and do all laboratory exercises in planned program.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

1.6

Experimental work

Report

0.8

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.6

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The rating is formed from three parts: tests which is 40 % of the grade , the experimental section, which is 40 % of the grade , and Lab Notebook, which is the remaining 20 % of the grade.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. Prkić, Vježbe iz analitičke kemije, Preddiplomski studij kemijske tehnologije, interna recenzirana skripta, Split, 2008. (odabrana poglavlja)

0

dostupno u digitalnom obliku

Vježbe iz kvalitativne analitičke kemije, dr. sc. Josipa Komljenović, doc. (odabrana poglavlja)

0

dostupno

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

1. D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, šesto izdanje (englesko), prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.
2. Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju, Zagreb, 2016.
3. Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju I. dio, Redak, Split, 2013..
4. M. Kaštelan-Macan, Kemijska analiza u sustavu kvalitete, Školska knjiga, Zagreb 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Analytical Chemistry II
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Analytical Chemistry II

Code

KTG204

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

60

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students gain basic knowledge of working in the analytical laboratory, the proper approach to chemical analysis of samples, the possibility of critical reasoning based on knowledge, the chemical changes in the experimental work , correct writing lab reports in accordance with good laboratory practices.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Analytical Chemistry II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Apply standard laboratory procedures in gravimetric analysis.
2. Apply titration based on homogenous or heterogeneous equilibrium with previous theoretical predictions.
4. Apply the principles of good laboratory practice.
5. Properly collect and process numerical data.
6. Write the appropriate laboratory report.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. (6 hours) Determinations based on heterogeneous equilibrium. Argentometric titration.
2. (6 hours) Potentiometric titration.
3. (6 hours) Gravimetric determination of sulphate ion.
4. (6 hours) Gravimetric determination of nickel ion.
5. (4 hours) Preparing standard solution, acid-base titration.
6. (6 hours) Acid-base titration, determination of H2C2O4.
7. (6 hours) Finding the end point with pH electrode.
8. (4 hours) Preparing standard solution, EDTA titration.
9. (6 hours) EDTA titration, determination of Fe3+.
10. (4 hours) Preparing standard solution, redox titration.
11. (6 hours) Redox titration, determination of Cu2+.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students must attend classes regularly and do all laboratory exercises in planned program.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

1.6

Experimental work

Report

0.8

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.6

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The rating is formed from three parts: tests which is 40 % of the grade , the experimental section, which is 40 % of the grade , and Lab Notebook, which is the remaining 20 % of the grade.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

1. D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, šesto izdanje (englesko), prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.
2. Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju, Zagreb, 2016.
3. Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju I. dio, Redak, Split, 2013..
4. M. Kaštelan-Macan, Kemijska analiza u sustavu kvalitete, Školska knjiga, Zagreb 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Organic chemistry 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Organic chemistry 1

Code

KTG206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

60

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge of modern organic chemistry, understanding the structure and properties of organic compounds, nomenclature of organic compounds, the types of isomers, spectroscopic techniques in determining organic structures, understanding the mechanisms of organic reactions of addition, substitution, elimination and rearrangement.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Laboratory exercises in organic chemistry I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course, students will be able to:
- describe the basic concepts, nomenclature of organic compounds, stereochemistry, and typical organic reactions of addition, elimination, substitution and rearrangement
- illustrate modes of applying the nomenclature, isomerism, stereochemistry and mechanisms of organic reactions (ion type and radical type)
- determine the structure of simple organic compounds on the basis of spectroscopic methods
- propose mechanisms for nucleophilic substitution reactions at saturated carbon and elimination reactions, additions to the unsaturated carbon and electrophilic aromatic substitution, taking into account the regio-selectivity / specificity and stereo-selectivity / specificity
- choose the correct chemical approach to solving problems in the field of organic chemistry, starting from the acquired knowledge in general, analytical and physical chemistry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Introduction. A short historical overview. The modern organic chemistry. The binding in organic molecules. Electronegativity and bond types. Quantum mechanics and atomic orbitals. Electronic configuration. Lengths and bond energies. (3 hours); Hybrid atomic orbitals (sp3, sp2 and sp). Molecular orbitals (σ- and π-bonds), polar and non-polar covalent bond. Bonding angles. Examples of organic molecules (orbital images) with single, double and triple bond. (3 hours); Physical properties, molecular structure and intermolecular bonds (dipole-dipole, van der Waals and hydrogen bonding). Solubility in organic solvent. Examples. Presentation of organic structures. (3 hours)
Classification and nomenclature of organic compounds. Functional groups and priority order. Alkanes. Alkenes. Alkynes. Aromatic hydrocarbons. Examples of the nomenclature of branched acyclic and cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Alcohols. Phenols. Thiols. (3 hours); Ethers. Thioethers. Amines. Organohalogen compounds. Aldehydes. Ketones. Carboxylic acids. Carboxylic acid derivatives (acyl halides, anhydrides, esters, amides and nitriles). (3 hours); Examples of the nomenclature of various functional groups. (3 hours)
Isomers. Constitutional isomers. Index of hydrogen deficiency (IHD). The conformation and configuration. Stereoisomers. Conformations of acyclic alkanes (conformational analysis). (3 hours); Conformations of cycloalkanes (angle tension and heat of combustion). Substituted cycloalkanes. Geometric isomers of alkenes, aldoximes, ketoximes and azo compounds (cis, trans, E, Z, sin, anti). CIP rule sequence. (3 hours); Examples of geometric isomers of molecules with multiple double bonds. Geometric isomers of cyclic compounds (cis, trans isomers conformational structure). Symmetry, chirality and achirality. Stereogenic center (chiral center). Enantiomers. Diastereomers. (3 hours); The absolute configuration. CIP system - rule sequences. Fischer projection formula. The properties of the enantiomers. Optical activity. The racemic mixture. Enantiomeric excess. The optical purity. The biological significance of chirality. Examples of chiral biologically active substances. (3 hours); The separation of the racemate (direct crystallization, converting into diastereomers, chromatographic methods and kinetic resolution). Molecules having multiple stereogenic centers. Relative configuration erythro- and threo. Meso compounds. Stereoisomers of cyclic compounds. Chiral molecules without tetrahedral atoms. Examples of different kinds of stereoisomers. (3 hours)
Determination of organic structures. Introduction. Mass spectrometry (MS). Resolution. The molecular ion. Isotopes. Fragmentation. Examples of mass spectra. Electromagnetic radiation. Ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy (UV / Vis). Infrared spectroscopy (IR). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). 13C NMR. 1H NMR. Chemical shift. Spin-spin coupling. Examples of the IR and NMR spectra. (11 hours)
Types of organic reactions. Mechanisms. Acid-base reactions. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. Redox reactions. Energy and reaction kinetics. (4 hours)
Nucleophilic substitution at saturated carbon. SN2-mechanism. SN1-mechanism. Energy diagrams. The stereochemistry of the nucleophilic substitution. (3 hours); Variables in the nucleophilic substitution of (leaving group, nucleophile, position of substitution and solvent). Conditions of SN2 and SN1-reaction. Competitive reactions. (3 hours); Nucleophilic substitution possibilities, conventional nucleophiles and their products. Examples. Elimination reactions. E1 and E2 mechanism. Conditions of E1 and E2 reactions. Orientation of elimination. The stereochemistry of the elimination (anti- or sin-) (3 hours); Competition elimination and substitution (reaction process conditions and examples). Examples of elimination reactions: dehydrogen-halogenation, dehalogenation of vicinal dihalogenalkanes, double dehydrogenation, dehydratation of alcohols (E1 and E2 mechanism, energy diagrams). (3 hours)
Electrophilic Addition. Orientation and additions (regioselectivity). The stereochemistry of the addition (anti- or sin-). Addition of free radicals. The addition of hydrogen. The addition of halogen. Halohydrin reaction. The addition of hydrogen halide. Conditions of Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov addition. (3 hours); Hydration. Oxymercuration / demercuration. Hydroboration. Epoxidation - hydroxylation. Oxidation of alkenes with KMnO4 and OsO4. The ozonolysis of alkenes. The addition of alkenes (alkylation). (3 hours); Polymerization (radicals type and ions type). Examples of typical polymers. The additions to alkynes. Examples. Summary of the reaction of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and halogenoalkanes. (3 hours)
Aromatic compounds and antiaromatics. The structure of benzene. Examples. Mechanism of electrophilic aromatic substitution. The impact on the groups on electrophilic aromatic substitution. (3 hours); Multiple substitutions of substituted aromatic compounds. Arenes. Phenols. Aromatic amines. Examples. (3 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars) and actively participate in the teaching process, which will be evaluated in the final assessment by the weight coefficient of 5%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

4.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students can take three partial tests during the lectures. If not pass partial tests, students will be evaluated by written exam. Rating at partial tests and the final examination is formed as follows: 51-60% sufficient (2); 61-75% good (3); 76-88% very good (4); 89-100% excellent (5). The total score is formed by summing all activities (for each activity % success multiply weigh coefficient): 5% x the presence and activity in lectures and seminars + 36% x performance on the first test + 23% x performance on the second test + 36% x performance on the third test.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. H. Pine: Organska kemija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.

9

Morrison and Boyd, Organic Chemistry, 6th edition, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, India, 2002.

2

Vodič kroz IUPAC-ovu nomenkalturu organskih spojeva, Školska knjiga Zagreb. 2002.

2

I. Jerković, Predlošci za predavanja iz Organske kemije I, 2014.

0

web stranica KTF-a

I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, KTF-Split, 2009.

0

web stranica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Clayden, Greeves, Warren and Wothers, Organic Chemistry, Oxford University Press, 2001.
S. Borčić, O. Kronja, Praktikum preparativne organske kemije, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Academic Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Laboratory exercises in organic chemistry 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Laboratory exercises in organic chemistry 1

Code

KTG207

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge of practical work in organic-chemical laboratory in line with modern trends in organic chemistry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Organic chemistry I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course, students will be able to:
- describe basic laboratory procedures in organic-chemistry laboratory
- demonstrate fundamental processes in organic-chemical laboratory, the simple methods of synthesis of organic compounds and determination the functional groups
- determine the structure of simple organic compounds using spectroscopic methods
- propose basic laboratory procedures in accordance with set-up objectives (synthesis or isolation)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Preparing for laboratory work, conducting laboratory diary and account of reaction yields. Isolation and purification of organic compounds. Recrystallization. Sublimation. Extraction. Distillation. Chromatography. (5 hours) Qualitative element analysis of organic compounds. The solubility of organic compounds. Detection of functional groups of organic compounds. Spectroscopic methods of organic analysis. (10 hours) Organic reactions and preparation of compounds. Oxido-reduction reactions. Nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions at saturated carbon Electrophilic aromatic substitution. (15 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students during exercises are evaluated on their knowledge shown by the examinations and their commitment, the work and the results of work in organic-chemistry lab.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, KTF-Split, 2009.

0

Da (web stranica KTF-a)

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Borčić, O. Kronja, Praktikum iz preparativne organske kemije, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Academic Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Organic Chemistry 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Organic Chemistry 2

Code

KTG208

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Prof Igor Jerković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge about chemistry of carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acid and derivatives, heterocycles and carbohydrates.
This course is basis for understanding other courses, such as Natural products, Organic synthesis, Organic analysis, Biochemistry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Experimental Organic Chemistry II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam students will be able to:
- recognize and give the IUPAC name to carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids and derivatives, heterocycles and carbohydrates, and draw the corresponding structural formula based on systematic name (apply basic rules of organic compounds nomenclature)
- connect organic compounds molecular structure with their physico - chemical
properties and reactivity
- differentiate, describe and compare reaction mechanisms of nucleophilic addition and nucleophilic substitution at carbonyl group
- specify the most important reactions of carbonyl and carboxylic compounds
- describe heterocycles and carbohydrates reaction mechanisms, specify the most important reactions of these compounds
- solving problems regarding carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acid and derivatives, heterocycles and carbohydrates

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures (2 hours weekly):
1st week: Introduction to course (course content, students responsibilities, terms and conditions for passing exam). Nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Addition-elimination mechanism. Elimination-addition mechanism. Aryl cation mechanism.
2nd week: Polycyclic aromatic compounds - sources. Polycyclic aromatic compounds reactions. Nucleophilic addition to carbonyl group - introduction. Cyanide as a nucleophile (cyanohydrin formation).
3th week: Oxygen and sulphur as nucleophiles. Addition of alcohols (hemiacetals and acetals formation). Addition of water (hydrates formation). Addition of thiols (hemithioacetals and thioacetals formation). Hydride as a nucleophile - reduction. Reduction by complex metal hydrides. Cannizzaro reaction -disproportionation.
4th week: Carbon as a nucleophile - organometallic compounds. Organometallic reagents synthesis. Grignard reaction. Syntheses using Grignard reagents.
5th week: Nitrogen as a nucleophile. Imines. Enamines. Nucleophilic addition to carbonyl related compounds. Nucleophilic addition to imines. Nucleophilic addition to enamines. Nucleophilic addition to nitriles.
6th week: Nucleophilic acyl substitution - introduction. Carboxylic acids and derivatives reactivity. Oxygen and sulfur as nucleophiles. Substitution with alcohols - esterification. Lactonization. Transesterification. Substitution with water - hydrolysis.
7th week: Substitution with thiols. Nitrogen as a nucleophile. Acyl halides and anhydrides. Acyl halide synthesis. Anhydride synthesis.
8th week: Hydride as a nucleophile - reduction. Carbon as a nucleophile - organometallic reagents. Reactions with esters. Reactions with acyl halides. Reactions with carboxylic acids.
9th week: Nucleophilic substitution on derivatives of sulfuric and phosphoric acid. Nucleophilic reactions involving enolate anions. Enols and enolate anions. Enolization (keto-enol tautomerism). The aldol reaction.
10th week: Mixed aldol reaction. Dehydration of aldol products. Ester condensation – Claisen condensation.
11th week: Mixed Claisen condensation. -dicarbonyl compounds splitting. Reverse Claisen reaction. Decarboxylation.
12th week: Alkylation of enolate anions. Active methylene compounds.
Conjugate addition reactions. Electrophilic conjugate addition - conjugated dienes.
13th week: Nucleophilic conjugate addition - ,-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Michael reaction. Diels-Alder cycloaddition.
14th week: Carbohydrates – definition and classification. Cyclic forms of monosaccharides and their representation. Reactions of monosaccharides. Oxidation. Reduction. Monosaccharides in aqueous solution (mutarotation). Monosaccharides in alkaline or acidic solution.
15th week: Glycosides. Typical disaccharides and polysaccharides.
Heterocyclic compounds (five-membered and six-membered heterocycles). Structures and stability of aromatic heterocycles. Electrophilic and nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions.
Seminars (1 hour weekly):
Solving problems in organic chemistry.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend lectures and seminars in the amount of at least 80% of the times scheduled and complete all laboratory exercises (100% attendance). Active participation in teaching process will be also evaluated in the final score.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

4.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam by taking and passing two partial exams (tests) consisting of theoretical questions and seminar problems during the semester. Test passing score is 60%. Each test constitute 45% of the final exam score. Attendance to the lectures and seminars (80-100%) participate in the final score with 5%. Any of the partial exams passed during the semester is valid throughout the academic year.
Students who do not pass one of the partial exam or both of them have to take an written exam in the regular examination periods. Exam passing score is 60%.
Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. H. Pine, Organska kemija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.

8

R. T. Morrison, R. N. Boyd, Organska kemija, Sveučilišna naklada Liber, Zagreb, 1979.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

T. W. Solomons & C. B. Fryhle, Organic Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2004.
J. Clayden, N. Greeves, S. Warren, P. Wothers, Organic Chemistry, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality;
(2) Faculty Level, by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level, monitoring and accepting suggestions of students and colleagues

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Organic Chemistry 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Organic Chemistry 2

Code

KTG209

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge and working skills in organic laboratory, application of laboratory methods and techniques for laboratory synthesis, isolation, characterization and purification of organic compounds.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Organic Chemistry II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course students will be able to:
- perform independently laboratory exercises according to laboratory procedures
- apply basic laboratory procedures and techniques for synthesis, isolation and purification of organic compounds as well as their characterization and identification
- connect theoretical knowledge gained throughout lectures in organic chemistry with experimental work
- propose basic laboratory procedures in accordance with set-up objectives (organic compound synthesis or isolation)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercises (3 hours weekly joined together in 7 lab periods):
1. Nucleophilic substitution at acyl carbon. Acetanilide synthesis. (1 lab period)
2. Electrophilic aromatic substitution. p-Nitroacetanilide synthesis. p-Nitroaniline synthesis. (2 lab periods)
3. Nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Diazotation. Phenol synthesis. (2 lab periods)
4. Nucleophilic addition at carbonyl group. The Cannizzaro reaction – benzyl alcohol and benzoic acid synthesis. (1 lab period)
5. Organic compounds characterization. Determination of physical constants and spectroscopic analysis (UV/VIS and FT-IR spectra recording and interpretation). (1 lab period)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students have to complete all planned laboratory exercises (100% of the times scheduled) and active participate in laboratory work.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students are evaluated based on their knowledge shown at the tests accompanying exercises and their commitment during experimental work and the results achieved during work in organic-chemistry lab.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, KTF-Split, 2009.

0

Da (web stranica KTF-a)

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Borčić, O. Kronja, Praktikum preparativne organske kemije, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1991.
V. Rapić, Postupci priprave i izolacije organskih spojeva, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality;
(2) Faculty Level, by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level, monitoring and accepting suggestions of students and colleagues

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physical Chemistry 2
NAME OF THE COURSE Physical Chemistry 2

Code

KTG210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Renato Tomaš

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aims of the course are to enable students to:
- understand chemical and electrochemical kinetics which is raised at a higher level,
- understand processes and equilibriums in electrolyte solutions, and understand of surface dynamics,
- resolve different physicochemical problems,
- apply acquired knowledge and skills in professional and specialist courses.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Physical Chemistry II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to:
1. Describe and explain mechanism and kinetics of complexs reactions.
2. Describe and explain various equilibriums in the electrolyte solutions.
3. Describe and explain equilibrium and dynamics of processes on solid and liquid surfaces.
4. Calculate physicochemical parameters using thermodynamic and kinetic equations.
5. Interpret experimental and numerical data.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures (2 hours weekly):
1st, 2nd and 3rd week: Ionic equilibria: The solute activity in molality scale. Mean activity coefficient of electrolyte. Debye-Hückel theory. Colligative properties of electrolyte solutions. Acid-base equilibria in water medium. Solubility of slightly soluble salts. The solubility constant. The common-ion efect. The activity coefficient from measurement of solubility.
4th, 5th, and 6th and 7th week: Equilibrium electrochemistry: Thermodynamic functions of the ion formation. Electrochemical cells. Galvanic cells. Half-reactions and electrodes. Reactions at electrodes. The cell reaction. The potential difference of the cell. Standard electrode potentials. Cells at equilibrium. Types of electrode. Types of galvanic cells. The liquid junction potential and transference number. The solobility constant from potential difference mesurements of the cell. The determination of pH. The determination of thermodynamic functions. Diffusion potential.
8th, 9th and 10th week: The kinetics of complex reactions: Chain reactions. The structure of chain reactions. The rate laws of chain reactions. The explosion. Polymerization kinetics. Chain polymerization. Stepwise polymerization. Photochemical reactions and their quantum yields. Molecular reaction dynamics. Reactive encounters. Activated complex theory. Catalysis. Kinetics in the liquid phase. Primary kinetic salt efect.
11th, 12th and 13th week: The properties of surfaces (Surface dynamics): Types of disperse systems. Colloidal systems. The properties of liquid surfaces. Solid surfaces: surfaces growth and surface composition and structure. Physisorption and chemisorption. Adsorption isotherms. Langmuir isotherm. Catalytic activity at surfaces. Mechanisms af heterogeneous catalysis. Use of adsorption measurements to determine surface area: Low-energy electron diffraction. Electron emission from surfaces (photoelectron spectroscopy).
14th and 15th week: Dynamic electrochemistry: Processes at electrodes. The electrical double layer. The rate of charge transfer. Polarization. Electrochemical processes. Electrolysis. The characteristics of working cells. Fuel cells and secondary cells. Corrosion. The rate of corrosion. The inhibition of corrosion.
Seminars (one hour weekly):
Solving numerical problems in physical chemistry.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture and seminar attendance and active participation of at least 70 percent of the planned schedule.
The exam can be taken continuously (cumulatively) through colloquiums (partial tests) combining theoretical and practical tasks or as one comprehensive exam (written and oral).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continually evaluation: (success (%) / share in evaluating (%):
- presence and activities in the classroom: (70 - 100 / 10)
- first partial test: (60 - 100 / 30)
- second partial test: (60 - 100 / 30)
- third partial test: (60 - 100 / 30)
Final evaluation: (success (%) / share in evaluating (%):
- written exam with numerical tasks: (50 - 100 / 40)
- oral exam: (50 - 100 / 45)
- priviously activities from continually evaluation: (50 - 100 / 15)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Tominić, Fizikalna kemija II, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

0

www.ktf-split.hr

R. J. Silbey, R. A. Alberty, M. G. Bawendi, Physical Chemistry, 4th Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New Jersey, 2005.

1

R. Tomaš, Predavanja iz Fizikalne kemije II, ppt-prezentacija, 2013.

0

digitalni zapis

P. Atkins, J. de Paula, Elements of Physical Chemistry, 4th Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Mekjavić, Fizikalna kemija 2, Golden marketing, Zagreb, 1999.
P. Atkins, J. de Paula, Atkins’ Physical Chemistry, 8th Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Physical Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Physical Chemistry

Code

KTG211

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Renato Tomaš

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

60

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aims of the course are to enable students to:
- perform measurements in the laboratory individually or in a team, present and process measurement data.
- apply acquired knowledge and skills in professional and specialist courses.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Physical Chemistry II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to:
1. Perform experiments and measurements in the laboratory.
2. Explain different physicochemical dependencies of the examined systems.
3. Calculate physicochemical parameters using thermodynamic and kinetic equations.
4. Interpret experimental and numerical data.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercises in Laboratory for Physical Chemistry (5 hours weekly):
1. week: Vapour pressure of pure liquid.
2. week: Surface tension and refractometric determination of composition of two-component mixture.
3. week: Viscosity.
4. week: Colligative properties.
5. week: Adsorption from aqueous solution.
6. week: Equilibrium constant of homogeneous reaction.
7. week: Phase diagram for three-component system.
8. week: Transference numbers by Hittorf method.
9. week: Conductometry and conductometric titrations.
10. week: Galvanic cell and electrode potentials.
11. week: Rate constant of inversion of sucrose by polarimetric method.
12. week: Conductometric determination of the rate constant of hydrolysis of ethyl acetate.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Completed all laboratory exercises (100 %).
Student must show theoretical knowledge before each practical work or experiments (12 partial oral exams).
Student must write 12 reports with complete experimental and calculated data: All reports should contains tables and graphical dependencies. At the end of report put conslusion.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continually evaluation: (success (%) / share in evaluating (%):
- presence and activities in the laboratory: (100 / 10)
- laboratory exercises (measurements): (60 - 100 / 25)
- 12 partial test: (60 - 100 / 25)
- 12 final reports: (60 - 100 / 40)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Radošević, Lj. Aljinović, Fizikalna kemija, Laboratorijske vježbe, Sveučilišna naklada Liber, Split, 1980.

25

R. J. Silbey, R. A. Alberty, M. G. Bawendi, Physical Chemistry, 4th Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New Jersey, 2005.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. M. Halpern, Experimental Physical Chemistry, A Laboratory Textbook, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Catalysis
NAME OF THE COURSE Catalysis

Code

KTG212

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Prof Matko Erceg

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- acquiring knowledge about the role of catalysts in chemical reaction
- identify the key variables for the preparation of better catalysts
- overview of the processes of catalysts preparation
- understanding the importance of catalysts in industry and sustainable development through the improvement of existing or development of new chemical, petrochemical and related processes

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- list and describe types of catalysts
- explain the principle of operation of the catalyst in a chemical reaction
- know the role of each component in catalyst system
- explain the processes of catalysts preparation
- explain deactivation, reactivation and regeneration of catalyst
- give examples of the catalyst application in real systems
- to argue the importance of a catalyst for industry and sustainable development

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: General concept of catalysis: the definition of catalysis and catalysts, the historical development of catalytic processes, the economic importance of the catalyst.
2nd week: Distribution of catalysis and katalizatora. Comparison of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts and the industrial značaj. General theory of catalysis. Effect of catalyst on reaction rates and the position of the chemical equilibrium. The activation energies.
3rd week: The mechanism of catalysis, inhibition, initiation. Basic features of the catalyst: activity, selectivity and stability.
4th week: Homogeneous catalysis in the gaseous and in the liquid phase. Homogeneous catalysis by acids and bases, by ions and transition metal compounds.
5th week: Coordination complexes as catalysts. Metallocenes.
6th week: Heterogeneous catalysis: the basic stages of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Physical and chemical adsorption and their comparison. The heat of adsorption (Lennard-Jones diagram).
7th week: Types of adsorption isotherms. The basic laws of adsorption. Mechanisms and kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the gas phase: Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism. Eley-Rideal mechanism.
8th week: Theories of the catalytic activity of heterogeneous catalysts: the theory of unstable intermediates, the theory of active centers, the theory of geometric factors.
9th week: Theory of electronic factors. The selectivity of catalysts.
10th week: Durability (stability) and resistance to deactivation. Poisoning and selectivity coefficient of toxicity. Deactivation of the catalyst layers on the surface. Deactivation by sintering and phase transformation. Loss of catalyst by evaporation. Mechanical disintegration of the catalyst. Prevention of deactivation. Reactivation and regeneration of the catalyst.
11th week: Zeolites: properties, catalytic properties, selectivity. Zeolite modification processes.
12th week: Design of heterogeneous catalysts: active components, carriers, promoters, moderators, inhibitors, activators.
13th week: Characterization of heterogeneous catalysts. Determination of physical properties of the catalyst: the volume and the pore size, the total area of the catalyst. Mechanical properties of the catalyst.
14th week: Methods of heterogeneous catalysis: the precipitated catalysts impregnated catalysts, skeletal catalysts, catalysts with active coating. Monolithic catalysts.
15th week: Biocatalysts. Final comments, discussion, conclusions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures and seminars in the 80% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.9

Oral exam

0.7

Written exam

0.9

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 45% in a final grade while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade. Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 40% and oral exam for 50%, respectively. Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 50% and oral exam for 50% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Kovačić, B. Andričić, Kataliza, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

5

WEB knjižnica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Zrnčević, Kataliza i katalizatori, Hinus, Zagreb, 2005.; J. Hagen, Industrial Catalysis-A Practical Approach, 2nd ed., Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2006.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University Level, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Natural Products
NAME OF THE COURSE Natural Products

Code

KTG213

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge about structural characteristics, properties, biological distribution, biological activity and application of important classes of natural products. The course is basis for understanding of other courses, especially Chemistry and technology of aromatic plants , Aroma chemistry, Synthesis of biological active compounds.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Experimental in Natural Products

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam students will be able to:
- differentiate primary and secondary metabolites
- specify important classes of natural products and characteristic representatives of each class
- recognize and give name to some, important natural compounds based on structural formula and classify them in the appropriate class based on structural features
- present by structural formula the most important natural compounds
- specify main characteristics, physical and chemical properties of important natural compounds based on their structure
- describe biosynthesis of natural products classes or important natural compounds
- specify major biological activities (physiological function) of important natural compounds
- specify importance and application of important natural compounds

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures (3 hours weekly):
1st week: Introduction to course (course content, students responsibilities, terms and conditions for passing exam). Primary and secondary metabolism. Primary and secondary metabolites. Natural products isolation methods. Basic isolation procedures. Distillation. Extraction.
2nd week: Chromatographic methods – definition and classification. Thin-layer chromatography. Column chromatography. Gas chromatography. Liquid chromatography.
3th week: Lipids - introduction. Classification. Fats and oils. Fatty acids. Saturated, unsaturated, -3 and -6, polyunsaturated and essential fatty acids.
4th week: Physico-chemical properties of fats and oils. Hydrolysis. Oxidation. Hydrogenation. Physical and chemical constants of fats and oils. Isolation methods of fats and oils.
5th week: Waxes. Plant waxes. Animal waxes. Compound lipids. Phospholipids. Sphingolipids. Glycolipids.
6th week: Terpenoids – introduction. Classification of terpenoids. Monoterpenes. Sesquiterpenes. Diterpenes. Triterpenes. Polyterpenes.
7th week: Steroids – introduction. Classification. Sterols. Zoosterols. Cholesterol. Phytosterols. Stigmasterol. -Sitosterol. Sterols of yeast and fungi. Ergosterol. Bile acids.
8th week: Steroid hormones – introduction. Classification. Sex hormones. Estrogens. Progestogens. Androgens. Adrenocortical hormones- corticosteroids.
9th week: Steroid glycosides. Cardiac glycosides. Saponins. Carotenoids – introduction. Carotenes. Xanthophylls.
10th week: Vitamins – introduction. Classification of vitamins. Water-soluble vitamins. Vitamin C. Vitamin B complex. Vitamin B1. Vitamin B2. Niacine-vitamin B3. Vitamin B5. Vitamin B6. Folic acid. Biotin. Vitamin B12.
11th week: Fat-soluble vitamins. Vitamin A. Vitamin D. Vitamin E. Vitamin K. Alkaloids. Definition. Function of alkaloids. Classification of alkaloids.
12th week: Protoalkaloids. Alkaloids with pyridine, piperidine and pyrolidine ring. Tropane alkaloids.
13th week: Alkaloids with quinoline ring. Opium alkaloids. Alkaloids with indole ring. Purine alkaloids. Phenolic compounds. Definition, properties and function of phenolics. Biosynthesis. Shikimic acid and shikimic acid derived compounds.
14th week: Structural types of phenolic compounds. Phenylpropanoids. Phenolic acids. Lignins. Flavonoids.
15th week: Natural dyes. Flavonoid dyes. Anthocyanins. Quinones. Benzoquinones. Naphthoquinones. Anthraquinones. Carotenoids. Pyrols. Alkaloids.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend lectures in the amount of at least 80% of the times scheduled. Active participation in teaching process will be also evaluated in the final score.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam by taking and passing three partial exams (tests) during the semester. Test passing score is 60%. Each test constitute 30% of the final exam score. Attendance to the lectures (80-100%) participate in the final score with 10%. Any of the partial exams passed during the semester is valid throughout the academic year.
Students who do not pass some of the partial exams or all of them have to take an written exam in the regular examination periods. Exam passing score is 60%.
Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. V. Bhat, B. A. Nagasampagi, M. Sivakumar, Chemistry of Natural Products, Springer-Narosa, Berlin, 2005.

1

P. M. Dewick, Medicinal Natural Products, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1997.

1

J. Mann, R. S. Davidson, J. B. Hobbs, D. V. Banthorpe, J. B. Harborne, Natural products: their chemistry and biological significance, Addison Wesley Longman Limited, Harlow, 1994.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Bruneton, Pharmacognosy, Phytochemistry, Medicinal Plants, Lavoisier publishing Inc., Paris, 1995.
I. Tabaković, Organska kemija prirodnih spojeva, Glas, Banja Luka, 1983.
D. Kuštrak, Farmakognozija-Fitofarmacija, Golden marketing-Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality;
(2) Faculty Level, by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level, monitoring and accepting suggestions of students and colleagues

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Natural Products
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Natural Products

Code

KTG214

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge and working skills in organic laboratory, application of laboratory methods and techniques for isolation, purification and characterization of natural organic compounds.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Natural Products

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course students will be able to:
- perform independently laboratory exercises according to laboratory procedures
- propose basic laboratory procedures for isolation of natural organic compounds from biological material based on knowledge gained throughout lectures in natural products (connect theoretical knowledge with experimental work)
- apply basic laboratory procedures and techniques for isolation and purification of natural products as well as their characterization
- set up appropriate apparatus for performing isolation of natural products from biological material and their purification
- record and interpret UV/VIS and FT-IR spectra

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercises (2 hours weekly joined together in 6 lab periods):
Isolation of selected natural products.
1. Lipids. Isolation of fatty acids from natural fatty oil. Isolation of oleic acid from olive oil. (2 lab periods)
2. Carotenoids. Isolation of carotenes from tomato. Thin-layer chromatography of carotenes. (1 lab period)
3. Alkaloids. Isolation of piperine from black pepper. (2 lab periods)
4. Alkaloids. Isolation of caffeine from tea. (1 lab period)
5. Characterization of piperine and caffeine. Determination of melting point, thin-layer chromatography, UV/VIS and FT-IR spectroscopy. (1 lab period)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students have to complete all planned laboratory exercises (100% of the times scheduled) and active participate in laboratory work.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students are evaluated based on their knowledge shown at the tests accompanying exercises and their commitment during experimental work as well as the results achieved during work in organic-chemistry lab.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, KTF-Split, 2009.

0

Da (web stranica KTF-a)

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V. Rapić, Postupci priprave i izolacije organskih spojeva, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.
S. Borčić, O. Kronja, Praktikum preparativne organske kemije, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality;
(2) Faculty Level, by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level, monitoring and accepting suggestions of students and colleagues

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General Biology
NAME OF THE COURSE General Biology

Code

KTG301

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nada Bezić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Valerija Dunkić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students learn to:
- Introduce students to the relationships of animate and inanimate nature
- Understand the basic principles of cell biology
- mastering the basics of genetics and ecological relationships among organisms

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will after the course unit power:
- Recognize the importance of living organisms in relation to the environment
- To master the basic knowledge of cell biology and evolution of organisms
- Know the basic genetic principles
- Know how environmental changes affect the ecosystem changes

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Content - hours L S
Animate and inanimate nature. 3 1
Prokaryotes, eukaryotes, relationships between plants-animals 3 1
Membranes and transport through the membrane, nucleus, nucleolus 3 1
DNA, RNA, CD-biology, Endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes
3 1
Mitochondria - breathing, chloroplasts - photosynthesis, peroxisomes
3 1
Cell cycle, mitosis, meiosis (spermatogenesis, oogenesis), fertilization
3 1
The embryonic development model operon differentiation in plants and animals
3 1
Aging and death, viruses (HIV), tumors 3 1
The basics of inheritance, Mendel’s laws, mutations 3 1
Ecological concepts and relationships of organisms in the biocenosis 3 1

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures of at least 70%, as well as seminars and seminar work in 100% of scheduled classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The obligation is to the students during the course of hearing preparation seminar that also must know the present. Upon completion of the lecture can be the time to take the entire test period courses in writing.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Autorizirana predavanja na webu PMF-a

0

G. M. Cooper, Stanica: molekularni pristup, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2004.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A.Delić i N. Vijtiuk, Prirodoslovlje, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Instrumental Methods of Analysis
NAME OF THE COURSE Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Code

KTG302

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun

Credits (ECTS)

4.5

Associate teachers

ScD Maja Biočić
Asst Prof Franko Burčul

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the theoretical principles, practical work and the use of instrumental techniques and procedures relating to the process analysis. The choice of method will depend on the knowledge of the basic principles of individual method or group of methods and the understanding of their advantages and limitations.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Adopt theoretical knowledge related to methods of instrumental analysis (spectrometry, electroanalytical, thermal methods, instrumental separation methods) and the principles of instruments.
2. Correctly interpret the adopted theoretical knowledge relating to methods of analysis instrument and principles of instruments.
3. Explain the connection between basic knowledge of analytical chemistry with application in instrument analysis.
4. Select analytical technique due to the characteristics of the analyte and the specificity of the sample.
5. Integrate acquired knowledge and apply them in problem-solving and decision-making in analytical practice and in process analysis.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week
Lectures: Fundamentals of instrumental techniques and their application in continuous and process analysis.
Seminars: Introduction, memento. SI system of units.
2nd week
Lectures: Planning and optimizing the experiment. Optimizing analytical control of technology process.
Seminars: Kinetic method analysis.
3rd week
Lectures: Gass chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography. Gass chromatography coloumns and detectors.
Seminars: Chromatography (numerical examples).
4th week
Lectures: Continuous segmentation flow analysis. Flow injection analysis.
Seminars: Flow injection analysis, construction of manifold.
5th week
Lectures: Thermal analysis Termogravimetric methods. Differential thermal analysis.
Seminars: Thermal analysis (numerical examples).
6th week
Lectures: Fundamentals of spectrophotometry. Atomic absorption spectrometry. Flame emission spectrometry. Atomic fluorescence. Atomic emission. Atomic absorption.
Seminars: Atomic absorption spectroscopy.
7th week
Lectures: Ultraviolet / Visible absorption spectrometry.
Seminars: Spectrometry (numerical examples).
8th week
Lectures: Infrared absorption spectrometry. Raman spectrometry.
Seminars: Spectrometry (numerical examples).
11th week
9th week
Lectures: Mass spectrometry. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry, Fotoelectron spectrometry. Auger electron spectrometry. Photoelectron spectroscopy. Analysis of surface with electron beams.
Seminars: Mass spectrometry, modern ionisation methods.
10th week
Lectures: Microanalysis with electronic sampling. X-ray diffraction analysis. Scanning electron microskop.
Seminars: Potentiometry (numerical examples).
11th week
Lectures: Electroanalytical methods. Potentiometry. Indicator electrodes. Potentiometric setup.
Seminars: Potentiometry (numerical examples).
12th week
Lectures: Coulometry.
Seminars: Electrogravimetry (numerical examples).
13th week
Lectures: Coulometry
Seminars: Coulometry (numerical examples).
14th week
Lectures: Voltammetry.
Seminar: Voltammetry (numerical examples).
15th week
Lectures: Amperometry.
Seminars: Amperometry (numerical examples).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 70% presence at lectures and seminars.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

1.4

Essay

Seminar essay

2.4

Tests

Oral exam

0.7

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Scoring at the exam consists of two basic parts, test of numerical example (minimum score: 18; maximum score: 30) and test of theoretical part (minimum score: 42; maximum score: 70).
Students who had attended lectures and seminar in 70 % can take the exam through partial tests: 2 tests of numerical examples (minimum score: 9; maximum score: 15) and 2 tests of theoretical part (minimum score: 21; maximum score: 35)
The rating is formed in accordance with the score ranges: sufficient ( 60 - 70 points) , good ( 71-80 points) , very good ( 81-90 points) , excellent ( ≥91points ).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, šesto izdanje (englesko), prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.

18

Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2016.

4

M. Kaštelan-Macan, Kemijska analiza u sustavu kvalitete, Školska knjiga, Zagreb 2003.

2

I. Piljac, Elektroanalitičke metode, RMC, 1995.

3

I. Piljac, Senzori fizikalnih veličina i analitičke metode, Zagreb, 2010.

3

Analitika okoliša (ur. M. Kaštelan Macan, M. Petrović), HINUS i FKIT, Zagreb 2013.

3

I. S. Krull, Analytical Chemistry, Intech, Rijeka, 2012.

0

dostupno na webu: DOI: 10.5772/3086

M. Kaštelan-Macan, M. Medić-Šarić, S. Turina, Plošna kromatografija, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet, Zagreb. 2006.

20

T. Bolanča, Š. Ukić, Ionska kromatografija, Fakultet kemijskog inženjerstva i tehnologije, Zagreb, 2015.

0

dostupno na webu: https://www.fkit.unizg.hr/images/50012393/Bolanca-Ukic_Ionska_kromatografija.pdf

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

1. Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju I. dio, Redak, Split, 2013.
2. R. Kellner, J. M. Mermet, M. Otto, M. Valcarcel and H. M. Widmer (Urednici), Analytical Chemistry (A Modern Approach to Analytical Science, Second Edition) Wiley-VCHVerlag Gmbh & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2004.
3. D. A. Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler and S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Eighth Edition, Thompson Brooks/Cole, Belmont, USA, 2004.
4. G. D.Christian, Analytical Chemistry, Sixth Edition, John Willey & Sons, INC, 2004.
5. D. Harvey, Modern Analytical Chemistry, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, New York, London, 2000.
6. F. W. Fifield & D. Kealey, Principles and Practice of Analytical Chemistry, Blackwell Science Ltd, Malden MA, London, 2000.
7. M. Kaštelan-Macan, Enciklopedijski rječnik analitičkog nazivlja, FKIT, Mentor, Zagreb 2014.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Instrumental Methods of Analysis
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Code

KTG303

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

ScD Maja Biočić
Andrea Anđić
Azra Đulović

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

After completion of a process of learning the learner is able for independent work in instrumental analytical laboratory

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Adopt theoretical knowledge related to methods of instrumental analysis (spectrometry , electroanalytical , thermal methods , instrumental methods for separation ) and principles of instruments and apply knowledge in the experimental work.
2. Select analytical technique due to the characteristics of the analyte and the specificity of the sample.
3. Plan and install an experiment using instrumental techniques.
4. Apply basic statistical analysis of numerical data and graphed the results.
5. Independently take Lab Notes and prepare a report after completion of the analysis.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Kinetic methods of analysis, determoination of tiolic compound using kinetic manifold with spectrophotometric detector
2. Flow injection analysis, determination of ascorbic acid by flow injection analysis and spectrophotometric detector
3. UV/Vis spectrophotometry, spectrophotometric measurement of an equilibrium constant
4. Atomic absorption spectroscopy, determination of metals in real samples
5. Ions selective electrode, potentiometry, measurement of an equilibrium constant
6. Electrogravimetric determination, determination or separation of metals

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students must attend classes regularly and do all laboratory exercises in planned
program.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.8

Report

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The rating is formed from three parts: tests which is 40 % of the grade , the experimental section, which is 40 % of the grade , and Report, which is the remaining 20 % of the grade.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, šesto izdanje (englesko), prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.

18

I. S. Krull, Analytical Chemistry, Intech, Rijeka, 2012.

0

dostupno na webu: DOI: 10.5772/3086

L. Kukoč, Molekulska spektroskopija, Interna recenirana skripta, 2003.

30

dostupno u digitalnom obliku

L. Kukoč, Spektrometrijske metode elementne analize, Interna recenirana skripta, 2005.

30

dostupno u digitalnom obliku

Josipa Komljenović, Ion selektivna sulfidna elektroda, Interna recenzirana skripta

30

dostupno u digitalnom obliku

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju I. dio, Redak, Split, 2013.
R. Kellner, J. M. Mermet, M. Otto, M. Valcarcel and H. M. Widmer (Urednici), Analytical Chemistry (A Modern Approach to Analytical Science, Second Edition) Wiley-VCHVerlag Gmbh & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2004.
D. A. Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler and S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Eighth Edition, Thompson Brooks/Cole, Belmont, USA, 2004.
D. Harvey, Modern Analytical Chemistry, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, New York, London, 2000.
F. W. Fifield & D. Kealey, Principles and Practice of Analytical Chemistry, Blackwell Science Ltd, Malde

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Biochemistry 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Biochemistry 1

Code

KTG304

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Mila Radan

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge and skills in the field of biochemistry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Biochemistry I laboratory

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

(1) Upon completion of this course, students should be able to recognize how fundamental chemical principles and reactions are utilized in biochemical processes. (2) Be able to identify, formulate and solve complex biochemical problems. (3) Calculate the speed of biochemical reactions catalyzed by enzymes, determine the type of inhibition (4) To predict the potential impact of compounds on the pace of enzymatic reactions (5) Have the necessary knowledge and strategies for the separation, identification and quantification of compounds and elements from complex mixtures. (6) Connect the structure of DNA molecules with the transfer of genetic information and the principles of inheritance (7) Be able to design and conduct experiments. (8) Be able to communicate the findings and conclusions. (9) Read and understand original research.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

The contents of the course, the historical development of biochemistry, biomolecules, biological structures (3) Water, hydrogen bonds, the role of water, buffer systems in the body, amino acids (3) Amino acids, peptides, proteins, peptide bond (4) The techniques of protein purification; electrophoresis, chromatographic methods, ultracentrifugation (4) Characterization of protein: Edman degradation, immunological, mass spectrometry, MALDI-TOF, X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy (3) Structure of nucleotides, DNA, RNA, and the flow of genetic information, DNA replication, transcription and translation, gene expression (3) Hemoglobin-myoglobin, structure and function, allosteric proteins (3) Enzymes as catalysts in biological systems, the model Menten kinetics Michaelis- (3) Types of enzyme inhibition: competitively, nekompeticijski and akompeticijski inhibitors (3) Catalytic strategies, catalytic core principles, covalent catalysis, acid base catalysis, catalysis approaching, metal ion catalysis (3) Regulatory strategies, allosteric control, isozymes, reversible covalent modification, activation of proteolysis-zymogens (3) Carbohydrates: monosaccharides, complex carbohydrates, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, lectins (3) lipids and the cell membrane, transport of molecules through the membrane, types of movement across the cell membrane (4) Signal transduction cascades, primary and secondary signal carriers, phosphorylation cascade, disturbances in the signal conducting paths (3)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Partial exams. Oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Biokemija , J.M. Berg, J.L. Tymoczko and L. Stryer, Prijevod VI izdanja, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2013.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in Biochemistry 1
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in Biochemistry 1

Code

KTG305

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Mila Radan

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

60

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

This laboratory course will introduce student to techniques fundamental to biochemical investigations.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Biochemistry I

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- understand and use many of the techniques and tools of biochemistry
- comprehend fundamental principles of biochemical research
- communicate research results effectively in written format

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Potentiometric determination of amino acids (4) Qualitative analysis of proteins: colored and precipitation reactions to proteins (4) Lipid-isolation and detection of phospholipids from egg yolk (4) Properties of carbohydrates and carbohydrate tests (4) Enzymes: properties of digestive enzymes - ptyalin (4) Determination of protein concentration by Bradford assay (4) Determination of carbohydrate structures using periodic acid (4) Properties of lipids, solubility, saponification (4) Gel filtration of hemoglobin (4) Enzyme catalysis - kinetics of the enzymatic reactions (4) Enzyme catalysis - effect of inhibitors on enzyme activity (4) enzyme catalysis - effect of temperature and pH on enzyme activity (4) Isolation and quantification of nucleic acids (4) Protein electrophoresis (4) Biological oxidation: oxidation test with substance (4)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

3.0

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Interna skripta "Biokemijski praktikum", O. Politeo

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analysis of Real Samples
NAME OF THE COURSE Analysis of Real Samples

Code

KTG306

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Credits (ECTS)

3.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Provide students with the basics of sampling.
- Teach students solve practical problems of sampling of real sample
- Introduction of students to basic methods for assessing the composition and size fractions in the real sample.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercise of Analysis of real samples

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Implementation of the sampling process as the initial step of each chemical analysis
Proper selection of the quantity of collected material, depending on the analyte and the available analytical methods and techniques
Link Auditors solve problems related to sampling using statistical methods with the available techniques and methods which can be carried out chemical analysis
Learning to use mathematical tools in solving mathematical problems related to sampling

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Significance analysis of real samples: raw materials, industrial products. The development and control processes. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material.
Week 2: Sampling of gases, liquids and solids. Seminar: Solving numerical examples from the sampling of gases, liquids and solids.
Week 3: Analytical separation. Preparation of samples for analysis. Seminar: Solving numerical problems in the theory of analytic separation.
Week 4: Decomposition and dissolution of samples. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material - Decomposition and dissolution of samples.
Week 5: Development of selected methods. The choice of methods of analysis. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material - Development of selected methods.
Week 6: Reporting and interpretation of analytical data. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material - Reporting and interpretation of analytical data.
Week 7: Revision of theoretical and seminar materials. Assessment (first partial test of theoretical and seminar materials).
Week 8: Determination of water. Moisture in solids and gases. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material - moisture in solids and gases.
Week 9: Methods for the analysis of materials: cement, minerals, alloys and metals, oil, water. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical materials - Methods for analysis of materials.
10th week: Quality control. Tolerance. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material - Quality control and tolerance.
11th week: Reference Materials. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material - Reference Materials.
12 weeks: Sampling and sample preparation for analysis of plaster and cement. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical materials - Sampling plaster and cement.
13th week: Separation and Analysis of Minerals. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material - Collection and analysis of minerals.
14th week: Separation and analysis: alloy. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material - Collection and analysis of alloys.
Week 15: Revision of theoretical and seminar materials. Examination (II. Partial test theoretical and seminar materials).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80% of the hourly rate.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.3

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.3

Tests

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire examination can be applied over the two partial test of theoretical and seminar materials during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in the assessment accounts for 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written, oral and written and oral examination. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test from any part (previous activity) is valid throughout the current academic year. Written exam has a share of 30% of oral and written with 60% and 10% verbal. Students who did not pass the exam by the partial tests take the exam through written, oral and written-oral examination in the regular examination periods. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the assessment with 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - a good 80% -89% -very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.

6

A. I. Vogel, A. Tekst-book quantitative inorganic analysis, Fifth Edition Longman, London, 1986.

0

R. Kellner, J.M. Mermet, M. Otto, M. Varcarcel, H.M. Widmer, Analytical Chemistry (A Modern Approach to Analytical Science, 2nd Edition) Wiley-VCHVerlag Gmbh&Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2004.

0

D. A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 9th edition, Brooks&Cole, SAD, 2014.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Šoljić, Računanje u analitičkoj kemiji, Zagreb, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of students during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercise in Analysis of Real Samples
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercise in Analysis of Real Samples

Code

KTG307

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- To enable students to maintain their own sampling
- Teach students solve practical problems of sample analysis
- Introduce students to the basic methods of sampling and critical analysis of the results, their display and interpretation and linking theoretical knowledge and experimental work.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Analysis of real samples

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Collection, identification and interpretation of results of analysis of real samples. Sampling of solids, liquids and gases. Dissolution samples of solids and liquids. The separation of homogeneous and heterogeneous mixture

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction to the problem of sampling (4 hours).
2. Sampling of mineral resources (3 hours)
3. Dissolving sample of mineral resources (4 hours)
4. Sampling of water (sea and water) (3 hours)
5. Processing and analysis of samples of sea and tap water (6 hours)
6. Sampling and dissolving alloys (5 hours)
7. Sampling and dissolving organic origin sample (5 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The presence and activity of the exercises in the amount of 100% of the times scheduled. Perform all prescribed laboratory exercises and writing reports. Continuous assessment by tests prior to commencement of the exercise.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation: (success (%) / share in the assessment (%))
- presence and activity in the classroom: (100/10)
- oral exams (60-100 / 25)
- Performance measurement: (60-100 / 25)
- writing reports (experimental data, calculating data, tables and graphs, conclusion): (60-100 / 40)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

E. Generalić, S. Krka, Analiza realnih uzoraka – vježbe, Split 2012. (interni nerecenzirani skript)

0

Web-stranica Zavoda

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of students during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercise in Analysis of Real Samples
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercise in Analysis of Real Samples

Code

KTG307

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- To enable students to maintain their own sampling
- Teach students solve practical problems of sample analysis
- Introduce students to the basic methods of sampling and critical analysis of the results, their display and interpretation and linking theoretical knowledge and experimental work.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Analysis of real samples

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Collection, identification and interpretation of results of analysis of real samples. Sampling of solids, liquids and gases. Dissolution samples of solids and liquids. The separation of homogeneous and heterogeneous mixture

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction to the problem of sampling (4 hours).
2. Sampling of mineral resources (3 hours)
3. Dissolving sample of mineral resources (4 hours)
4. Sampling of water (sea and water) (3 hours)
5. Processing and analysis of samples of sea and tap water (6 hours)
6. Sampling and dissolving alloys (5 hours)
7. Sampling and dissolving organic origin sample (5 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The presence and activity of the exercises in the amount of 100% of the times scheduled. Perform all prescribed laboratory exercises and writing reports. Continuous assessment by tests prior to commencement of the exercise.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation: (success (%) / share in the assessment (%))
- presence and activity in the classroom: (100/10)
- oral exams (60-100 / 25)
- Performance measurement: (60-100 / 25)
- writing reports (experimental data, calculating data, tables and graphs, conclusion): (60-100 / 40)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of students during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in elementary chemical engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in elementary chemical engineering

Code

KTG309

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Renato Stipišić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Establishing knowledge of the principles of momentum, heat and mass transfer and its application in technological processes of the chemical industry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Elementary chemical engineering

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to:
- Apply conservation laws in fluid flow
- Identify and analyze the molecular mechanisms and eddy transfer of momentum, energy and mass
- The eve of major resistance for notebook phenomenon and the possibility of intensifying the transfer of the unit operations
- Different key parameters for mechanical, thermal and diffusion unit operations of chemical industry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1: Determination of fluid flow type and the critical Reynolds number; Applying the Bernoulli’s theorem. (2.5 hours)
Exercise 2: Determination of pressure drop in the pipeline. (2.5 hours)
Exercise 3: Determination of fluidized bed characteristics. (2 hours)
Exercise 4: Filtration - determination of filtration coefficient and filtration cake resistance. (2 hours)
Exercise 5: Heat exchanger - overall heat transfer coefficient determination in heat exchangers. (2 hours)
Exercise 6: Absorption - determination of loading and flooding points of packed tower absorber. (2 hours)
Exercise 7: Crystallization - Impact of process parameters on final product of crystallization. (2 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at 100% of the hourly rate.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.2

Research

Practical training

0.2

Experimental work

0.2

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

0.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam written exam. The principle of assessment: 60-69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - a good 80% -89% Very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Priručnik za vježbe iz kolegija Tehnološke operacije, interna skripta 2012.

0

Web stranice KTF-a

E. Mitrović - Kessler: Tehnološke operacije kemijske industrije - laboratorijske vježbe, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split 1991.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in elementary chemical engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in elementary chemical engineering

Code

KTG309

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Establishing knowledge of the principles of momentum, heat and mass transfer and its application in technological processes of the chemical industry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Elementary chemical engineering

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to:
- Apply conservation laws in fluid flow
- Identify and analyze the molecular mechanisms and eddy transfer of momentum, energy and mass
- The eve of major resistance for notebook phenomenon and the possibility of intensifying the transfer of the unit operations
- Different key parameters for mechanical, thermal and diffusion unit operations of chemical industry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1: Determination of fluid flow type and the critical Reynolds number; Applying the Bernoulli’s theorem. (2.5 hours)
Exercise 2: Determination of pressure drop in the pipeline. (2.5 hours)
Exercise 3: Determination of fluidized bed characteristics. (2 hours)
Exercise 4: Filtration - determination of filtration coefficient and filtration cake resistance. (2 hours)
Exercise 5: Heat exchanger - overall heat transfer coefficient determination in heat exchangers. (2 hours)
Exercise 6: Absorption - determination of loading and flooding points of packed tower absorber. (2 hours)
Exercise 7: Crystallization - Impact of process parameters on final product of crystallization. (2 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at 100% of the hourly rate.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.2

Research

Practical training

0.2

Experimental work

0.2

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.1

Oral exam

Written exam

0.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam written exam. The principle of assessment: 60-69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - a good 80% -89% Very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Selected processes of chemical industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Selected processes of chemical industry

Code

KTG311

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

5.5

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Miće Jakić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Qualifying students for the adoption and application of the fundamental principles of chemical processes in technological processes of inorganic and organic industry with special emphasis on techno-economic and environmental aspects.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Selected processes of chemical industry- laboratory

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course the student will be able to:
1. Classify and apply the basic principles of chemical processes in technological processes of inorganic and organic industry.
2. To explain the process and apply methods for the preparation of process water.
3. Categorize energy sources for inorganic processes and describe the processes of combustion of solid fuels.
4. Describe catalytic processes and influential factors in production processes basic inorganic chemical industry (ammonia, sulfuric acid, nitric acid).
5. Explain the basic processes (hydration, sintering) and the influential factors in the production of ceramic materials.
6. Distinguish metallurgical, electrothermical and electrochemical processes in relation to the implementation of the process, equipment, quality assurance, the possibility of using secondary raw materials and by-products of inorganic processes.
7. Compute important parameters for the phases of the production process.
8. Explain the basic processes (primary and secondary) of the processing of petroleum.
9. Distinguish and explain processes for production of components for organic synthesis (alkanes, alkenes, acetylene, aromatic hydrocarbons, synthesis gas) from the petrochemical sources (natural gas, petroleum).
10. Describe technological processes in organic synthesis.
11. Explain the processes of polymerisation.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Elementary principles of chemical processes.
2nd week: Water in the technological processes. The precipitation agents, ion exchangers and membranes in the waters-treatment process (basic processes and reactions, equipment and process control).
3rd week: Energy sources for inorganic processes. Fuels and burning processes of solid fuels. Gas generator.
4th week: The most important examples of catalytic processes of the basic inorganic chemical industry (synthesis of ammonia, production of nitric and sulphuric acids). The written knowledge tests (I Colloquium).
5th week: The high-temperatures reaction in the solid state and sintering processes in the production of ceramic materials.
6th week: Forming processes of dispersion systems with water. Clay-water system.
7th week: Hydration processes and hardening of mineral binders.
8th week: Metallurgical and electrothermical processes. Electrochemical industrial processes, electrolyses of aqueous solutions and melting salts. The written knowledge tests (II Colloquium).
9th week: Primary and secondary processes of the processing of petroleum.
10th week: Processes for production of components for organic synthesis (alkanes, alkenes, acetylene, aromatic hydrocarbons, synthesis gas) from the petrochemical sources (natural gas, petroleum).
11th week: Alternative (no conventional) methods for raw materials production for organic synthesis.
12th week: Technological processes in organic synthesis according the criteria of similar chemical reactions (thermodynamics and kinetics, catalysts). The written knowledge tests (III Colloquium).
13th week: The production of fine chemicals. The processes of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, hydroformilation and oxidation reactions.
14th week: The production of fine chemicals. The processes of alkylation, esterification and nitration.
15th week: The production of fine chemicals. The processes of sulfonation and sulphating, hydrolysis and polymerisation. The written knowledge tests
(IV Colloquium).
SEMINARS:
During the semester are processed numerical examples (tasks) from lectures and the flow diagram presentation of selected technological processes (physical and chemical base processes, equipment and environmental impact), which together with lectures seems a whole.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking four (4) partial tests during the semester, i.e., two (2) partial tests from the inorganic part, and two (2) partial tests from the organic part. Test passing score is 60%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of theoretical (oral) and written part. Exam passing score is 60%.
Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, and 93% 100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R. Krstulović, Tehnološki procesi anorganske industrije, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 1986.

5

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali), http://www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Procesi_anorganske_industrije.pdf

1

www.ktf-split.hr

Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa, Zagreb, 1997.

6

I. Klarić, Tehnološki procesi organske industrije (I. dio), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2008., (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali), https://www.ktf-split.hr/index.php/nastavni-materijali-knjiznice/repozitorij-265?start=20

0

www.ktf-split.hr

Z. Janović, Naftni i petrokemijski procesi i proizvodi, Hrvatsko društvo za goriva i maziva, Zagreb, 2011.

15

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Zelić, Z. Osmanović, Čvrstoća i trajnost cementnih kompozita, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, 2014., ISBN 978-953-7803-01-8.
Z. Osmanović, J. Zelić, Proizvodnja Portland-cementa, Univerzitetski udžbenik, Univerzitet u Tuzli, B&H, Tuzla, 2010., ISBN 978-9958-897-04-7.
http://www.knjiga.ba/proizvodnja_portlandj_cementa-k7412.html

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) Faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Elementary Chemical Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Elementary Chemical Engineering

Code

KTG312

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Miće Jakić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge about the principles of transfer of momentum, heat and mass transfer on the principle of a unified approach to transport phenomena. This knowledge forms the basis of chemical engineering unit operations, and they are therefore essential for a fuller understanding of process engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises of elementary chemical engineering

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, student is expected to know how to:
- apply the laws of conservation in fluid flow
- identify and analyze molecule and vortex mechanisms of transport phenomena
- notice the major resistances in transport phenomena and to know how to intensify transport in different unit operations
- differentiate the key parameters in mechanic, heat and diffusion based unit operations of chemical industry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st. week: Introduction to chemical engineering. Processes and process variables. Process classification. Flowchart of process.
2nd week: Fundamentals of material and energy balances. General balance equation. Material balances on batch, semibatch and continuous processes.
3th week: Energy and energy balances. Energy balances on closed and opened systems.
4th week: Introduction to physical transport phenomena. Rate of transport processes. Molecular and convective transport mechanisms.
5th week: Flow phenomena. Conservation law. Application of momentum and mass balances in fluid mechanics. Application of heat balance in fluid mechanics: Bernoulli equation and its application in process engineering.
6th week: Flow phenomena. Laminar and turbulent flow. Flow in boundary layers. Pressure drop in pipe systems.
7th week: Flow around obstacles. Rate of sedimentation.
8th week: Flow through beds of particles. Fluidization. Filtration.
9th week: Fundamental principles of heat transfer. Stationary heat conduction. Heat transfer by forced and natural convection. Heat transport by radiation.
10th week: Heat transfer industrial applications. Heat-exchange equipments.
11th week: Fundamental principles of mass transfer. Stationary diffusion. Equimolar counterdiffusion and one-component diffusion. Mass transfer with forced and natural convection.
12th week: Interphase mass transfer. Analogy between heat and mass transfer.
13th week: Unit operations involving mass transfer. Gas absorption. Apparatus used in gas absorption.
14th week: Distillation and its aplications. Performance of distillation columns.
15th week: Crystallization. Influence of process parameters on final products of crystallization. Crystallization equipments.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.6

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Examination passing rate is 55%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists only the theoretical (oral) part.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali), http://www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Procesi_anorganske_industrije.pdf

1

www.ktf-split.hr

I. Klarić, Vježbe iz polimerizacije (za internu upotrebu), Tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 1990.

10

I. Klarić, Vježbe iz tehnoloških procesa organske industrije (za internu upotrebu), Tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 1990.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Krstulović, Tehnološki procesi anorganske industrije, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 1986.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Environmental Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Environmental Chemistry

Code

KTG313

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic objective of the course is to study the basic chemical principles that are happening in the environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. knowing the first and explain the interactions that occur between different phases in the environment (water-to-air, ground-to-air, water-soil)
2. distinction approach to chemical analysis of soil, water or air
3. understand the circular cycle gas emissions (CO2, NOx, SOx) in the environment
4. explain the impact of metals on the environment
5. identify and explain the effect of organic compounds in the environment
6. solve problems in environmental protection

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction to Environmental Chemistry. The impact of technology on the chemical processes in the environment.
Lecture 2: Parts of the environment: hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere and biosphere. Water chemistry. Gases in Water
Lecture 3: Complexation and speciation. Redox reactions, pE in natural waters.
Seminar 1 (2 hours): Interpretation and Data Processing
Lecture 4: pE-pH diagrams. Interaction phases: solid-liquid-gas.
Seminar 2 (2 hours): Redox reactions, PE in natural waters.
Lecture 5: Creating sediment and ion-exchange processes on its border. Biochemical processes in the waters
Seminar 3 (2 hours): pE-pH diagrams. Interaction phases: solid-liquid-gas
Lecture 6: Transformation elements. Biodegradation of the organic material. water pollution
Lecture 7: The atmosphere and the chemistry of the atmosphere. Physical characteristics of the atmosphere
Lecture 8: Chemical and photochemical reactions in the atmosphere
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): Standard deviations, errors
Lecture 9:. Air pollution: inorganic gases, organic compounds, particulate matter
Seminar 5 (2 hours): Biochemical processes in the waters
Lecture 10: Photochemical smog. Geosphere and geochemistry.
Seminar 6 (2 hours): Determination of pH and concentration in aquatic environmental samples
Lecture 11: The composition of the soil, nutrients. Acid-base and ion-exchange reactions
Seminar 7 (2 hours): Processing of the data collected by monitoring the atmosphere
Lecture 12: soil pollution
Lecture 13: Toxicity of chemical substances. Analytical Environmental Chemistry.
Lecture 14: Analytical Environmental Chemistry
Lecture 15: Evaluation and interpretation of analytical data from the environment. specific applications
Seminar 8 (1 hour): Assignments: gases, calculations composition

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial tests to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

E. Burcu Özkaraova Güngör, Environmental Technologies New Developments, Vienna,2008

1

Vježbe iz Kemije okoliša (interna skripta u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

1

P.O’Neil, Environmental Science, London, 1993.

1

W. Stumm, J.J. Morgan, Aquatic Chemistry, New York, 1996

1

B.J.Alloway, Heavy Metals in Soils, London, 1995

1

D. Tuhtar, Zagađivanje zraka i vode, Sarajevo, 1984

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V. Glavač, Uvod u globalnu ekologiju, Zagreb, 1999.
M. Črnjar, Ekonomija i zaštita okoliša, Rijeka, 1997.,
C.Baird, Environmental chemistry,New York, 1998.,
C.E. Kupchella, M. C. Hyland, Enviromental science, Massachusetts, 1989.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Enzyme kinetics
NAME OF THE COURSE Enzyme kinetics

Code

KTG315

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScD Ivana Carev
Asst Prof Franko Burčul

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge and skills in the field of enzyme kinetics.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Enzyme kinetics exercise

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Understand the basic principles of chemical kinetics.
- Understand the importance and role of the enzymes in the life of the cell.
- Understand and explain Mechaelis-Menten kinetics model.
- Experimentally determined parameters of the enzyme-catalysed reactions.
- Understand and explain the importance and role of inhibition of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.
- Explain the mechanisms of regulation of enzyme activity.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

LECTURES:
Basic principles of chemical kinetics: order of reaction. The reaction rate constants. The influence of temperature on rate constants. (3) Enzymes as biological catalysts: Basic properties of the enzymes. Nomenclature and classification of enzymes. The specificity of the enzymes. The active site of the enzymes. (4) Cofactors and coenzymes. (2) The kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions: Activation energy. Enzyme-substrate reaction. Michaelis - Menten equation. Experimental determination of Km and Vmax. Graph of the Michaelis-Menten equation: the Lineweaver-Burkov double-reciprocal plot. Hanes plot. Eadie-Hofstee plot. (3) Inhibition of enzymes. Competitive inhibition. Uncompetitive reversible inhibition. Mixed inhibition. Irreversible inhibition. (3) Effect of pH and temperature on enzyme activity. (2) Control of enzyme activity: Cooperativity. Allosteric interactions. Hill equation. (2) Catalytic strategies. (4) Mehanisms of regulation: Inhibition feedback, covalent modifications, proteolytic cleavage (3) Kinetics of multienzyme systems. (2) Fast reactions (2)
SEMINARS:
Basic principles of chemical kinetics (2) Enzymes as biocatalysts. (1) Cofactors and coenzymes. (1) Michaelis-Menten equation. (4) Inhibition of enzymes. (4) Effect of pH and temperature on enzyme activity. (1) Allosteric interactions. (1) Mehanisms of regulation of enzyme activity. (1)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance, preparing seminar papers and taking the final exam.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

2.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Activity during attendance, presentation of seminar papers and final exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.M. Berg, J.L. Tymoczko, L. Stryer: Biokemija, 5th Ed, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2013.

0

R.K. Murray, D.A. Bender, K.M. Botham, P.J. Kennelly, V.W. Rodwell, P.A. Weil, Harperova ilustrirana biokemija, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2011.

0

D. Voet. J. G. Voet, C. W. Pratt, Fundamentals of Biochemistry, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., NY, Chichester, Weinheim, Brisbane, Singapore, Toronto, 1999.

0

Cornish-Bowden: Fundamentals of Enzyme Kinetics, Butterworth, London 1979

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Christopher K. Mathews and K. E. Van Holde: Biochemistry, Second edition, The Benjamin / Cummings Publishing Company Inc 1996.;
Thomas M. Devlin: Textbook of Biochemistry, Third Edition, Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, Chichester, Brisbane, Toronto, Singapore, 1992.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Level of teachers.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Enzyme kinetics
NAME OF THE COURSE Enzyme kinetics

Code

KTG315

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge and skills in the field of enzyme kinetics.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Enzyme kinetics exercise

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Understand the basic principles of chemical kinetics.
- Understand the importance and role of the enzymes in the life of the cell.
- Understand and explain Mechaelis-Menten kinetics model.
- Experimentally determined parameters of the enzyme-catalysed reactions.
- Understand and explain the importance and role of inhibition of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.
- Explain the mechanisms of regulation of enzyme activity.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

LECTURES:
Basic principles of chemical kinetics: order of reaction. The reaction rate constants. The influence of temperature on rate constants. (3) Enzymes as biological catalysts: Basic properties of the enzymes. Nomenclature and classification of enzymes. The specificity of the enzymes. The active site of the enzymes. (4) Cofactors and coenzymes. (2) The kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions: Activation energy. Enzyme-substrate reaction. Michaelis - Menten equation. Experimental determination of Km and Vmax. Graph of the Michaelis-Menten equation: the Lineweaver-Burkov double-reciprocal plot. Hanes plot. Eadie-Hofstee plot. (3) Inhibition of enzymes. Competitive inhibition. Uncompetitive reversible inhibition. Mixed inhibition. Irreversible inhibition. (3) Effect of pH and temperature on enzyme activity. (2) Control of enzyme activity: Cooperativity. Allosteric interactions. Hill equation. (2) Catalytic strategies. (4) Mehanisms of regulation: Inhibition feedback, covalent modifications, proteolytic cleavage (3) Kinetics of multienzyme systems. (2) Fast reactions (2)
SEMINARS:
Basic principles of chemical kinetics (2) Enzymes as biocatalysts. (1) Cofactors and coenzymes. (1) Michaelis-Menten equation. (4) Inhibition of enzymes. (4) Effect of pH and temperature on enzyme activity. (1) Allosteric interactions. (1) Mehanisms of regulation of enzyme activity. (1)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance, preparing seminar papers and taking the final exam.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

2.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Activity during attendance, presentation of seminar papers and final exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Christopher K. Mathews and K. E. Van Holde: Biochemistry, Second edition, The Benjamin / Cummings Publishing Company Inc 1996.;
Thomas M. Devlin: Textbook of Biochemistry, Third Edition, Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, Chichester, Brisbane, Toronto, Singapore, 1992.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Level of teachers.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Perfumes and Cosmetics
NAME OF THE COURSE Perfumes and Cosmetics

Code

KTG317

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge in the field of chemistry of fragrances and fragrant compounds and their significance and application in everyday life.
Acquisition of basic knowledge about the most important raw materials which are used in production of cosmetic preparations, types of cosmetic preparations and side effects of cosmetic raw materials and/or preparations on skin and skin appendages.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Experimental in Perfumes and Cosmetics

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam students will be able to:
- define basic terms associated with chemistry and creation of fragrances
- specify perfumery materials of natural origin, methods used to extract ingredients from their natural sources and the most common natural sources
- specify and recognize some, the most common synthetic fragrant compounds according to their structural formula
- define terms cosmetics and cosmetology
- differentiate main classes of ingredients for cosmetics production and specify the most important representatives of each class
- differentiate cosmetics according to utilization and specify typical products belonging to each class

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures (2 hours weekly):
1st week: Introduction to course (course content, students responsibilities, terms and conditions for passing exam). Definitions of terms such as fragrance, fragrant or aroma compound, olfactology, olfaction.
2nd week: Olfactory system. Olfactory system disorders. History of discovery, production and use of fragrances.
3th week: Perfume types. Classification of fragrances by the origin of the ingredients. Natural, nature-identical, synthetic. The structure of an fragrance. Classification of fragrances by olfactive family.
4th week: Olfactive families. Classification by H&R. Classification by M. Edwards – so-called ”fragrance wheel”. Classification by fragrance manufacturers.
5th week: Fragrance ingredients. Natural ingredients. Methods of natural ingredients isolation. Distillation. Expression. Solvent extraction.
6th week: Definitions of natural fragrance ingredients. Aromatics sources. Plant sources. Bark. Flowers. Fruits.
7th week: Plant sources. Leaves and twigs. Roots, rhizomes and bulbs. Seeds. Woods. Resins and balsams.
8th week: Animal sources. Other natural sources. Fragrant compounds. Classification of synthetic ingredients. Classification by functional groups. Alcohols. Aldehydes. Ketones.
9th week: C13 norisoprenoids.. esters. Lactones. Musks. Phenolics. Hydrocarbons. Heterocyclic compounds.
10th week: Definition of terms cosmetics and cosmetology. Significance and classification of cosmetology. Skin and skin appendages. Cosmetics ingredients. Natural ingredients. Inorganic ingredients.
11th week: Organic ingredients. Ingredients of plant origin. Ingredients of animal origin. Biogenic stimulants: hormones, vitamins and enzymes.
12th week: Semisynthetic ingredients. Synthetic ingredients. Active ingredients and adjuvants. Tensides. Emollients. Thickeners. Preservatives. Antioxidants. Dyes. Sunscreen preparations.
13th week: Cosmetic preparations. Definitions of basic terms andclassification. Cleansing products.
14th week: Skin care products. Creams, lotions, gels and oils for skin and hair care.
15thwek: Decorative cosmetics.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend lectures in the amount of at least 80% of the times scheduled. Active participation in teaching process will be also evaluated in the final score.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam by taking and passing two partial exams (tests) during the semester. Test passing score is 60%. Each test constitute 45% of the final exam score. Attendance to the lectures participate in the final score with 10%. Any of the partial exams passed during the semester is valid throughout the academic year.
Students who do not pass one of the partial exam or both of them have to take an written exam in the regular examination periods. Exam passing score is 60%.
Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

The Chemistry of Fragrances, 2nd edition, edited by C. S. Sell, RSC Publishing, Cambridge, 2006.

0

Da (osobno vlasništvo nastavnika)

M. Čajkovac, Kozmetologija, Naklada Slap, Zagreb, 2000.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Poucher’s Perfumes, Cosmetics and Soaps, 10th edition, edited by Hilda Butler, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 2000.
Tehnička enciklopedija, vol. 5, str. 360-370, JLZ, Zagreb, 1976.
Tehnička enciklopedija, vol. 7, str. 311-319, JLZ, Zagreb, 1980.
J. Buckle, Clinical Aromatherapy, Essential Oils in Practice, 2nd edition, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality;
(2) Faculty Level, by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level, monitoring and accepting suggestions of students and colleagues

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Experimental in Perfumes and Cosmetics
NAME OF THE COURSE Experimental in Perfumes and Cosmetics

Code

KTG318

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Credits (ECTS)

1.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge and application of laboratory methods and techniques for isolation of fragrant constituents which are used in fragrant preparations creation.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Perfumes and Cosmetics

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course students will be able to:
- perform independently laboratory exercises according to laboratory procedures
- set up appropriate apparatus for performing isolation of natural ingredients which are used in creation of fragrant preparations
- apply basic laboratory procedures and techniques for isolation of natural ingredients which are used in creation of fragrant preparations and cosmetics
- propose laboratory procedures for isolation of natural ingredients from plant material based on knowledge gained throughout lectures (connect theoretical knowledge with experimental work)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercises (1 hour weekly joined together in 5 lab periods):
1. Isolation of fragrant compounds from flowers (such as lavender, broom…) by hydrodistillation – obtaining of flower” oil
2. Extraction of fragrant compounds from flowers in Soxhlet apparatus – obtaining of concrete
3. Hydrodistillation of concrete – obtaining of so-called concrete oil
4. Processing of concrete and obtaining of absolute. Thin-layer chromatography of flower oil, concrete oil and absolute.
5. Synthesis of selected fragrant compound.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students have to complete all planned laboratory exercises (100% of the times scheduled) and active participate in laboratory work.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students are evaluated based on their commitment during experimental work and the results achieved during work in organic-chemistry lab.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, KTF-Split, 2009.

0

Da (web stranica KTF-a)

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V. Rapić, Postupci priprave i izolacije organskih spojeva, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.
S. Borčić, O. Kronja, Praktikum preparativne organske kemije, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality;
(2) Faculty Level, by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level, monitoring and accepting suggestions of students and colleagues

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemistry in pharmacology
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry in pharmacology

Code

KTG319

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Mislav Šolić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introducing chemical characteristics of drug substances. Basic divisions and characteristics of certain classes of drugs.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercise of chemistry in pharmacology

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. definition of basic concepts and distribution of certain classes of drugs
2. physicochemical properties of drugs
3. effect and mechanism of drugs
4. Development and mode of action of drugs
5. adverse effects of drugs and their resistance
6. interactions with other drugs

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction: definition and application
Lecture 2: Chemical structures and stereochemical characteristics of drug substances
Lecture 3: Chemical structures and stereochemical characteristics of drug substances
Seminar 1 (2 hours): Introduction to the legislation of drugs
Lecture 4: Physico-chemical properties of drugs
Seminar 2 (2 hours): Distribution of drugs by pharmacological groups
Lecture 5: Physico-chemical properties of drugs
Seminar 3 (2 hours): The pharmacokinetics of drugs
Lecture 6: Chemical stability and incompatibility drugs
Lecture 7: Chemical stability and incompatibility drugs
Lecture 8: Activity and mechanism of action
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): The pharmacodynamics of drugs
Lecture 9:. Division according pharmacological groups
Seminar 5 (2 hours): analgesics
Lecture 10: The properties of certain classes of drugs
Seminar 6 (2 hours): anxiolytics
Lecture 11: Development and explanation of drug action
Seminar 7 (2 hours): antibiotics
Lecture 12: The main stages of drug action: absorption, distribution, metabolic processes, removal
Lecture 13: The main stages of drug action: absorption, distribution, metabolic processes, removal
Lecture 14: Introduction to side effects, resistance, interactions with other drugs
Lecture 15: Introduction to side effects, resistance, interactions with other drugs
Seminar 8 (1 hour): Minerals in pharmaceuticals, Chromatography and detection of drugs

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial tests to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.B. Stenlake, Foundations of Molecular Pharmacology: Chemical Basis of Drug Action, 1979

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

K.A. Connors, Chemical Stability of Pharmaceuticals: A Handbook for Pharmacists, 1986.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Kent and Riegel’s, Handbook of industrial chemistry and biotechnology, Volume I, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, 2007.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Eiichiro Ochiai, Chemicals for Life and Living, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

T.C. Marrs, R.L. Maynard, F.R. Sidell, Chemical Warfare Agents: Toxicology and Treatment, 1996;
L. Poller, Oral Anticoagulants: Chemical and Biological Preperties and Clinical Applications, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercise of chemistry in pharmacology
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercise of chemistry in pharmacology

Code

KTG320

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Mislav Šolić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

25

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Supplement theoretically acquired knowledge pertaining to the analysis of pharmacological preparations.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Chemistry in pharmacology

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completion of the training, students are expected to know:
1. basic methods of obtaining chemical compounds defined as a drug
2. way of identifying the active ingredients
3. determination of the active ingredients in the composition
4. evaluation of technological perfection and preparation method of packing, compared to the durability, handling and contamination of the drug
5. opinion on the quality of the drug on the basis of the laboratory tests

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lab course 1 (5 hour): Getting acetylenic acid
Lab course 2 (5 hour): Getting Bi-subgallate
Lab course 3 (5 hour): Getting caffeine
Lab course 4 (5 hour): Formation of calcium carbonate
Lab course 5 (5 hour): Determination of the aqueous extract and tablets
Field work (JGL, Belupo Koprivnica)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.3

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester students will be evaluated through six Laboratory test.
For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

B. Zorc, I.Butula, Vježbe iz farmaceutske kemije, Zagreb, 1995.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemistry of polymers
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry of polymers

Code

KTG321

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- knowledge about the most important properties of different types of polymers
- understanding the relation between structure and specific properties of the polymers
- basic knowledge of the methods of preparation of synthetic polymers
- introduction to the basic methods of polymer characterization

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Exercises in polymer chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- distinguish and explain basic types of polymers and their properties
- explain the specific structure of the polymer
- argue correlation between structure and properties of polymers
- distinguish and explain the polymerization reactions
- identify and characterize polymeric materials using modern instrumental techniques

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: : Introduction. The nomenclature of the polymer. The classification of polymers (thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers).
2nd week: Types of bonds in polymers. Configuration of the polymers. Conformation of the polymers.
3rd week: Super-molecular structure of the polymer. Polymer liquid crystals.
4th week: The rheological properties of the polymer.
5th week: Polymer solutions: swelling, solubility, method of calculating the solubility parameters, Hansen’s theory.
6th week: Molecular weight of the polymer. Viscosimetric determination of molecular weights.
7th week: Fractionation of the polymer. Methods of fractionation. Gel permeation chromatography.
8th week: Step-growth polymerization: properties, rate of step-growth polymerization, polymers synthesized by step-growth polymerization.
9th week: Chain growth poli. Radical polymerization: properties, rate of radical polymerization, polymers synthesized by radical polymerization.
10th week: Cationic and anionic polymerization: properties, rate of cationic and anionic polymerization, polymers synthesized by cationic and polymerization polymers
11th week: Coordination polymerization: properties, the rate of coordination polymerization, polymers synthesized by coordination polymerization.
12th week: Methods of polymerization. Natural polymers. Cellulose, cellulose fibers, cellulose modification. Starch.
13th week: Protein, protein fibers. Structure and properties of natural rubber. Synthetic rubbers. Biosynthetic polymers.
14th week: Infrared Spectroscopy.
15th week: Thermal methods - differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). Glass transition temperature, melting temperature, thermal stability of polymers.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.7

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.7

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 45% in a final grade while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 40% and oral exam for 50%, respectively. Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 50% and oral exam for 50% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Y. Gnanou, M. Fontanille, Organic and Physical Chemistry of Polymers, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, 2008.

1

T. Kovačić, Struktura i svojstva polimera, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

5

Web knjižnica KTF-a

B. Andričić, Prirodni polimerni materijali, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2009.

0

Web knjižnica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, HDKI-Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 1997.; B. Stuart, Infrared Spectroscopy - Fundamentals and Applications, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, 2004.; J. D. Menzel, R. B. Prime, Thermal Analysis of Polymers - Fundamentals and Applications, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, 2009.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University Level, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Exercises in polymer chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Exercises in polymer chemistry

Code

KTG322

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- acquiring practical knowledge about polymerization of polymers in laboratory
- identification and characterization of polymers by using complex methods and instruments
- report writing

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Enrolled in or passed the course Polymer chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- synthesize polymer in the laboratory
- create the procedure for analysis of polymers using modern analytical methods
- use the appropriate standards in analysis
- analyze and discuss the obtained experimental results
- write a report

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Exercise 1. Swelling of the polymer
Exercise 2. Fractionation of polymer by fractional precipitation
Exercise 3. Viscometric determination of polymer molecular weight
Exercise 4. Polyesterification of adipic acid with diethylene glycol
Exercise 5. Suspension polymerization of styrene
Exercise 6. Identification of polymer by infrared spectroscopy
Exercise 7. Determination of the thermal characteristics of the polymer by using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending laboratory exercices in the 100% amount.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.3

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Oral examination is done before each laboratory exercise. The student activity in the laboratory is monitored and evaluated as well as the reports from exercises. Oral examination, laboratory work and report account for 40%, 30% and 30% of the final grade, respectively.
Rating: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Kovačić, B. Andričić, Struktura i svojstva polimera, Interna skripta za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2007.

0

Zavod za organsku tehnologiju

I. Klarić, N. Stipenanelov Vrandečić, Karakterizacija polimera, Interna skripta za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2008.

0

Zavod za organsku tehnologiju

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University Level, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Nanochemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Nanochemistry

Code

KTG323

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Proposing and explaining how the principles of chemistry could be applied to the bottom-up synthesis of advanced functional materials and hierarchical construction principles, by using molecular/nano-scale building blocks programmed with chemical information.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After teaching process, the student should:
- Know the characteristics of basic nanostructures and methods for analyzing their morphology;
- Be able to apply the principles of chemistry in the so-called ”bottom-up” synthesis, in which the molecules or particles of nanometer dimensions as building elements, ”programmed” to spontaneously self-organize, organize themselves in a hierarchical structures;
- Be able to explain the relationship between structure / dimensionality and specific properties as well as functionality of nanostructures, for the given examples;
- Be able to assess the applicability of nanostructures in scientific research and new technologies.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Starting ideas of nanochemistry. Creating nanostructures.(3). Specifics of nanostructures: surface, size, shape, and self-organization (3). Examples of nanostructures of carbon, silicon, metals and metal oxides and organic nanostructures (6). Synthesis of organized nanostructures (4). Hierarchical systems (2). Experimental characterization techniques (4). Selected examples of properties of nanostructures - fundamental and practical significance of the ”size and shape effect”(6). Bio-nano interface: nanochemistry as a link between the natural and life sciences (2).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted by midterm tests and a seminar essay.
In the final exam perods the final exam shall be taken after the presentation of the seminar essay.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Lučić Lavčević, Nanostrukture, interna skripta u pripremi

0

Personal web-site

Cademartiri, G. A.Ozin, Concepts of Nanochemistry, Wiley VCH, 2009.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected web-sites

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Proffesional practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Proffesional practice

Code

KTGOSP

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Final work
NAME OF THE COURSE Final work

Code

KTGOZR

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

3. STUDY PERFORMANCE CONDITIONS

3.1. Places of the study performance

Buildings of the constituent part (name existing, under construction and planned buildings)

Identification of building

Zgrada tri fakulteta

Location of building

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Year of completion

2015

Total square area in m2

29500

Identification of building

Zgrada u Kaštel Sućurcu

Location of building

Kaštel Sućurac

Year of completion

1961

Total square area in m2

3000

3.2. List of teachers and associate teachers

 

Course Teachers and associate teachers

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić
Renato Stipišić

Asst Prof Mila Radan

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo
ScD Ivana Carev
Asst Prof Franko Burčul

Analysis of Real Samples

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Analytical Chemistry 1

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Analytical Chemistry II

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun
ScD Maja Biočić

Biochemistry 1

Asst Prof Mila Radan

Catalysis

Prof Branka Andričić
Prof Matko Erceg

Chemistry in pharmacology

Prof Marija Bralić
Mislav Šolić

Chemistry of polymers

Prof Matko Erceg

Computer application

Prof Dražan Jozić

Elementary Chemical Engineering

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Miće Jakić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Environmental Chemistry

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Enzyme kinetics

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo
ScD Ivana Carev
Asst Prof Franko Burčul

Exercise in Analysis of Real Samples

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Exercise of chemistry in pharmacology

Prof Marija Bralić
Mislav Šolić

Exercises in Analytical Chemistry 1

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Exercises in Analytical Chemistry II

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun
ScD Maja Biočić

Exercises in Biochemistry 1

Asst Prof Mila Radan

Exercises in elementary chemical engineering

Renato Stipišić

Exercises in General Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 1

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry 2

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Exercises in Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun
ScD Maja Biočić
Azra Đulović
Andrea Anđić

Exercises in Natural Products

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Exercises in Organic Chemistry 2

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Exercises in Physical Chemistry

Assoc Prof Renato Tomaš

Exercises in polymer chemistry

Prof Matko Erceg

Exercises in Pysics 1

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Exercises in Pysics 2

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
ScD Mirko Marušić
Lucija Matković

Experimental in Perfumes and Cosmetics

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Final work

 

General Biology

Prof Nada Bezić
Assoc Prof Valerija Dunkić

General Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Inorganic chemistry 1

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Inorganic Chemistry 2

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun
ScD Maja Biočić
Asst Prof Franko Burčul

Laboratory exercises in organic chemistry 1

Prof Igor Jerković

Mathematics 1

ScM Branka Gotovac
Lucija Ružman

Mathematics 2

ScM Branka Gotovac
Lucija Ružman

Nanochemistry

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Natural Products

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Organic chemistry 1

Prof Igor Jerković
Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Organic Chemistry 2

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić
Prof Igor Jerković

Perfumes and Cosmetics

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Physical Chemistry 2

Assoc Prof Renato Tomaš

Physics 1

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
Lucija Matković
Matko Maleš

Physics 2

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević
Lucija Matković

Proffesional practice

 

Selected processes of chemical industry

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Miće Jakić

 

3.4. Optimal number of students

The optimal number of students at the Undergraduate study who can be enrolled in one year of study in terms of space, equipment and number of full-time teachers is 30 (this represents the enrollment quota).

3.5. Estimate of costs per student

Average annual cost of studying per one student is aproximately 31,500.00 kunas.

3.6. Plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance

In keeping with the European standards and guidelines for internal quality assurance in higher education institutions (according to “Standards and Guidelines of Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area”) on the basis of which the University of Zagreb defines procedures for quality assurance, the proposer of the study programme is obliged to draw up a plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance.

Documentation on which the quality assurance system of the constituent part of the University is based:

- Regulations on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if existing)
- Handbook on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if it exists)

Description of procedures for evaluation of the quality of study programme implementation

  • Fore each procedure the method needs to be described (most often questionnaires for students or teachers, and self-evaluation questionnaire), name the body conducting evaluation (constituent part, university office), method of processing results and making information available, and timeframe for carrying out evaluation
  • If procedure is described in an attached document, name the document and the article.

Evaluation of the work of teachers and part-time teachers

The process of student evaluation of the teaching quality is conducted by the Quality Enhancement Centre (at the level of the University) and the Quality Enhancement Committees (at the level of constituents). The procedure consists of informing students and teachers, student survey questionnaire, the processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results, the adoption of measures to improve quality. The procedure is described in detail in the Regulations on the procedure for student evaluation of teaching at the University of Split. The processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results are under jurisdiction of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Summary results for the each constituent are submitted to the Dean and the leader of the Quality Enhancement Committee.

Monitoring of grading and harmonization of grading with anticipated learning outcomes

Procedures, rules and criteria for grading of students include: method for taking the exams, requirements for taking the exams, method of evaluation through colloquia, seminars, active participation in classes, exams and other obligations, conditions for signature, a list of references for exam preparation, and data about the teacher, assistant, etc. Informations about procedures, rules and criteria for grading students can found on the website of the Faculty and at the introductory lectures.

Evaluation of availability of resources (spatial, human, IT) in the process of learning and instruction

The Faculty provides adequate and appropriate educational resources for the study program and support for teaching and non-teaching activities of students, which are consistent with the specific programs and student needs and readily accessible to students (equipped classrooms, library, computer classrooms, and support for students with disabilities.

Availability and evaluation of student support (mentorship, tutorship, advising)

Student evaluation of the teaching quality, student survey questionnaire.

Monitoring of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole

Analysis of student success at the study is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre of the University of Split. The analysis is carried annually by survey questionnaire at the beginning of the academic year for the previous academic year. The results of the analysis and measures to improve student success are presented to the Senate of the University of Split by leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Likewise, ISVU system allows the student service and ISVU coordinator to keep track of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole.

Student satisfaction with the programme as a whole

Quality Improvement Centre of the University of Split has defined the procedure for conducting a survey on the evaluation of the overall study. The student survey questionnaire for evaluation of the study is conducted by the platform Evasys but after the student has passed the final exam. The aim of the survey is to hear the opinion of students on various aspects of the study which they have completed and to determine flaws in order to increase the quality of the content and implementation of the study. Data is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre and results are submitted to the Head of Department and to leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre.

Procedures for obtaining feedback from external parties (alums, employers, labour market and other relevant organizations)

Former students are contacted in order to express their assessment of the qualifications for the professional requirements. Selected employers can be contacted as well in order to assess their satisfaction with students which have been studing at this the study program. Regular exchange of information at conferences organized by the ALUMNI of the Faculty (AMACTFS).

Evaluation of student practical education (where this applies)

Evaluation of student training is conducted orally by the course teacher. At the same time the student must submit the log and seminar about selected topic of professional practice.

Other evaluation procedures carried out by the proposer

Formal and informal consultation with colleagues in the profession at the Faculty level and beyond.

Description of procedures for informing external parties on the study programme (students, employers, alums)

Results are available on the official web site of the Faculty (https://www.ktf.unist.hr) Brochure (revised annually) The University review. Universitas – supplement of the Slobodna Dalmacija about the University of Split. The participation of staff and students ot the Faculty at the Science Festival and similar events.