UNIST
U N I V E R S I T Y   O F   S P L I T

FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

 

 

DETAILED PROPOSAL OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Graduate university studij

Chemical Technology

 

 

 
GENERAL INFORMATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

Name of higher education institution

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Address

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Phone

021/ 329-420

Fax

021/ 329-461

E-mail

dekanat@ktf-split.hr

Internet address

https://www.ktf.unist.hr/

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Name of the study programme

Chemical Technology

Provider of the study programme

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Other participants

Type of study programme

Level of study programm

Academic/vocational title earned at completion of study

Master Engineer of Chemical Engineering

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Reasons for starting the study programme

By the graduate study of chemical technology, the Faculty of Chemical Technology of Split, as a high-education and scientific institution, is trying to offer a new impetus for economic development and rational economizing on natural resources. This study provides knowledge required for designing, leading and developing of sustainable chemical processes, as well as the knowledge on the methods of quality investigations and their development at the process of analysis. The graduate study is organized through three study orintations: Materials, Environmental Protection and Chemistry and Technology of Mediterranean Cultures. The basic knowledge from the field of chemical engineering is applied in the manufacture and analysis of materials, in the investigations of various degradation processes and in the protection of construction materials in different surroundings. Sustainable development is closely connected with industry and environment. When they finish this study, the students can be quickly involved in work to solve many problems and promote the interrelation between technological development and environment, with an emphasis on water resources and coastal sea, and on soil and atmosphere protection.

1.2. Relationship with the local community (economy, entrepreneurship, civil society, etc.)

The proposed study programs are based on the scientific knowledge of chemistry, chemical engineering and food technology, which significantly contributes to modern education of new experts. The possible partners outside high-school education system interested in continuation of the study of chemical technology are the economy and public services of the Split-Dalmatia County, as well as: cement industry, shipbuilding industry, processing of polymer materials, Institute for Oceanography and Fishing, Croatian Hydrographical Institute, Institute for Adriatic Cultures and Melioration of Karsts, Institute for Civil Engineering, Public Health Institute and other County and City public services. It is important to point out that due to the geographic position of Split there is a growing presence of students not only from Dalmatia but also from Bosnia and Herzegovina, so that such a trend is expected to continue in the future.

1.3. Compatibility with requirements of professional organizations

One of the basic assumptions for quality implementation of the proposed program is educational, professional and research cooperation of all relevant factors that may contribute to the process of the training and education of students. The teachers who teach at the graduate study of chemical technology are members of various professional associations and commitie (Croatian Society of Chemical Engineers, Association of Chemical Engineers Split, Croatian Chemical Society Parent Committee for Technical Sciences, Chemical Engineering field, Croatian Academy of Engineering , Croatian standard Institute, etc.).

1.4. Name possible partners outside the higher education system that expressed interest in the study programme

The possible partners outside high-school education system interested in continuation of the study of chemical technology are the economy and public services of the Split-Dalmatia County and beyond. Some of the specialized sites and laboratories with whom Faculty cooperates (usually for the purpose of student’s practical and field work and the preparation of graduate theses of students) are: companies from Dalmatia (eg. AD Plastik, Brodosplit, CEMEX, Cian), the entire Croatia (pharmaceutical industry, oil industry, food industry, cosmetics industry, paints and varnishes, the company dealing with the protection of the environment, etc.) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (eg. Aluminij Mostar). Faculty partners are also institutes as follows: Institute Ruđer Bošković, Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation, Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries.

1.5. Financing

The planned source of financing for the graduate study of chemical technology is the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports.

1.6. Comparability of the study programme with other accredited programmes in higher education institutions in the Republic of Croatia and EU countries

When elaborating the programs, special care was taken to harmonize the subjects and their teaching programs with related studies at other high-school institutions. In that way the programmes are mutually comparable and, also, they stimulate the student and teacher mobility. The proposed program can be compared with the programmes of the following high-school institutions:
- Politecnico di Torino, Italy (www.polito.it )
- University of Maribor, Slovenia (http://www.fkkt.uni-lj.si),
- University of Pardubice, Czech Republic (http://www.upce.cz/en/fcht/uechi.html),
- Politechnika Warszawska, Poland (http://www.ichip.pw.edu.pl/)
- Universit? degli Studi di Roma ”La Sapienza” ( http://www.chem.uniroma1.it/didattica/offerta-formativa/cdl-chimica-industriale), Rome, Italy;
- Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.

1.7. Openness of the study programme to student mobility (horizontal, vertical in the Republic of Croatia, and international)

It can be realized through the enrolment of particular subjects in other university studies, as well as of the whole semesters in the related studies, or through the work on the final project. The students will be also given an opportunity to enroll in a certain number of courses out of their profession. The studies suitable for the realization of that mobility are the components of the University of Split, but also of other Croatian universities and high-school institutions of the EU countries. The study programme is organized in one-semester courses, which is one of the important prerequisites of student mobility. The proposed programme of graduate study of chemical technology and its comparability with the related studies in the Republic of Croatia and the EU countries enables the student and teacher mobility. The mobility can be realized through the enrolment of particular subjects in other university studies, as well as of the whole semesters in the related studies, or through the work on the final project. Institutions with which it will be possible to achieve the mobility are constituents of the University of Split, other Croatian universities (Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology in Zagreb, Faculty of Food Technology in Zagreb, Faculty of Food Technology in Osijek, Faculty of Textile Technology in Zagreb, Faculty of Graphic Arts in Zagreb, etc.), and certain institutions from the European Union. The Faculty has signed the agreement for Erasmus mobility of teachers and students with the Universite Techniche Dresden, Dresden, Germany, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, Universita di Trieste, Trieste, Italy, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Polonia, Polytecnich institutes of Braganca, Braganca, Portugal, University of Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia, Polymer technology college, Maribor, Slovenia and others. The Faculty also participates in multilateral cooperation with the possibilities of mobility of students and teachers across the Central European Exchange Program for University Studies (CEEPUS). Through this program, the cooperation with the following foreign institutions is achived: 1) Faculty of Material Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland, 2) Institute für Analytische Chemie, Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz, Austria, 3) Department of Analytical Chemistry, Slovak University of Technology, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, 4) Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic, 5) Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Slovenia.

1.8. Compatibility of the study programme with the University mission and the strategy of the proposer, as well as with the strategy statement of the

The study program has been consolidated with the Strategy of the development of the Faculty, its mission and vision, as well with the strategy of the University of Split.

1.9. Current experiences in equivalent or similar study programmes

The Faculty of Chemical Technology of Split was founded in 1960, responding the economic demands of the region and aiming at fulfilling its personnel and professional needs. On the grounds of the acquired scientific knowledge and economic demands, the teaching programs have been continually improved and up-dated. Close cooperation between this region economy and the Faculty has resulted in great number of projects, expertise, elaborates and, in particular, in opening new study orientations and post graduate studies, the content of which is just the result of this region needs.

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

2.1. General information

Scientific/artistic area of the study programme

Technical sciences

Duration of the study programme

2 years (4 semesters)

The minimum number of ECTS required for completion of study

120

Enrolment requirements and admission procedure

Completed appropriate undergraduate study

2.2. Learning outcomes of the study programme (name 15-30 learning outcomes)

Master engineer of chemical engineering generally will be able to:
- apply statistical and mathematical analysis in chemical engineering experiments and processes
- tackle a real chemical engineering problem by a scientific approach
- recognise the need for information, find and provide information
- plan and carry out both theoretical and experimental researcheas independently
- evaluate data critically and draw conclusions from it
- apply basic methodology of chemical engineering necessary in the selection of an appropriate processes and devices
- define and optimize the process parameters to increase process efficiency
- adopt a methodological approach in device designing that are used in process engineering
- think systematically about the non-technical effects of an engineer’s job and include these aspects responsibly in what they do
- function effectively as a member of a team that may be composed of different disciplines and levels
- work and communicate effectively in national and international contexts,
and specifically, depends on orientation:
- apply innovative methods in solving problems in materials development and environmental protection based on fundamental principles of chemistry and thermodynamics
- apply basic chemical engineering methodology necessary for processes and equipment selection used in production of materials and environmental protection in order to elevate the process effectiveness
- methodically develop the equipment used in process engineering
- analyse and solve problems concerning polymers production, processing or characterization
- analyse and solve problems concerning properties of construction materials and their protection against corrosion
- analyse and solve problems concerning environmental protection during materials processing
- classify knowledge from various fields methodically such as materials, corrosion and environmental protection and draw systematic conclusions from it
- apply engineering skills to conduct the processes and solve the problems in food processing characteristic for Mediterranean region.

2.3. Employment possibilities

Graduates can be employed by the aforementioned business entities with which the faculty cooperates, as well at educational institutions, various inspection services at the national and regional level, etc. Employment opportunities in the region:
- Brodosplit, Split
- AD plastik, Split
- Omial, Omiš
- Cemex, Kaštel Sućurac
- Adriacink, Split
- Vodovod i kanalizacija, Split
- TOF, Drniš
- ALPRO ATT, Trogir...

2.4. Possibilities of continuing studies at a higher level

Higher level studies are possible at the postgraduate studies of Chemical Engineering in Materials Development and Environmental Protection and Chemistry of Mediterranean Environment at Faculty of Chemistry and Technology and at others institutes in Croatia and abroad as well.

2.5. Name lover level studies of the proposer or other institutions that qualify for admission to the proposed study

The permission to qualify for admission to the proposed study have candidates who have completed undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Chemical Technology of Split at the University of Split, undergraduate programs of the Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology at the University of Zagreb, undergraduate study of Food Technology and Biotechnology at the Faculty of Food Technology in Zagreb, undergraduate study of Chemistry at the Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek and undergraduate study of Food technology at Faculty of Food Technology at the Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek.

2.6. Structure of the study

Conditions and modes of studying at Graduate Study of Chemical Technology are based on the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split which is in compliance with the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the University of Split. Graduate Study of Chemical Technology takes place during the two years, includes mandatory and elective courses, and it is based on active participation of students in all forms of studing (lectures, laboratory exercises, seminars, field trips, etc.). In general, students’ obligations include presence at lectures and exercises, independent learning, literature analysis, presentations, field work and the preparation and defense of the diploma thesis. The monitoring and evaluating student’s activities listed in the program are done by teachers. During the first year of study objective is focused on mastering basic knowledge of chemistry and related natural sciences, respectively. During the last three semesters of study the content of chemical engineering is gradually increased. In the final semester students have the option of choosing from a large number of elective courses. The study ends with the preparation and defense of the diploma thesis.

2.7. Guiding and tutoring through the study system

With the aim of providing advice, information and guidance to students during the course of study, the Faculty Council of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology appoints the head of study for student groups at each year of study

2.8. List of courses that the student can take in other study programmes

With the aim of continuing and extending their education, and strengthening and supporting professional training, especially in the context of raising awareness on the interrelation between faculties and universities, students may take elective courses from other study programmes that offer courses that relate or overlap with the topic of interest of this study programme. The procedure for selecting courses from other faculties is defined in the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

2.9. List of courses offered in a foreign language as well (name which language)

As a rule, the lectures and courses held at the study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials shall be provided in Croatian language. Since there are courses included in the programme that are proposed to be taught in English, as necessary these courses will be provided in English.

2.10. Criteria and conditions for transferring the ECTS credits

The criteria and requirements for the transfer of ECTS credits are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the University of Split, Statute of the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split and Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

2.11. Completion of study

Final requirement for completion of study



Requirements for final/diploma thesis or final/diploma/exam

Requirements for final thesis are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam and evaluation and defence of final/diploma thesis

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam is regulated by the Ordinance on final thesis/diploma thesis at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

 

2.12. List of mandatory and elective courses

Materials

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTB101 Applied Mathematics 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTB102 Thermodinamics of Real Processes 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTB103 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTB104 Process Automatic Control 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTB105 Mechanical and Thermal Operations 30 15 30 0 6.5
Total
150 75 120 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTB106 Chemical Reactors 30 15 15 0 5.0
KTB107 Electrochemical Engineering 30 30 30 0 6.5
KTB108 Inorganic Processes in Heterogeneous Systems 45 15 30 15 8.0
KTB109 Polymerization Processes 45 15 45 0 8.0
KTBOSP Professional Practice 0 0 0 0 2.5
Total
150 75 120 15 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Obvezni
Total
0 0 0 0 0
Elective  
Elective courses of group: Inorganic Materials
         
KTB207 Glass and Ceramics 30 0 20 10 5.0
KTB208 New Inorganic Materials 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB209 Technology of Building Materials 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB210 Non-metallic Composites 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB211 Structure and Properties of Inorganic Non-metallic Materials 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB212 Corrosion and Degradation of Building Materials 30 0 20 10 5.0
 
Elective courses of group: Organic Materials
         
KTB201 Structure and Properties of Polymers 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB202 Polymers Characterization 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB204 Polymer Processing 30 0 20 10 5.0
KTB206 Coatings 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB224 Polymer Blends and Composites 30 0 25 5 5.0
 
Elective courses of group: Materials Protection
         
KTB213 Corrosion and Materials Protection 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB214 Electrodeposition Proceses 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB215 Surface Protection Technology 30 0 25 5 5.0
KTB216 Electrochemical Methods and Their Application 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB217 Corrosion Inhibitors 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB221 Solid Waste Recycling 30 0 25 5 5.0

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTB219 Process Design 30 30 0 0 7.0
KTBODR Diploma Thesis 0 0 0 0 18.0
Total
30 30 0 0 25
Elective KTB205 Naturally Occuring Polymeric Materials 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB218 Direct Energy Conversion 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB220 Marine and Submarine Mineral Raw Materials 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB225 Wastewater Engineering 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB226 Introduction to Scientific Research 15 15 0 0 3.0

 

Environmental Protection

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTB101 Applied Mathematics 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTB102 Thermodinamics of Real Processes 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTC107 Catalysis in Enviromental Protection 30 15 0 0 4.5
KTC108 Electrochemical Technologies in Environmental Protection 30 15 15 0 5.0
KTC109 Measurment and Automatic Process Control 30 0 8 7 4.0
KTC110 Biochemistry 30 15 30 0 7.0
Total
180 75 83 7 31

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTB106 Chemical Reactors 30 15 15 0 5.0
KTC106 Environmental Process Engineering 45 15 30 0 7.0
KTC111 Sustainable Technologies and Development 30 15 0 0 4.5
KTC112 Methods for Characterization of Materials 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTC113 Environmental Remediation Technologies 30 15 15 0 5.0
KTCOSP Professional Practice 0 0 0 0 2.5
Total
165 60 90 0 29

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTC218 Advanced water treatment engineering 30 15 30 0 7.0
KTC219 Solid Waste Recycling 30 0 0 0 3.0
Total
60 15 30 0 10
Elective KTB212 Corrosion and Degradation of Building Materials 30 0 20 10 5.0
KTB215 Surface Protection Technology 30 0 25 5 5.0
KTC206 Microbiology of Polluted Waters 30 15 15 0 5.0
KTC211 Ecotoxicology 30 0 15 0 5.0
KTC212 Soil Chemistry 30 15 15 0 5.0
KTC215 Recycling of Plastics 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTC216 Nanotechnology and the Environment 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTC220 Product Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) 30 15 0 0 4.5
KTC221 Study on the Environmental Impact 30 30 0 0 5.0

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTB219 Process Design 30 30 0 0 7.0
KTC217 Energy and Development 30 0 0 0 2.0
KTCODR Diploma Thesis 0 0 0 0 18.0
Total
60 30 0 0 27
Elective KTB220 Marine and Submarine Mineral Raw Materials 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTB226 Introduction to Scientific Research 15 15 0 0 3.0
KTC222 Sanitary Landfill Disposals 30 15 0 15 5.0
KTC223 Chemical Ecology 30 15 15 0 5.0

 

 

2.13. Course description

 

Applied Mathematics
NAME OF THE COURSE Applied Mathematics

Code

KTB101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Nives Baranović

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

20 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Student are introduced to the ideas and methods of approximate solving algebraic and differential equations, interpolation and numerical integration, to concepts of the theory of probability and statistics and their application to particular example and tasks.
By developing a positive attitude toward learning, responsibility for own success and progress, and the acquisition of competencies described above, the students are expected to build a solid foundation for lifelong learning and further education.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Students should have fundamental competencies related to the calculus.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the passing the exam, students will be able to:
- use appropriate language, symbolic notation and graphic representation to describe the ideas and methods for numerical solving equations;
- apply the methods described above in the particular tasks;
- describe the concept and define the notions of probability theory;
- understand the concepts and apply the methods described above in real situations;
- define discrete and continuous random variables and their characteristics;
- properly interpret characteristics of random variables on particular examples;
- describe examples of important distribution and identify conditions for their use in problem solving;
- describe the concept and define the notions of statistics theory;
- use a computer and appropriate software as a tool in the statistical data processing;
- understand the process of statistical testing and parametric and non-parametric sample testing.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Introduction to the objectives and learning outcomes, curriculum, methods of evaluation and assessment criteria.
Errors of approximate values. The types of errors. Sources of errors. (2 + 1)
Solving equations approximately. Graphical method. Bisection method. Iteration. Secant method. Tangent method. (4 + 2)
Interpolation and approximation. (2 + 1)
Numerical integration. Rectangular formula. Trapezium formula. Simpson’s formula. (2 + 1)
Numerical solving of differential equations. Euler’s method. Taylor’s method. (2 + 1)
Written exam. (0 + 2)
Definition and properties of probability. (2 + 1)
Conditional probability. Independence of events. (2 + 1)
Random variables. Discrete and continuous random variables. Independence of random variables. (2 + 1)
Numerical characteristics of random variables. Mathematical expectation. (2 + 1)
Dispersion. Mode and median. Moments. The coefficient of skewness and kurtosis. (2 + 1)
Some important distributions. Binomial distribution. Poisson distribution. Normal distribution. Uniform distribution. Exponential distributions. (4 + 2)
Basics of statistics. Population. Sample. Displaying data. The average value of the sample. Sample variance. Sample mode. Sample median. (2 + 1)
Statistical testing. Parametric test. Nonparametric test. Χ2 test. (2 + 1)
Written exam. (0 + 2)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Samostalni zadaci

0.8

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.6

Written exam

1.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The first method: Engagement during semester 20% (E), written exam 40% (W) and oral exam 40% (O). During the semester, student can do additional task, write a seminar paper and express own knowledge through activities in class. The final score: z = 0.2(E) + 0.4(W) + 0.4(O).
The second method: written exam 500% and oral exam 50%; final: z = 0.5(W) + 0.5(O).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Bogdanic, N. (1980), Primijenjena matematika, Split: Sveučilište u Splitu

1

Baranović, N. (2014.) Primijenjena matematika

0

e-learning (materijal dostupan na moodlu Filozofskog fakulte

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Ivanšić, I. (2002). Numerička matematika. Zagreb: Element
Scitovski, R. (2004). Numerička matematika, Osijek: http://www.mathos.unios.hr/nm/materijali/Num.PDF
Elezović, N. (2008). Diskretna vjerojatnost. Zagreb: Element
Elezović, N. (2008). Matematička statistika. Statistički procesi. Zagreb: Element
Kreyszig, E. (1999). Advanced Engineering Mathematics, New York: J. Wiley & Sons, Inc., http://faculties.sbu.ac.ir/~sadough/pdf/Advanced%20Engineering%20Mathematics%2010th%20Edition.pdf

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Thermodinamics of Real Processes
NAME OF THE COURSE Thermodinamics of Real Processes

Code

KTB102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Vanja Martinac

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

ScD Jelena Jakić
Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is that students acquire knowledge in applying the basic laws of thermodynamics and advanced mathematical methods to solutions of chemical engineering problems.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students are expected to:
- evaluate the thermodynamic properties of the pure substances, mixtures and solutions based on the pressure, temperature and composition
- select the required literature thermodynamic data and theoretical relationships to describe the dependence of various thermodynamic properties of real gases, mixtures and solutions on pressure and temperature
- apply different types of phase diagrams, tables and numerical expressions to display thermodynamic properties of real gases and solutions
- calculate the thermodynamic properties of real fluids using the equations of state
- calculate the thermodynamic properties of real solutions using a model of the activity coefficient
- apply the acquired knowledge of thermodynamic and advanced mathematical methods to solve chemical engineering tasks

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: General consideration. Thermodynamic probability and Boltzman equation.
2nd week: Volumetric properties of real fluids. Equations of state of a real gas and mixture.
3rd week: The principle of corresponding states and thermodynamic similarity. Critical compressibility factor. Application to gases and liquids.
4th week: Improved principle of corresponding states. Pitzer correlation - acentric factor.
5th week: Calculation of the pVT-properties, the comparison equations.
6th week: Thermodynamic properties of real fluids - fugacity and fugacity coefficient
7th week: Methods of calculating fugacity.
8th week: Thermodynamic of real solutions – volume, enthalpy and entropy of mixing, causes of non-ideality of real solutions, regular and athermal solutions.
Exam (I preliminary exam)
9th week: Partial molal quantities. Methods of calculation of partial molal quantities in binary mixtures.
10th week: Partial fugacity and partial fugacity coefficient
11th week: Excess functions. Activity and activity coefficient, standard state for pure gases, liquids and solids and components of gas and liquid mixtures. Activity and activity coefficients from the Gibbs energy.
12th week: Activity coefficient models for liquid mixtures.
13th week: The third law of thermodynamics and calculation of equilibrium transformation. Heterogeneous reactions-changes in reagents’ surface area.
14th week: Introduction to thermodynamics of open systems - work, energy and heat, enthalpy, partial molal quantities, heat in open system, relation between entropy and heat, affinity, thermodynamic functions of non-equilibrium states, entropy balance - entropy production and entropy flow in open system, dissipation function, relation between reaction rates and the affinities.
15th week: Thermodynamic analysis of elastic deformation of a solid. Equation of state for elastic deforming axis. Caloric properties. Thermodynamic deformation processes. Application of thermodynamic theory to man and society.
Exam (II preliminary exam)
Numeric examples demonstrating the topics covered are analysed during the course and make an integral part with lectures.
During exercises, examples from engineering practice are solved using PC and available software.
Laboratory exercises:
1. Thermal storage of solar energy
2. Partial molar quantities
3. Vapour-liquid equilibrium

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous assessment through partial preliminary exams (twice in a semester) allows for exemption from the written exam. The passing threshold is 60%. Partial preliminary exams are not mandatory. Preliminary exams are not eliminatory.
Each passed preliminary exam participates with 18% in the rating. Attendance to lectures and seminars for 80%-100% is 5% of the grade. Activity in lab excercises is 5% of the grade. The oral exam participates with 54 %.
A written and an oral exam are held in the examination periods. The oral exam is mandatory for all students, and the written exam is mandatory if a student is not exempt from it. A passed preliminary exam also participates with 10% in the summer examination period. The written exam participates with 36%, and the oral one with 54%. Students who have not passed the written exam through preliminary exams take the full exam (final exam) consisting of the written and the oral exam in regular examination periods. The passing threshold is 60%. The written exam form participates in the rating with 46% and oral one with 54%..
Ratings: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 71%-80% - good, 81%-90% - very good,
91%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. M. Smith, H. C. Van Hess, M. M. Abbott, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2005.

1

S. I. Sandler, Chemical, Biochemical and Engineering Thermodynamics, 4th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2006.

1

M. J. Moran, H. N. Shapiro, D. B. Daisie, M. B. Bailey, Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2010.

1

P. Ahuja, Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, PHI Learning, New Delhi, 2009.

1

N. Petric, V. Martinac, Kemijsko-inženjerska termodinamika, Termodinamika realnih procesa, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 1998.

1

M. Labor, Termodinamika realnih procesa, Seminar, ppt prezentacija, on line (2014-02-20), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2014.

0

on line

V. Martinac, J. Jakić, Vježbe iz termodinamike, on line (2011-11-15), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

0

on line

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

B. E. Poling, J. M. Prausnitz, J. P. O’Connell, The Properties of Gases and Liquids, 5th Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2001.
M. Graetzel, P. Infelta, The bases of Chemical Thermodynamics, Vol. 1. & Vol. 2., Universal Publishers, Florida, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Instrumental Methods of Analysis
NAME OF THE COURSE Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Code

KTB103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

ScD Maja Biočić
Asst Prof Franko Burčul

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the theoretical principles, practical work and the use of instrumental techniques and procedures relating to the process analysis. The choice of method will depend on the knowledge of the basic principles of individual method or group of methods and the understanding of their advantages and limitations. After completion of a process of learning the learner is able for independent work in instrumental analytical laboratory.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Adopt theoretical knowledge related to methods of instrumental analysis (spectrometry, electroanalytical, thermal methods, instrumental separation methods) and the principles of instruments.
2. Correctly interpret the adopted theoretical knowledge relating to methods of analysis instrument and principles of instruments.
3. Explain the connection between basic knowledge of analytical chemistry with application in instrument analysis.
4. Select analytical technique due to the characteristics of the analyte and the specificity of the sample.
5. Integrate acquired knowledge and apply them in problem-solving and decision-making in analytical practice and in process analysis.
6. Adopt theoretical knowledge related to methods of instrumental analysis ( spectrometry , electroanalytical , thermal methods , instrumental methods for separation ) and principles of instruments and apply knowledge in the experimental work.
7. Select analytical technique due to the characteristics of the analyte and the specificity of the sample.
8. Plan and install an experiment using instrumental techniques.
9. Apply basic statistical analysis of numerical data and graphed the results.
10. Independently take Lab Notes and prepare a report after completion of the analysis.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week
Lectures: Fundamentals of instrumental techniques and their application in continuous and process analysis.
Seminars: Introduction, memento. SI system of units.
2nd week
Lectures: Planning and optimizing the experiment. Optimizing analytical control of technology process.
Seminars: Kinetic method analysis.
3rd week
Lectures: Gass chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography. Gass chromatography coloumns and detectors.
Seminars: Chromatography (numerical examples).
4th week
Lectures: Continuous segmentation flow analysis. Flow injection analysis.
Seminars: Flow injection analysis, construction of manifold.
5th week
Lectures: Thermal analysis Termogravimetric methods. Differential thermal analysis.
Seminars: Thermal analysis (numerical examples).
6th week
Lectures: Fundamentals of spectrophotometry. Atomic absorption spectrometry. Flame emission spectrometry. Atomic fluorescence. Atomic emission. Atomic absorption.
Seminars: Atomic absorption spectroscopy.
7th week
Lectures: Ultraviolet / Visible absorption spectrometry.
Seminars: Spectrometry (numerical examples).
8th week
Lectures: Infrared absorption spectrometry. Raman spectrometry.
Seminars: Spectrometry (numerical examples).
11th week
9th week
Lectures: Mass spectrometry. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry, Fotoelectron spectrometry. Auger electron spectrometry. Photoelectron spectroscopy. Analysis of surface with electron beams.
Seminars: Mass spectrometry, modern ionisation methods.
10th week
Lectures: Microanalysis with electronic sampling. X-ray diffraction analysis. Scanning electron microskop.
Seminars: Potentiometry (numerical examples).
11th week
Lectures: Electroanalytical methods. Potentiometry. Indicator electrodes. Potentiometric setup.
Seminars: Potentiometry (numerical examples).
12th week
Lectures: Coulometry.
Seminars: Electrogravimetry (numerical examples).
13th week
Lectures: Coulometry
Seminars: Coulometry (numerical examples).
14th week
Lectures: Voltammetry.
Seminar: Voltammetry (numerical examples).
15th week
Lectures: Amperometry.
Seminars: Amperometry (numerical examples).
Experimantal part:
1. Kinetic methods of analysis, determoination of tiolic compound using kinetic manifold with spectrophotometric detector.
2. Flow injection analysis, determination of ascorbic acid by flow injection analysis and spectrophotometric detector.
3. UV/Vis spectrophotometry, spectrophotometric measurement of an equilibrium constant.
4. Atomic absorption spectroscopy, determination of metals in real samples.
5. Ions selective electrode, potentiometry, measurement of an equilibrium constant.
6. Electrogravimetric determination, determination or separation of metals.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.3

Report

Test numeričkih zadataka

2.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Teorijski dio testa

3.3

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Scoring at the exam consists of three basic parts: scoring the experimental part (minimum score 2 , maximum score 4), test of numerical example (minimum score: 18; maximum score: 30) and test of theoretical part (minimum score: 39; maximum score: 65).
Students who had attended lectures and seminar in 70 % can take the exam through partial tests: 2 tests of numerical examples (minimum score: 9; maximum score: 15) and 2 tests of theoretical part (minimum score: 19,5; maximum score: 32,5).
The rating is formed in accordance with the score ranges: sufficient ( 60 - 70 points) , good ( 71-80 points) , very good ( 81-90 points) , excellent ( ≥91points ).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, šesto izdanje (englesko), prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.

18

Nj. Radić i L. Kukoč Modun, Uvod u analitičku kemiju, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2016.

4

M. Kaštelan-Macan, Kemijska analiza u sustavu kvalitete, Školska knjiga, Zagreb 2003.

2

I. Piljac, Elektroanalitičke metode, RMC, 1995.

3

I. Piljac, Senzori fizikalnih veličina i analitičke metode, Zagreb, 2010.

3

Analitika okoliša (ur. M. Kaštelan Macan, M. Petrović), HINUS i FKIT, Zagreb 2013.

3

I. S. Krull, Analytical Chemistry, Intech, Rijeka, 2012.

0

dostupno na webu: DOI: 10.5772/3086

M. Kaštelan-Macan, M. Medić-Šarić, S. Turina, Plošna kromatografija, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet, Zagreb. 2006.

20

T. Bolanča, Š. Ukić, Ionska kromatografija, Fakultet kemijskog inženjerstva i tehnologije, Zagreb, 2015.

0

dostupno na webu: https://www.fkit.unizg.hr/images/50012393/Bolanca-Ukic_Ionska_kromatografija.pdf

L. Kukoč, Molekulska spektroskopija, Interna recenirana skripta, 2003.

30

dostupno u digitalnom obliku

L. Kukoč, Spektrometrijske metode elementne analize, Interna recenirana skripta, 2005.

30

dostupno u digitalnom obliku

Josipa Komljenović, Ion selektivna sulfidna elektroda, Interna recenzirana skripta

30

Josipa Komljenović, Ion selektivna sulfidna elektroda, Interna recenzirana skripta

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Kellner, J. M. Mermet, M. Otto, M. Valcarcel and H. M. Widmer (Urednici), Analytical Chemistry (A Modern Approach to Analytical Science, Second Edition) Wiley-VCHVerlag Gmbh & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2004.
D. A. Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler and S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Eighth Edition, Thompson Brooks/Cole, Belmont, USA, 2004.
G. D.Christian, Analytical Chemistry, Sixth Edition, John Willey & Sons, INC, 2004.
D. Harvey, Modern Analytical Chemistry, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, New York, London, 2000.
F. W. Fifield & D. Kealey, Principles and Practice of Analytical Chemistry, Blackwell Science Ltd, Ma

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Process Automatic Control
NAME OF THE COURSE Process Automatic Control

Code

KTB104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Jadranka Marasović

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Enable students to understand the importance of automated systems, to comprehend how danger can be potentially poorly designed control systems. Enable students to understand that the process automatic control is very difficult task and for its realization it is necessary to connect numerous different subsystems and the resulting creation is very complex system. But, for its proper work it was necessary to harmonize different subsystems characteristics introducing many compromises while trying to connect all of them.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing this course, students will be able to describe different automatic and controlled processes realizations. Students will be able to describe the problems of implementation such different realizations in real life situations. They will be able to explain with arguments why some ides of control theory can be or cannot be implemented different real life tasks.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

System theory and control theory. Mathematical modeling. Examples of mathematical models of physical systems. Laplace transformation, transfer function, transient part of time domain analysis, frequency domain analysis. Analysis of first and second order processes. Digital computer as process controller. Behavior of feedback loop controlled systems. First and second order processes in control loop. Control loop objectives. Stability analysis. Routh criterion. Nyquist criterion. Control loop synthesis. Nonlinear systems and nonlinear control loop analysis. Design and characteristics of controllers. Regulation valve. Self-regulating control loop systems. Examples of modern control theory: expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy logic. Examples of process control ( thermal systems, chemical reactor systems, drying systems, distillation).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Samostalni zadaci

1.5

Essay

Seminar essay

2.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, there will be two mid-term exams. At the end of the semester, students will take a written exam. In order to get a positive grade from this course, students need to acquire minimum 50% of the total score on each of the mid-term exams or at the final exam.
The final grade is determined as follows:
Percentage Grade
50% to 61% sufficient (2)
62% to 74% good (3)
75% to 87% very good (4)
88% to 100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Božičević, Temelji automatike 1, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

0

J, Božičević, Automatsko vođenje procesa, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb, 1971.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D.E. Seborg, T.F. Edgar, D.A. Mallichamp, Process Dynamics and Control, J. Wiley, New York, 1989.
W.J. Palm, Control Systems Engineering, J. Wiley, New York, 1994.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

During the semester, there will be two mid-term exams. At the end of the semester, students will take a written exam. Each mid-term exam and the final exam will consist of several short questions intended to evaluate the students’ understanding of the theory and their ability to describe the fundamental concepts, as well as to test students’ ability to apply the theory onto simple, practical examples.
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mechanical and Thermal Operations
NAME OF THE COURSE Mechanical and Thermal Operations

Code

KTB105

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To acquaint the students with mechanisms which follow performance of individual mechanical and thermal operation and with the state of product during transformation of material systems. Enables the students to apply general procedure to design equipment and to choose optimal process conditions taking into account energy costs and product quality.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- explain fundamental principles of mechanical and of thermal operations,
- recognize the major resistance during the performance of individual operation and explain how to improve operation performance,
- the functional dependence of the characteristics of a given system using equations for process dimensioning,
- suggest the most common used equipments for particular operation and explain their working principle,
- bring up some of the most common operating problems encountered in the mechanical and heat transfer operations.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Mechanical and thermal operations in the process engineering. . Elementary principles of mechanical operations. Separation operations which include mass and heat transfer.
2nd week: Introduction to particle size characterization. The characterization of dispersion systems. Representing of the extent of mixing and the state of dispersivity.
3th week: Gravity sedimentation process, gravity classifiers and thickeners and their design.
4th week: Centrifugal sedimentation process. Equipment for centrifugal sedimentation.
5th week: Centrifugal filters. Hydrocyclone geometries and operational conditions.
6th week: Size reduction operation; crushing and milling operations. Equipment for size reduction.
7th week: Solid-gas filtration and types of filters. Electrostatic precipitation. Mechanism of an electrostatic precipitator. Mechanisms of scrubbing and types of scrubbers
8th week: Basic concepts of adsorption. Adsorber design.
9th week. Theory of crystallization.
10th week: Industrial crystallization equipment.
11th week: Leaching. Leaching equipment.
12th week: Extraction. Extraction equipment.
13th week: Membrane separation processes. Membrane structure. Elementary principles of ultrafiltration, electrodialysis and reverse osmosis.
14th week: Mixing in heterogeneous system. Solid-liquid mixing; suspension of floating and settling solids.
15th week: Mixing in heterogeneous system. Gas-liquid dispersion.
Laboratory exercise:
Granulometric characterization of dispersed systems by analytical functions. Gravity settling processes - determination of sedimentation rate of suspension.
Milling- determination of reduction degree
Crystallization: determination of kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth,
Mixing – determination of influence of operating conditions on homogenization time and complete suspension state.
Adsorption – Influence of temperature and adsorbent surface area on adsorption rate
Extraction – determination of the numbers of extraction stages
Field work:
Gravity sedimentation - Optimization of operating conditions of the circular gravity thickener (wastewater treatment plant, Trilj)
Gravity sedimentation - Optimization of operating conditions of the horizontal gravity thickener (wastewater treatment plant, Sinj)
Determination of suspension flow in the disc type centrifuge (treatment plant oily water Cian - Solin).
Determination of the optimal working conditions of the centrifuge with a helical-conveyor (treatment plant oily water Cian - Solin).
Milling: process control of in industrial ball mill (Cemex, Kaštel Sućurac).
Solid-gas filtration: process parameters control of the bag filters and electrofilters (CEMEX - Kastel Sućurac)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

1.3

Experimental work

Report

Laboratorijske vježbe

1.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Terenska nastava

Tests

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester student may take the exam by two oral tests. Tests are consisting of questions from lectures and seminars. Test passing score is 55%. After passing both tests the grade of theoretical part is determined by the following criteria: 55%-66% - satisfactory, 67%-78% - good, 79%-89% - very good, 90%-100% - excellent.
The final grade is calculated form the grade of oral test and grades from laboratory exercises and field work. Theoretical part constitutes 67% of grade while grade of laboratory exercises and filed work together made 33 % of final grade. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an oral exam in the regular examination periods. Final grade is determined by previously notated criteria.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. L. McCabe, J. C. Smith, P. Harriott, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2004.

2

C. J. Geankoplis, Transport Prosesses and Separation Process Principles (Includes Unit Operations), 4th ed., Pearson Eucation, Inc.,New Jersey, 2007.

1

Hraste, Mehaničko procesno inženjerstvo, 2. izdanje, HINUS, Zagreb, 2003.

5

V. Koharić: Mehaničke operacije, FSB, Zagreb 1996.

3

J. Welty, J. W. Wicks, R. E. Wilson, G. L. Rorrer, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th ed., J. Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 2007.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Beer., Priručnik za dimenzioniranje uređaja kemijske industrije, HDKI/Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 1980.
R.H. Perry, D.W. Green, J.O. Maloney, Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2007.
E. L. Paul, V. A. Atiemo-Obeng, S. Kresta, Handbook of Industrial Mixing, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New Jersey, 2004.
J. W. Mullin, Crystallization, 4th ed, Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford, 2001.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemical Reactors
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemical Reactors

Code

KTB106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be acquainted with the knowledge in the field of chemical reaction engineering especially different types of chemical reactors.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will be able to:
- describe the steps in heterogeneous reactions
- describe various types of bioreactors
- discuss how one goes form a region mass transfer limitation to reaction limitation
- describe various types of multiphase reactors and their application
- determine the reaction order and specific reaction rate from experimental data obtained from reactors using linear and nonlinear regression.
- compare kinetic models and to choose the best fit model for kinetic experiment data

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction, reactor as a processing unit in a technological process. Living example problems
2nd week: Heterogeneous chemical reactions. Determination of rate-controlling step. Kinetics of heterogeneous (gas -liquid) reactions. Examples on seminars
3rd week: Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reaction. Experimental catalytic reactors. Examples on seminars
4th week: Biological reaction fundamentals.
5th week: Biocatalysts. Bioreactors for microbial cell culture.
6th and 7th week: Bioreactors for plant and animal cell and tissue culture. Enzyme bioreactors.
8th and 9th week: Adiabatic operation of a batch reactor. Examples on seminars. Partial knowledge test
10th week: Continuous stirred tank reactor in series; CTRS in parallel. Mixing in CST and batch reactors. Heat transport in CST and batch reactors. Examples on seminars. Sterilization.
11th week: Combinations of CSTRs and PFRs in series. Examples on seminars..
12th week: Tubular reactors- 1D and 2D models for homogenous reactions. Material balances. Model for axial dispersion, model for laminar flow
13th week: Tubular reactors- 1D and 2D models for heterogeneous reactions.
14th week: Multiphase reactors
15th week: Microreactors. Reactors evaluation and ratings
Partial knowledge test
Exercises: Kinetics of homogenous reaction. Kinetics of heterogeneous reactions: influence of agitation speed on rate-controlling step, influence of particle size on rate-controlling step. Determination of the reaction order and specific reaction rate from experimental data obtained from batch reactor using linear and nonlinear regression (Mathcad).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Seminarski rad

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-79% good (3); 80-92% very good (4); 93-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Z. Gomzi, Kemijski reaktori, HINUS, Zagreb, 1998.

10

S. G. Fogler, Elements of, Chemical Reaction Analysis and Design, Prentice-Hall, Englewood, N.J.,2006

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Zrnčević, Kataliza i katalizatori, HINUS, Zagreb, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Electrochemical Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Electrochemical Engineering

Code

KTB107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Maja Kliškić

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

30

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Student will be able to use the aspects of electrochemical engineering on electrochemical processes. Also, he will be introduced to fundamental principles for optimisation electrochemical processes.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- define the components in the electrochemical reactor, and describe the operation in the same
- define which materials are used for manufacturing electrochemical reactors and their components
- evaluate the balance of power, materials and energy in the electrochemical reactor
- differentiate primary and secondary current distribution and potential
- define the basic types of electrochemical reactors
- ascertain and select the ways of connecting the electrodes and the reactor in practice

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Technology of electrochemical processes. Constituent parts and operation in Electrochemical reactor.
2nd week: Velocity of electrochemical reactions and material balance.
3rd week: Minimum voltage for electrolysis. Balance on electrode. Required working potential.
4th week: Individual reactions in electrochemical reactors. Efficiency and energy balance.
5th week: Transport phenomena in electrochemical systems – complex systems.
6th week: Current and potential distributions on working electrode.
7th week: Electrochemical reactor with parallel plane electrodes. Annular geometry electrochemical reactor.
8th week: First test
9th: Electrochemical reactor with vibrating and rotating electrode. Electrochemical reactor with free convection.
10th week: Electrochemical reactor with bubbling gas mixture.
11th week: Electrochemical reactor with porous electrode. Electrochemical reactor with movement particles electrode.
12th week: Description and qualification of electrochemical reactor.
13th week: Demand in construction of electrochemical reactor. Type of materials for construction of electrochemical reactor.
14th week: Corrosion systems.
15th week: Second test
Exercises:
Distribution of potential in electrolysis, Natural convection, Forced convection, Electrocatalysis, Electrochemical studies on a rotating disc electrode, Electrochemical tests in a flow reactor.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

3.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 40%. In the final grade laboratory exercises has fraction of 20%. In the exam period the student has to attend to oral exam (passing score is 60%). Grades: successful (60% – 69%), good (70% – 79%), very good (80% – 89%), excellent (90% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

K. Scott, Electrochemical Reaction Engineering, Academic Press, London, 1991.

1

F. Goodridge, K. Scott, Electrochemical Process Engineering, Plenum Publishing Corporation, New York, 1995.

1

S.Zečević, S. Gojković, B. Nikolić, Elektrohemijsko inženjerstvo, Tehnološko-metalurški fakultet, Beograd, 2001.

1

F. Lapicque, A. Strock, A. A. Wragg, Electrochemical Engineering and Energy, Plenum Publishing Corporation, New York, 1990.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Zečević, S. Gojković, Elektrohemijsko inženjerstvo-zbirka zadataka, Tehnološko-metalurški fakultet, Beograd, 2001.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Tracking suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Inorganic Processes in Heterogeneous Systems
NAME OF THE COURSE Inorganic Processes in Heterogeneous Systems

Code

KTB108

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

30

15

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Qualifying students to adopt and apply the knowledge of the fundamental principles of chemical processes of creating and obtaining technically important materials that occur at elevated and high temperatures and about processes that enable the use of these and similar materials, with special emphasis on techno-economic and environmental aspects.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course the student will be able to:
1. Apply basic principles of chemical processes that are carried out at elevated and high temperatures in heterogeneous systems.
2. Categorize the processes of thermal decomposition.
3. Assess the conditions for the formation and dissociation of metal oxides.
4. Explain the process of sintering and mechanisms of reactions in the solid state.
5. Interpret phase diagrams for systems important in the production of Portland cement and in the synthesis of pure ingredients of cement clinker.
6. Illustrate ways of applying the basic theory of the reduction of metals in the blast furnace processes, and of the metallothermic reduction of metal oxides in the ferroalloys production.
7. Use the basic theory of oxidation and the metals oxidizing refining processes in the production of steel and other metals.
8. Explain the basic theory of the production of metals by electrolysis of molten salts, and of the production of technical glass from silicate melts.
9. Explain the kinetics and mechanisms of the Portland cement hydration and propose the cement hydration processes for the permanent disposal of hazardous substances and industrial waste in order to support sustainable development and environmental protection.
10. Choosing the correct engineering approach to solving similar problems on the basis of the knowledge acquired.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. General principles and rules in the implementation of chemical processes. Thermal decomposition processes (dehydration and dehydroxylation, and thermal dissociation). Dehydration of gypsum. Dehydration and dehydroxylation of clay.
2nd week: Thermal dissociation of the metal oxides, hydroxides and sulfates. Affinity of metals for oxygen and dissociation pressures of oxides. Model, mechanism and conditions of the carbonate dissociation.
Seminar: The thermal dissociation of limestone and the production of lime. Problem solving.
3rd week: Processes of technical silicates formation. Sintering processes and reactions in the solid state. The mechanism of the reaction. The driving force of the process. The mechanism of mass transfer. Chemical and physical changes during sintering.
Seminar: The phase diagrams. Gibbs phase rule. The ternary system CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 with the areas (zones) of the occurrence of certain technical silicates. Problem solving.
4th week: Portland (silicate) cement. Production of Portland Cement. Basic minerals of clinker. Cement modules. Classification of Portland cement according to European norm, EN 197-1.
Seminar: The technological scheme of the Portland cement production. Calculation of the mixture for the Portland clinker production. Problem solving.
5th week: Technical silicates obtained by sintering in the silica-alumina system. Classic ceramic materials. Pottery supplies, tile, porcelain. Refractory materials.
Seminar: The SiO2-Al2O3 phase diagram. Diagram stability of SiO2. Refractory materials based on the MgO-SiO2 system. Forsterite, periclase.
6th week: Processes of silicate and aluminate formation in melts. Examples: water glass, aluminous cement. The written knowledge tests (I Colloquium).
7th week: Silicate melts. Glass. Definition. The role of major ions in the glass. Devitrification. Crystallization. Technical glass. Chemical composition, classification, properties and practical application. Physico-chemical and mechanical properties of glass.
8th week: Technological processes and methods for making technical glass. Raw materials. Melting and transformation of raw materials into glass. The Na2O-SiO2 system. Shaping and processing of glass. Cooling and surface treatment of glass.
Seminar: The technological scheme of technical glass production. Calculation of the mixture for the production of colorless and colored (green) glass. Problem solving.
9th week: Manufacture of carbon materials, graphite, carbides. The reduction of metallic oxides with carbon and carbon monoxide. The blast furnace process. Oxidizing refining processes of the metals in the melts. Mettalothermic reduction and electrothermic reduction of metallic oxides in the production of ferroalloys.
Seminar: Examples of the MeO reduction and of oxidizing refining processes in industrial practice. The reduction of iron oxides and production of iron in the blast furnace. Steel. Ferroalloys.
10th week: Electrolysis in the melts. Electrolysis of alumina for the production of aluminum. Current density. Anode effect. The technological scheme of the aluminium production. Problem solving. The written knowledge tests (II Colloquium).
11th week: Inorganic processes in heterogeneous systems at low temperatures. Hydration processes of products of the thermal decomposition (gypsum plaster and lime). Hydration and hardening of gypsum plaster and lime. The factors affecting the reactivity of lime.
Seminar: The production of lime and gypsum. Plants, basic operations and devices. Furnaces.
12th week: Inorganic processes in heterogeneous systems at low temperatures. The processes of hydration, setting and hardening of the silicate cement (Portland cement). The mechanism and kinetics of hydration. Hydration products in the cement-water system.
Seminar: Application of thermal methods (DTA-TG/DTG) in the chemistry of cement. Kinetics and mechanisms of the Portland cement hydration. Problem solving.
13th week: Development of microstructure and corrosion stability of cement composite binder. Factors affecting the strength of concrete. Hydration and hardening of the aluminate cement.
Seminar: Practical examples. Influence of pozzolanic additions to the strength and durability of cement composites.
14th week: Additives for cement and concrete. Plasticizers and superplasticizers. Air-entraining agents. Supplementary cementing materials. Concrete. Composite materials.
15th week: The role of cement hydration processes in the permanent disposal of hazardous substances and industrial waste. Sustainable development. Environmental protection. The written knowledge tests (III Colloquium).
SEMINARS:
During the semester is processed numerical tasks (practice examples) to calculate the process parameters with the flow diagrams presentation of selected technological processes (physical and chemical base processes, equipment and environmental impact), which together with lectures seems a whole.
EXERCISES:
1. Determination of reactivity of lime depending on the production conditions.
2. Determination of particle size and particle size distribution by the Andreasen pipette.
3. Determination of physico-chemical properties of silicate cement (density, specific surface area, normal consistency, setting time, heat of hydration).
4 Determination of the cation exchange capacity of clays by the ammonium acetate method, and identification of the clay minerals.
5. Determination of chemical resistance of the Na2O-CaO-SiO2 glass.
6. Field work - visit technological facilities for the production of concrete, gypsum, lime, Portland cement and glass.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking three (3) partial tests during the semester. Test passing score is 60%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of theoretical (oral) and written part. Exam passing score is 60%.
Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, and 93% 100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani nastavni materijal)

1

www.ktf-split.hr http://www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Procesi_an

Z. Osmanović, J. Zelić, Proizvodnja Portland-cementa, Univerzitetski udžbenik, Univerzitet u Tuzli, B&H, Tuzla, 2010., ISBN 978-9958-897-04-7.

5

www.knjiga.ba http://www.knjiga.ba/proizvodnja_portlandj_cem

J. Zelić, Z. Osmanović, Čvrstoća i trajnost cementnih kompozita, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, 2014., ISBN 978-953-7803-01-8.

1

www.ktf-split.hr

R. Krstulović, Tehnološki procesi anorganske industrije, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 1986.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. M. German, Sintering Theory and Practice, Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1996, ISBN 978-0-471-05786-4.
M. Tecilazić-Stevanović, Osnovi tehnologije keramike, Univerzitet u Beogradu, Tehnološko-metalurški fakultet, Beograd, 1990., YU ISBN 86-7401-065-2.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Polymerization Processes
NAME OF THE COURSE Polymerization Processes

Code

KTB109

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- introduction to mechanisms and kinetics of polymerization reactions (step-growth and chain polymerization) and their technological implementation
- training for work in a manufacturing plant and / or laboratory
- understanding the importance of polymers in modern society

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- distinguish basic types of polymers
- enumerate the raw material for the production of polymers
- differentiate the basic polymerization reaction
- explain the parameters for the polymerization process
- explain that širokoprimjenjivi polymers are obtained which polymerisation reactions
- implement selected polymerization reaction in laboratory equipment
- conclude on the importance of polymers in modern society
- use the acquired knowledge in engineering practice

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. World production of polymers, the main application, historical development of synthetic organic polymers. Production of monomers from petrochemicals and renewable raw materials.
2nd week: Polymerization reactions. Characteristics of step-growth and chain reactions. Step-growth polymerization. Mechanism. Kinetics of catalyzed polymerization. Kinetics of uncatalysed polymerization. Analytical expressions for the reaction rate.
3rd week: Dependence of the average degree of polymerization and the average molecular weight on duration of polymerization. The definition of average molecular weight. Flory’s the most probable molecular weight distribution (numerical and weight average).
4th week: Modified Carothers equation: the average functionality of the critical conversion. Carothers equation for non-stoichiometric ratio of bifunctional monomers. Technical design of step-growth polymerization (bulk polymerization, the interfacial polymerization).
5th week: Examples of thermoplastic step-growth polymers: polyesters, polycarbonates, polyamides (aliphatic and aromatic), polyimides, polysulfones, poly (phenylene oxide), polyurethanes, polysiloxanes. The theory of crosslinking.
6th week: Examples of thermosetting step-growth polymers: unsaturated polyesters and modified alkyd resins, phenoly formaldehyde polymers, epoxy resins). Chain polymerization - characteristics.
7th week: The radical chain polymerization, initiator types. The mechanism of polymerization (initiation, propagation and termination). Rate of polymerization (analytical expression). The kinetic chain length. Average degree of polymerization and the average molecular weight. The distribution of molecular weights.
8th week: The ionic chain polymerization. Anionic polymerization: initiators, mechanism, rate of polymerization, the kinetic chain length, average degree of polymerization, molecular weight distribution. Anionic polymerization: initiators, mechanism, rate of polymerization, the kinetic chain length, average degree of polymerization, molecular weight distribution
9th week: Effect of temperature on the rate of polymerization. Stereospecific polymerization. Ziegler-Natta catalyst. The mechanism of the stereospecific polymerization. Basic characteristics of stereoregular polymers. Metallocenes. Polymerization with metallocene catalysts.
10th week: Examples of polymers obtained by chain polymerizacion: polyethylene, poly(vinyl chloride), polypropylene, polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetrafluoroethylene)...
11th week: Copolymerization. Types of copolymers. Copolymerization equation. Experimental determination of reactivity ratios (Lewis Maya method). Allfrey-Price method of determining the individual reactivity of monomers in copolymerization. Distribution and average length of the sequences in the copolymer.
12th week: Technical Design polymerization process. Homogeneous polymerization in bulk, in solution. Heterogeneous polymerization in bulk, in solution and in suspension.
13th week: Polymerization in supercritical CO2. Industrial production of widely available polymers: low density polyethylene and high density polyethylene. Polymerization of ethylene in suspension, in solution and gass phase.
14th week: Borstar bimodal process. Poly (vinyl chloride): production and application. Polypropylene and polystyrene (technical performance of the polymerization process).
15th week: The final lecture, discussion, comments, conclusions.
Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1. Synthesis of phenol-formaldehyde resin.
Exercise 2. Polyesterification of adipic acid with diethylene glycol.
Exercise 3. Synthesis of modified alkyd resin.
Exercise 4. Suspension polymerization of styrene.
Exercise 5. Emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate.
Exercise 6. Preparation of poly(vinyl alcohol) by alcoholysis of poly(vinyl acetate).
Exercise 7. Synthesis of polyamide 610 by interfacial polymerization.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures and seminars in the 80% amount and laboratory exercises in the 100% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

0.3

Experimental work

1.5

Report

0.4

0.7

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.2

Oral exam

1.2

Written exam

1.2

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over three colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 25% in a final grade. Laboratory exercises (50-100% success) participate with 20% in a final grade, while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 5% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
Two passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 20% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 40%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

H. Ulrich, Introduction to Industrial Polymers, Hanser Publishers, Munich, 1992.;

1

A. G. Odian, Principles of Polymerization, 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2004.

1

Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 1997.;

2

F. Rodriguez, Polymer Science and Technology, Taylor and Francis, Philadelphia, 1996.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

H. Ulrich, Row Materials for Industrial Polymers, Hanser Publishers, Vienna 1988.;
A. Ravve, Principles of Polymer Chemistry, Plenum Press, London, 1995.;
G.M. Wells, Handbook of Petrochemicals and Processes, Ashgate Publishing Ltd, Aldershot, 1999.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Structure and Properties of Polymers
NAME OF THE COURSE Structure and Properties of Polymers

Code

KTB201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- acquire knowledge about the structural properties of the polymer
- ability to connect the structure with properties of polymers
- understanding the mechanisms of polymer degradation
- ability to analyze polymers using modern instrumental techniques

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- distinguish different types of polymers
- explain the specific structure of the polymer
- argue correlation of structure and properties of polymers
- describe the basic properties of polymers (mechanical, thermal, optical, electrical)
- carry out tests of thermal, mechanical and structural properties of polymers
- describe the mechanisms of polymer degradation
- dse the acquired knowledge in engineering practice

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Basic concepts and terminology. Types of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers.
2nd week: The structure of polymers: the size of macromolecules, molecular weight, homopolymers, copolymers, the configuration of macromolecules.
3rd week: The conformation of macromolecules. Morphology of macromeolecular systems.
4th week: Phase states and physical states of polymers. Thermomechanical curve. Polymer liquid crystals.
5th week: Differential scanning calorimetry. Transition temperatures: the glass transition temperature, the melting temperature, the crystallization temperature.
6th week: Thermal degradation of polymers. Thermogravimetric analysis.
7th week: UV/VIS spectroscopy. Oxidative degradation. Ozonation.
8th week: Photochemical and photooxidative degradation. Ionizing degradation.
9th week: Chemical and mechanical degradation. Aging. Biodegradation.
10th week: The thermal stability and combustibility of polymers.
11th week: The permeability of polymers. Thermal properties of polymers.
12th week: The mechanical properties of polymers.
13th week: The optical properties of polymers. The solubility of polymers.
14th week: Electrical properties of polymers. Conductive polymers.
15th week: Infrared Spectroscopy.
Exercises: Identification of polymers by primary tests, Viscometric determination of molecular weight of polymers, Identification of polymers and additives by infrared spectroscopy, Determination of glass transition temperature by thermomechanical method, Determination of the glass transition and the melting temperature by differential scanning calorimetry, Analysis of structure of degraded poly(vinyl chloride) by UV/VIS spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis of polymers, Determination of hardness - Shore hardness.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount and laboratory exercises in the 100% amount of the total number of lessons

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

Ostalo

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 35% in a final grade. Laboratory exercises (50-100% success) participate with 20% in a final grade, while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 40%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Kovačić, Struktura i svojstva polimera, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet Split, Split, 2010.

5

Web knjižnica KTF-a

C. E. Carraher, Jr., Seymour/Carracher’s Polymer Chemistry, 4thEdition, Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, 1996.

1

I. M. Campbel, Introduction to Synthetic polymers, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000.

1

D. J. David, A. Misra, Relating Materials Properties to Structure, Technomic Publishing Co., Lancaster, 1999.

1

P. J. Haines, Thermal Methods of Analysis, Principles, Application and Problems, Blackie Academic &Professional, Glasgow, 1995.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa, Zagreb, 1997.
D. W. van Krevelen, Properties of Polymers, Elsevier Science B. V., Amsterdam, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Polymers Characterization
NAME OF THE COURSE Polymers Characterization

Code

KTB202

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To provide an understanding of thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of polymers, polymer solutions and melts as a base for their characterization.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student should be able to:
- describe specific characteristics of polymers, polymer solutions and melts
- describe relation between structure and properties of polymers
- characterise polymers by selected analytical techniques
- determine thermal characteristics of polymer
- perform complex experiment in laboratory and to interpret collected data
- participate in team work and to present results of investigation

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Statistics of polymer chain.
2nd week: Conformation of polymer molecules in dilute solution, distribution function.
3rd week: Polymer solutions: swelling and solution of polymers, solubility parameters.
4th week: Statistical thermodynamics of polymer solutions.
5th week: Theory of dilute polymer solutions.
6th week: Phase equlibrium in polymer systems: binary systems, ternary systems
7th week: Theory of fractionation. Methods of fractionation
8th week: Repetition and first test.
9th week: Polydispersity of polymers and its determination
10th week: Methods of determination of the average molecular masses and average dimensions of polymeric coils: osmometry, light-scattering
11th week: Diffusion and ultracentrifugation, viscometry
12th week: Flow of concentrated polymer solutions and polymer melts: rheological methods, flow curves
13th week: The relation between flow and molecular parameters, relation between flow and polymeric melts temperature
14th week: Viscosity of concentrated polymeric solutions
15th week: Repetition and second test.
Laboratory exercises:
1. Swelling of polymeric materials
2. Fractionation of polymer by fractional precipitation method
3. Turbidimetric titration
4. Determination of molecular mass by viscometry
5. Determination of viscosity of concentrated polymer solutions by rotational viscometer
6. Determination of thermal characteristics of polymers

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %. The preparation and presentation of seminar essay (team work)

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

Terenska nastava

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.8

Oral exam

1.4

Written exam

1.4

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

CONTINUOUS EVALUATION
The complete exam can be passed through two partial tests during semester.
Attendance on lectures, A1(successfulness =70 -100 %), share in grade, k1 =0,10
Laboratory exercises, A2(successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k2 =0,20
1st test, A3 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k3 =0,35
2nd test, A4 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k4 =0,35
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,20A2 + 0,35A3+ 0,35A4
FINAL EVALUATION
Students who did not take or pass partial tests have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods.
Activities A1 and A2 are evaluated in the same way as indicated above.
Written exam, A5 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k5 =0,20
Oral exam, A6 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k6 =0,40
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,15A2 + 0,20A5 + 0,40A6
FINAL GRADE: successful (50% – 61 %), good (62% – 74 %), very good (75% – 87 %), excellent (88% – 100 %).
In the case that student passed only one test during continuous evaluation, he/she have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods. The passed test will be recognized by the end of the academic year as a part of the written exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Stipanelov Vrandečić: Karakterizacija polimera, recenzirani nastavni materijali, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2012.

1

web knjižnica KTF-a

I. Klarić: Karakterizacija polimera, Interna skripta, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

1

web knjižnica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

L.H. Sperling, Introduction to Physical Polymer Science, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1992.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Polymer Processing
NAME OF THE COURSE Polymer Processing

Code

KTB204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

20

10

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Understanding the modern processing of polymers
- Understanding the modern methods of polymer waste recovery
- Implementation of the adopted knowledge in finding optimal solutions in the processing and recovery of polymers

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- identify and compare the properties and behavior of the polymer in processing and application
- explain the importance of polymer additives
- separate and identify additives polymers
- describe and select proper procedure for polymer processing
- argue selection of the optimal recovery of waste
- argue the importance of polymers in modern society

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Historical development of processes for production of polymer products. Croatian plastics industry. Basic concepts, nomenclature of polymers.
2nd week: Types of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers. Systematization of polymer processing. Phase and the physical states of the polymers.
3rd week: Mechanical and thermal properties of polymers.
4th week: Rheological properties of polymers.
5th week: Additives to polymers. Mixing.
6th week: Continuous primary shaping processes: calendering, continuous coating.
7th week: Extrusion
8th week: Discontinuous primary shaping processes: casting, sintering, compression molding, transfer molding.
9th week: Injection molding of polymers.
10th week: Specific injection molding procedures (gas assisted injection moulding, inserts in plastic mouldings, structural foam, pultrusion).
11th week: Secondary shaping procedures: warm and cold secondary shaping, blowing, drawing, shrinkage.
12th week: Extrusion and injection blow molding. Production of foamed and reinforced polymer products (laminating, winding, spraying, pultrusion).
13th week: Finishing: particle separation, bonding, welding. Surface treatment.
14th week: Coating other materials with polymers. Recovery of plastic waste.
15th week: Recovery of plastic waste (continued). Final comments, conclusions.
Exercises: Modification of the properties of polymer by additives, Separation and identification of additives in polymer materials, Preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites, Determination of oxidation induction time and oxidation induction temperature, Effect of repeated mechanical recycling on the thermal properties of the polymer.
Field work: Visit to factories AD Plastik Inc. Solin and Fornix Ltd., Dugi Rat.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount, and laboratory exercises in the 100% amount of the total number of lessons

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.7

Report

0.2

Priprema eksperimetnalnog rada

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Terenska nastava

0.3

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 35% in a final grade. Laboratory exercises (50-100% success) participate with 20% in a final grade, while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 40%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. Rogić, I. Čatić, D. Godec, Polimeri i polimerne tvorevine, Društvo za plastiku i gumu, Zagreb, 2008.

2

A. Azapagic, A. Emsley, I. Hamerton, Polymers, The Environment and Sustainable Development, Wiley, 2003.

1

M. Šercer, D. Opsenica, G. Barić, Oporaba plastike i gume, mtg topograf d.o.o., Zagreb, 2000.

1

J. Scheirs, Polymer Recycling: Science, Technology and Applications, John Wiley&Sons, Chichester, 1998.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Čatić, F. Johannaber, Injekcijsko prešanje polimera i ostalih materijala, Društvo za plastiku i gumu, Zagreb, 2004.; H. F. Gilles, Jr., J. R. Wagner, Jr., E. M. Mount, III., Extrusion: The Definitive Processing Guide and Handbook, William Andrew, Inc., New York, 2005.; L. Lundquist, Y. Leterrier, P. Sunderland, J.E. Manson, Life Cycle Engineering of Plastics, Elsevier, Oxford, 2000.; A. L. Andrady, Plastics and the Environment, Wiley-Interscience 2003.; Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa, Zagreb, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Naturally Occuring Polymeric Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Naturally Occuring Polymeric Materials

Code

KTB205

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining of basic theoretical and practical knowledge on origin and properties of naturally occurring polymers and their application.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- listing of naturally occurring polymers and their resources
- able to explain the structure and properties of naturally occurirng polymers
- be acquainted with application fields of naturally occurring polymers
- distinguish naturally occurring polymers according burning characteristics

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: An overview of basic terms in polymers and polymeric materials. Basic characteristic of macromolecules.
2nd week: Definition of naturally occurring polymers in narrow and broad sense. PLA and PHB: synthesis and properties. Molecular and supermolecular structure of polymers.
3rd week: Starch: structure and properties. Modification and application of starch.
4th week: Structure and properties of cellulose. Microcrystalline cellulose. Natural cellulose fibres. Mercerization and crosslinking of cotton fibres.
5th week: Regenerated cellulose. Cellulose derivates. Alginic acid and alginates. Structure and application of alginates. Ion exchange.
6th week: Other polysaccharides. Structure, properties and application of lignin.
7th week: Ponavljanje. First test.
8th week: Amino acides in proteins. Primary, secondary and tertiary structure of proteins.
9th week: Protein fibres. Structure and properties of silk fibre. Structure and properties of wool.
10th week: Structure and properties of collagen. Collagen based materials.
11th week: Casein: structure, phase separation, application. An overview of natural fibres properties.
12th week: Natural caoutchouc. Derivates of natural caoutchouc. Mastication and vulcanization.
13th week: Shaping of caoutchouc and production of rubbery products (tires etc.) Reuse and recycling of rubber. Regeneration of caoutchouc
14th week: Plastic and rubbery waste management system. Natural resins.
15th week: Ponavljanje. Second test.
Laboratory exercises:
1. Preparation of thermoplastic starch
2. Regeneration of cellulose. Identification of natural fibres by burning tests.
3. Immobilization of bakers yeast on alginate
4. Gelatine swelling
5. Isolation of casein and preparation of casein glue

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.5

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.4

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 35%. In final grade laboratory exercises has fraction of 30%. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%). Written exam is 35% and oral exam is 35%.
Grades: successful (60% – 70%), good (71% – 80%), very good (81% – 90%), excellent (91% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

B. Andričić, Prirodni polimerni materijali, Priručnik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2008.

1

Web knjižnica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C. E. Carracher, Seymour/Carraher’s Polymer Chemistry, 4th Ed., Marcel Dekker, New York, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Coatings
NAME OF THE COURSE Coatings

Code

KTB206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining the basic theoretical and practical knowledge on structure and characteristics of paint and surface coatings, industrial paint-making processes, as well as on application of coatings in different fields.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student should be able to:
- define types and functions of coatings
- list components of coatings and to explain its characteristics
- describe manufacturing process of coatings
- explain importance of rheological characteristics of coatings
- perform experiment and measurement in laboratory and to interpret collected data
- participate in team work and to present results of project

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction: characteristics, definitions and historical development of coatings,
2nd week: Classification and application of coatings. Composition of coating and role of basic components.
3rd week: Binders: Natural polymers, Oils and fatty acids, Oleoresinous media
4th week: Alkyd resins, Polyurethane and urethane alkyd,
5th week: Acrylic polymers, Amino resins
6th week: Phenol-formaldehyde resins, Epoxy resins, Polyester resins
7th week: Vinyl polymers, Silicone resins, Chlorinated rubber
8th week: Emulsion and dispersion polymers, Non-aqueous dispersion polymers, Water-borne systems
Written test (first)
9th week: Resins for electrodeposition, High solids coatings, Radiation-curing coatings, Powder-coatings compositions.
10th week: Pigments: required qualities of pigments, pigment classification, particulate nature of pigments and the dispersion process, corrosion-inhibiting pigments.
11th week: Solvents and thinners, solvent power, solubility parameters, solvent effect on viscosity, evaporation solvent from coatings
12th week: Additives for coatings
13th week: Industrial paint-making process, methods of dispersion and machinery
14th week: Rheological properties of coatings: definitions, solution and dispersion viscosity, viscosity of polymer solutions,
15th week: Rheology of coatings during manufacture, storage and application, Methods of coating application.
Written test (second)
Laboratory exercise:
1. Synthesis of polymer suitable as resin for organic coating; Analysis of raw materials and product
2. Analysis of alkyde and acrylic coatings by FT-IR spectroscopy
3. Analysis of coating by DSC
4. Determination of viscosity of coatings
5. Determination of relative density by areometer
6. Determination of volatile matter in coatings
7. Determination of thermal stability of coatings by TG

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.8

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

3.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

CONTINUOUS EVALUATION
The complete exam can be passed through two partial tests during semester.
Attendance on lectures, A1(successfulness =70 -100 %), share in grade, k1 =0,10
Laboratory exercises, A2(successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k2 =0,20
1st test, A3 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k3 =0,35
2nd test, A4 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k4 =0,35
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,20A2 + 0,35A3+ 0,35A4
FINAL EVALUATION
Students who did not take or pass partial tests have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods.
Activities A1 and A2 are evaluated in the same way as indicated above.
Written exam, A5 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k5 =0,20
Oral exam, A6 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k6 =0,40
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,15A2 + 0,20A5 + 0,40A6
FINAL GRADE: successful (60% – 70 %), good (71% – 80 %), very good (81% – 90 %), excellent (91% – 100 %).
In the case that student passed only one test during continuous evaluation, he/she have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods. The passed test will be recognized by the end of the academic year as a part of the written exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Stipanelov Vrandečić, Premazi, nastavni materijali u obliku PPT prezentacije, 2013.

0

web KTF-a

R. Lambourne and T.A. Strivens (Edit.), Paint and surface coatings, Woodhead publishing Ltd., Cambridge, 1999.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Janović: Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa , Zagreb, 1997

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Glass and Ceramics
NAME OF THE COURSE Glass and Ceramics

Code

KTB207

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

20

10

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Qualifying students to adopt and apply basic processes in glass and ceramic production with chemical engineering aspect of the production, control and application of comercial ceramics.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students will be able to:
1. Classify the ceramic materials due to their properties and applications.
2. Assess the interconnectedness of microstructure, properties and production of tradicional and advanced ceramics.
3. Explain the properties and behavior of clay minerals in a water-clay depending on the structure of clay minerals.
4. Explain the difference in the structure of ceramics depending on the processes of drying and firing (sintering).
5. Classify the technical glass.
6. Explain the properties of molten glass and the reason for the occurrence of defects in the glass.
7. Assess the impact of the environment (weathering) on the durability of technical glass.
8. Assess the quality of raw materials and finished products using chemical and physical parameters.
9. Choosing the correct engineering approach in the selection of raw materials and process parameters in the production of glass and ceramics starting from the knowledge acquired.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Historical overview, potential and meaning of glass and ceramic industries.
2nd week: Definition, composition, and structure of technical (commercial) glass. Classification of glass.
3rd week: The basic processes and the manufacture of glass. Raw materials and basic requirements for quality raw materials. The Na2O-SiO2 system.
4th week: Calculation and preparation of raw material mixture for the manufacture of colourless and coloured (green) glass.
5th week: Glass melting processes. Basic operations and devices. Furnaces.
The properties of glass melts. Defects in glass. Crystallization. Devitrification. Viscosity.
6th week: Glass forming operations (blowing, rolling, drawing, pressing). Devices.
7th week: Cooling and surface treatment of the glass. Glass dyeing. The stained glass. Glass-ceramics.
8th week: The written knowledge tests (I Colloquium)
9th week: Definition and classification of ceramics. Traditional and advanced ceramic materials.
10th week: Natural mineral raw materials. Synthesis of ceramic powders. Phase diagrams of systems important for ceramics.
11th week: Structure and properties of clay minerals. Ion exchange phenomenon clay. The clay-water. Characterization of ceramic slurries (rheology, plasticity, etc..).
12th week: Formating processes (slip casting, pressing, jiggering, extrusion, etc..). Drying and firing of crude products. Sintering processes and reactions in the solid state.
13th week: Overview of important traditional ceramic materials, their properties and applications. Flow diagrams of production, with special emphasis on the physical and chemical base process, equipment and the environment aspects.
14th week: Overview of important advanced ceramic materials, their properties and applications. Flow diagrams of production, with special emphasis on the physical and chemical base processes, equipment and the environment aspects.
15th week : The written knowledge tests (II Colloquium).
EXERCISES:
1. Determination of the cation exchange capacity of clays by the ammonium acetate method, and identification of clay minerals.
2. Applications of thermal analysis (DTA-TG/DTG) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in the analysis of the clay.
3. Determination of the porosity of the sintered ceramic body.
4. Manufacturing ceramic vase by slip casting technic in laboratory scale.
5. Determination of hydraulic resistance of technical glass.
6. Field work - visiting the technological facilities for the production of glass and ceramic products.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Implementation and analysis of selected processes according to preset conditions.
Each student is required to attend laboratory practice and field work (100%). On completion of all exercises the final written exam is obligated.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two (2) exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 45%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one colloquium (previous activity) is true in the summer examination period with a share of 10% in the assessment. Written exam has a share of 40% and 50% verbal. Students who have not passed the exam by tests take the examination through written and oral exams in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, 93% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

1

www.ktf-split.hr http:// www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Procesi _an

J. Zelić, Engineering of Selected Inorganic Materials/ Inženjerstvo odabranih anorganskih materijala, (na engleskom jeziku), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013 (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

1

www.ktf-split.hr http:// www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Inzenjerstv

J. Zelić, Engineering of Selected Inorganic Materials/ Inženjerstvo odabranih anorganskih materijala, (na engleskom jeziku), Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2014, u postupku recenzije.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. A. McCauley, Corrosion of Ceramic and Composite Materials, 3rd Ed., CRC Press, 2013, ISBN 0-8247-5366-6.
M. Tecilazić-Stevanović, Osnovi tehnologije keramike, Univerzitet u Beogradu, Tehnološko-metalurški fakultet, Beograd, 1990., YU ISBN 86-7401-065-2

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

New Inorganic Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE New Inorganic Materials

Code

KTB208

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Damir Barbir

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Acquiring knowledge of modern inorganic materials with a description of the technology preparation and opportunities to apply
- To train students for the preparation and evaluation of properties of individual
modern inorganic materials

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to know:
- Define and differentiate types of modern inorganic materials
- Introduction of new technology for preparing inorganic materials
- Characterized nanostructured materials and their use in the new process
technologies
- Conclude on the importance of the synthesis of new inorganic materials in modern society
- Independent synthesis and evaluation of some new properties of inorganic materials

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction, course content, basic definitions, the importance of research material, sustainable technologies and environmental impact
Week 2: Metallic glasses, properties, methods of characterization, methods of preparation, the importance and applications
Week 3: Glass-ceramics, properties, methods of characterization, methods of preparation, the importance and applications
Week 4: Superconducting materials, historical overview of the discovery, properties and characterization, Meissner effect, Josephson effect
Week 5: Superconducting materials, the type I and type II, the application of new technologies based on superconducting materials, application examples
Week 6: Based on nanotechnology, historical development and achievements, a review of major nanostructured materials
Week 7: Written examination - I Colloquium
Week 8: Sol-gel technology, a historical overview of the development, the basic
concepts, processes the sol-gel methods, operation sequence to obtain silicate glasses
Week 9: Sol-gel technology, processes for forming thin films, getting of powder with application
Week 10: Sol-gel technology, obtaining of inorganic membranes with nanopore and
active catalytic properties, practical examples applied inorganic membrane
Week 11: CVD and PECVD technology preparation of nanostructured materials
Week 12: Optical fibers and photosensitive inorganic materials, properties, methods preparation and application
Week 13: Bioceramics, basic concepts, types, properties, methods of obtaining and application
Week 14: Inorganic polymers, basic concepts, types, properties, methods of obtaining and application
Week 15: Written examination - II. colloquium
Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1 Preparation of silica sol-gel process
Exercise 2 Electrochemical method for preparing colloidal silver
Exercise 3 Synthesis of colloidal silver by chemical precipitation
Exercise 4 Preparation of stable suspensions of nanoparticles of iron oxide – ferrofluid from aqueous solution
Exercise 5 Preparation of photovoltaic cells based on titanium nanocristallic oxide
Exercise 6 The synthesis of zeolite A hydrothermally

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be laid across two exams during the semester. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 35%. Laboratory exercises participate in the evaluation of 20%. The presence of lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed one colloquium, it is recognized as part of the exam (35% score). The remaining part shall write in regular examination periods. Written exam if not passed a single colloquium has an interest in the evaluation of 70%, while laboratory exercises have share of 20%.
Rating: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.K. West, Chemical Processing of Advanced Materials, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 1992.

1

L. Theodore, Nanotechnology-Basic Calculations for Engineers and Scientists, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 2006.

1

J. D. Wright, N.A.J.M. Sommerdijk, Sol-Gel Materijals, Chemistry and Applications, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2006.

1

M. Aparicio, A. Jitianu, L. C. Klein, Sol-Gel Processing for Conventional and Alternative Energy, Springer, New York, 2012.

1

P. Dabic, Novi anorganski materijali - laboratorijske vježbe, KTF, 2013.

1

WEB KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.W. Dull et al., A Teacher`s Guide to Superconductivity for High School Studets, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, WWW-Book, 2001.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Methods for Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University - student survey; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching - annual analysis of the performance of examinations;
(3) Teacher Level:
- Keeping records of class attendance
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Technology of Building Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Technology of Building Materials

Code

KTB209

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring basic theoretical and practical knowledge about the materials used in construction as well as manufacturing process conditions and preparation of composite materials. Acquiring basic Principe about the methods of characterization and protection of materials in the different environment conditions of use.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
1. Prepare samples for standard test procedures in construction materials
2. Conduct tests of physical and chemical parameters essential for mineral binders in accordance with the procedures prescribed standard norms for mineral binders
3. Assess the type of bonding material suitable for use in a variety of application conditions of building materials
4. Prepare mortars and concretes by default specifications
5. Evaluate materials suitable for waterproofing

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week L Description and overview of the course contents. Introductory remarks. The division of materials and their properties, Natural materials, Artificial materials, Materials applied as a structural and / or insulating materials
E
2. Week L Physical and mechanical properties of materials, Chemical properties of the material. Checking the quality of the material.
E
3. Week L The basics of building materials (stone, wood, building ceramics, glass, metals, polymeric materials). Mineral binders (air and hydraulic binders). Mortars and plasters.
E
4. Week L The processes of thermal decomposition of carbonate and technology of production the lime as mineral binder. Standard test methods and characterization of lime
E Preparation of lime and measure the reactivity of lime
5. Week L Technology of production of gypsum, and its application as construction materials, Standard methods for testing gypsum for application as construction materials
E
6. Week L The First colloquium
E
7. Week L Technology for production of Portland cement. Standards and types of the cements, Chemical and mineralogical composition of the cement.
E Determination of the specific surface area, density and particle size of the cement as mineral binder.
8. Week L Cement hydration. Cements for special purposes. Mineral admixtures for cement
E Determination of normal consistency, time for start and end of setting time. Determination of constancy of cement composites volume.
9. Week L Chemical additives for cement. The quality control of cement. Cement mortars. Examination of physical properties of mortars
E Preparation of cement mortars with and without additives, rheological properties of cement composites (mortar, concrete)
10. Week L The technology of preparation of concrete. Test methods for testing production of concrete and produced hardened concrete. Concrete for special purposes. Aggregates for the preparation of concrete, Production of concrete aggregates, The physical properties of aggregates. Methods of testing aggregates.
E Testing of the mechanical properties of cement mortars
11. Week L Resistance cements composites in terms of exposure to aggressive environments. Additives used to increase the durability and stability of the composite materials, Methods of monitoring (monitoring) the condition of structures,
E Rapid method of measuring the resistance to penetration of cement composites chloride
12. Week L Clay and clay minerals as mineral raw materials for production of building materials.
E Determination of capacity exchange cations (CEC value) of clays minarals
13. Week L Materials suitable for thermal and sound insulation used as construction materials
E
14. Week L Waterproofing materials used for protection and decoration of constructions. Techniques and methods of repairing of the buildings.
E Adhesion of waterproofing materials on concrete (pull off test)
15. Week L The Second colloquium
E

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.7

Report

0.3

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.6

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 50% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 40% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 50% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 25% and verbal has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and oral exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam and oral part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 50%-61% - sufficient, 62%-74% - good, 75%-87% very good, 88%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Andrija Đureković; Cement, cementni kompozit i dodaci za beton, Školska knjiga, Zagreb 1996.

1

H.F.W. Taylor; Cement chemistry, 2nd edition, Thomas Telford Publishing, Thomas Telford Services Ltd, London, 1997.

1

Pierre-Claude Aïtcin, Sidney Mindess; Sustainability of Concrete, Spon Press, Oxon 2011.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

1. Tracking suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
2. Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Non-metallic Composites
NAME OF THE COURSE Non-metallic Composites

Code

KTB210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Awareness of the importance of non-metallic composite with programmed properties in contemporary society.
- Knowledge of the obtaining technology of such material.
- Independent preparation and evaluation of the properties of these materials.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student will know about:
- The types of non-metallic composite materials
- Procedures for the preparation of non-metallic composite materials
- The composition, structure and properties of non-metallic composite materials
- The importance of non-metallic composites in modern society

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introductory lecture
Week 2: Composite non-metallic materials. Types and properties.
Week 3: Hydraulic mineral binders and composites.
Week 4: Mineral replacement supplements in obtaining of cement composites.
Week 5: Additives for cement composites with programmed properties.
Week 6: Concrete. Concrete based on cement binder.
Week 7: A fresh and hardened concrete.
Week 8: Assessment (first colloquium);
Week 9: Lightweight concretes.
Week 10: Ceramic and Bioceramic composites and materials.
Week 11: Selective inorganic membranes.
Week 12: Stacked metallic catalysts.
Week 13: Carbon composite materials. Other non-metallic composite materials.
Week 14: Final comments, discussion, conclusions. Assessment (second colloquium);
Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1: Preparation of cement composites with replacement supplements.
Exercise 2 Determination of physico-chemical properties of cement composites.
Exercise 3 Determination of the heat of hydration of cement composites.
Exercise 4 Composite materials based on red mud.
Exercise 5 Analysis of non-metallic composites by using EDXRF technique.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at lectures in the 80% amount, and laboratory exercises in 100% of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be laid across two exams during the semester. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 35%. Laboratory exercises participate in the evaluation of 20%. The presence of lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed one colloquium, it is recognized as part of the exam (35% score). The remaining part is laid in the regular examination periods. Written examination in this case has a share of 70%, while laboratory exercises have a share of 20%.
Students who did not pass a single comprehensive exam midterm examination in the regular examination periods. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Laboratory work involved in assessing the share of 20%.
Rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. K. Mazumdar, Composites Manufacturing, Material Product, and Process Engineering, CRC Press, New York, 2002.

1

L. W. D. Callister, Materials Science and Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1994.

1

L. Hench, J. K. West, Chemical Processing of Advanced Materials, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1992.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. N. Ghosh, Cement and Concrete Science Technology, Vol. 1., Part I, ABI Books Private Limited, New Delhi, 1991.; Application of Admixtures in Concrete, Ed. A. M. Paillere, E & FN SPON, London, 1995.; P. Bartos, Fresh Concrete, Properties and Test, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1992.; A. Đureković, Cement, cementni kompozit i dodaci za beton, IGH i Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Keeping records of class attendance
- Annual Performance analysis Examination
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Structure and Properties of Inorganic Non-metallic Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Structure and Properties of Inorganic Non-metallic Materials

Code

KTB211

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Qualifying students to adopt and apply basic knowledge of the structure and properties of inorganic non-metallic materials and methods of investigations as important preconditions to create materials of predetermining properties.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course, students will be able to:
1. Explain the concept of minerals, crystals and amorphous state.
2. Explain the basic concepts and principles of crystallography.
3. Categorize the elements of symmetry of crystals and crystal systems.
4. Explain the interatomic bonds in crystals and the packing of atoms concept in the crystal structures.
5. Describe the basic concepts, parameters and principles in X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis methods (DTA-TG/DTG) and electron microscopy (TEM, SEM).
6.Choosing the right approach in the selection of appropriate methods for structural characterization of materials starting from the knowledge acquired.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week. Introduction. The Earth’s crust, rocks, minerals, the environmental conditions and processes of minerals genesis.
2nd week: Overview of basic raw non-metallic materials.
3rd week: Crystalline and amorphous state. Basic crystallographic principles.
4th week: The crystal structure. Crystallographic axes, lattice parameters and lattice planes in the crystal.
5th week: Symmetry elements. Crystal systems and symmetry. Unit cell parameters of crystals.
6th week: Bases of crystalochemistry. Coordination number. Pauling’s rules for ionic crystals.
7th week: Theory of close-packed crystal structure. Main types of crystal structures. Silicate structures. Crystal lattice defects, isomorphism, polymorphism and solid solutions.
8th week: The physical, electrical, thermal and optical properties of crystalline substances. The written knowledge tests (I Colloquium).
9th week: The significance of the structural phases analyses in control and managing of manufacturing processes, and in holding out qualities of final industrial products. Examples from practice.
10th week: Methods for structural characterization of silicates, oxides and other inorganic engineering materials. Example for the identification of clay minerals by the combined methods of analysis (chemical analysis, X-ray analysis, thermal and infrared analysis).
11th week: The basic principles of the X-ray diffraction. X-ray spectra, continuous and characteristic spectrum. Bragg’s equation. Qualitative and quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis. Silicate structures and their characteristic X-ray diffraction patterns.
12th week: Fluorescent X-ray analysis. Infrared spectroscopy. Characteristic absorption band position of the individual functional groups of minerals. Infrared spectra of the phylosilicates.
13th week: Methods for identification of microstructure. Electron microscopy and microanalysis.
14th week: Methods of thermal analysis. Differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).
Applying the method of thermal analysis (DTA-TG/DTG) in chemistry of cement.
15th week: Electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Application of transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy and electron microanalysis on silicate materials. The written knowledge tests (II Colloquium).
EXERCISES:
1. Determination unit cell parameters and identification of the hkl indices of the powder sample.
2. Determination of crystallite size. Determination of the unit cell parameters by method oscillations of single crystals.
3. XRD characterization of crystal materials. Qualitative X-ray analysis of the mineral sample and the mixture of minerals.
4. Application of the method of thermal analysis (DTA-TG/DTG) in the chemistry of cement: (a) monitoring the progress of the hydration reaction in cement-water system (with and without pozzolana additions), and (b) the determination of kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of portlandite formed in cement-water system.
5. Applying infrared spectroscopy: (a) in the analysis of the historic and cultural heritage monuments (”Mediterranean patinas” on the monuments of marble and limestone), and (b) in the analysis and identification of silicate.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Each student is required to do the entire exercises planned program (100%). On completion of all exercises the final written exam is obligated.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two (2) exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 45%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one colloquium (previous activity) is true in the summer examination period with a share of 10% in the assessment. Written exam has a share of 40% and 50% verbal. Students who have not passed the exam by tests take the examination through written and oral exams in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, 93% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Terić, J. Zelić, Strukturna analiza faza, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2008. (interna skripta).

6

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

1

www.ktf-split.hr http:// www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Procesi _an

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. R. West, Solid State Chemistry and its Application, Wiley & Sons Ltd., 1992., ISBN 0 471 90377 9 (U.S.).
P. Petrovski, Uvod u rentgensku difraktometriju i mineralna rentgenska analiza cementa, Univerzitetski udžbenik, Univerzitet u Zenici, B&H, Zenica, 2006.
ISBN 9958-716-16-X.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) Faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Corrosion and Degradation of Building Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Corrosion and Degradation of Building Materials

Code

KTB212

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

20

10

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Qualifying students to apply the knowledge about the processes of deterioration and corrosion in the resistance and durability assessment of technically important inorganic non-metallic building materials under natural conditions of their application, with special emphasis on techno-economic and environmental aspects.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Inorganic processes in heterogeneous systems

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students will be able to:
1. Distinguish the mechanism of corrosion and non-metals.
2. Categorize types of chemical corrosion of concrete, mortar and cement composites as a result of the interaction of concrete (mortar, cement composite) and aggressive environment.
3. Explain the model of the chemical action of sea water on concrete or reinforced concrete.
4. Assess the impact of atmospheric corrosion and deterioration of technical and decorative stone including historic and cultural heritage monuments.
5. Anticipate the consequences of alkali-aggregate reaction.
6. Assess the impact of pozzolanic additives and other additives (finely ground limestone) on the prevention of corrosion and improve the durability of concrete, mortar and cement composites.
7. Explain the process of deterioration/corrosion of technical glass surface by weathering.
8. Apply methods to examine the impact of an aggressive environment on the durability of construction structures.
9. Evaluate and propose protection measures in order to improve the durability of selected building materials.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Economic and ecological significance of environmental effects on construction. Basic theory of the corrosion processes with special emphasis on the effects of the environment on building materials. Destructive phenomena in corrosion of metals and non-metals.
2nd week: Technical important non-metallic inorganic building materials. Relationship between structure and properties of materials in assessing their resistance and durability under natural conditions of their use.
3rd week: The factors affecting the degradation of structures of concrete, mortar and cement composites. Types and mechanisms of chemical corrosion depending on the aggressive environment.
4nd week: Chemical corrosion in soil, seawater and process industry. Selected examples of chemical corrosion of concrete and reinforced concrete structures. Sulphate corrosion, products and consequences of concrete corrosion.
5th week: Influence of types of cement, sulphate concentrations, types of cations bonded to the sulfate ion, temperature and exposure time on the rate of corrosion of concrete. Pozzolanic materials.
6th week: Types of concrete. Concrete with recycled materials. Concrete and sustainability. Life cycle analysis.
7th week: Self-cleaning concrete. Translucent concrete. Geopolymers. New composite materials with high corrosion resistance and durability.
8th week: Rocks. Definition. Division. The structure of the stone and the application. The written knowledge tests (I Colloquium).
9th week: The factors affecting the degradation of the structure of technical and decorative stone. Types and mechanisms of chemical corrosion depending on the aggressive environment. Alkali-silica reaction. Causes and consequences.
10th week: Chemistry of the formation of ”black crust” on the rock carbonate origin (limestone, marble) and deterioration of rock by weathering (H2O, SO2, CO2, soot). Mediterranean patinas on historical and cultural heritage monuments. Hypothesis of their origin.
11th week: Test methods. Protection measures in practice.
Week 12: Glass. Definition. Composition of technical glass. Holders of the structure and types of technical glass.
13th week: The kinetics and mechanism of deterioration/corrosion of the glass surface by weathering. Hydration and hydrolysis of the Na-silicate glass.
14th week: Hydrolytic resistance of glass. Test methods. Protection measures.
15th week: The written knowledge tests (II Colloquium).
EXERCISES:
1. Determination of corrosion resistance of the Portland cement mortars (with and without pozzolanic additions) to sulphate attack of Na2SO4 and MgSO4 solutions by measurements the mechanical strength (compressive and flexural), modulus of elasticity, changes of volume due to swelling, and by quantification of unleached calcium hydroxide.
2. Determination of calcium hydroxide in hydrated Portland cement mortars (with and without pozzolanic additions) by thermal analysis (DTA -TG/DTG).
3. Testing effect of acid on different types of rocks. Testing of alkali-aggregate reaction.
4. Characterization of the Mediterranean patinas on the rock carbonate origin, including historic and cultural heritage monuments, by FTIR method.
5. Determination of hydraulic resistance of technical glass.
6. Visual observation of objects on the ground, and field trials.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Implementation and analysis of selected processes according to preset conditions.
Each student is required to do the entire exercises planned program and field work (100%). On completion of all exercises the final written exam is obligated.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two (2) exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 45%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one colloquium (previous activity) is true in the summer examination period with a share of 10% in the assessment. Written exam has a share of 40% and 50% verbal. Students who have not passed the exam by tests take the examination through written and oral exams in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, 93% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Zelić, Z. Osmanović, Čvrstoća i trajnost cementnih kompozita, Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu, 2014., ISBN 978-953-7803-01-8.

1

www.ktf-split.hr

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali)

1

www.ktf-split.hr http:// www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Procesi _an

Z. Osmanović, J. Zelić, Proizvodnja Portland-cementa, Univerzitetski udžbenik, Univerzitet u Tuzli, B&H, Tuzla, 2010., ISBN 978-9958-897-04-7.

5

www.knjiga.ba http://www.knjiga.ba/proizvodnja_portlandj_cem

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Zelić, Engineering of Selected Inorganic Materials/Inženjerstvo odabranih anorganskih materijala (na engleskom jeziku), Sveučilišni udžbenik, Sveučilište u Splitu u Splitu, Split, 2014. , u postupku recenzije.
J. Zelić, Engineering of Selected Inorganic Materials/Inženjerstvo odabranih anorganskih materijala (na engleskom jeziku), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. (recenzirani i objavljeni nastavni materijali), http:// www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Inzenjerstvo_odabranih_anorganskih_materijala_en.pdf
R. A. McCauley, Corrosion of Ceramic and Composite Materials, 2nd Ed., CRC Press, 2004, ISBN 0-8247-5366-6.
C. Saiz-Jimenez (Ed.), Air pollution and Cultural Heritage, Taylor & Francis Group, London, 2004, ISBN 90 5809 682 3.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Corrosion and Materials Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Corrosion and Materials Protection

Code

KTB213

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Maja Kliškić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective of this course is to achieve the knowledge about fundamentals of corrosion processes and corrosion protection, and methods of corrosion testing and prevention. This course will provide student to acquire an orderly pattern of thought in solving practical corrosion problems in a critical and creative manner.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- define and classify the corrosion processes
- evaluate the resistance of materials for any given conditions
- perform the corrosion tests
- ascertain and select the most effective corrosion protection system for any given conditions – project related and on-site if appropriate – and evaluate its durability

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Definition and importance of corrosion. Classification of corrosion processes.
2nd week: Chemical corrosion. thermodynamic conditions. The mechanism and kinetics of chemical corrosion process. Resistance to chemical corrosion.
3rd week: Electrochemical corrosion. Thermodynamic conditions. The mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical corrosion process. Types of electrochemical corrosion.
4th week: Corrosion of inorganic materials (corrosion of concrete, reinforcement in concrete, ceramics and glass in aggressive environments).
5th week: Corrosion under specific conditions: in the atmosphere, water, sea water.
6th week: Corrosion in soil, in melts.
7th week: Corrosion caused by microorganisms.
8th week: First test
9th week: Corrosion protection by materials selection and proper designing.
10th week: Materials protection using corrosion inhibitors.
11th week: Electrochemical methods of protection.
12th week: Surface protection. Selection of coatings and paints.
13th week: The importance of inspection and maintenance.
14th week: Corrosion tests. Standards.
15th week:. Second test.
Exercises:
Monitor atmospheric corrosion. Examination of corrosion rate by polarization methods. Determination of the critical pitting temperature of stainless steel. Examination of corroded metal samples by optical microscopy. Protection of aluminum alloy anodizing and processing of the oxide film. Determination of the effectiveness of organic corrosion inhibitors. Cathodic protection by means of a protector.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 40% and exercises with 20%. On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: <60% insufficient, 61 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.R. Davis, Corrosion – understanding the basic, ASM International, 2000.

1

B. Jarić, A. Rešetić, Korozija i katodna zaštita, Korexpres, Zagreb, 2003.

1

I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Babolan, Corrosion Tests and Standards, Amer. Tech. Pulbl. Ltd. New York, 1995.
P. Marcus, J. Oudar (Eds.), Corrosion Mechanisms in Theory and Practice, M. Dekker, New York, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Tracking suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Electrodeposition Proceses
NAME OF THE COURSE Electrodeposition Proceses

Code

KTB214

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will acquire knowledge that enables them to perform self-monitoring or
performing electroplating process. The knowledge acquired can also use to explore and improve the electrodeposition processes.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After successfully passing the exam, students will be able to:
1. Select the most appropriate metal coating for the corresponding metal surfaces.
2. Independently run or monitor the electroplating process.
3. Distinguish all process parameters that affect the quality of metal coatings.
4. Examine the quality of the obtained metallic coatings.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction. Technological processes of production galvanic and chemical coating.
Week 2: Metal deposition on cathode. Electrocrystallization. Current distribution and metal sediment on cathode. Sedimentary power of the electrolyte.
Week 3: Preparation of specimen for metallic coatings deposition.
Week 4: Metallic coatings. The criteria for selection of metal coatings. Criteria for the selection of conversion coatings.
Week 5: Galvanization. Composition of bath. Material and shape of anodes for electroplating. Influence of electrolyte temperature, convection and current density.
Week 6: Sources of current and facilities for electroplating. The most important processes of metal electroplating. Tin-plating in different electrolytes.
Week 7: Zinc-plating.
Week 8: Copper plating.
Week 9: Nickel-plating. Cathodic and anodic processes in deposition of nickel.
Basic electrolyte components. Influence of additives on plating shining nickel. Nickel anodes.
Week 10: Chromium plating. Deposition of metallic chromium on cathode. Basic electrolyte components for chromium plating. Anodes and anode processes. Coating errors. I. partial knowledge test.
Week 11: Plating with noble metals.
Week 12: Manufacturing of metallic coatings by spraying with melting metal. Coatings which was produced by diffusion processes.
Week 13: Electroplating of non-metal substrates. Electroplating of product of porous
materials.
Week 14: Electroforming. Mechanical preparation of model for galvanization. Galvanization in electroforming. Reinforcing of galvanic layers. Separation of final product from model. Final treatment of product.
Week 15: Production of foils, sheets and pipes by electroforming. II. Partial knowledge test.
List of laboratory exercises:
Preparing of metal surface for metal layer formation (mechanical, chemical, electrochemical) and their comparison; nickel electroplating, copper electroplating, Electroless formation of a nickel coating, anodic oxidation of aluminum, phosphating.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures, laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-78% good (3); 79-90% very good (4); 91-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Gojić, površinska obradba materijala, Metalurški fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Sisak, 2010.

2

E. Stupnišek Lisac, Korozija i zaštita konstrukcijskih materijala, FKIT Zagreb, 2007.

1

M. Schlesinger, M. Paunović, Modern electroplating, IV edition, J. Wiley & Sons, USA, 2000.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Esih, Z. Dugi, Tehnologija zaštite od korozije, Školska knjiga, Zagreb,1990.
I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2003.
D.A. Jones, Principles and Prevention of Corrosion, 2nd Ed. Prentice Hall, Upper Sadle River, 1996.
M. Paunović, M. Schlesinger, Fundamentals of electrochemical deposition, J. Wiley & sons, USA 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Keeping records of student attendance; annual analysis of the exam results; student survey in order to evaluate teachers, self–evaluation of teachers, feedback from students who have already graduated to relevance of curriculum.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Surface Protection Technology
NAME OF THE COURSE Surface Protection Technology

Code

KTB215

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

25

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will learn about different methods of surface protection.
Students will be able to choose efficient corrosion protection system and pursue its maintenance. They will be informed in application of norms that are concern in materials surface protection.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students will be able to:
- Define methods of materials surface protection.
- Distinguish the most important features of individual processes of materials surface protection.
- Select the appropriate procedure for the protection of materials.
- Evaluate the efficiency of implementing procedures for the protection of materials and structures.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction. Economic aspects of surface protection.
Week 2: The choice of the protection system. Temporary and permanent protection.
Week 3: Surface preparation and standards.
Week 4: Metallic coatings. The criteria for metal coatings selection. The criteria for the conversion coatings selection.
Week 5: Protective coatings and organic coatings. Effectiveness in service.
Week 6: Classification by type, composition and purpose. Coating systems.
Week 7: Design and execution of corrosion protection coatings.
Week 8: Coatings for temporary protection. Antifouling coatings.
Week 9: Methods for applying coatings, and coatings.
Week 10: I. partial knowledge test. Inhibitors in coatings.
Week 11: Mixtures of inhibitors. Use of inhibitors in maritime transport.
Week 12: Protective isolation and elimination of the associated problems due to corrosion.
Week 13: Maintenance of corrosion protection systems. Methods of analysis of protective coatings and linings.
Week 14: Rubber coatings. Bitumenisation.
Week 15: Enameling. II. Partial knowledge test.
Laboratory exercises
Preparation of metal surfaces and application of organic coating. Determination of wet film thickness of the organic coating. Determination of physical and mechanical properties of organic coatings. The application of polarization techniques to determine the protective properties of the coating. Application of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the study of organic coatings. Nickel plating in steel protection. Visits to the laboratory for corrosion protection of company Shipbuilding Industry Split. A visit to the company Adriacink.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures, laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-78% good (3); 79-90% very good (4); 91-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Gojić, površinska obradba materijala, Metalurški fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Sisak, 2010.

2

E. Stupnišek Lisac, Korozija i zaštita konstrukcijskih materijala, FKIT Zagreb, 2007.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P. R. Roberge, Handbook of corrosion engineering, McGrow-Hill, New York, 2000. H. H. Uhligh, R.W. Revie, Corrosion and corrosion control, John Wiley and Sons, New York 1985.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Keeping records of student attendance; annual analysis of the exam results; student survey in order to evaluate teachers, self-evaluation of teachers; feedback from students who have alredy graduated to relevance of curriculum.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Electrochemical Methods and Their Application
NAME OF THE COURSE Electrochemical Methods and Their Application

Code

KTB216

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Student will acquire proficiency in knowledge that allowed him to perform electrochemistry experiment and complete the research of mechanism and kinetics of electrode processes.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student is able to:
- explain the mechanism and kinetics of electrode processes
- properly choose the experimental method of measurement
- carry out electrochemical experiment independently
- analyze the experimental results
- predict the behavior of metallic materials under different conditions.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Metal/electrolyte phase boundary.
2nd week: Electrochemical experiment. Electrochemical cell and electrodes. Electrode materials. Calibration of electrodes and cell.
3rd week: Electricity passage through electrochemical cell. Instruments (potentiostat/galvanostat).
4th week: Hydrodynamic electrodes. Limiting current at hydrodynamic electrodes. Rotating disc electrode and rotating ring-disc electrode.
5th week: Linear potential sweep methods. Polarization resistance method measurement. Tafel method.
6th week: Potentiodynamic polarization measurements in a wide potential range. Application of linear polarization methods - examples from practice.
7th week: Cyclic voltammetry. Cyclic voltammetry on planar and spherical electrode.
8th week: Cyclic voltammetry of coupled component systems. Application of cyclic voltammetry - examples from practice.
9th week: First test. Pulse methods. Chronoamperometry. Chronocoulometry. Chronopotentiometry.
10th week: Pulse voltammetry. Pulse polarography. Other pulse methods. Application of pulse methods - examples from practice.
11th week: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Basic of alternating current. Detection and measuring of impedance.
12th week: Impedance and equivalent circuit of electrochemical cell. Faradaic impedance of simple electrode processes.
13th week: Presentation of results in complex impedance planes. Complexes systems and constant phase element.
14th week: Admittance. A.c. voltammetry. A.c. polarography. Application of impedance methods - examples from practice.
15th week: Second test.
Exercises:
Polarization of copper in NaCl solution. Investigation of electrochemical behavior of iron using cyclic voltammetry. Chronoamperometric and chronopotentiometric growth of oxide films on aluminum. Characterization of oxide films on aluminum using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Study of corrosion behavior of iron using Impedance spectroscopy. Negative differential effect of magnesium.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 40 %. The fraction of laboratory exercises is 20%. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam. Grades: <60% insufficient, 60-70% sufficient, 71-80% good, 81-92% very good, 93-100% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

C.M.A. Brett and A.M. Oliveira-Brett, Electrochemistry: Principles, Methods and Applications, Oxford University Press, Inc., New York, 1993.

1

A.J. Bard and L.R. Faulkner, Electrochemical Methods: Fundamentals and Applications, 2nd Edition, J. Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2001.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

H.D. Abruna (Ed.), Electrochemical Interfaces: Modern Techniques for in-situ Interface Characterization, VCH Publishers, Inc., Cambridge, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Corrosion Inhibitors
NAME OF THE COURSE Corrosion Inhibitors

Code

KTB217

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge necessary for the proper selection of corrosion inhibitors, depending on materials, environment, and other conditions of use and to evaluate its effectiveness.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student is able to:
- define corrosion inhibitors
- identify factors that affect the inhibitory properties of particular compounds
- properly select corrosion inhibitor, depending on materials conditions of use
- explain the corrosion inhibition mechanism
- determine the corrosion inhibition effectiveness
- evaluate the ecological impact of corrosion inhibitors.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Historical overview of corrosion inhibition. Electrochemical double layer and zero charge potential.
2nd week: Effect of inhibitors on kinetics of electrochemical reactions. Adsorption processes. Effect of the chemical structure of organic compounds on their protective properties.
3rd week: Role of the medium composition in metals protection from corrosion. Effect of pH.
4th week: Inhibition in acid solutions. Problems in selecting inhibitors for acid media.
5th week: Inhibition in neutral solutions. Inorganic inhibitors. Organic inhibitors. Chelating agents as corrosion inhibitors in neutral solutions.
6th week: Inhibition of localized corrosion.
7th week: First test. Mechanism of corrosion inhibition.
8th week: Hard and soft acids and bases interaction (HSAB principle). HSAB concept in corrosion inhibition. Application of HSAB principle to specific adsorption at electrode.
9th week: Hammett equation. Application of Hammett equation in corrosion inhibition.
10th week: The Hansch model. Hansch model in corrosion inhibition. Free and Wilson correaltions.
11th week: Inhibitors for atmospheric corrosion. Inhibitors for temporary protection. Vapor phase corrosion inhibitors.
12th week: Determination of inhibitor efficiency using electrochemical and non-electrochemical techniques.
13th week: Real problems in inhibition of corrosion. Possibilities for improving inhibitors effectiveness.
14th week: Environmental friendly inhibitors. Inhibitors toxicity. Possibility of replacement of toxic inhibitors with new environmental friendly.
15th week: Second test.
Exercises:
Inhibition of pitting corrosion of Al by NaNO2. Determination of thermodynamic properties in the adsorption of p-hydroxybenzoic acid on Cu. Influence of thiourea on iron corrosion in acidic solution. Influence of thermal and mechanical treatment of the materials on its corrosion resistance. Corrosion inhibition of steel by caffeine. Study of zinc corrosion inhibition using the Mylins method.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 40 %. The fraction of laboratory exercises is 20%. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam. Grades: <60% insufficient, 60-70% sufficient, 71-80% good, 81-92% very good, 93-100% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Gudić, Inhibitori korozije metala, KTF-Split, 2006.

0

Web

V.S. Sastri, Corrosion Inhibitors, J. Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1998.

1

Y.I. Kuznetsov, Organic Inhibitors of Corrosion of Metals, Plenum Press, New York, 1996.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Kalman, Routes to the Developmens of Low Toxicity Corrosion Inhibitors in Corrosion Inhibitors, The Institute of Materials, London, 1994.
R. W. Revie (Ed.), Uhlig¢s Corrosion Handbook, J. Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Direct Energy Conversion
NAME OF THE COURSE Direct Energy Conversion

Code

KTB218

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will acquire knowledge about possibilities and methods of direct energy conversion. After passing this exam they will be able to select the most useful and suitable energy converter, considering their usage.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student is able to:
- explain the basic principles of energy conversion
- distinguish between the different possibilities of direct energy conversion
- calculate the effectiveness of each energy converter
- select the most suitable energy converter, considering their usage
- apply the knowledge gained in the development and scientific research in this field of science.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction in problem of direct energy conversion. Primary energy sources. Limitations in exploitation of energy. State of energy conversion (review).
2nd week: Reasons for direct energy conversion. Principles of energy conversion. Basic definitions and units. Equation for efficiency of conversion.
3rd week: Irreversible thermodynamics. Unique theory of energy converter. Device’s classification. Construction and manufacturing of energy converter and batteries.
4th week: Photoelectric converters. Review principles of radiation. Optical effects at semiconductors and p-n junctions. Application photoelectric effect on p-n junction in solar batteries.
5th week: Thermoelectric converters. Solid state description of thermoelectric effects. Energy relations in thermoelectric converter. Energy relations, efficiency and power of the thermoelectric converter. Criteria for selection of thermoelectric materials. Reliability and application of thermoelectric converters.
6th week: Thermionic converters. Electron work function and surface phenomena. Role of cesium in thermoionic converter. Thermodynamic analysis of thermoionic converter.
7th week: First test. Electrochemical energy conversion. Description of electrochemical system.
8th week: Thermodynamic aspects of electrochemical energy conversion. Factor of efficiency. Primary cells – characteristics.
9th week: Types of primary cells. Leclanche cell. Zinc chloride cell. Alkaline battery. Silver-oxide cell. Lithium cells. Metal-air cells.
10th week: Batteries - characteristics. Lead acid battery. Alkaline systems. Ni-Cd, Ag-Zn, Ni-Zn batteries.
11th week: New battery technologies. Nickel-metal hydride battery. Lithium-ion battery. Lithium polymer battery.
12th week: Fuel cell. Fuel cell as energy converter.
13th week: Classification of fuel cell - Review of realized systems and systems in development. Molten-carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Alkaline fuel cell (AFC). Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC).
14th week: Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Direct-methanol (DMFC) and direct-ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). Regenerative fuel cell (RFC).
15th week: Second test.
Exercises:
Determination of efficiency in thermoelectric generator. Characterization of anode materials for aluminum-air batteries. Current-voltage characteristics of PEM fuel cell. Direct energy conversion of solar radiation into electrical energy. Determination of current capacity of Li-ion battery. Charging of lead acid battery.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 40 %. The fraction of laboratory exercises is 20%. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam. Grades: - 60% insufficient, 60-70% sufficient, 71-80% good, 81-92% very good, 93-100% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Gudić, Elektrokemijski izvori struje, KTF-Split, 2011.

0

web

R. Decher, Direct Energy Conversion: Fundamentals of Electric Power Production, Oxford University Press, New York, 1997.

1

R. Decher, Energy Conversion: Systems, Flow Physics, and Engineering, Oxford University Press, New York, 1994

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A.J. Appleby, Fuel Cells: Trends in Research and Applications, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, New York, 1987.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Process Design
NAME OF THE COURSE Process Design

Code

KTB219

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will know the basic principles and the methodology of process equipment design. They will also acquire knowledge of the methodology used in chemical process industry to evaluate the ultimate commercial feasibility.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- steps in the design and modification of chemical processes
- evaluation of the optimum plant location
- process research and development in the laboratory and pilot plant facility
- scaling up of process and apparatus of the chemical process industry
- selection and design of process equipment
- estimation of financial viability of the investment
- synthesis, optimization and flowsheet simulation
- synthesis of heat exchanger network using pinch analysis
- sizing of heat transfer, continuous distillation of multicomponent mixtures, separated, pipelines.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1 week: Introduction. Design, optimization, sustainable development. Steps in the design and development of new processing plants. The project leader.
2 week: From idea to product. Idea. Preliminary works . A feasibility study . Numerical examples. Process development and evaluation. Selection and design of project equipment. Project engineering. Process engineering. Construction of the plant.
3 week: Plant location. Location factors. Methods of evaluation of location factors. Numerical examples.
4 week: The process development. Process research in laboratory and industrial scale.
5 week: Scaling up of process and apparatus of the chemical process industry. Similarity low. Models and scaling up methods in chemical engineering. Numerical examples.
6 week: The rating process. The rating of the financial performance of investments. Estimation of investment costs. Estimation of production costs. Methods for the evaluation of financial viability of the investment. Numerical examples.
7 week: Process design. Synthesis, optimization and flowsheet simulation. Material and energy balance. Numerical examples.
8 week: Synthesis and process integration. A hierarchical approach. Model of onion. A holistic approach to the integration process. Pinch analysis. Synthesis of heat exchanger network by pinch analysis.
9 week: A graphical method. Analytical method of temperature intervals . Performance of heat exchanger network above and below pincha. Numerical examples.
10 week: Heat transfer. Classification. Analysis of the processes of heat transfer. Calculation of the heat exchanger using the mean logaritam differences of temperature. Calculation of the heat exchanger using heat efficiency.
11 week: Sizing the heat exchanger. Heat calculation. Mechanical calculation. Numerical examples.
12 week. Determining the optimal thickness of insulation. A numerical example.
13 week: Sizing distillation columns. The multicomponent mixtures . The distribution of the components. Vapor-liquid equilibrium. Temperature of boiling and dew point. Calculation of Underwodova parameter  using Newton’s method. Numerical examples.
14 week: Sizing the continuous distillation of a multicomponent mixture. The heat duty of the condenser and reboiler. Numerical examples.
15 week: Sizing separators. Sizing pipelines. Numerical examples.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

2.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 70% -80% - good, 80% -90% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. D. Seider, J.D. Seader, D. R. Lewin, Product & Process Design Principles, Synthesis, Analysis, and Evaluation, 2nd ed., John Wiley&Sons, Inc., New York [etc.], 2004.

1

R. Smith, Chemical Process Design, McGraw-Hill, New-York, 1995.;

1

W. D. Seider, J.D. Seader, D. R. Lewin, Process Design Principles, Synthesis, Analysis, and Evaluation, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York [etc.], 1999.

1

F. Šef, Ž. Olujić, Projektiranje procesnih postrojenja, SKTH/Kemija u industriji, Zageb, 1988.;

1

E. Beer, Priručnik za dimenzioniranje uređaja kemijske procesne industrije, HDKI/Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 1994.;

1

E. Beer, Destilacija, HDKI/Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 2006.

1

M.S. Peters and K.D. Timmerhaus, Plant Design and Economics for Chemical Engineers, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2003.

1

A. Bejan, Heat transfer, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 1993.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.H. Perry et al., Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, 7th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1997.; James M. Douglas, Conceptual Design of Chemical Processes, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1988.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Marine and Submarine Mineral Raw Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Marine and Submarine Mineral Raw Materials

Code

KTB220

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Through a program of lectures and exercises students acquire knowledge of marine and submarine mineral resources and their exploitation.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students are expected to:
- explain and distinguish mineral resources of the sea and seabed
- describe the methods of exploitation
- describe the economic aspects of the exploitation of mineral resources of the sea and seabed
- implement ”sustainable” development in certain industrial processes

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Minerals expected in beach deposits.
2nd week: Submerged beaches.
3rd week: Beaches being exploited now and exploration methods.
4th week: Mineral raw materials from sea water. Extraction of minerals from
seawater: NaCl, magnesium compaunds, bromine, gold etc.
5 th week: Production of minerals in conjuction with the desalination of sea water.
6 th week: New technologies for mineral extraction from the sea.
7 th week: The concentration of elements by marine organisms.
8 th week: Superficial deposits of the continental shelf. Phosphate deposites -
distribution and exploration.
9 th week: Other minerals on the continental shelfves - glauconite, barium
sulphate, organic sediments, etc.
10 th week: Sediments of the ocean floor. Pelagic sediment. Calcareous and
siliceous oozes, red clay and other minerals.
11 th week: Manganese nodules. Physical characteristic of the nodules, methods of
exploration, concetraction of Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, etc.
12 th week: Associated sediments. Effect of ocean-floor currents and animals.
13 th week: Mining of superficial sediments from the ocean floor.
14 th week: Economic aspect of ocean mining.
15 th week: Legal problems involved in ocean mining - law of the sea.
Exercises:
During the practicum, students will gain the practical knowledge about how to prepare raw materials required for the technological process of obtaining magnesium oxide from sea water. List of laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1. Determining the optimal amount flocculent at 80% precipitation of magnesium hydroxide from seawater.
Exercise 2. Determining the influence the initial concentration of magnesium hydroxide on the sedimentation rate and concentration of the resulting suspension.
Exercise 3. Determining the influence the degree of completenes of precipitation on the rate of sedimentation of magnesium hydroxide.
Exercise 4. Determination of the optimal degree of completeness precipitation with appropriate quantities of the flocculent added.
Exercise 5. Calculation of a continuous thickener applying Kynch theory

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance to lectures for 80% of the total number of hours. Full attendance to exercises (100% of the total number of hours).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Attendance to lectures is registered (not included in the rating). During the semester students have to perform lab exercises. After performing exercises followed by treatment of the experimental results and preparation of reports. Finally completed students take the oral examination of the material covered by the exercises. Experimental part of the work in the lab scored with 30% of the final assessment report after completion of the exercise with 2%, and the final oral exam with 60%.
Ratings: 60%-70% satisfactory, 71%-80% good, 81%-90% very good,
91%-100% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

K. A. Sverdrup, A. B. Duxbury, A. C. Duxbury, Fundamentals of Oceanography, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill Companies, 2006.

1

V. Martinac, Magnezijev oksid iz morske vode, on line (2010-12-13), Sveučilišni priručnik, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

0

on line

T. Garrison, Essentials of Oceanography, 6th Edition, Brooks/Cole, USA, 2012.

1

M. J. Kennish, Practical Handbook of Marine Science, 3rd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2001.

1

B. Petric, V. Martinac, Mineralne sirovine mora i podmorja, laboratorijske vježbe, Tehnološki fakultet, Split, 1994.

10

M. Labor, Mineralne sirovine mora i podmorja, ppt prezentacija, on line (2014-02-26), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2014.

0

on line

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

K. Stowe, Exploring Ocean Science, 2nd Edition, Wiley, New York, 1996.
Desalination, Trends and Technologies, Ed by M. Schorr (on line 2011-02-28), InTechOpen, 2011.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Solid Waste Recycling
NAME OF THE COURSE Solid Waste Recycling

Code

KTB221

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko
Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

25

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The course will provide multidisciplinary knowledge regarding all aspects of municipal and industrial solid waste recycling technology, such as project management, energy efficiency and economy, quality assurance, environmental protection, safety and health, and legal aspects and their effect on technological choices.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- identify key sources, typical quantities generated, composition, and properties of solid waste;
- describe and explain recovery and recycling techniques and their impacts;
- identify and quantitatively assess recycling technologies according to the characteristics of the materials to be recovered;
- analyse quantitative and qualitative problems associated with operation of recycling techniques;
- estimate solid waste recycling costs.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Definition of solid waste (physical, chemical and biological characteristics of solid wastes). Technological, economic, environmental and social aspects of recycling.
2nd week: Recyclability criteria. Ecodesign.
3rd week: Characterisation of waste streams, recycling and solid waste characterisation.
4th week: Recycling of complex multimaterial consumer goods (cars, electronics, etc.).
5th week: Recycling Technologies: paper.
6th week: Recycling Technologies: glass.
7th week: First test.
8th week: Recycling Technologies: ferrous metals.
9th week: Recycling Technologies: non-ferrous metals.
10th week: Recycling Technologies: composite materials.
11th week: Recycling Technologies: bio-waste.
12th week: Recycling Technologies: textiles and carpets.
13th week: The economics of recycling.
14th week: Trends in solid waste recycling: issues, challenges and opportunities.
15th week: Second test.
Exercises: Reuse/recycle citrus peels. Ethanol production by distillation of fermented grape pomace. Calcium tartrate production. Fieldwork at the Karepovac landfill. Fieldwork at the Cijan d.o.o. company.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Examination passing rate is 55%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of two parts: written and oral. Written part will constitute 40% and oral part will constitute 60% of the final score.
Grades with numerical equivalents: <55% insufficient – fail (1); 55%-65% - sufficient (2); 66% -77% - good (3); 78% -89% very good (4); 90% -100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

G. Tchobanoglous, F. Kreith, Handbook of solid waste management, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2002.

1

H.D. Sharma, S.P. Lewis, Waste Containment Systems, Waste Stabilization and Landfills, J. Wiley & Sons, New York, 1994.

1

B.J. Alloway, D.C. Ayres, Chemical Principles of Environmental Pollutions, Blackie Academic & Profesional, Glasgow, 1994.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

- A. Pintarić, T. Filetin: Analiza recikličnosti proizvoda, Zbornik III. međ. simpozija”Gospodarenje otpadom Zagreb 94”, Zagreb, 1994, str. 59-68.
- Professional Journals. Scientific Journals (Industry and Environment-UNEP ).

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Polymer Blends and Composites
NAME OF THE COURSE Polymer Blends and Composites

Code

KTB224

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

25

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining of the basic theoretical and practical knowledge on multi-component systems, ie. polymer blends and composites. Correlation of composition, structure and properties of material.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- distinguish deformational states of polymers and describe thermomechanical curve
- describe phase diagrams of polymer blends
- be able to recognize miscible and immiscible polymer blends based on Tg measurements
- be acquainted with methods for polymer blends preparation
- distinguish the components of polymer blends and polymer composites
- be able to explain the differences between microcomposites and nanocomposites
- explain the role of fillers and reinforcements in polymer composites

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Historical overview and world consumption of polymeric materials. Basic terms and classification of polymers.
2nd week: Molecular and supermolecular structure of polymers. Physical and deformational states of polymers. Thermomechanical curve.
3rd week: Reasons for preparing blends and composites. Design of polymer blends. Thermodinamic aspect of miscibility.
4th week: Phase diagrams. Prediction of thermodynamic properties (theories of mixing). Influence of molecular weight on polymers miscibility.
5th week: Determination (estimation) of polymers miscibility (methods). Properties and morphology of miscible polymer blends.
6th week: Properties and morphology of immiscible polymer blends. Compatibilization methods. Preparation of polymer blends.
7th week: Commercial polymer blends. Blends with LCP.
Ponavljanje. First test.
8th week: Polymer composites, classification. Fillers and reinforcements in polymer composites.
9th week: Particle reinforced polymer composites.
10th week: Fibre reinforced composites. Types of fibre orientation.
11th week: Types of fibres and mechanical properties. Prepregs.
12th week: Matrix-reinforcement boundary surface and compatibilization of matrix and reinforcement/filler.
13th week: Polymer nanocomposites. Composites with biodegradable components.
14th week: Structural composites: basic components and adhesives. Preparation methods of structural composites.
15th week: An Overview. Second test.
Laboratory exercises:
1. TG analysis of composite materials
2. DSC analysis of polymer blends
3. Identification of polymers using FT-IR spectroscopy
4. Separation and identification of additives in polymeric material
5. Modification of PVC and material preparation on an extruder

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.5

Experimental work

0.8

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.2

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.4

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 35%. In the final grade laboratory exercises has fraction of 30%. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%). Written exam is 35% and oral exam is 35%.
Grades: successful (60% – 70%), good (71% – 80%), very good (81% – 90%), excellent (91% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

L. A. Utracki, Polymer Alloys and Blends, Hanser Publ., Munich, 1989

1

D. J. David, A. Misra, Relating Materials Properties and Structure, Technomic Publ. Co. Basel, 1999.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

M.J. Folkes, P.S. Hope, Polymer Blends and Alloys, Blackie Academic & Professional, London, 1995;
S. Datta, D.J. Lohse, Polymeric Compatibilizers, Hanser Publ., Munich,1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Wastewater Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Wastewater Engineering

Code

KTB225

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will acquire knowledge in the field of wastewater engineering. They will become familiar with the calculation of the state of water ecosystems due to discharge of wastewater, pollution loading calculations, selecting the process and methods of wastewater treatment, the influence of various factors on the process, appropriate calculation procedure for process equipment capacity.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- the impact of pollution on developments in aquatic ecosystems
- sources and characteristics of wastewater, the classification of harmful substances, calculation of pollution loading
- determination of the possible savings of fresh water and the formation of waste water using water pinch analysis
- selection procedures and methods for wastewater treatment
- stability and destabilization of colloids
- mechanisms of coagulation / flocculation
- application of aeration, neutralization, oxidation / reduction and chemical precipitation of wastewater treatment
- mechanism and kinetics of aerobic biological wastewater treatment
- methods of processing biological sludge
- application and significance of advanced wastewater treatment.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1 week: Introduction. The use of water. Hydrologic cycle. Water quality management. Water and Sustainable Development.
2 week: The aquatic ecosystem. Events in aquatic ecosystems. The consequences of pollution. Oxygen levels in the water. The kinetics of the aerobic decomposition of organic matter in water.
3 week: Wastewater. The origin of the waste water. Contamination and pollution of natural waters. Classification of harmful substances. Specific and nonspecific quality indicators. Sampling methodology. Pollution loading.
4 week: The steps of priorities in dealing with wastewater. A hierarchical approach. A holistic approach. Integration processes. Water pinch. A graphical method.
5 week: Wastewater treatment. Selection process and processing methods. Numerical examples.
6 week: Previous treatment stage. Screening, size reduction, equalization and flotation in waste water treatment.
7 week: Removing dispersed and colloidal particles. The separation of suspended solids from wastewater by gravity sedimentation. Designing the sedimentator. Coagulation and flocculation in wastewater treatment. Colloidal systems. Stability and destabilization of colloids. Mechanisms of flocculation.
8 week: Application of aeration in wastewater treatment. Neutralization, oxidation / reduction and chemical precipitation in wastewater treatment.
9 week: Biological processes for wastewater treatment. The factors of the biological activity of microorganisms. The types of microorganisms. The mechanism and kinetics of aerobic biological wastewater treatment. Calculating the parameters of running processes.
10 week: Disinfection of wastewater treatment. Sludge treatment.
11 week: Advanced wastewater treatment processes. Application of adsorption in wastewater treatment.
12 week: Application of ion exchange in wastewater treatment.
13 week. The application of membrane processes in wastewater treatment. Application of advanced oxidation processes in wastewater treatment.
14 week: Biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus.
15. week: Constructed wetlands.
Laboratory exercises:
Exercises 1. Removal of zinc from waste water by neutralization and chemical precipitation. The construction of solubility diagram for the system Zn(OH)-H2O, and the determination of optimum pH for the precipitation of Zn(OH)2.
Exercises 2. Removal of zinc from waste water by neutralization and chemical precipitation. Calculation of addition of hydrated lime and material balance.
Exercises 3. Removal of iron from waste water by oxidation / reduction. Determination of rate constants of the oxidation process of Fe(II).
Exercises 4. Removal of colloidal particles dispersed in the water by coagulation / floculation. Test coagulation / flocculation of colloidal particles dispersed in the water jar test. Determination of the optimal addition of coagulant / flocculant.
Exercise 5. Characterization of waste water using oxygen as an indicator. Determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using Dichromate method. Determination of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) using Winkler method.
Exercise 6. The kinetics of biochemical degradation of organic matter. Datermination of rate constant and inital concentration of organic matter in wastewater.
Fieldtrips for visiting of wastewater treatment plants.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while laboratory exercises and field work 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Every laboratory exercises include oral exam before exercise and writing of final report.
The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed written evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 70%-80% - good, 80%-90% very good, 90%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Hendricks, Water Treatment Unit Processes, CRC Press, Roca Raton [etc.], 2006.

1

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda , HDGI, Zagreb, 1997.

1

J. M. Coulson, J. F. Richardson, J. R. Backhurst, J. H. Harker, Chemical Engineering, 5th ed., London, England, 2002.

1

Metcalf & Eddy, Wastewater Engineering, McGraw-Hill, Inc., Boston [etc.], 1991.

1

L. D. Benefield, J. F. Judkins, B. L. Weand, Process Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Treatment, Prentice-Hall, Inc. London [etc.], 1982.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Margeta, Oborinske i otpadne vode: teret onečišćenja i mjere zaštite, Sveučilište u Splitu, Građevinsko-arhitektonski fakultet, Split, 2007.
B. Tušar, Pročišćavanje otpadne vode, Kigen d.o.o. i Geotehnički fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2009.
B. Tušar, Ispuštanje i pročišćavanje otpadne vode, Croatia knjiga, Zagreb, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Introduction to Scientific Research
NAME OF THE COURSE Introduction to Scientific Research

Code

KTB226

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Marin Ugrina

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to train students for the organization of scientific research, to master the principles and methodology of data collection and literature, the way of processing and data analysis and presentation of results according to the principles of ethical responsibility in the natural, technical and biotechnological sciences.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the learning outcomes provide knowledge about:
- understanding of the importance of science and scientific research
- types of scientific fields and branches of science, scientific institutions and professions
- legislation in science
- way to search and use bibliographic databases and other sources of scientific information
- organization and implementation of scientific research
- understanding of the structure and meaning parts of scientific work
- analyse scientific issues and interpretation of results
- independent design of scientific work at writing, technical processing, presentation, and presentation
- ethical responsibility in scientific research.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introductory lecture. The historical development of science. Scientific knowledge.
2nd week: Science and legislation (fields and branches of science, scientific institutions, organizations, programs, declarations, scientific degrees)
3rd week: Classification and type of papers. The aims and purposes of scientific paper. Differences between the scientific and professional paper.
4th week: Components of scientific work (spot the problem, study the problem, set up a hypothesis, design research, conduct research and process the results, confirm or reject the hypothesis, to publish the results)
5 th week: Sources of information. The literature search. Database.
6 th week: Experiment. The organization of work in the field and in the laboratory. Planning, implementation and testing.
7 th week: Processing the results: sorting, statistics, modelling.
8 th week: Writing an article (scientific, professional, review, scientific and popular).
9 th week: Presentation of research. Poster presentations.
10 th week: Presentation of research. Oral presentation. Basic principles in the presentation of work.
11th week: References. The use of computer technique in the citation.
12 th week: Keywords. Graphical abstract.
13 th week: Applications for the expert and scientific conferences. The publication of the article. Reviews of scientific papers.
14 th week: Measure the value of articles (citations, indexing, impact factor).
15 th week: Scientific research ethics.
Seminar: writing seminar paper, making poster presentations, making a PowerPoint presentation of the paper and oral presentation.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

999.9

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Final written exam or two partial exams (50% of the total evaluation).
A written essay (25% of the total evaluation).
Oral presentation of written seminar paper (20% of the total evaluation) and poster presentation based on a written seminar paper (5% of the total evaluation). Passing threshold is 60%. Grades: successful (60% – 69%), good (70% – 79%), very good (80% – 89%), excellent (90% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Marušić i suradnici, Uvod u znanstveni rad u medicini, 5. izdanje, Zagreb, Medicinska naklada, 2013.

1

Darrell D. Ebbing and Steven D. Gammon, General Chemistry, 9th edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 2009. Raymond Chang, Chemistry, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2010. F. Albert Cotton et al., Basic Inorganic Chemistry, New York, John Wil

1

J. Kniewald, Metodika znanstvenog rada, Zagreb, Multigraf, 1993.

1

A. Tkalac Verčić, Dubravka Sinčić Čorić, Nina Pološki Vokić, Priručnik za metodologiju istraživačkog rada, Zagreb, M.E. P. d.o.o., 2010. M. I. Miljević, Metodologija naučnog rada, Sarajevo, Univerzitet u istočnom Sarajevu, Filozofski fakultet, 2007.

0

Praćenje sugestija i reakcija polaznika tijekom semestra. S

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013. Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. Tkalac Verčić, Dubravka Sinčić Čorić, Nina Pološki Vokić, Priručnik za metodologiju istraživačkog rada, Zagreb, M.E. P. d.o.o., 2010.
M. I. Miljević, Metodologija naučnog rada, Sarajevo, Univerzitet u istočnom Sarajevu, Filozofski fakultet, 2007.
Z. V. Popović, Kako napisati i objaviti naučno delo, Beograd, Akademska misao, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Diploma Thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Diploma Thesis

Code

KTBODR

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

18.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Professional Practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Professional Practice

Code

KTBOSP

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

2.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Environmental Process Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Environmental Process Engineering

Code

KTC106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students are introduced to the theoretical concepts and the application of unit operations in environmental engineering that are necessary in a systematic problem solving of procedures related to the waste treatment. Acquired knowledge allows them to evaluate and select the optimal separation process and introduces them to equipment designing with a special emphasis on optimizing the process operating conditions.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student are expected to:
understand the concept of sustainable development and to know how to connect the causes of pollution in the environment to the possibilities of its reduction by applying a certain specific environmental engineering process operations,
acquire the basic theoretical knowledge of an advanced separation processes that are applied in environmental engineering,
know how to apply a basic methodology of chemical engineering necessary in a selection of an appropriate processes and devices used in environmental engineering and to define and optimize the process parameters to increase process efficiency,
develop a critical approach towards a certain procedures in environmental engineering in terms of their selection, advantages, disadvantages and applications,
adopt a methodological approach in device designing that are used in environmental engineering.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st. week: Interaction between human and environment. Natural and anthropogenic factors causing land pollution. The role of environmental engineering. Principles of sustainable development.
2nd. week: Separation processes in environmental engineering. Elementary principles of separation operations. Mechanical separations processes. Separation processes which include mass and heat transfer.
3rd. week: Structure and properties of dispersed systems. Working principles of separators. Effectiveness of separation. Product purity and yield.
4th. week: Separation based on the motion of particles through fluids. Gravity settling processes. Batch sedimentation. Rate of sedimentation. Equipment for gravity sedimentation. Sedimentation zones in continuous thickeners. Clarifier and thickener design.
5th. week: Aerated and non-aerated grit chambers. Design of grit chambers. Bar screens - types and applications. The removal of oil from wastewater by natural and by air flotation.
6th. week: Centrifugal settling processes. Principles of centrifugal sedimentation. Equipments for centrifugal sedimentation. Centrifugal decanters (tubular centrifuge, disk centrifuge, helical-conveyor centrifuge). Hydrocyclone. Centrifugal filters. Choice of centrifuge.
7th. week: Oil spill removal from aquatic environments. Behavior and effects of oil spills on the water. Spread prevention of oil spills. Booms (floating barriers) - types and application.
8th. week: Mechanical, physical and chemical methods for oil spills removal from aquatic environments. Oil skimmers.
9th. week: Aeration - principles and practice. Interphase mass transfer. Application of oxygen transfer in wastewater engineering. Equalization.
10th. week: Aerated biofilters. Aeration in biological wastewater treatment systems. Design and optimization of aeration.
11th. week: Fundamentals of solid-gas separation. Separation by rotating flow (cyclone). Flow field in a cyclone. Collection efficiency and design of cyclones. Solid-gas filtration and types of filters. Electrostatic precipitation. Mechanism of an electrostatic precipitator. Mechanisms of scrubbing and types of scrubbers
12th. week: Basic concepts of adsorption. Engineered adsorption processes in water treatment. Adsorption kinetics. Adsorber design.
13th. week: Crystallization - elementary principles. Nucleation. Crystal growth theories. Influence of process parameters on final product of crystallization. Crystallizer equipments.
14th. week: Membrane separation processes. Advantage and disadvantage of the membrane separation. Membrane types. Membrane selectivity. Mechanism of mass transfer across the membrane. Product purity and yield.
15th. week: Membrane structure. Flow patterns in membrane separators. Concentration polarization. Elementary principles of ultrafiltration, electrodialysis and reverse osmosis.
Exercises:
Laboratory exercises:
Granulometric characterization of dispersed systems by analytical functions. Gravity settling processes - determination of sedimentation rate of suspension. Geometric characteristics determination of gravity settling separator. Aeration - interphase mass transfer rate. Impact of process parameters on final product of crystallization. Membrane separation process - reverse osmosis water demineralization.
Field exercises:
Optimization of operating conditions of aerated oil and grit chambers (wastewater treatment plant Stupe - Stobreč). Determination of the suspension flow in a centrifuge with a helical-conveyor (treatment plant oily water Cian - Solin). Oil removal from water surface (oily water treatment plant Cian - Solin). Equipment for gravity sedimentation (wastewater treatment plants Sinj and Trilj). Aeration and its application in biological wastewater treatment (wastewater treatment plant Trilj). Solid-gas filtration: process parameters control of the bag filters (CEMEX - Kastel Sućurac)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

4.0

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists the theoretical (oral) part. Oral part will constitute 70%, laboratory and field exercises will constitute 30% of the final score.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W.L. McCabe, J.C. Smith, P. Harriott, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, McGraw-Hill, 6th edition, New York, 2001.

3

T.D. Reynolds, P. Richards, R. Reynolds, Unit Operations and Processes in Environmental Engineering, Brooks Cole, New York, 1995.

1

Edward E, Baruth, Water Treatment Plant Design, McGraw-Hill, 4th edition, New York, 2005.

1

R.H. Perry, D.W. Green, J.O. Maloney, Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, 7th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1999.

3

M. Hraste, Mehaničko procesno inženjerstvo, HINUS, Zagreb, 2003.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 1997.;
V. Koharić, Mehaničke operacije, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 1996.;
E. Beer, Priručnik za dimenzioniranje uređaja kemijske procesne industrije, HDKI/Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 1994.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Catalysis in Enviromental Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Catalysis in Enviromental Protection

Code

KTC107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

4.5

Associate teachers

Prof Matko Erceg

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Strengthening the knowledge about catalysis and catalysts as well as the overview of the catalyst preparation methods. Insight in modern methods of pollution control and „green“ chemical catalytic processes.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- detailed explanation of the principle of catalyst role in chemical reaction
- distinguish homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts
- distinguish the basic components of heterogeneous catalytic system
- recognition of the different catalysts in real systems (stationary and mobile sources of emissions)
- ability to explain the importance of catalysts applications in industry and the concept of sustainable development.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Presentation of learning outcomes of the course. Environmental pollution and “clean” energy. Importance of catalysis.
2nd week: Basic principles of catalysts role in chemical reactions (activity, selectivity, stability).Heterogeneous catalysis: reaction steps. Physical and chemical adsorption (Lenard-Jones diagram). Basic laws of adsorption.
3rd week: Mechanism and kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Heterogeneous catalytic system: carriers, promoters, activators, moderators and inhibitors.
4th week: Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts (precipitation, impregnation, skeletal catalysts, monoliths).
5th week: Durability of catalysts and deactivation resistance. Causes of catalysts deactivation.
6th week: Catalytic oxidation of VOC (traditional industrial processes, air clean-up).
7th week: NOx reductions: nonselective and selective catalytic reduction. An overview of lectures.
8th week: First test.
9th week: Emissions from stationary sources. CH abatement procedures. Low temperature CO oxidation.
10th week: Emission control from gasoline engines (engine construction, emissions and regulations, catalytic conversion).
11th week: Emission control from diesel engines (engine construction, emissions and regulations, particulate filters, catalysts for diesel engines).
12th week: Zeolites as the catalysts in environmental protection (structure and application in industrial processes and environmental protection).
13th week: The role of catalysts in chemical recycling of waste plastics (catalytic cracking to gasoline, diesel, kerosene, fuel oils, monomers and other chemicals.)
14th week: An overview of lectures. Discussion about some examples from practice.
15th week: Second test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.9

Oral exam

0.7

Written exam

0.9

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during the semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 45%. At least 80 % class attendance during the lectures gives additional 10% of final grade.
In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%). Written exam is 50% and oral exam is 50%.
Grades: successful (60% – 70%), good (71% – 80%), very good (81% – 90%), excellent (91% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Kovačić, B. Andričić, Kataliza, Interna skripta, KTF, Split, 2010.

5

Web stranice KTF-a

R. M. Heck, R. J. Farrauto, Catalytic Air Pollution Control, J. Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2012

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

F. J. J. G. Janssen, R. A. van Santen, Environmental Catalysis, Imperial Colledge Press, London, 1999
- stručni i znanstveni članci dostupni putem interneta

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Electrochemical Technologies in Environmental Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Electrochemical Technologies in Environmental Protection

Code

KTC108

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge about the basic laws of electrolysis and electrochemical kinetics which play an important role in materials science and materials engineering, corrosion protection of materials, electroorganic and inorganic synthesis processes and also in modern and sustainable electrochemical technologies in environmental protection.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- design and optimize electrochemical reactor,
- explain the electrochemical aspects of environmental protection,
- identify the benefits and limitations of electrochemical technology in environmental protection,
- explain the electrochemical processes of wastewater treatment and organic waste treatment,
- explain the electrochemical processes of gases purification and remediation of soil,
- apply the electrochemical sensors in the engineering environment.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Electrochemical systems. Electrode/electrolyte interface.
2nd week: Mechanism and kinetics of electrode processes.
3rd week: Optimization of electrochemical reactor design. Electrochemical processes control.
4th week: Electrochemical technologies in environmental protection - advantages and limitations. Economic analysis.
5th week: Electrochemical processes for water treatment and organic pollutants. Anodic processes. Anodic material selection. Dimensionally stable anodes. Direct electrochemical oxidation of toxic organic compounds (complete decomposition to CO2) and inorganic compounds (cyanide and thiocyanate).
6th week: Indirect electrochemical oxidation (IEO) of toxic organic compounds.
IEO mechanism. Oxidizing agent formation. Electro-Fenton process.
7th week: Anodic removal of pesticides. Pollutant removal from organic mixtures - Selected process. Cathodic processes. Cathodic material selection.
8th week: Cathodic reduction of heavy metal ions. Direct electrochemical reduction of perchlorate, nitrate, chromate. Cathodic dechlorination of organic waste.
9th week: First test. Membrane-based electrochemical processes: Electrodialysis, Salt splitting.
10th week: Electrochemical gas purification. Electrode for direct and indirect gas purification. Removal of CO2, NOx, SO2, H2S. New process developments.
11th week: Electrochemical remediation of soil. Removal of ionic impurities. Electrokinetic removal of organic compounds. Economic analysis and benefits of electrochemical soil remediation.
12th week: Electrochemical sensors in environmental engineering. Improved electrochemical processes and products.
13th week: Electrochemical power sources for cleaner electrical energy.
14th week: Photoelectrochemical methods for removal of organic, inorganic and microbiological contamination of the water.
15th week: Second test.
Exercises: Electrolyte decomposition voltage. Electrogravimetric analysis. Electrorefining of silver. Direct electrochemical oxidation of phenolic compounds. Electro-Fenton process to remove organic compounds. Direct electrochemical reduction of nitrate. Cathodic reduction of heavy metal ions. Indirect reduction of perchlorate.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through three tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 33 %. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam. Grades: - 60% insufficient, 60-70% sufficient, 71-80% good, 81-92% very good, 93-100% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. Despić, Osnove elektrokemije 2000, Zavod za udžbenike i nastavna sredstva, Beograd, 2003.

0

J.O’M. Bockris, A.K.N. Reddy, M. Gamboa-Aldeco, Modern Electrochemistry 2A, Fundamentals of Electrodics, 2nd Edition, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, 2000.

1

Electrochemistry for the Environment Comninellis, Christos, Chen, Guohua (Eds.) 2010.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C. H. Hamann, A. Hamnett, W. Vielstich, Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH Weinheim, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Measurment and Automatic Process Control
NAME OF THE COURSE Measurment and Automatic Process Control

Code

KTC109

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

8

7

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective is to familiarize students with process measurements, metrology, and metrology infrastructure as well as with different methods of automatic process control in environmental protection engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, student is expected to be able to:
- analyze the importance of measuring process variables for the purpose of process control,
- select an appropriate measuring instrument for the purpose of process control
- in different segments of environmental protection engineering,
- understand the basic concepts of the process control theory,
- define and explain the role of the basic components of automatic control system,
- calculate the basic data needed to run a system as well as to predict its dynamic behavior.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: The basic principles of measurement systems used for process control in environmental protection engineering. Control loop, elements of the control loop.
Week 2: Development of dynamic models of the process.
Week 3: Measuring sensor and transmitter and their general features.
Week 4: Calibration of measuring instruments to national standards. Repeatability and reproducibility of measurements.
Week 5: Temperature sensors and transducers. Pressure sensors and transducers.
Week 6: Flow sensors and transducers. Level sensors and transducers.
Week 7: Control of physical variables in a bioreactor (temperature, pressure, flow, level).
Week 8: Monitoring and control of chemical and biological indicators of the state of a bioprocesse in bioreactors (pH, redox potential, dissolved oxygen, CO2 ...).
Week 9: Proportional, integral, and derivative actions of a controller. Control loop design. P & ID diagrams.
Week 10: Basic terms, means and methods of process control. Automatic stabilization. Sequential control. Feedback and feedforward control.
Week 11: Process control methods: cascade, feedforward and multivariable process control.
Week 12: Modern industrial controllers. Instruments management system. Control valves.
Week 13: The use of artificial intelligence algorithms for monitoring and control in biotechnological processes.
Week 14: Modern control systems. Distributed control systems. Process control of batch and continuous processes.
Week 15: Examples of process control in environmental protection engineering.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

4.5

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. In order to pass the test, student should achieve a minimum score of 55%. Final grade is based on an average of the scores on both tests: 55%-66% - satisfactory, 67%-78% - good, 79%-89% -very good, 90%-100% - excellent.
Students who do not pass partial tests have to take an exam in a regular examination periods. Final grade is determined by previously notated criteria.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Božičević, J. (1992). Temelji automatike I i II, Školska knjiga, Zagreb

6

R. Žanetić, Vođenje procesa u proizvodnji, Interna skripta, KTF, Split, 2006.

0

Web stranica KTF

N. Bolf, Mjerenja i automatsko vođenje procesa, Interna skripta, FKIT, Zagreb, 2007. N. Prljača, Z. Šehić, Automatsko upravljanje: analiza i dizajn. Mikroštampa, Tuzla, 2008. J. Marasović, Temeljni postupci u automatici, Interna skripta, FESB, Split,

0

Praćenje kvalitete i uspješnosti obavljat će se na tri razin

Ostalo (prema mišljenju predlagatelja)

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

N. Bolf, Mjerenja i automatsko vođenje procesa, Interna skripta, FKIT, Zagreb, 2007.
N. Prljača, Z. Šehić, Automatsko upravljanje: analiza i dizajn. Mikroštampa, Tuzla, 2008.
J. Marasović, Temeljni postupci u automatici, Interna skripta, FESB, Split, 2001.
D. E. Seborg, T. F. Edgar, D. A. Mellichamp, Process Dynamics and Control, 2nd Edition, Willey International, New Jersey, 2003.
T. Marlin, Process Control: Designing Processes and Control Systems for Dynamic Performance, 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill Science, New York, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Biochemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Biochemistry

Code

KTC110

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition a basic knowledge and skills in the field of biochemistry

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, student is expected to be able to:
- Understand the basic principles of protein structure and the impact of their structure on biological function.
- Understand the basic principles of enzyme kinetics and enzyme inhibition.
- Understand the importance of carbohydrate structures in the living system.
- Understand the importance of lipid structures in living system.
- Explain the structure and role of biological membranes.
- Understand the structure and biological function of nucleic acids.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

LECTURES:
The history of biochemistry. The origin of life. (2) Water, bioelements, biomolecules and chemical bonds in living organisms. (2). Amino acids (1). Buffers & Buffer systems. (1). Proteins. Protein conformation. (2) Protein sequencing. (1) Protein function. Collagen & Elastin. Hemoglobin & Myoglobin. (2) Isolation and characterisation of proteins. (2) Enzymes. Enzyme kinetics. Enzyme inhibition. (2) Regulation of enzyme activity. (1) Coenzymes and Cofactors. (1) Carbohydrates. (2) Lipids. Lipoproteins. Steroids. (2). Biological membranes. Transport across membranes. (2) Nucleotides and nucleic acids. DNA replication. Transcription. Translation (3) Protein modifications and protein transport. (1) Bioenergetics. Energy-reach compounds: phosphate compounds and ATP. (3)
SEMINARS:
Buffers & Buffer systems. (3) Amino acids and peptides. (3) ) Enzymes. Enzyme kinetics. Enzyme inhibition. (3) Coenzymes (1) Carbohydrates (1) Lipids. (1) Biological membranes. (1) ) Nucleotides and nucleic acids (1) Bioenergetics. (1)
EXERCISES:
Izolacija i kvantitativno određivanje nukleinskih kiselina iz biljnih tkiva (3) The potentiometric titration of amino acids (3) Qualitative analysis of proteins (3) Quantitative determination of proteins by Bradford method. (3) Protein electrophoresis (3) The enzyme kinetics: determination vmax and Km. (3) Enzyme catalysis - effect of inhibitors on enzyme activity (3) The properties of carbohydrates and qualitative tests for carbohydrates (3) Properties of lipids, solubility, saponification (3) Lipid-isolation and detection of phospholipids from egg yolk (3) Isolation and quantification of nucleic acids from plant material (3)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.M. Berg, J.L. Tymoczko, L. Stryer: Biokemija, 5th Ed, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2013.

5

R.M.Murray i sur: Harperova ilustrurana biokemija, 28th Ed, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb 2011.

3

S K Sawhney, R ingh: Introductory Practical Biochemistry. Alpha Science International Ltd., Harrow, U.K. 2008.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Sustainable Technologies and Development
NAME OF THE COURSE Sustainable Technologies and Development

Code

KTC111

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

4.5

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The application of preventive environmental strategies in the chemical and technological (manufacturing) processes, products and activities, according to the principle: cleaner production - sustainable development, in order to increase production efficiency and reduce risks to the environment and human health.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Selected Processes of Chemical Industry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, student is expected to be able to:
- assess contemporary environmental problems
- describe the concept and principles of sustainable technology and development
- apply the principle of cleaner production - sustainable development in some industrial processes
- propose an energy efficient and completed technological process
- organize the implementation of environmental management systems and quality assurance.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Development and the environment. Important concepts. Contemporary issues in society. The objectives of environmental protection strategy with the aim of sustainable development.
2nd week: Linking industrial activity and social sciences and environmental sciences. Assessing the impact of chemical-technological processes on the environment. Origin and distribution of pollutants in air, soil and water, global warming and the greenhouse effect.
3rd week: The basics of sustainable development. The concept and evolution of sustainable development. Principles and models of sustainable development. Indicators of sustainable development, their management and implementation.
4th week: Preventive approach to cleaner production (non-waste production processes). Integrated Strategies for sustainable technologies and the development of the manufacturing process, products and support activities in order to increase production efficiency and environmental protection.
5th week: Analysis of resource flow in industrial ecosystems. Rational use of raw materials, water and energy and reduction of waste at source during the production. Examination (I colloquium).
6th week: ”Cost-benefit” analysis in environmental protection as an indicator of proper environmental management strategy. Viewing and control of overall mass balance in industrial processes in environmental protection.
7th week: Environment and protection. From the rehabilitation and prevention of pollution to the environment management system. The implementation of environmental management systems and quality assurance. The role of ISO standards in environmental management strategy. Models for Environmental Management (ISO 14000 system). Models for Quality Assurance (ISO 9000).
8th week: Overview of all activities in the chemical production facility as the basis for a program of environmental management and quality assurance. Operational control and corrective measures.
9th week: A systematic monitoring of emissions to air, water and soil in industrial chemical processes. Sources of emissions of emissions, equipment and devices for different waste treatment processes. Selected examples.
10th week: Energy efficiency of the technology processes. Alternative energy (municipal waste, car tires, used oil and other waste materials).
11th week: Cement production - example of sustainable technology and development. Increased production efficiency and product quality.
12th week: European Union Directives (IPPC, WID, BATNEEC, BREF) for the prevention and control of pollution in the cement industry.
13th week: Methods of forecasting crisis situations and their prevention in production processes as the basis for the development of cleaner technologies.
14th week: The role of sustainable technologies in the development of new chemical-technological processes for the protection of heritage and ensure sustainable - sustainable, rather than survive development.
15th week: Examples of the application of the ”cleaner” production concept on certain industrial processes. Best available technology (BAT) - principles, the implementation of sustainable and similar processes for the environment.
Examination (II. Colloquium).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam through tests (two tests) during the semester. Passing threshold is 55%. Students who did not pass the exam through tests pass the exam at regular examination dates and the exam consists of written and oral part. Limit of passing the written exam is 55%.
The principle of assessment: 55% -64% - sufficient, 65% -78% - good, 79% -90% -very good, 91% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T.E. Graedel, B.R.Allenby, Industrial ecology, Second ed., Pearson education Inc. Upper saddle River, 2003.

0

M. L. Davis, D.A. Cornwell, Introduction to Environmental Engineering, McGraw Hill, New York, 1998.

0

Z. Osmanović, J. Zelić, Proizvodnja portland-cementa, Univerzitet u Tuzli, Tuzla, 2010.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

IPPC - EU Direktiva za prevenciju i kontrolu onečišćenja zraka, vode i tla
WID - EU Direktiva za spaljivanje otpada
BATNEEC - EU Direktiva za nadzor i smanjenje emisije u industriji cementa
BREF - EU Direktiva za poboljšanje ukupne ekološke zaštite u sektorima aktivnosti BAT - EU Direktiva za najbolje raspoloživu tehniku za proizvodnju cementa

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Methods for Characterization of Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Methods for Characterization of Materials

Code

KTC112

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Sanja Perinović Jozić
Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of theoretical knowledge about different techniques and methods for characterization of materials, and practical knowledge about the preparation of samples and the application of simple and advanced instrumental techniques and methods.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, student is expected to be able to:
- optimally use numerous possibilities of individual instruments
- conclude which instrumental technique and method can be applied to determine predicted properties of materials
- properly prepare samples and adjust a instrument for a particular measurement, i.e. to calibrate the instrument
- independently carry out measurements and determine basic parameters of the measured data

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: L Introductory notes related to the course. Introduction to structure and properties of materials using MSE tetraedre (Material Science and Engineering) for clarification of relations between composition, structure, properties and synthesis of materials. Classification of materials. Classification based on structure of materials. Crystalline and amorphous state. Practical examples of structure and properties of waste materials in environment.
E -
2nd week: L Development of techniques and methods for characterization of materials throughout the history. Introduction to methods for characterization of materials. The accuracy and precision of measurement, statistical deviation of measurement. Basic terminology in instrumental characterization of materials (calibration, recalibration, baseline, standards, systematic errors..).
E -
3rd week: L Physical and chemical properties of materials. Basic notations and terminology. Crystal states. Symmetry elements. Crystal systems. Spatial symmetry and space groups. Crystal planes, Miller indices and interplane distances. d. Isomorphism and polymorphism. Enantiomorphism and chirality. Crystal habits. Dendrites. Composite crystals and splicings. Irregularities in crystals.
E -
4th week: L Electromagnetic radiation. Instrumental methods and techniques. X-ray radiation. The interaction of X-ray radiation with electrons. The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atoms. Basics of X-ray fluorescence techniques and methods. Calibration and calibration standards of instruments. Interpretation of the results.
E Determination of the elemental composition using fluorescence techniques.
5th week: L Determination of the basic parameters of the diffraction pattern. Industrial constructions of instrument and performance limitations.
E Rapid methods for characterization of materials using X-ray diffraction.
6th week: L Microscopic techniques. Light microscopy. The law of reflection. The law of refraction. Absolute and relative refractive index. Methods of measuring the refractive index. Birefringence. Construction of microscope. Polarizing microscope. Compensation plates and their role.
E Application of microscopy in characterization of materials.
7th week: L Assessment of knowledge (I. test). Spectroscopic techniques and methods for characterization of materials. Theoretical background of infrared spectroscopy (IR).
E Application of infrared spectroscopy in characterization of materials.
8th week: L Basics interactions of infrared radiation with a matter. Important terminology related to infrared spectroscopy and its possible application. Methods for a sample preparation. Methods and techniques of measurement. Practical guidelines for the measurement on infrared spectrometer.
E Application of infrared spectroscopy in characterization of materials.
9st week: L Introduction to thermal techniques and methods. Fundamental terminology. Types of thermal techniques and methods. Factors affecting the results of thermal analysis.
E -
10th week: L Theoretical background of thermogravimetry (TG). Standards for calibration and calibration methods of thermogravimeter and thermogravimeter / differential thermal analyzer (TG/DTA). Determination of the baseline and measurement interpretation. Importance of instrument calibration, measurement program, working conditions, preparation of samples. Interpretation of thermogravimetric curves. Possible applications of thermogravimetry (examples). Mistakes that occur in measurement.
E Determination of thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of materials with thermogravimetric method.
11th week: L Assessment of knowledge (II. test). Theoretical background of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Instrumental designs of these techniques.
E -
12th week: L Importance of instrument calibration, measurement program, working conditions, preparation of samples for differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis. Standards for calibration and recalibration of instruments. Determination of a baseline and measurement interpretation. Possible applications (examples) and possible problems. Mistakes that occur in the measurement.
E Determination of thermal properties of material using differential scanning calorimetry.
13th week: L Theoretical background of thermomechanical (TMA) analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Construction of thermomechanical system. Calibration of the instrument, measurement program, working conditions, sample preparation, etc. Thermomechanical curves. Possible applications (examples) and possible problems.
E -
14th week: L Construction of dynamic mechanical system (DMA). Calibration of the instrument, measurement program, working conditions, sample preparation, etc. Dynamic mechanical curves. Possible applications (examples) and possible problems.
E -
15th week: L Repetition of course content. Assessment of knowledge (III. test).
E -

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

0.6

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire exam can be passed over three tests during the semester. Minimum for successfully passed tests is limit of 50% of resolved test. Each test participates with a share of 25% in total grade. Class attendance in the amount of 70% to 100% presents the share of 5% in total grade, while the implementation of experimental work of 100% presents the share of 10% in total grade. During the regular examination period students pass the exam over a written and oral exam. Minimum for passage is 50% of resolved test. Each previously passed test (previous activity) is valid only in the summer examination period with a share of 10% in total grade. The written exam participates with 35%, while the oral exam participates with a share of 40% in total grade. Students who didn’t pass the tests during the semester will take the exam during the regular examination period through the written and oral exam. Limit for passage is 50% of resolved test, the written and the oral part of the exam participates with a share of 50%.
Grading: 50%-61% - sufficient, 62%-74% - good, 75%-87% very good, 88%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

H. Günzler and H. Gremlich, Uvod u infracrvenu spektroskopiju, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2006.

1

T. Kovačić, Struktura i svojstva polimera, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2010.

1

Michael E. Brown, Introduction to Thermal Analysis, Techniques and Applications (2nd edition), Kluwer Academics Publishers, New York, 2004.

1

B.E. Warren, X-Ray diffraction, Dover Publications, New York

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

1. Roger N. Clark, Spectroscopy of Rocks and Minerals, and Principles of Spectroscopy, John Wiley and Sons, Inc, New York, 1999.
2. Odabrani članci iz časopisa po preporuci predmetnog nastavnika

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Environmental Remediation Technologies
NAME OF THE COURSE Environmental Remediation Technologies

Code

KTC113

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović
Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Training students for independent and team work in identifying the specific locations of contamination in the environment, and the selection and application of methods of remediation.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- methods of identifying contaminated sites in the environment
- determining the type of contaminants and contamination intensity
- the selection procedures for remediation of environmental
- application of methods of remediation.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Assessing the state of the environment. Methods for identification and testing of contaminated sites in the environment.
2nd week: Types of pollutants. Qualitative and quantitative identification of contaminant in the contaminated site.
3rd week: Factors influencing migration (spreading) of contaminants in the environment. The role of soil and sediment in retaining and slowing ground water contamination.
4th week: Models of migration of contaminants in the environment.
5th week: Environmental remediation techniques: in situ, on site, ex situ. Selection criteria for remediation technologies.
6th week: Technologies for remediation of soil. Physical remediation: soil encapsulation. Excavation of the soil. Mixing of soil.
7th week: Chemical soil remediation: electrochemical remediation, flooding, flushing, solidification / stabilization, natural cleaning.
8th week: Thermal soil remediation: incineration, vitrification, solar / photochemical degradation of the soil.
9th week: Biological soil remediation: bioremediation, bioventilation, phytoremediation, phytoextraction / phytoaccumulation.
10th week: Remediation of sediment
11th week: Remediation of groundwater. Ex situ physical / chemical processes: stripping, adsorption, oxidation, separation.
12th week: Remediation of groundwater. In situ physical / chemical processes: ventilation, stripping, permeable reactive barriers, oxidation.
13th week: Bioremediation of groundwater. Passive bioremediation. Biostimulation / Bioaugmentation.
14th week: Phytoremediation. Rhizosphere biodegradation. Fitodegradation.
15th week: Phytostabilization. Rhizofiltration. Phytovolatilization.
Seminar: Analysis of examples of remediation of contaminated sites in our country and in the world.
Exercises: Identification of contaminated environment and selection of the appropriate remediation techniques. Remediation of contaminated groundwater by using permeable reactive barriers. Calculation of distribution coefficient. Prediction of migration distribution of harmful substances in the environment. The use of flotation in the remediation of contaminated sediment. The application of dewatering in the remediation of the environment. Efficiency of dewatering of contaminated sediment and purity of the filtrate. Electroremediation of sediment polluted with heavy metals. Phytoremediation.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars, laboratory exercises 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Every laboratory exercises include oral exam before exercise and writing of final report.
The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation and one oral evaluation of seminar during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 70% -80% - good, 80% -90% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Krešić, N., Vujasinović, S., Matić, I. Remedijacija podzemnih voda i geosredine, Univerzitet u Beogradu, Beograd, 2006.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Kisić, I., Sanacija onečišćenoga tla, Zagreb: Agronomski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2012.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

0

L. H. Odell, Treatment technologies for groundwater, America

N. L. Nemerow, F.J. Agardy, P. Sullivan, J.A. Salvato, Environmental Engineering, Soil and groundwater tretament and remediation, Sixth Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.New Jersey, 2009.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

S. Zrnčević, Čišćenje (remedijacija) podzemnih voda zagađenih organskim spojevima, Hrvatske vode 14 (2006) 305-310.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

S. Zrnčenić, Čišćenje (remedijacija) podzemnih voda zagađenih organskim spojevima - Fizikalno-kemijski "ex situ" postupci, Hrvatske vode 15 (2007) 17-24.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

S. Zrnčević, Čišćenje (remedijacija) podzemnih voda zagađenih organskim spojevima - Bioremedijacija "in situ", Hrvatske vode 15 (2007) 73-82.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Znanstveni i stručni radovi

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Microbiology of Polluted Waters
NAME OF THE COURSE Microbiology of Polluted Waters

Code

KTC206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nada Krstulović

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

20 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The purpose oft his course is to provide an introduction to microbial water pollution, especially to microorganisms which are actual or potential water-borne human pathogens.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Knowledge in Basic Microbiology

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Acquisition of knowledge about the sources of microbial contamination of natural waters.
- Acquisition of knowledge about the microorganisms which are actual or potential water-borne human pathogens.
- Understanding of the definition of indicator organisms.
- Understanding the criteria and standards for assessing the quality of different types of water (drinking water, recreational water, acquaculture areas, etc.) .
- Acquisition of knowledge about the fate of allochthonous microorganisms upon arrival in the aquatic environment, or on their mechanisms of adaptation and survival.
- Introduction to environmental factors that affect the survival (T90) of indicators and pathogenic microorganisms in different types of water environment.
- Acquisition of knowledge about the impact of allochthonous microorganisms on organisms living in that aquatic environment.
- Understanding why shellfish are considered the most risk organisms in microbiologically polluted water, and what are the factors affecting the rate of concentration of microorganisms in shellfish.
- Acquisition of knowledge about the processes of eutrophication and conditions which cause toxic algal blooms and blooms of cyanobacteria.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lesson 1. Introduction to Sanitary Microbiology (2 hours)
Microbiological contamination of waters as one of the main public health problems. Clasification of different types of water distinguished on the basis of use (drinking water, bathing waters, waters used for other recreational purposes, aquaculture areas).
Lesson 2. Sources of microbiologica pollution (2 hours)
Sources of microbial pollution: untreated wastewater discharges and outfalls, including type, e.g. industrial, domestic or mixed; Water pollutant sources can be grouped into two supercategories: (a) point sources which can be attributed to discrete discharge from a factory or sewage outfall and (b) non-point sources that include agricultural runoff, urban stormwater runoff and other area wide sources.
Lesson 3. Rewiev of pathogens or potential human pathogens in polluted waters (2 hours)
Microorganisms which are actual or potential pathogens of man and can be transmitted through polluted waters, or through consumption of contaminated waterfood: bacteria, viruses, fungi and variety of protozoan and metazoan parasites.
Lesson 4: Pathogenic microorganisms (3 hours)
The main features of cammon pathogenic bacteria in polluted waters: Salmonella,Shigella, Vibrio, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Clostridium, Campylobacter, Yersinia, Aeromonas, enteropathpgenic Escherichia coli, and a number of streptococci. Viruses: various group pf viruses are known to be isolated from polluted waters, including enteroviruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses and parvoviruses. Pathogenic fungi: the most common one associated with infection through contact with polluted waters is Candida albicans. Features of other parasites.
Lesson 5. Microbial indicator organisms (2 hours)
Concept, definition and features of indicator organisms.The main parameters used for monitoring quality of waters are bacterial indicator organisms. The main ones are the following: total coliforms, faecal coliforms (Escherichia coli), faecal streptococci, intestinal enterococci, and some others regarding the use of monitored waters.
Lesson 6. A water quality criteria and standards (2hours)
Concept and definition of microbial water quality criteria and standards. The concept of acceptability for various types of water (drinking water, fresh water environment, marine environment). Microbial water quality assesment.
Lesson 7. Fate of allochthonous microorganisms after arrival in the aquatic environment (2 hours)
Surviving of alochtonous microorganisms in the aquatic environment: Mechanisms of adaptation and survival of alochtonous microorganisms in the freshwater and marine environments.
Lesson 8. Environmental factors influencing to die-off of microorganisms in water environments (3 hours)
Factors that can affect die-off of microorganisms in water environments: temperature, solar radiation, salinity, osmotic preassure, pH, nutrients, simultaneous effect of environmental factors, antagonistic effect of other organisms.
Lesson 9. Determination of survavial rates for selected bacteria (2 hours)
T90 value of the indicator bacteria and some pathogens. The differential die-off of indicators in marine and fresh water environments.
Lesson 10. The accumulation of microorganisms in organisms living in that environment (2 sata)
Impact of allochtonous microorganisms on sanitary quality of organisms that live in that environment.
Lesson 11. Overview of risk groups of edible organisms to human health (2 hours)
Shellfish as the risk organisms for human health. Features of shellfish due to the sessile mode of life and feeding by filtering water. Review of factors that affect the filtration rate of shellfish and the rate of concentration of microorganisms in shellfish.
Lesson 12. Infections and poisoning by shellfish (2 hours)
The role of shellfish as vectors in human deseases. The most common pathogens transferable via shellfish.
Lesson 13. Eutrophication and toxic phytoplankton blooms (2 hours)
Blooms of toxic algal species producing potent toxins. Acumulation of biotoxins in shellfish during filter feeding becoming vectors in various forms of shellfish poisoning.
Lesson 14. Blooms of Cyanobacteria (2 hours)
Risk assessment of the mass proliferation of cyanobacteria. Cyanotoxins. Human health risk assessment related to Cyanotoxins.
Seminars
Students prepare seminars in topics related to the lessons and presentations of seminars are followed by discussion.
Laboratory Exercises
Exercise 1. (3 hours)
Sampling of water
Determination of microbiological quality of drinking water by spread plate technique.
Determination of indicators of faecal pollution in drinking water and seawater by membrane filtration culture method: E. coli, faecal coliforms and intestinal enterococci following ISO standards.
Exercise 2. (3 hours)
Determination of E. coli and faecal coliforms by MPN method following ISO standards.
Dtermination of intestinal enterococci in seawater by MPN method (after WHO/UNEP 1995)
Exercise 3. (4 hours)
Determination of indicators of faecal pollution int he shellfish:
Determination of E. coli int he shellfish by MPN method following ISO standards.
Determination of E. coli and faecal coliforms in shellfish by MPN method following ISO standards
Dtermination of intestinal enterococci in sshellfish by MPN method (after WHO/UNEP 1995)
Exercise 4. (2 hours)
Determination of some pathogens in shellfish:
Dtermination of Salmonella in shellfish following ISO standards
Exercise 5. (3 hours)
Determination of sanitary quality of freshwater and marine sediments by pour plate technique (after WHO/UNEP 1995).
Dtermination of total number bacteria in water samples by fluorescence method.
Dtermination of total number bacteria in water samples by flow citometer method.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance is mandatory , seminars, discussions on teaching units.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

90-100% of the resolved questions in tests and oral exam- excellent (5)
80-89% of the resolved questions in tests and oral exam -very good (4)
70-79% of the resolved questions in tests and oral exam - good (3)
60-69% of the resolved questions in tests and oral exam - sufficient (2)
<60% - student is not satisfied

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Krstulović, N: Power Point nastavni materijali na CD-u.

0

Svi studenti dobiju CD

Krstulović, N. I M. Šolić, 2006. Alohtoni mikroorganizmi u moru, 199-254. U: Mikrobiologija mora, IOR-Split, 317p. Udžbenik Sveučilišta u Splitu.

10

Pike E.B., Gale, P. & Bryan J.J. Health risks of freshwater and the development of microbial standards. Water research Centre Report, London, 1989.

1

Članci u časopisima i sadržaji na internetu koji se odnose na problematiku onečišćenja mora

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

T.N. Hofer, (2008).Marine pollution: New Research, Nova Science Publishers, New York, 448p.
Laws, E.A. (2000). Aquatic Pollution, An Introductory Text (Third Edition). Willey Intersci. Publ., New York, 672 pages.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Ecotoxicology
NAME OF THE COURSE Ecotoxicology

Code

KTC211

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Jasna Maršić Lučić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining of basic theoretical and practical knowledge of direct and indirect effects of xenobiotics on the environment, at all living organisms, and their relationship to inanimate matter.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to know:
- basic concepts and relationships in the ecosystem,
- types of pollution and ways which are due to the environment
- the mechanisms of action of different types of xenobiotics,
- molecular-cellular aspects of toxicity,
- the role of bioindicators and biomarkers for determining the condition of environmental pollution in land and water ecosystems .

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to ecotoxicology. Definitions of terms and development of ecotoxicology.
2nd week: Human impact on the environment. The division of pollutants per site pollution .Persistence and detoxication.
3thweek: Physiological classification of pollutants. Factors that determine the movement and distribution of pollutants
4thweek: The pathophysiological effects of poisoning. The mode of action of pollutants. Absorption and distribution of xenobiotics in the body
5th week: Molecular-cellular aspects of toxicity.Transport of toxicants through the cell membrane
6th week: Biotransformation. Biodynamics and excretion of toxic substances.
7th week: Biological degradation of the toxic substances in the environment. Transport mechanisms in the environment.Bioaccumulation, bioconcentration and biomagnification
8th week: Assessment of genotoxicity.UV radiation and marine phytoplankton
9th week: Introduction to analytical methods in ecotoxicology. Qualitative analytical
methods for determination of toxicants
10th week: Quantitative analytical methods for the determination of toxicants
11thweek: The mechanism of toxicity and detection of nitrate, nitrite and ammonia
12th week: Methods for detection of cyanide and cyanide glycoside
13th week: The mechanism of toxicity of heavy metals
14th week: Methods of biomonitoring, analysis of residues (determining MRL).
15th week: Biological determination of toxins from shellfish

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

1.5

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students’ work will be evaluated and assessed during the teaching process as well as on the final exam.
Overall examination can be applied over the two exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each exams is scored and gets a score that enters the final assessment of the case. In the exam period there is a written and oral exam,
Rating: 60% -70% - sufficient, 71% -80% - good, 81% -90% -very good, 91% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Springer, O., Springer, D.. Otrovani modrozeleni planet, Meridijani, Samobor, 2008.

1

Knjižnica Instituta za oceanografiju i ribarstvo

J. Maršić Lučić, Ekotoksikologija, predavanja, ppt

1

Web, Institut za oceanografiju i ribarstvo

Srebočan V. Veterinarska toksikologija, Medicinska naklada, 1993.

1

Knjižnica Instituta za oceanografiju i ribarstvo

Hoffman, D.J., Rattner,B.A., Burton, G.A.jr. , Cairns, J.,jr. 1995. Handbook of ecotoxicology, CRC Press,

1

Knjižnica Instituta za oceanografiju i ribarstvo

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Walker, C.H., Hopkin, S.P., Sibly, R.M.and Peakall, D.B.: Principles of ecotoxicology Taylor & Francis publ. 1997.
Kamrin, M.A.: Toxicology: a primer on toxicology principles and applications. Lewis publishers. 1988

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Soil Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Soil Chemistry

Code

KTC212

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Maša Buljac
Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the properties of mineral and organic matter of the soil and their role in chemical processes in the soil. Determine the concentration and composition of the soil solution, the importance and role of soil reaction, acidity, alkalinity and salinity for certain soil properties and processes in the soil. Analyze soil contamination by organic and inorganic compounds.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
- Identify chemical composition pedosphere, the origin of the chemical constituents in the soil
- To compare the natural and anthropogenic processes caused by the transformation of mineral and organic matter in soil
- Establish similarities and differences in the chemical processes in different soils
- The sources of soil contamination as a result of human activity
- Make a plan of chemical analyzes for different needs
- To elaborate obtained knowledge of soil

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction. Definition of basic concepts in chemistry of soil
Lecture 2: The fundamental substrates and processes of pedogenesis
Lecture 3: Mineral soil structure (oxides and hydroxides of Al, Si, Fe, Mn, no silicate minerals, secondary clay minerals, ion dispersion)
Seminar 1 (2 hours): Redox reactions of cations and anions at the solid-liquid
Lab course 1 (3 hours): Soil analysis (determining the acidity of the soil, the determination of total carbonate in the soil).
Lecture 4: The organic structure of the soil (fresh remains on the ground and in the soil, transformation of soil organic matter, mineralization, humus- origin, composition and properties, divisions humus importance of humus for soil fertility).
Lecture 5: The liquid phase of the soil. The properties of the soil solution.
Seminar 2 (2 hours):. soil acidity, soil pH
Lab course 2 (3 hours): Determination of buffering capacity of the soil.
Lecture 6: The processes of precipitation and dissolution
Lecture 7: I. Partial Test
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Methods of measuring soil acidity
Lab course 3 (3 hours): Determination of ammonium nitrogen in the soil with Nessler reagent.
Lecture 8: Reactions of cations and anions at the interface soil-solution
Lecture 9: The acidity of the soil, methods of measuring soil acidity, soil acidity and origin correction of soil acidity.
Seminar 4 (2 hours): The redox potential of the soil and the practical application
Lab course 4 (3 hours): Determination of physiologically active lime (CaO%) by the method of Galeta.
Lecture 10: Alkalinity, salinity, soil buffers. Soil contamination from organic and inorganic compounds
Lecture 11:: The basic principles of electrochemistry.
Seminar 5 (2 hours): The chemical composition of the organic portion of soil.
Lab course 5 (3 hours ): Determination of total nitrogen in plant material and soil by the method of Kjeldahl.
Lecture 12: The redox potential of the soil and practical application.
Lecture 13: The properties of colloids in the environment.
Seminar 6 (2 hours): The liquid phase of the soil
Lecture 14: The problems of soil contamination.
Lecture 15: II. partial test
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): oxido-reducing conditions in the soil

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.8

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester two exams will be performed. Final examinations will be administered during formal examination periods. The following percentage equivalents apply to final grade: 90% (5). After written exam, student will attend to oral exam. Lecturers do not give grades. Students earn grades.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D.L. Sparks, Environmental Soil Chemistry, 2 nd edition Academic Press, London, 2003.

0

Jedan primjerak u zavodu

E. Prohić, Geokemija, Targa, Zagreb, 1998.

0

M. Cresser, K. Killham, T. Edwards, Soil Chemistry and its applications, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1993.

0

Jedan primjerak u zavodu

A. Škorić, Postanak, razvoj i sistematika tala, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, 1986.

0

Jedan primjerak u zavodu

A. Škorić, Sastav i svojstva tla, Fakultet poljoprivrednih znanosti, Zagreb, 1991.

0

Jedan primjerak u zavodu

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

T. G. Spiro, W. M. Stigliani, Chemistry of environment, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1996;
A. Škorić, Priručnik za pedološka istraživanja, Fakultet poljoprivrednih znanosti, Zagreb, 1982.;
C.S. Kupchella, M.C. Hyland, Environmental science, 2 nd edition, Allyn and Bacon, Massachusetts, 1989.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Recycling of Plastics
NAME OF THE COURSE Recycling of Plastics

Code

KTC215

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- rising awareness and knowledge about the necessity of plastics recycling
- understanding of modern methods of plastic recycling
- implementation of the adopted basic knowledge in finding optimal solutions for recycling of plastics

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to be able to:
- explain and argue the importance of plastics for sustainable development
- categorize the sources of plastic waste
- explain the importance of sorting plastic waste
- propose and implement a procedure for sorting plastic waste
- explain the basic characteristics of the mechanical, chemical and energy recovery of plastics
- choose the optimal method of waste recovery given its composition

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. The nomenclature of the polymer. The classification of polymers. Polymerization (step-growth, chain). Methods of polymerization.
2nd week: The structure of the polymer: bonds, configurations and conformations of polymers. The physical state of the polymer-thermomechanical curves. Mechanisms of polymer degradation.
3rd week: Polymers and sustainable development. Life cycle stages of plastic. Additives for polymers. Ecological aspects of polymer additives (examples: heat stabilizers and plasticizers for poly(vinyl chloride)).
4th week: Polymer processing procedures (extrusion, injection molding). Environmental burden at the stage of processing of polymers.
5th week: World, European and Croatian plastics industry - statistical data. Types of plastic waste.
6th week: Plastics waste in household, automotive, construction, electric, electronic, agriculture and distribution. Recycling of plastic waste and sustainable development.
7th week: Material recovery (recycling). Homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic waste. The collection and identification of plastic waste.
8th week: Sorting of plastic waste: float-sink method, supercritical fluids method, air classification, hydrocyclon classification, optical sorting method, infrared spectroscopy method.
9th week: Sorting of plastic waste: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method, electrostatic classification method, sorting by melting temperature, sorting by selective dissolution.
10th week: Reduction of plastic waste: granulators, mills, shredders, apparatus for agglomeration and compacting, mills (turbo mill, disks), cryogenic milling, shear extrusion in the solid state, chemical fragmentation.
11th week: Plants for recycling homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic waste.
12th week: Chemical recycling of plastic waste (examples, plants): depolymerization processes (hydrolysis, alcoholysis, glycolysis, acidolysis, aminolysis), thermolysis processes (gasification, pyrolysis, hydrogenation)
13th week: Energy recovery of plastic waste: burning on the mechanical stoker incinerator, incineration in rotary kilns, fluidized-bed combustion.
14th week: Waste disposal and landfill. Behavior of plastic waste in landfills. The management of plastic waste.
15th week: Life Cycle Assessment (LCA method). Conclusions.
Exercises: Manual sorting of packaging plastic waste, Sorting of plastic waste by float-sink method, Sorting of plastic waste using infrared spectroscopy, Separation of poly (vinyl chloride) and poly (ethylene terephthalate), Effect of repeated recycling of the thermal properties of polymers, Chemical recycling of poly (ethylene terephthalate) by glycolysis, Recycling of expanded polystyrene.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount, and laboratory exercises in the 100% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.2

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.7

Written exam

0.7

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 35% in a final grade. Laboratory exercises (50-100% success) participate with 20% in a final grade, while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 40%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Šercer, D. Opsenica, G Barić, Oporaba plastike i gume, Mtg topograf d.o.o., Velika Gorica, 2000.;

1

A. Azapagić, A. Emsley; I. Hamerton, Polymers, The Environment and Sustainable Development, Wiley, 2003.

1

J. Scheirs, Polymer Recycling: Science, Technology and Applications, John Wiley&Sons, Chichester, 1998.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

L. Lundquist, Y. Leterrier, P. Sunderland, J.E. Manson, Life Cycle Engineering of Plastics, Elsevier, Oxford, 2000.; A. L. Andrady, Plastics and the Environment, Wiley-Interscience, 2003.; M. Črnjak, K. Črnjar, Menadžment održivog razvoja, AKD, Zagreb, 2009.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Nanotechnology and the Environment
NAME OF THE COURSE Nanotechnology and the Environment

Code

KTC216

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Preview of the fundamentals of nanotechnology, analysis of its possible impact on the environment and its possible applications in the protecting of environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

The knowledge of fundamentals of nanotechnology.
The ability of estimate possible impacts of technology on the environment.
The knowledge of nanotechnology-based methods used in monitoring, protecting and remediation of environment.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Nanoparticles, nanomaterials and nanotechnology (3). The use of nanotechnology in environmental protection (3+3). Potential impacts of nanotechnology on the environment (3+3). Toxicology and biological effects of nanomaterials (3+3). Geochemistry of nanoparticles in air and water (3). Metrology nanomaterials (3). The sensors based on nanotechnology for monitoring chemical and biological parameters of environment (3+3). Production of ”green” energy based on nanotechnology (3+1). Catalysts (3). Treatment of water pollution and emissions (3+2).
Number of hours of lectures and seminars (L + S) are indicated in brackets.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted by midterm tests and seminar essays (analysis of selected examples).
In the final exam perods the final exam shall be taken after the presentation of seminar essays.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Lučić Lavčević, Nanostrukture , 2014. interna skripta

0

Osobna web stranica

Introduction to nanoscale science and technology, M. Di Ventra et al. (Eds.), Springer-Verlag, 2004;

1

Chemical and biological sensors, A. Mulchandan (Ed.), Oxford University Press, 2000.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Nanostructured catalysts, S.L. Scott (Ed.), Springer-Verlag, 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Energy and Development
NAME OF THE COURSE Energy and Development

Code

KTC217

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

ScD Mirko Marušić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Obtaining basic theoretical knowledge in the field of energetics. Introduction to basic information needed for active participation in classes in the field of termotechnics and energetics.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Describing the ways of energy conversion and comparing conventional energy sources.
- Describing the ways in which electricity can be produced.
- Describing the ways in which nuclear energy can be used and analyizing the operation of a nuclear power plant.
- Defining and describing the types of renewable energy sources.
- Describing the basic characteristics of water energy usage.
- Describing the ways in energy of the sun can be used and its basic characteristics.
- Describing the basic characteristics of the usage of wind energy.
- Describing the ways in which geotermal energy and biomass energy can be used, as well as their basic characteristics.
- Defining and describing the basic elements of energetic planning and energetic policy.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

- 1st week: Energy: definition and units, energy inflow the on Earth, Earth′s energy balance - energy crises, enegy resources, energy supplays, energy conversion and heat.
- 2nd week: Consumption of energy; historical development, regional consumption, influence on the life quality, consumption and saving of energy in basic sectors (industry, traffic, households), estimation of global energetics development.
- 3rd week: Energy of fossil fuels: coal.
- 4th week: Energy of fossil fuels: oil.
- 5th week: Energy of fossil fuels: natural gas. Partial assessment (1st preliminary test)
- 6th week: Thermal power plant, influence on environmente (greenhouse effects, acid rains, particulates, heat contamination), exploitation of waste heat, magnetohydrodynamic generators.
- 7th week: Hydroenergy: basic characteristics of water flow, hydro-electric power plants.
- 8th week: Nuclear energy: fission.
- 9th week: Nuclear reactors.
- 10th week: Nuclear fuels. Partial assessment (2nd preliminary test)
- 11th week: Nuclear fusion, projects of fusion devices.
- 12th week: Influence of nuclear energy on mankind and environmente.
- 13th week: Solar energy: conversion in heat energy (active and passive solar systems, solar furnaces, solar-electric power plants), photovoltaic conversion (photovoltaicells and photovoltaic systems), application of nanotechnology, bioconversion (cultivation and energetical exploitation of biomass).
- 14th week: Wind energy: basic characteristics, wind turbines, wind-electric power plants.
- 15th week: Energy of oceans and seas: energy of high and low tide, energy of waves, heat energy. Geothermal energy: hydrogeothermal and petrogeothermal energy supplays, influence on environmente. Storage of energy. Partial assessment (3nd preliminary test).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

In course of the semester, the entire exam can be passes by taking and passing the three preliminary tests consisting of theoretical questions.
In the examination periods oral exam is taken.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Internal script

0

Web portal KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Krpan-Lisica, Osnove energetike, Hinus, Zagreb, 2001.
C.J. Cleveland, Editor, Encyclopedia of Energy, Vol.1-6, Elsevier, San Diego 2004.
H. Požar, Osnove energetike 1,2, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.
V. Knapp, Novi izvori energije 1, Školska knjiga, Zagareb, 1993.
P. Kulišić, Novi izvori energije 2, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Advanced water treatment engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Advanced water treatment engineering

Code

KTC218

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Knowledge of advanced water treatment processes for high standards of effluent quality and natural purification processes in rural areas.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Passed a subject dealt with classical processes of water treatment (Wastewater treatment and / or Industry and Environment)

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- the necessity of the development and application of advanced water treatment processes, with special emphasis on the protection of vulnerable karst aquifer
- types of process, application and advantages of the application of advanced process compared to conventional treatment processes
- analysis of the ecological footprint water treatment facilities
- advanced oxidation technologies in water treatment
- chemical reactions and reaction mechanisms of hydroxyl radicals
- mechanism, kinetics and the performance of the adsorption and ion exchange in water treatment
- biological processes of removing nitrogen and phosphorus, technological performances, removal efficiency
- the application of MBR technology in water treatment and comparison of membrane bioreactor technology with other technologies for biological treatment of wastewater

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction lecture: Preserving the quality of natural water. Recycling and reuse of water.
2nd week: Advanced processes of water treatment. Overview of processing methods. Analysis of the ecological footprint of water treatment facilities. Seminar.
3rd week: Advanced Oxidation Processes. Theoretical basis. The formation of hydroxyl radicals and their role.
4th week: Reaction mechanisms and kinetics of production of reactive hydroxyl radicals in systems: H2O2 / UV, Fe3+ / UV, Fe3+ / H2O2 / UV, Fe2+ / H2O2, Fe3+ / H2O2.
5th week: The factors influencing on the process of oxidation. Practical application of advanced oxidation processes. The possibilities and limitations. Seminar.
6th week: The use of adsorption to remove residual organic compounds. The factors influencing on the adsorption. Batch and column performance. Advantages and disadvantages.
7th week: Mathematical models of the adsorption column. Models based on mass transfer. Seminar.
8th week: The biological nitrogen removal processes. Nitrification and denitrification. Technological process implementation. Seminar.
9th week: Biological phosphorus removal processes. Technological performance. The efficiency of phosphorus removal. Seminar.
10th week: Combined biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus. Designing process. Seminar.
11th week: Removal of dissolved inorganic substances by ion exchange. The mechanism and kinetics of the process.
12th week: Designing of cation and anion exchanger. Seminar.
13th week: The advanced membrane processes for water treatment. Methods review. Influential factors. Membrane bioreactor-MBR technology. Performance. Efficiency. Seminar.
14th week: The natural processes of water treatment. Mechanism. Performance. Advantages and disadvantages compared to conventional water treatment processes. Seminar.
15th week: An integrated approach to solving the problem of water treatment. Case study. Seminar.
Exercises: The efficiency of removal of organic matter by using Fe2+ / H2O2 process. Removal of colorants by adsorption on activated carbon. Determination of the operating capacity of activated carbon. Removal of dissolved inorganic ion by ion exchange in the column. Calculation of characteristic parameters of the breakthrough curve. Analysis of biodegradation of waste water. The kinetics of biological degradation of organic substances with high content of nitrogen. The efficiency of plant equipment.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars, laboratory exercises 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Every laboratory exercises include oral exam before exercise and writing of final report.
The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 70% -80% - good, 80% -90% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Matsuo, K. Hanaki, S. Takizawa, H. Satoh (eds.), Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment Technology, Elsevier, London-Amsterdam, 2001.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

R.D. Noble, P.A. Terry, Principles of Chemical Separations with Environmental Applications, Cambridge University press, 2004

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

M. Henze, M., van Loosdrecht, M.C.M., Ekama, G., Brdjanovic, D. Biological Wastewater treatment, IWA Publishing, 2008, London, UK

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

R.W. Baker, Membrane technology and application, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Hoboken (USA), 2004.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

David W. Hendricks, Water Treatment Unit Processes, Physical and Chemical, CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton, 2006.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

D. Malus, D. Vouk, Priručnik za učinkovitu primjenu biljnih uređaja za pročišćavanje sanitarnih otpadnih voda, Sveučilište u zagrebu, Građevinski fakultet, 2012.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

N. Koprivanac, H. Kušić, Hazardous organic pollutants in colored wastewater, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York, 2009.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Judd, S., The MBR book, Elsevier Ltd., Oxford, UK, 2006.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

N. P. Cherrmisinoff, Handbook of water and wastewater treatment technology, Butterwort-Heinemann, Boston, 2002.
J. M. Coulson, J.F. Richardson, Chemical engineering, 5th edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford, 2002.
D. Mara, Domestic wastewater treatment in developing country, Earthscan, London, UK, 2004.
M. von Sperling, Basic principle of wastewater treatment, IWA Publishing, London, 2007.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Solid Waste Recycling
NAME OF THE COURSE Solid Waste Recycling

Code

KTC219

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The course will provide multidisciplinary knowledge regarding all aspects of municipal and industrial solid waste recycling technology, such as project management, energy efficiency and economy, quality assurance, environmental protection, safety and health, and legal aspects and their effect on technological choices.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- identify key sources, typical quantities generated, composition, and properties of solid waste;
- describe and explain recovery and recycling techniques and their impacts;
- identify and quantitatively assess recycling technologies according to the characteristics of the materials to be recovered;
- analyse quantitative and qualitative problems associated with operation of recycling techniques;
- estimate solid waste recycling costs.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Definition of solid waste (physical, chemical and biological characteristics of solid wastes). Technological, economic, environmental and social aspects of recycling.
2nd week: Recyclability criteria. Ecodesign.
3rd week: Characterisation of waste streams, recycling and solid waste characterisation.
4th week: Recycling of complex multimaterial consumer goods (cars, electronics, etc.).
5th week: Recycling Technologies: paper.
6th week: Recycling Technologies: glass.
7th week: First test.
8th week: Recycling Technologies: ferrous metals.
9th week: Recycling Technologies: non-ferrous metals.
10th week: Recycling Technologies: composite materials.
11th week: Recycling Technologies: bio-waste.
12th week: Recycling Technologies: textiles and carpets.
13th week: The economics of recycling.
14th week: Trends in solid waste recycling: issues, challenges and opportunities.
15th week: Second test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the
semester. Examination passing rate is 55%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of two parts: written and oral. Written part will constitute 40% and oral part will constitute 60% of the final score.
Grades with numerical equivalents: - 55% insufficient – fail (1); 55%-65% - sufficient (2); 66% -77% - good (3); 78% -89% very good (4); 90% -100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

E. Worrell, M. A. Reuter, Handbook of Recycling: State-of-the-art for Practitioners, Analysts, and Scientists, Elsevier Inc., United Stated of America, 2014.

1

H. Lund, McGraw-Hill Recycling Handbook, 2nd Edition Hardcover, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., United Stated of America, 2001.

1

M. Kljajin, M. Opalić, A. Pintarić: Recikliranje električnih i elektroničkih proizvoda, Sveučilište J. J. Strossmayer u Osijeku i Sveučilište u Zagrebu, 2006.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. Pintarić, T. Filetin: Analiza recikličnosti proizvoda, Zbornik III. međ. simpozija
”Gospodarenje otpadom Zagreb 94”, Zagreb, 1994, str. 59-68.
- članci iz tematskih znanstvenih i stručnih časopisa iz knjižnice ili javno dostupnih baza na Internetu.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Product Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)
NAME OF THE COURSE Product Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)

Code

KTC220

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

4.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Provide a comprehensive understanding of the life cycle assessment (LCA) as a standardized ecological tool to compare different products and processes with regard to their impact on the environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam,the student is expected to be able to:
- understand and use the concepts of sustainable development and environmental policy
- become familiar with the laws and regulations related to the environmental protection
- use standardized approach to product life cycle assessment
- prepare and present a simple project concerning the environment protection
- apply computer applications in the field of LCA method
- develop critical thinking skills in the evaluation of the results of LCA methods.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: The environment: environmental systems, sources of pollution, anthropogenic pollution, the consequences of environmental pollution (ecological boomerang).
2nd week: Sustainable development and environmental policy.
3rd week: The legal system of environmental protection in the world and Croatia.
4th week: Environmental Management: concept and mission. Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001.
5th week: The life cycle approach: Life Cycle Thinking (LCT), Life Cycle Initiative (LCI), Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Life Cycle Management ( LCM).
6th week: Discussion on the previous subjects. Conclusions.
7th week: Standardization of the life cycle assessment: ISO 14040 and ISO 14044.
8th week: The structure of LCA method (Part 1).
9th week: The structure of LCA method (Part 2).
10th week: Computer programs (softwares) for the LCA analysis - LCA analysis on selected examples (Part 1)
11th week: Computer programs (softwares) for the LCA analysis - LCA analysis on selected examples (Part 2).
12th week: The advantages and disadvantages of the LCA approach. Selected examples.
13th week: Application areas of the LCA: design for the environment, improvement of products (technology), strategic planning, marketing, lowering costs.
14th week: Knowledge management in the environmental protection - the mission of the educational system in the environmental protection.
15th week: The final lecture. Discussion on previous subjects. Conclusions.
SEMINAR:
The seminar will be used for further analysis and discussion following lectures. Students will also receive individual and group tasks (projects) that will solve and present at the seminar.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures and seminars in the amount of 80% of the total hourly rate. Individual and group assignments (projects) and their presentation. Active participation during lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.9

Oral exam

0.7

Written exam

0.8

Project

0.6

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquia during the semester. The pass threshold for each colloquium is 60%. Each colloquium participates with 45% in a final grade. Attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 40% and oral exam for 50%.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. The pass threshold is 60%, while written and oral exam account for 50% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (60-69%), good (70-79%), very good (80-89%), excellent (90-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Guinee, Handbook on Life Cycle Assessment: Operational Guide to ISO Standards, Kluwer Academic Publishers, New York, 2002.

0

pdf

M. Črnjak, K. Črnjar, Menadžment održivog razvoja, AKD, Zagreb, 2009.

0

pdf

H. Wenzel, M. Hauschild, L. Alting, Environmental Assessment of Products, Volume ½, Kluwer Academic Publishers, New York, 2002.

0

pdf

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Scientific and technical papers of the subject area.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Study on the Environmental Impact
NAME OF THE COURSE Study on the Environmental Impact

Code

KTC221

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

30

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to get knowledge about analysis of environmental impact of any activity in the environment. They will able to analyse location of the impact, environmental sensitivity, to create base of all discharges and evaluate their impacts.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the learning outcomes provide knowledge about:
- Activities which needs elaborate of environmental impact
- Ability to identify impacts
- Methods development for evaluation and pondering of environmental impacts
- Elaborate performance.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Importance of Environmental impact elaborate as document according to directive 97/11/EC.
2nd week: Types of activities which needs evaluation of environmental impact
3rd week: definition of the main steps and criteria for evaluation
4th week: Screening and scoping of the project idea.
5th week: Prediction of specific impacts, evaluation of importance.
6th week: Techniques of collecting data and analysis of particular impact
7th week: Analysis of location of the project, geological and hydrographical situation related to climatic conditions
8th week: Flora and fauna analysis, distance from buildings.
10th week: Interaction of the project with live organisms, application of the models..
11th week: Definition of the mail elements for elaborate as document.
12th week: Suggestion of methods of protection according to positive practice examples.
13th week: Presentation of the elaborate, resting of modelled impacts. Evaluation of the costs of the project.
14th week: Methods of decreasing of the negative impacts and disabling of extreme negative impacts.
15th week: Interdisciplinary approach to the environmental evaluation, publication of results.
SEMINARS:
1st week: Law regulative in area of environmental protection.
2nd week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the Centre for the solid waste treatment – part 1.
3rd week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the Centre for the solid waste treatment – part 2.
4th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the Centre for the solid waste treatment – part 3.
5th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the Marine with tourist accommodation – part 1.
6th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the Marine with tourist accommodation – part 2.
7th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the Marine with tourist accommodation – part 3.
8th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the solid waste incineration – part 1.
9th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the solid waste incineration – part 2.
10th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the solid waste incineration – part 3.
11th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the fish aquaculture growing plant – part 1.
12th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the fish aquaculture growing plant – part 2.
13th week: Analysis of the Study of environmental impact of the fish aquaculture growing plant – part 3.
14th week: Oral presentations of the students.
15th week: Oral presentations of the students.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Final written exam or two partial exams (50% of the total evaluation).
A written essay (25% of the total evaluation).
Oral presentation of written seminar paper (20% of the total evaluation) and poster presentation based on a written seminar paper (5% of the total evaluation). Passing threshold is 60%. Grades: successful (60% – 69%), good (70% – 79%), very good (80% – 89%), excellent (90% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Podloga za predavanja u obliku ppt prezentacije

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Studija o utjecaju na okoliš za zahvat-izgradnja pomorskih i kopnenih objekata na ,prostoru "Giričić"-Kaštel Gomilica , Hidroelektra-projekt d.o.o., Zagreb, 2004.

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Studija o utjecaju na okoliš centra za gospodarenje otpadom Dubrovačko-neretvanske županije, IPZ Uniprojekt, Zagreb, 2010.

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

A. Gilpin, Environmental Impact Assessment; Cutting Edge for the 21st Century, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1995.

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Directive 97/11/EC

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Sanitary Landfill Disposals
NAME OF THE COURSE Sanitary Landfill Disposals

Code

KTC222

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

15

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to introduce students on planning, projecting, use and closing procedures of the landfills. Should know elements of the landfill, producing of the leachate and gases as well as their impact on the environment related to Croatian legislative.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the learning outcomes provide knowledge about:
- Importance of regular landfill organization
- Building new centre for waste management
- Establishment of the recycling yards
- Introducing into bioreactor landfills
- Planning and guidelines for projecting of new landfills.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introductory lecture. Solid waste classification, illegal landfills, Croatian regulations regarding unregularly disposed waste.
2nd week: Evaluation of the situation on improper disposal areas, compressively stolid waste.
3rd week: Sampling of the solid, liquid and gaseous samples on the landfill for characterisation of the waste. Comparison with legal disposal, examples of good practice.
4th week: Analysis of produced gasses for evaluation of landfill age, phases of the degradation.
5th week: Leachate composition, evaluation of the age depending of leachate characteristics. Methods and apparatus for leachate treatment. Stripping, physic-chemical treatment.
6th week: Description of the recommended treatment technologies, in situ and ex situ procedure.
7th week: Projecting of the new landfill, basement construction elements.
8th week: leachate drainage systems, methods for collecting and use of gaseous.
9th week: Underground natural waters protection, inhibition of infiltration.
10th week: infrastructure of the landfill, recycling yard organization and management.
11th week: Mechanical and biological treatment (MBT) combined with bioreactor landfill.
12th week: Storm water infiltration in disposed waste. Evaluation models, climatic impacts.
13th week: Covering of the disposed waste to prevent loosing of the material.
14th week: Closing and monitoring procedures of the landfill.
15th week: Cost-benefit analysis according to Croatian laws.
SEMINAR:
1st week: Guidelines for local plan for waste management – part 1.
2nd week: Guidelines for local plan for waste management – part 2.
3rd week: Analysis of landfill gasses, example for calculation
4th week: Establishment of the degradation model
5th week: Analysis of the leachate composition results.
6th week: Calculations for re-use of the old waste on the illegal landfill
7th week: Material balance for known solid waste.
8th week: Analysis of the Study on the environmental impact for landfill “Borovik” on the island Šolta, part 1.
9th week: Analysis of the Study on the environmental impact for landfill “Borovik” on the island Šolta, part 2.
10th week: Analysis of the Study on the environmental impact for landfill “Borovik” on the island Šolta, part 3.
11th week: Analysis of the project for landfill Kutina, part 1.
12th week: Analysis of the project for landfill Kutina, part 2.
13th week: Analysis of the project for landfill Kutina, part 3.
14th week: Croatian legislative in waste management.
15th week: EU directives related to waste management.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Final written exam or two partial exams (80% of the total evaluation).
A written essay (20% of the total evaluation).
Passing threshold is 60%. Grades: successful (60% – 69%), good (70% – 79%), very good (80% – 89%), excellent (90% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Podloga za predavanja u obliku ppt prezentacije

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Priručnik za statističke podatke o otpadu, Agencija za zaštitu okoliša, Zagreb, 2014.

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Plan gospodarenja otpadom u RH 2007.-2015. NN 85/2007.; 126/2010.; 31/2011.

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

R Cossu, H van der Sloot Sustainable Landfilling, CISA Publisher 2013.

1

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Qian, X., Koerner, R.M., Gray, D.H.: Geotechnical Aspects of Landfill Design and Construction, Prentice Hall, Inc., 2002.

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Proceedings of 10th International Waste Management and Landlill Symposium, Cagliari, Sardinia, 2005.

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Strategija gospodarenja otpadom Republike Hrvatske, NN 130/2005.

1

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Jahić, M.: Sanitarne deponije, Univerzitet u Bihaću, Tehnički fakultet, Bihać, 2006.

0

Dostupno kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Okvirna direktiva o otpadu 2006/12/EC,
Direktiva o odlagalištima 1999/31/EC,
Direktiva o opasnom otpadu 91/689/EEC s dodacima 94/31/EC, 166/2006,
Direktiva o mulju s uređaja za pročišćavanje otpadnih voda 86/278/EEC,
Direktiva o spaljivanju otpada 2000/76/EC,
Direktiva o ambalaži i amabalažnom otpadu 94/62/EC s dodacima 2005/20/EC, 2004/12/EC, 1882/2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Chemical Ecology
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemical Ecology

Code

KTC223

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Understanding of the basic groups of toxic pollutants, their way of dospjevanja into the environment, the transmission of the environment, their deposit and adversely affected.
Risk assessment and the ability to prevent harmful effects during working with chemicals.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1.definition of basic concepts and history of chemical ecology
2.the origin of the chemical constituents in the ecosystem
3.classification and labelling of hazardous chemicals
4.transport mechanisms in the environment
5.sources of pollution as a result of human activity
6.interactive impact of pollutants
7.how to process the obtained knowledge of the toxicological and ecotoxicological information

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction. Definition of basic concepts in ecology
Lecture 2: Identification of chemical components in the ecosystems, natural resources.
Lecture 3: Risk assessment of pollutants
Lecture 4: The main disturbances in ecosystems caused by human activities
Lecture 5: Overview of the sources of pollution as a result of human activity
Lecture 6:Distribution of pollutants. Pesticides, metals, fertilizers, mechanisms of toxicity
Lecture 7: The first midterm test
Lecture 8: Physical and chemical properties
Lecture 9:.The transport mechanisms in soil, water and air
Lecture 10: Bioaccumulation and bioconcentration in organisms and ecosystems
Lecture 11:The excretion of toxic substances from the organism
Lecture 12:Mitigation of biodegradation
Lecture 13: Sources and effects of contamination. Determination of risk from an environmental point of view
Lecture 14: The classification and labeling of hazardous chemicals. Legislation and toxicological tests in Croatia and the EU.
Lecture 15: The second midterm test
Lab course: Methods of preparation materials. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the most important pollutants. Ecotoxicity tests. Determination of metal toxicity biomonitoring. Determination of the harmfulness of fluoride ion in the environmental community in an aqueous medium. Analysis of the results obtained toxicity tests, statistical methods.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.7

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed. The student has the right to exercise fail one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

C.H.Walker,S.P.Hopkin, R.M. Sibly, D.B. Peakall. Principles of Ekotoxicology, Taylor&Francis,London, 2006.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

B.L. Carson, H.V.Ellis III, J.L.McCann. Toxicology and biological monitoring of metals in humans, Lewis Publishers, INC.Michigan, 1987.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

F. Plavšić, I. Žuntar. Uvod u analitičku toksikologiju, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 2006.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

V.Srebočan. Veterinarska toksikologija, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2009. L. Robinson, I. Thorn. Toxicology and Ecotoxicology in chemical safety assessment, Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2005.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V.Srebočan. Veterinarska toksikologija, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2009.
L. Robinson, I. Thorn. Toxicology and Ecotoxicology in chemical safety assessment, Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Diploma Thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Diploma Thesis

Code

KTCODR

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

18.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Professional Practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Professional Practice

Code

KTCOSP

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

2.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

3. STUDY PERFORMANCE CONDITIONS

3.1. Places of the study performance

Buildings of the constituent part (name existing, under construction and planned buildings)

Identification of building

Zgrada tri fakulteta

Location of building

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Year of completion

2015

Total square area in m2

29500

Identification of building

Zgrada u Kaštel Sućurcu

Location of building

Kaštel Sućurac

Year of completion

1961

Total square area in m2

3000

3.2. List of teachers and associate teachers

 

Course Teachers and associate teachers

Advanced water treatment engineering

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Applied Mathematics

Nives Baranović

Biochemistry

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo

Catalysis in Enviromental Protection

Prof Branka Andričić
Prof Matko Erceg

Chemical Ecology

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Chemical Reactors

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Coatings

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Corrosion and Degradation of Building Materials

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Corrosion and Materials Protection

Prof Maja Kliškić

Corrosion Inhibitors

Prof Senka Gudić

Diploma Thesis

 

Diploma Thesis

 

Direct Energy Conversion

Prof Senka Gudić

Ecotoxicology

Assoc Prof Jasna Maršić Lučić

Electrochemical Engineering

Prof Maja Kliškić

Electrochemical Methods and Their Application

Prof Senka Gudić

Electrochemical Technologies in Environmental Protection

Prof Senka Gudić

Electrodeposition Proceses

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Energy and Development

ScD Mirko Marušić

Environmental Process Engineering

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić
ScD Antonija Čelan

Environmental Remediation Technologies

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović
Prof Marina Trgo

Glass and Ceramics

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Inorganic Processes in Heterogeneous Systems

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Asst Prof Lea Kukoč Modun
ScD Maja Biočić
Asst Prof Franko Burčul

Introduction to Scientific Research

Prof Marina Trgo
Asst Prof Marin Ugrina

Marine and Submarine Mineral Raw Materials

Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Measurment and Automatic Process Control

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić
ScD Antonija Čelan

Mechanical and Thermal Operations

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić
ScD Antonija Čelan
Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Methods for Characterization of Materials

Asst Prof Sanja Perinović Jozić
Prof Dražan Jozić

Microbiology of Polluted Waters

Prof Nada Krstulović

Nanotechnology and the Environment

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Naturally Occuring Polymeric Materials

Prof Branka Andričić

New Inorganic Materials

Prof Pero Dabić
Asst Prof Damir Barbir

Non-metallic Composites

Prof Pero Dabić

Polymer Blends and Composites

Prof Branka Andričić

Polymer Processing

Prof Matko Erceg

Polymerization Processes

Prof Matko Erceg

Polymers Characterization

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Process Automatic Control

Prof Jadranka Marasović
Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Process Design

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Product Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)

Prof Matko Erceg

Professional Practice

 

Professional Practice

 

Recycling of Plastics

Prof Matko Erceg

Sanitary Landfill Disposals

Prof Marina Trgo

Soil Chemistry

Asst Prof Maša Buljac
Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Solid Waste Recycling

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko

Solid Waste Recycling

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko
Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Structure and Properties of Inorganic Non-metallic Materials

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Structure and Properties of Polymers

Prof Matko Erceg

Study on the Environmental Impact

Prof Marina Trgo

Surface Protection Technology

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Sustainable Technologies and Development

Prof Jelica Zelić
Asst Prof Mario Nikola Mužek

Technology of Building Materials

Prof Dražan Jozić

Thermodinamics of Real Processes

Prof Vanja Martinac
ScD Jelena Jakić
Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Wastewater Engineering

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović
Asst Prof Ivona Nuić

 

3.4. Optimal number of students

The optimal number of students in the graduate study of Chemical Technology in terms of space, equipment and number of full-time teachers is 60 and represents the proposed admission quota.

3.5. Estimate of costs per student

Average annual tuition fee per student amount about 31,500.00 kunas.

3.6. Plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance

In keeping with the European standards and guidelines for internal quality assurance in higher education institutions (according to “Standards and Guidelines of Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area”) on the basis of which the University of Zagreb defines procedures for quality assurance, the proposer of the study programme is obliged to draw up a plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance.

Documentation on which the quality assurance system of the constituent part of the University is based:

- Regulations on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if existing)
- Handbook on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if it exists)

Description of procedures for evaluation of the quality of study programme implementation

  • Fore each procedure the method needs to be described (most often questionnaires for students or teachers, and self-evaluation questionnaire), name the body conducting evaluation (constituent part, university office), method of processing results and making information available, and timeframe for carrying out evaluation
  • If procedure is described in an attached document, name the document and the article.

Evaluation of the work of teachers and part-time teachers

The process of student evaluation of the teaching quality is conducted by the Quality Enhancement Centre (at the level of the University) and the Quality Enhancement Committees (at the level of constituents). The procedure consists of informing students and teachers, student survey questionnaire, the processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results, the adoption of measures to improve quality. The procedure is described in detail in the Regulations on the procedure for student evaluation of teaching at the University of Split. The processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results are under jurisdiction of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Summary results for the each constituent are submitted to the Dean and the leader of the Quality Enhancement Committee.

Monitoring of grading and harmonization of grading with anticipated learning outcomes

Procedures, rules and criteria for grading of students include: method for taking the exams, requirements for taking the exams, method of evaluation through colloquia, seminars, active participation in classes, exams and other obligations, conditions for signature, a list of references for exam preparation, and data about the teacher, assistant, etc. Informations about procedures, rules and criteria for grading students can found on the website of the Faculty and at the introductory lectures.

Evaluation of availability of resources (spatial, human, IT) in the process of learning and instruction

The Faculty provides adequate and appropriate educational resources for the study program and support for teaching and non-teaching activities of students, which are consistent with the specific programs and student needs and readily accessible to students (equipped classrooms, library, computer classrooms, and support for students with disabilities.

Availability and evaluation of student support (mentorship, tutorship, advising)

Student evaluation of the teaching quality, student survey questionnaire.

Monitoring of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole

Analysis of student success at the study is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre of the University of Split. The analysis is carried annually by survey questionnaire at the beginning of the academic year for the previous academic year. The results of the analysis and measures to improve student success are presented to the Senate of the University of Split by leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Likewise, ISVU system allows the student service and ISVU coordinator to keep track of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole.

Student satisfaction with the programme as a whole

Quality Improvement Centre of the University of Split has defined the procedure for conducting a survey on the evaluation of the overall study. The student survey questionnaire for evaluation of the study is conducted by the platform Evasys but after the student has passed the final exam. The aim of the survey is to hear the opinion of students on various aspects of the study which they have completed and to determine flaws in order to increase the quality of the content and implementation of the study. Data is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre and results are submitted to the Head of Department and to leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre.

Procedures for obtaining feedback from external parties (alums, employers, labour market and other relevant organizations)

Former students are contacted in order to express their assessment of the qualifications for the professional requirements. Selected employers can be contacted as well in order to assess their satisfaction with students which have been studing at this the study program. Regular exchange of information at conferences organized by the ALUMNI of the Faculty (AMACTFS).

Evaluation of student practical education (where this applies)

Evaluation of student training is conducted orally by the course teacher. At the same time the student must submit the log and seminar about selected topic of professional practice.

Other evaluation procedures carried out by the proposer

Formal and informal consultation with colleagues in the profession at the Faculty level and beyond.

Description of procedures for informing external parties on the study programme (students, employers, alums)

Results are available on the official web site of the Faculty (https://www.ktf.unist.hr) Brochure (revised annually) The University review. Universitas – supplement of the Slobodna Dalmacija about the University of Split. The participation of staff and students ot the Faculty at the Science Festival and similar events.