Non-metallic Composites

NAME OF THE COURSE Non-metallic Composites

Code

KTB210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

P S V T

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Awareness of the importance of non-metallic composite with programmed properties in contemporary society.
- Knowledge of the obtaining technology of such material.
- Independent preparation and evaluation of the properties of these materials.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student will know about:
- The types of non-metallic composite materials
- Procedures for the preparation of non-metallic composite materials
- The composition, structure and properties of non-metallic composite materials
- The importance of non-metallic composites in modern society

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introductory lecture
Week 2: Composite non-metallic materials. Types and properties.
Week 3: Hydraulic mineral binders and composites.
Week 4: Mineral replacement supplements in obtaining of cement composites.
Week 5: Additives for cement composites with programmed properties.
Week 6: Concrete. Concrete based on cement binder.
Week 7: A fresh and hardened concrete.
Week 8: Assessment (first colloquium);
Week 9: Lightweight concretes.
Week 10: Ceramic and Bioceramic composites and materials.
Week 11: Selective inorganic membranes.
Week 12: Stacked metallic catalysts.
Week 13: Carbon composite materials. Other non-metallic composite materials.
Week 14: Final comments, discussion, conclusions. Assessment (second colloquium);
Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1: Preparation of cement composites with replacement supplements.
Exercise 2 Determination of physico-chemical properties of cement composites.
Exercise 3 Determination of the heat of hydration of cement composites.
Exercise 4 Composite materials based on red mud.
Exercise 5 Analysis of non-metallic composites by using EDXRF technique.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at lectures in the 80% amount, and laboratory exercises in 100% of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

0.0

Practical training

0.0

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

0.3

Essay

0.0

Seminar essay

0.0

 

 

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.0

 

 

Written exam

0.0

Project

0.0

 

 

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be laid across two exams during the semester. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 35%. Laboratory exercises participate in the evaluation of 20%. The presence of lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed one colloquium, it is recognized as part of the exam (35% score). The remaining part is laid in the regular examination periods. Written examination in this case has a share of 70%, while laboratory exercises have a share of 20%.
Students who did not pass a single comprehensive exam midterm examination in the regular examination periods. Pass rate threshold is 60%. Laboratory work involved in assessing the share of 20%.
Rating: sufficient (60-70%), good (71-80%), very good (81-90%), excellent (91-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. K. Mazumdar, Composites Manufacturing, Material Product, and Process Engineering, CRC Press, New York, 2002.

1

L. W. D. Callister, Materials Science and Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1994.

1

L. Hench, J. K. West, Chemical Processing of Advanced Materials, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1992.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. N. Ghosh, Cement and Concrete Science Technology, Vol. 1., Part I, ABI Books Private Limited, New Delhi, 1991.; Application of Admixtures in Concrete, Ed. A. M. Paillere, E & FN SPON, London, 1995.; P. Bartos, Fresh Concrete, Properties and Test, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1992.; A. Đureković, Cement, cementni kompozit i dodaci za beton, IGH i Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Keeping records of class attendance
- Annual Performance analysis Examination
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)