Process Automatic Control

NAME OF THE COURSE Process Automatic Control

Code

KTB104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Jadranka Marasović

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Type of instruction (number of hours)

P S V T

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Enable students to understand the importance of automated systems, to comprehend how danger can be potentially poorly designed control systems. Enable students to understand that the process automatic control is very difficult task and for its realization it is necessary to connect numerous different subsystems and the resulting creation is very complex system. But, for its proper work it was necessary to harmonize different subsystems characteristics introducing many compromises while trying to connect all of them.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing this course, students will be able to describe different automatic and controlled processes realizations. Students will be able to describe the problems of implementation such different realizations in real life situations. They will be able to explain with arguments why some ides of control theory can be or cannot be implemented different real life tasks.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

System theory and control theory. Mathematical modeling. Examples of mathematical models of physical systems. Laplace transformation, transfer function, transient part of time domain analysis, frequency domain analysis. Analysis of first and second order processes. Digital computer as process controller. Behavior of feedback loop controlled systems. First and second order processes in control loop. Control loop objectives. Stability analysis. Routh criterion. Nyquist criterion. Control loop synthesis. Nonlinear systems and nonlinear control loop analysis. Design and characteristics of controllers. Regulation valve. Self-regulating control loop systems. Examples of modern control theory: expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy logic. Examples of process control ( thermal systems, chemical reactor systems, drying systems, distillation).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

0.0

Practical training

0.0

Experimental work

0.0

Report

0.0

Samostalni zadaci

1.5

Essay

0.0

Seminar essay

0.0

2.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

 

 

Written exam

0.5

Project

0.0

 

 

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, there will be two mid-term exams. At the end of the semester, students will take a written exam. In order to get a positive grade from this course, students need to acquire minimum 50% of the total score on each of the mid-term exams or at the final exam.
The final grade is determined as follows:
Percentage Grade
50% to 61% sufficient (2)
62% to 74% good (3)
75% to 87% very good (4)
88% to 100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Božičević, Temelji automatike 1, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

0

J, Božičević, Automatsko vođenje procesa, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb, 1971.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D.E. Seborg, T.F. Edgar, D.A. Mallichamp, Process Dynamics and Control, J. Wiley, New York, 1989.
W.J. Palm, Control Systems Engineering, J. Wiley, New York, 1994.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

During the semester, there will be two mid-term exams. At the end of the semester, students will take a written exam. Each mid-term exam and the final exam will consist of several short questions intended to evaluate the students’ understanding of the theory and their ability to describe the fundamental concepts, as well as to test students’ ability to apply the theory onto simple, practical examples.
Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)