UNIST
U N I V E R S I T Y   O F   S P L I T

FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

 

 

DETAILED PROPOSAL OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Undergraduate professional studij

Materials Protection and Recycling

 

 

 
GENERAL INFORMATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

Name of higher education institution

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Address

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Phone

021/ 329-420

Fax

021/ 329-461

E-mail

dekanat@ktf-split.hr

Internet address

https://www.ktf.unist.hr/

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Name of the study programme

Materials Protection and Recycling

Provider of the study programme

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Other participants

Type of study programme

Level of study programm

Academic/vocational title earned at completion of study

Vocational Bachelor of Chemical Engineering

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Reasons for starting the study programme

The development of technical materials, starting from metals and ceramics and progressing to polymers, composite and hybrid materials, forms the basis for the development of the economy, and serves as a prerequisite for introduction of new technologies. Due to increase in demand and extension of application areas, properties of materials are continually improved and modified. Consequently, the value of the materials increases, as well as the value of products manufactured from these materials.
However, as early as in the production stage, and especially during use, such products are exposed to various influences and consequential unintentional harmful changes that decrease their usability, shorten service life and have negative effects on the environment. Therefore, due to technical, economical and environmental significance, it is necessary to prevent, or at least mitigate degradation of materials. Different end-of-life products, constructions and similar are disposed of through recycling, in a manner that is both commercially and environmentally acceptable. Considering the limited nature of natural resources, through material, chemical or energetic recycling of waste, the process resource depletion is detained.
Increasing knowledge on materials contributes to the development of a number of industries, presents a strategic development goal in the Republic of Croatia and is consolidated with the priorities of developed European countries. Furthermore, processing of materials is nowadays taking place mostly in small and medium special-purpose production facilities conformed to environment protection standards. Economy as a whole is in demand of a profile of experts trained for lifelong learning, who are able to adopt and apply new technologies. In this respect, it is necessary to make necessary adjustment in available study programmes.
Through introduction of the professional study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology in Split, as an institution of higher education, aims to provide incentive to economical development and rational management of natural resources. The proposed study programme provides basic engineering knowledge in relation to materials, as well as underpinning knowledge on methods used in quality control and analysis of materials. In addition, knowledge is provided on basic causes of degradation (corrosion, decomposition) of materials and their protection during use. Following the completion of studies, professional bachelors possess skills necessary for involvement in activities related to solving issues of management of various waste materials, thus balancing the relationship between technological development and the environment.
The basic aim and purpose of the study programme is to develop professional skills fundamental for prompt inclusion in the working processes of various industries and small and medium enterprises. Following the completion of studies, employment options include chemical, metal processing, construction, shipbuilding and related industrial facilities, as well as areas of quality assurance and control of final products, management of organic and inorganic waste and other job positions that require expertise and knowledge gained during the course of this study programme.
Due to specific nature of the professional study programme, the only one of this type available in the Republic of Croatia, representation of students from all Croatian regions is anticipated.

1.2. Relationship with the local community (economy, entrepreneurship, civil society, etc.)

With proposal of this study programme, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology responds to the needs of the local community and the University of Split and offers a professional study programme in the field of technical sciences, with focus on protection and recycling of materials, in accordance with the Mediterranean outlook of south Croatia. It should be noted that the proposed study programme is the only one of this type in the country and is not in collision with similar study programmes, either at the University of Split, or in the Republic of Croatia.
The tradition of production and processing of metal, polymers and silicate materials in this region contributed to continuous and permanent education of experts in this area, provided by the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split. Furthermore, ever since it has been established, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology promoted cooperation with the production experts, exchanging theoretical and practical findings in solving specific issues related to production and use of materials. At present, when large industrial facilities are mostly closed, the education of qualified experts serves to support technological development through small and medium enterprises, with skilled experts in the field of chemical engineering performing management and professional tasks. In this manner, significant contribution can be made towards increasing competitiveness of Croatian economy in the region and Europe.

1.3. Compatibility with requirements of professional organizations

Professional study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials has been consolidated with the recommendations of the Croatian Society for Materials Protection, Society of Plastics and Rubber Engineers, as well as the Croatian Society of Chemical Engineers. The study programme pays regard to the specific features of the local community and the region as a whole, emphasises the importance of staff training in the fields of corrosion and degradation protection and protection control, as well as waste management, with a special focus on recycling of materials.
The Association of Former Students and Friends of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology (ALUMNI), active organization formed at the Faculty, also supports development of this study programme.

1.4. Name possible partners outside the higher education system that expressed interest in the study programme

Potential partners outside higher education system that have expressed interest in the professional study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials are business enterprises and public institutions in the Split-Dalmatia County and wider region: AD plastik, Brodosplit, Omial, Cemex, Kalun, Adriacink, Adriachem, Vodovod i kanalizacija (Water supply and sewage services), Ingatest and other county and municipal inspection services.
Some of the stated institutions are willing to serve as teaching centers and provide assistance using available equipment, i.e. have expressed will to cooperate by offering field work courses and practical courses in their facilities.

1.5. Financing

The planned source of financing for the professional study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials is the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports. The Faculty of Chemistry and Technology currently offers professional study programme in Chemical Technology with two major fields of study: Chemical Technology and Materials and Food Technology. The study programme is fully financed by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports.
Admissions quotas for those study programmes are 20 students (Chemical Technology and Materials) and 30 students (Food Technology). With introduction of the study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials, the existing professional study programme would be terminated; therefore the introduction of the new programme would not require any additional funds.

1.6. Comparability of the study programme with other accredited programmes in higher education institutions in the Republic of Croatia and EU countries

The professional study programme is to a certain extent comparable with the study programmes of distinguished European higher education institutions and institutions of higher education in neighbouring countries, such as:
- Politecnico di Torino, Italy (https://didattica.polito.it/pls/portal30/gap.a_mds.init),
- Politecnico di Milano, Italy ( (http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/index.php?id=197 &uid=314&k_cf=31&k_corso_la=347&aa=2011)
- University of Maribor, Slovenia (http://www.fkkt.uni-lj.si/en/?2286),
- University of Pardubice, Czech Republic (http://www.upce.cz/en/fcht/uechi.html),
- Politechnika Warszawska, Poland (http://www.ichip.pw.edu.pl/)

1.7. Openness of the study programme to student mobility (horizontal, vertical in the Republic of Croatia, and international)

The proposed professional study programme and its comparability with similar study programmes in the Republic of Croatia and EU countries enable student mobility, as well as faculty/staff mobility. Mobility shall be realized through attendance of individual courses from other professional study programmes, or attendance of entire semester at the related study programme and through completion of the final thesis. Students will have the option to enrol a specific number of courses in other fields of study. The study programmes included in the mobility scheme are offered by the constituents of the University of Split, other Croatian universities and colleges, i.e. specific higher education institutions in the European Union.

1.8. Compatibility of the study programme with the University mission and the strategy of the proposer, as well as with the strategy statement of the

Preparation of this study programme is in accordance with mission, vision and goals that are partly related to the University of Split Scientific Strategy 2009-2014, encouraging the university constituents to create their own internal development plans. The proposed study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials is the only one of this type at the University of Split and in the wider region.
The proposed professional study programme is in agreement with the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology Development Strategy 2008 – 2013, namely through: Strategic aim 1 – Reform of study programmes; Task 1.1. – Maintain and achieve effective ratio of different study programmes and modules (Indicator 1.1a – Number of accredited study programmes and modules); Task 1.2. – Consolidate the ratio of a number of students at professional and university study programmes with labour market demands (Indicator 1.2a – Number of accredited study programmes and modules).
In order to increase recognition of study programmes and adequately address the needs of a modern economy, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology undertook reforms of the existing study programmes, including the professional study programme in chemical technology. In accordance with the Bologna Process, since academic year 2005/06 the Faculty has offered courses in two major fields of study, Chemical Technology and Materials and Food Technology, as a part of the professional study programme in Chemical Technology. The duration of the study programme is 2.5 years (5 semesters; 150 ECTS points).
The field of study Chemical Technology and Materials needs to be consolidated with the demands of a modern economy and labour market, as well as the concept of higher education, by giving the option to continue studies at an advanced level.

1.9. Current experiences in equivalent or similar study programmes

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology has had a few decade experiences in professional study in chemical technology, such as processing and application of polymers and chemical technology and materials. More than 320 students have been completed those studies.

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

2.1. General information

Scientific/artistic area of the study programme

Technical sciences

Duration of the study programme

3 years (6 semesters)

The minimum number of ECTS required for completion of study

180

Enrolment requirements and admission procedure

Completed 4-year secondary school and secondary school leaving exam.

2.2. Learning outcomes of the study programme (name 15-30 learning outcomes)

Professional bachelor of chemical engineering would be able to:
- apply basic knowledge of mathematics, physics and chemistry
- work in laboratory on professional and safe manner
- analyze and present the results of measurements in laboratory or plant facility using PC
- explain basic physical and chemical properties of pure substances and methods of their determination
- explain basic mechanism of matter and energy transfer
- apply appropriate unit operation
- recognize types and construction of chemical reactors and the area of their application
- recognize the processes of materials production (polymers, metals, binders…)
- diminish negative impact on the environment during materials manufacture and processing
- prepare processing water and adequately manage the waste waters
- routinely work with equipment for identification and characterization of materials
- recognize the causes of materials corrosion and degradation
- apply different methods of materials protection against corrosion
- recognize types of waste and their impact on the environment
- suggest the appropriate process of waste materials management
- work independently on relatively simple procedures of materials reuse recycling
- apply the knowledge of chemical engineering on the environmental protection
- estimate the economical values of materials protection against corrosion and degradation
- estimate the economical values of materials recycling procedures.

2.3. Employment possibilities

- Brodosplit, Split
- AD plastik, Split
- Omial, Omiš
- Cemex, Kaštel Sućurac
- Adriacink, Split
- Vodovod i kanalizacija, Split
- TOF, Drniš
- ALPRO ATT, Trogir

2.4. Possibilities of continuing studies at a higher level

Higher level studies are possible at the corresponding graduated studies in Croatia and abroad as well.

2.5. Name lover level studies of the proposer or other institutions that qualify for admission to the proposed study

Not applicable.

2.6. Structure of the study

STUDY PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
Within the structure of the undergraduate study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials, core courses are placed in the first four semesters, while the fifth and sixth semesters contain core and elective courses. With the aim of continuous improvement of the programme, updating of core and elective courses can be achieved by adding new ones. A new course is proposed by the professor to the Teaching Committee which has the authority to act towards the Faculty Council of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology. Following the second year of study, students take practical courses. The study programme is completed after passing all the exams and drafting and defending the final thesis.
ECTS
All courses are one-semester courses, carrying an appropriate number of ECTS credits. During the evaluation of ECTS credits, objective course workload and course professor estimate was taken into account. In case of subjects that are shared with the existing study programmes, the results of a student survey on awarding ECTS credits was also taken into consideration.

2.7. Guiding and tutoring through the study system

With the aim of providing advice, information and guidance to students during the course of study, the Faculty Council of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology appoints the head of study for student groups at each year of study.

2.8. List of courses that the student can take in other study programmes

With the aim of continuing and extending their education, and strengthening and supporting professional training, especially in the context of raising awareness on the interrelation between faculties and universities, students may take courses from other study programmes that offer courses that relate or overlap with the topic of interest of this study programme. The procedure for selecting courses from other faculties is defined in the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

2.9. List of courses offered in a foreign language as well (name which language)

As a rule, the lectures and courses held at the study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials shall be provided in Croatian language. Since there are courses included in the programme that are proposed to be taught in English, as necessary these courses will be provided in English.

2.10. Criteria and conditions for transferring the ECTS credits

The criteria and requirements for the transfer of ECTS credits are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the University of Split, Statute of the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split and Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

2.11. Completion of study

Final requirement for completion of study



Requirements for final/diploma thesis or final/diploma/exam

Requirements for final thesis are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam and evaluation and defence of final/diploma thesis

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam is regulated by the Ordinance on final thesis/diploma thesis at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

 

2.12. List of mandatory and elective courses

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTL101 General and inorganic chemsitry 30 15 30 0 7.0
KTL102 Chemical Calculus 15 30 0 0 4.0
KTL103 Mathematics 30 45 0 0 8.0
KTL104 Physics 30 15 30 0 7.0
KTL105 Computer application 15 0 30 0 4.0
Total
120 105 90 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTL106 Analytical chemistry 30 15 45 0 8.0
KTL107 Fundamentals of organic chemistry 30 15 30 0 7.0
KTL108 30 15 30 0 7.0
KTL109 Safety at work 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTL110 Fundaments of mechanical structures 15 15 0 0 4.0
Total
135 60 120 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTL201 Thermodynamics and thermotechnics 30 15 15 0 6.0
KTL202 Unit operations 30 15 25 5 8.0
KTL203 Electrochemical engineering 30 0 30 0 5.5
KTL204 Chemical reactors 30 0 15 0 5.0
KTL205 Metal construction materials 30 0 20 10 5.5
Total
150 30 105 15 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTGOSP Proffesional practice 0 0 0 0 3.0
KTL206 Measuring and control technique 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTL207 Polymerization processes 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTL208 Materials in the construction engineering 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTL209 Corrosion and metals protection 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTL210 Technology of the pretreatment of raw water 30 0 30 0 5.0
Total
150 0 150 0 28

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 5.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTL301 Methods for characterization of materials 30 0 30 0 6.0
KTL302 polymeric materials 30 0 25 5 6.0
KTL303 Industrial wastewaters 30 15 27 3 6.0
KTL304 Coatings 30 0 30 0 6.0
KTL305 Durability of non-metallic materials 30 0 26 4 6.0
Total
150 15 138 12 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 6.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTL306 Solid waste and recycling 30 0 10 5 5.0
KTL307 Processing and recycling of polymers 30 0 15 15 6.0
KTLOZR Final Thesis 0 0 0 0 7.0
Total
60 0 25 20 18
Elective KTL308 Composite materials 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTL309 30 0 10 5 4.0
KTL310 Technology and treatment of aluminium 30 0 12 3 4.0
KTL311 Water protection 28 0 15 2 4.0
KTL312 Industrial waste 30 0 12 3 4.0
KTL313 Environmental engineering 30 0 15 5 4.0
KTL314 Introduction to entrepreneurship 30 15 0 0 4.0

 

 

2.13. Course description

 

Proffesional practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Proffesional practice

Code

KTGOSP

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General and inorganic chemsitry
NAME OF THE COURSE General and inorganic chemsitry

Code

KTL101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

This course provides an introduction to chemistry as a quantitative and qualitative science. The course will provide students with the core chemistry skills and knowledge recommended for understanding of other fields of chemistry (organic, analytic, physics) and will provide knowledge needed for engineering study. Course will present fundamental concepts of chemistry including atomic structure, history of the atom, development of the periodic table, nuclear chemistry, chemical
nomenclature and formula, types of reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, liquids and solids, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases. Core topics include base theories in chemistry needed for understanding and recognizing problems in chemistry and provide the student with a basic foundation of laboratory inquiry and develop problem solving skills.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students successfully completing this course will:
1. Understand and apply concepts to solve problems by knowledge of the matter and measurement and atoms, molecules and ions.
2. Describe and calculate quantities for gas behaviour, stoichiometry and calculations with chemical formulas and equations, reactions in aqueous solution.
3. Use the following to predict, depict and describe electronic structure of atoms, elemental periodic properties, basic properties of chemical bonding, molecular geometry and theory of bonding.
4. Understand and apply concepts to solve problems using knowledge of properties of solutions and chemical kinetics.
5. Describe and calculate quantities for general chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, precipitation equilibria.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction to chemistry and matter and mathematics of chemistry. Physical and chemical properties of the matter.
2. Dalton`s theory of atom. Gases and their laws. Molar mass of molecules.
3. Atoms, the atomic theory and structure.
4. The periodic law, properties, and trends.
5. Compounds, bonding, ionic and covalent bonding, formula, nomenclature. Geometry of molecules. Lewis structure.
6. Intermolecular forces and interactions.
7. Chemical reactions, redox reactions, oxidation and reduction.
8. Solution chemistry. Properties and kind of solutions. Electrolytes.
9. Collligative properties. Henry`s and Rault`s law. Dissolution of gasses in liquids.
10. Chemical equilibrium. Heterogonous and homogenous equilibrium. Acid-base equilibrium. Buffers. pH.
11. Elements of 18. and 17. group. Hydrogen and water.
12. p-elements. Elements of 16. i 15. group. Characteristic reaction. Characteristic compounds and oxidation number. Water. Water hardness. Acid and basic oxides.
13. p-elements. Elements of 14. i 13. group. Carbonates, hydrogencarbonates. Aluminium-amphoteric properties of aluminium and its oxides.
14. s-elements. Elements of 1. and 2. group. Hydrides and oxides. Peroxides, superoxides, oxides. Basic character of s-elements and their compounds.
15. Overview.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance to all lab courses.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester two exams will be performed. Final examinations will be administered during formal examination periods. The following percentage equivalents apply to final grade: <55% Failure; 56%-66% (2); 67%-78% (3); 79%-90% (4);> 90% (5). After written exam, student will attend to oral exam. Lecturers do not give grades. Students earn grades.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

Sikirica, M., Stehiometrija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb

0

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Darrell D. Ebbing and Steven D. Gammon, General Chemistry, 9th edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 2009.
Raymond Chang, Chemistry, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemical Calculus
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemical Calculus

Code

KTL102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Getting insight to problems that involve quantitative relationships between reactants and products during chemical reactions.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1) Understanding of concept of mole and analyzing a problems involves quantitative relationship by mole method.
2) Understanding of losses and gain in chemical calculus.
3) Understanding of homogenous and heterogeneous chemical reaction that involves gases.
4) Solving problems that include preparation and determination of different solutions composition.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Quantitative relationship in chemistry. Definition of mole. The Law of conservation of mass.
Lecture 2: Mass fraction. Calculation of the mass of one element to the total mass of a compound. Calculation of the mass of pure compound to the total mass of a mixture.
Lecture 3: Losses during chemical reactions. Theoretical and practical quantity of products.
Lecture 4: Limiting reactant. Determination of limiting reactant and its influence on product amount.
Lecture 5: Losses of limiting reactant. Redundant reactant. Losses of redundant reactant.
Lecture 6: Resolving of complex problems including above mentioned lectures.
Lecture 7: Resolving of complex problems including above mentioned lectures.
Lecture 8: Stoichiometry involves gases. Ideal gas law. Volume relationship during chemical reaction.
Lecture 9: Heterogeneous chemical reaction including gases, liquid and solids.
Lecture 10: Chemical calculus in solution chemistry.
Lectures 11: Fractions and ratio (mole, mass, volume) in chemical calculus.
Lectures 12: Concentrations (mole, volume, mass) in chemical calculus.
Lectures 13: Molality and concentrations in chemical calculus.
Lectures 14: Preparation of solution. Determination of solution composition.
Lectures 15: Mixing of solution with different composition. Diluting and concentrating of solutions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.5

Oral exam

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester two exams will be performed. Final examinations will be administered during formal examination periods. The following percentage equivalents apply to final grade: <55% Failure; 56%-66% (2); 67%-78% (3); 79%-90% (4);> 90% (5). Lecturers do not give grades. Students earn grades.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

B. Perić, Kemijsko računanje, HDKI/Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 2006.

10

M. Sikirica, Stehiometrija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2001.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Filipović, S. Lipanović, Opća i anorganska kemija I. dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mathematics
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematics

Code

KTL103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScM Branka Gotovac

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Ružman

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

45

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic elements of calculus and linear algebra.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to:
- identify and sketch graphs of elementary functions, to determine the domains of more complex functions
- find the derivatives of the given functions
- know the graphical applications of the dervative (tangents and normals, maximum, minimum and inflection points, sketching and interpreting graphs)
- know techniques of integration (integration by substitution, integration by parts)
- use the definite integral -applications to geometry
- solve the system of linear equations (by matrix inversion, by Gaussian elimination)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Sets: Notion. Algebra of sets.
2. Number sets.
3. Functions: Notion. Inverse function.
4. Elementary functions. Limits.
5. Continuity. Sequences: Notion. Limits.
6. Derivative and application: Notion. Interpretation. Derivation techniques.
7. Differential. Higher order derivatives.
8. Theorems of differential calculus. Maximum, minimum points.
9. Inflection points. Asymptotes. Curve sketching.
10. Integral and application: Indefinite integral. Techniques of integration.
11. Definite integral.
12. Using the definite integral.
13. Matrices and vectors: Matrix algebra. Determinants. Inverse matrix.
14. Linear systems of equations. Vector algebra.
15. Course review. Revision.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance of classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Taking exams: during classes (1.) and after classes, in examination schedules (2.).
1.
points condition
tests 3x30 39
activity 10
total 100 46
2.
Students have to pass an oral exam after passing the written exam (at least 50% of the total number of points).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bradić, R. Roki et. al., Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Element, Zagreb (više izdanja)

47

B.P. Demidovič, Zadaci i riješeni primjeri iz više matematike, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb (više izdanja)

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kurepa, Matematička analiza I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1997.
I. Slapničar, Matematika 1, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje u Splitu, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2002. (http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat1)
I. Slapničar, Matematika 2, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2008. (http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat2)
Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physics
NAME OF THE COURSE Physics

Code

KTL104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScD Mirko Marušić

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring theoretical knowledge and developing the ability to differentiate properties and concepts of classical and modern physics. Creating an adequate attitude towards interpreting physical phenomena and their applications. Mastering the scientific physical approach to experimental observations and methods required in the physical laboratory.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to:
- know basic physical measures and units of measure,
- understand properties of motion and forces in the classical theory,
- be able to identify the characteristics of the exact approach the micro world phenomena,
- understand basic principles of electricity and magnetism, as well as the wave properties of electromagnetic radiation,
- be able to describe the phenomena associated with the dual nature of light,
- understand principles of geometrical and physical optics,
- have basic knowledge of modern physics,
- be able to apply the acquired knowledge to problem-solving tasks,
- be able to use the methods of measuring the chosen physical measures and carry our experiments autonomously,
- have developed the skill of graphic processing of measured data and the skill of writing reports on the experiment conducted and results obtained.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Motion and Forces
2nd week: Energy and Work
3rd week: Systems of particles. Rotation.
4th week: Elasticity. Oscillation. Elastic waves.
5th week: Partial assessment (1st preliminary test)
6th week: Molecular-kinetic theory. Heat.
7th week: Fluids. Transport phenomena.
8th week: Electrostatics and Magnetostatics
9th week: Electromagnetism. Electric Current and Electric Circuits.
10th week: Partial assessment (2nd preliminary test)
11th week: Electromagnetic Waves. Light. Geometrical Optics. Optical instruments.
12th week: Physical Optics.
13th week: Elements of Quantum mechanics.
14th week: Laser Light. Radioactivity.
15th week: Partial assessment (3rd preliminary test)
Seminars: Exercises on selected topics (40 - 60 exercises)
Seminars for advanced students on the topics of physics in engineering.
Exercises:
Measuring of the basic physical quantities. Taking basic physical measures. Numerical and graphical processing of the measured data. Measurement errors. Torque and moment of inertia. Conservation of energy. Oscillators. Heat capacity. The laws of hydrostatics. Surface phenomena. Electrical circuits. The laws of geometrical optics. The phenomena of physical optics and their applications. Spectroscopy.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.4

Report

0.6

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.4

Oral exam

1.3

Written exam

1.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

In course of the semester, the entire exam can be passes by taking and passing the three preliminary tests consisting of theoretical questions as well as practical exercises and 10 laboratory tests.
In the examination periods first written and then oral exam is taken.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Herak, Osnove kemijske fizike, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2001.

10

P. Kulišić, L.Bistričić, D. Horvat, Z. Narančić, T. Petrović i D. Pevec. Riješeni zadaci iz mehanike i topline. Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2002.

10

E. Babić, R. Krsnik, M. Očko, Zbirka riješenih zadataka iz fizike, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 1990.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley, New York, 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Computer application
NAME OF THE COURSE Computer application

Code

KTL105

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of computers and computer systems. Knowledge about the use of Internet content and protect your computer from malicious programs. Basic skills about the content management (folders and files) on PCs using the Windows operating system. Basic skills using programs offered in the MS Office software.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
1. Manage content on PC computer (files and folders)
2. Use the MS Word in the purpose of the editing the file according to the specified requirements (defining the shape and page layout, inserting the images, finished elements, tables, graphs ...)
3. Use the MS Excel for analysis, calculation, sorting, graphical presentation and format tables.
4. Use the MS PowerPoint to create presentations
5. Set up and use MS Outlook for editing and emailing
6. Find reliable sources of information on the Internet

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week L General information about the course and mode of examination, Introduction to computers application, Information activity and technology, Computerization, Computer applications in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
E
2. Week L Hardware (PC), Von Neumann’s model computers, Computer hardware, Computer types, Basic terms in the Computer Engineering and informatics, Basic parts (components) of the PC, Central processing unit (CPU), Computer memory, Motherboards and connectors, Input and Output devices
E
3. Week L Operating systems and applications, The BIOS (Basic Input / Output System), Preparing disks and drives for installation of the OS, File system (FAT, NTFS), Computer Programs, System programs, Application programs, Operating systems
E
4. Week L Basics commands for MS-DOS, GUI (Graphical User Interface), Properties GUI, History of developing the MS Windows OS, Example Installations operating systems (Windows OS), Customizing the User Interface, Library, Customize settings on PC computer, Firewall, Windows Defender, Windows Update, Action Center, Commercial antivirus programs
E
5. Week L Backup and Restore, Control Panel, Customize the computer, The Device Manager, Accounts, Network and Sharing Center, Troubleshooting, Personalization, BitLocker Drive Encryption, Region and Language, Programs and Features, Installing and uninstalling programs, Display, Devices and Printers, Default Programs, Help and Support, Accessories and system tools, Shortcuts in Window OS, Changing the language of Windows OS
E
6. Week L Malicious software (malware), Computer viruses, Computer worms, Trojan horses, Logic bombs, Spyware, Advertising Programs (Adware), INTERNET, History of the Internet, TCP / IP protocol
E
7. Week L First test
E
8. Week L Internet, Computer network and classification networks, Internet protocols: HTTP, HTTPS and FTP, Web browsers, Copyright Law
E
9. Week L MS Office, MS Word, How to start the MS Word, Layout MS Word window, The status bar, Tabs and tools, Copy and paste data, Special characters, Styles, Tabs, Sections, Creating a new document, Copy text, Headers and footers, Page numbers
E MS Word: How to insert and edit the text and its formatting. Paragraph formatting. Lists of lists. Working with documents. formatting documents
10. Week L How to insert and edit the formulas and equations, Application of the finished style characteristics, Input tables and formatting, input images in the document, the entry of bibliographic data entry page breaks and section breaks (define different sections of the document), display the contents of the document
E MS Word: Insert pictures, tables and SmartArt elements in the document. Formatting headers and footers document. Entering references and footnotes in the document. Insert the page break, Section break, Application of different style for document
11. Week L MS Excel, How to start MS Excel, Layout MS Excel windows, Toolbar for quick access, Status bar, Tabs and tools, Tabs formulas, Editing data within a worksheet, Graphic data presentation, Input data string in the table, Add the trend data, Sorting data set
E MS Excel: Working with the tables. Entering data into tables and data formatting. Entering a series of data. Entering data from different files. Displaying data graphically.
12. Week L Conditional Formatting Data, Creating and deleting equations, Addresses cells (relative, absolute, mixed), Types of functions, Logical operators, Boolean functions, Examples of application functions (IF, AND, OR, COUNTIF ..), MS PowerPoint, MS PowerPoint Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating presentations, add themes, Themes Edit, Insert object (images, tables, links, media content ...)
E MS Excel: Data processing, Calculating with tables, Input and syntax for creating mathematical equations. Showing the trend curve.
13. Week L MS Outlook, MS Outlook Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating a user account , Creating a new e-mail
E MS Power Point: Creating presentations. Choosing the design, How to make redesign of an existing template.
14. Week L Databases, What databases they are?, Fields in databases, How databases are developed?, Center for online databases, Bibliographic databases, Citation databases, Databases with full-text, Sciencedirect databases, Scopus databases, Web database, Bibliography
E
15. Week L Second Test
E

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.6

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The written exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Practical part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 20% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 20% and practical part of exam has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and practical exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam participates with a share of the 30% of the final grade and practical part of exam with a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 50%-61% - sufficient, 62%-74% - good, 75%-87% very good, 88%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Jozić, Predavanja iz kolegija:Primjena računala, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Interna skripta, Split, 2013.

1

WallaceWang, Office 2010 For Dummies, Wiley Publishing Inc., Indiana, 2010.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analytical chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Analytical chemistry

Code

KTL106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring basic basic theoretical knowledge of analytical chemistry, the role and application of analytical chemistry in various fields

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Completing the course: General chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will will be able to
- Define the concept of analytical chemistry
- Differentiate between the concepts of qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis
- Understand the concept of quantitative chemical reactions
- Understand the concept of gravimetric and volumetric determination
- Understand the precipitation, neutralization, complexometric and redox titrations
- Solving numerical problems from a qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

First week : Description and review of curriculum. Definitions of analytical chemistry. Division of Analytical Chemistry. The concept of the analytical signal. Seminar: Solving numerical problems from theoretical lecture
Second week : The concept and definition of chemical analysis - qualitative and quantitative. Seminar: Solving numerical problems; homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium in analytical chemistry..
3rd week : Qualitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of acids and bases. Consideration of acid-base balance. Seminar: Solving problems
.4th week : The concept and definition of complex ions., complexometric equilibrium . Seminar: Solving problems
5th week : The concept and definition of electrochemical reactions. Consideration of electrochemical equilibrium. Seminar: Solving problems
6th week: The concept and definition of heterogeneous equilibrium. process of dissolution and precipitation. Seminar: Solving problemsl
7th week .Recapitulation of theoretical and seminars lecture I partial exam .theoretical lecture and seminars
8th week . Quantitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of gravimetric determination. Seminar: Solving problems,
9th week . Optimization of precipitationcondition. Seminar: Solving problems.
10th week : The concept and definition of standards and standard solutions - primary and secondary. The concept and definition of the volumetric determination; Seminar: Solving problems.
11th week : The concept and definition of volumetric determinations- Argentometric titration; Seminar: Solving problems.
12th weeks The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on neutralization reactions - acid-base titration; Seminar Solving problems
13th week . The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on the complex - complexometric titrations; Seminar Solving problems
14th week . The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on redox reactions. Seminar Seminar Solving problems
15th week : Recapitulation of theoretical and seminars lecture II partial exam .theoretical lecture and seminars.
Laboratory excersise: Introduction to laboratory work. Qualitative chemical analysis – determination of group of cations and anions. Gravimetric determination nickel cations.
volumetric methods: Preparation of standard solutions. Acid-base titration.
Complexometric Titrations. Oxidation-reduction titration. Potentiometric titration

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 80% and completing exercises

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

2.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 50% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.

6

A. Prkić, Vježbe iz analitičke kemije, Preddiplomski studij kemijske tehnologije, interna recenzirana skripta, Split, 2008.

0

Web stranice KTF-a

R. Kellner, J.M. Mermet, M. Otto, M. Varcarcel, H.M. Widmer, Analytical Chemistry (A Modern Approach to Analytical Science, 2nd Edition) Wiley-VCHVerlag Gmbh&Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2004.

0

D. A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 9th edition, Brooks&Cole, SAD, 2014.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Šoljić, Računanje u analitičkoj kemiji, Zagreb, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Fundamentals of organic chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Fundamentals of organic chemistry

Code

KTL107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of modern organic chemistry and nomenclature of organic compounds, understanding the structure and properties of organic compounds and the basic mechanisms of organic chemical reactions.
Acquisition of basic skills and techniques required for work in organic-chemical laboratory.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student should be able to:
- use basic rules of organic compounds nomenclature
- differentiate classes of organic compounds according to functional groups
- connect organic compounds molecular structure with their physico - chemical
properties and reactivity
- differentiate organic reaction types and describe general characteristics of organic reactions
- explain reaction mechanisms of main classes of organic compounds
- use basic laboratory techniques for synthesis, isolation and purification of organic compounds as well as their characterization and identification

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures (2 hours weekly):
1st week: Introduction to organic chemistry. The binding in organic molecules.
2nd week: Molecular structure and properties of organic compounds. Isomers. Optical activity and chirality. The absolute configuration. Acid-base properties of organic compounds.
3th week: Types of organic reactions. Classification and nomenclature of organic compounds - functional groups.
4th week: Alkanes. Rotation about single bond. Oxidation. Halogenation. Alkenes.
5th week: Alkenes. Electrophilic Addition. The addition of hydrogen. The addition of halogen. The addition of hydrogen halide (Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov rule). Hydration. Polimerization.
6th week: Alkynes. Reactions of of alkynes. Alkyl halides. Nucleophilic substitution at saturated carbon. SN2-mechanism. SN1-mechanism.
7th tjedan: Elimination reactions. E1 and E2 mechanism. Competition among substitution and elimination. Repetition of the teaching materials.
8th week: 1st partial exam. Alcohols. Ethers.
9th week: Aldehydes and ketones. Nucleophilic addition to the carbonyl group. Reactions at the -carbon (the aldol reaction).
10th tjedan: Carboxylic acids and derivatives. Nucleophilic substitution at the carbonyl group.
11th week: Aromatic hydrocarbons. Electrophilic aromatic substitution. The impact of the groups on electrophilic aromatic substitution. Nucleophilic aromatic substitution.
12th week: Arenes. Phenols. Aromatic amines
13th week: Carbohydrates. Monosaccharides-basic reactions. Oligosaccharides. Polysaccharides.
14th week: Amines. Amino acids. Peptides and proteins.
15th week: 2nd partial exam.
Seminars (1 hour weekly):
Solving problems in organic chemistry.
Exercises (2 hours weekly joined together in 6 lab periods):
1. Laboratory safety and rules. Isolation and purification of organic compounds. Crystallization and melting point determination. Distillation. Extraction. Organic compounds synthesis.
2. Diazotation. Phenol synthesis.
3. Carbonyl compounds-nucleophilic addition. The Cannizzaro reaction – benzyl alcohol and benzoic acid synthesis.
4. Electrophilic aromatic substitution. p-Nitroacetanilide synthesis.
5. Oxidation-reduction reactions. Butan-2-one synthesis.
6. Organic compounds characterization. Characteristic reactions of functional groups.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend lectures and seminars of at least 80% of the times scheduled and to complete all planned laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

4.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam by taking and passing two partial exams (tests) consisting of theoretical questions and seminar problems during the semester. Test passing score is 60%. Each test constitutes 40% of the final exam score. Attendance to the lectures and seminars participate in the final score with 10%.Grades achieved through laboratory exercises will constitute 10% of the final score. Any of the partial exams passed during the semester is valid throughout the academic year.
Students who do not pass one of the partial exam or both of them have to take an written exam in the regular examination periods. Exam passing score is 60%. The exam will constitute 90% and laboratory exercises will constitute 10% of the final score. Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. H. Pine, Organska kemija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.

8

I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2009.

0

Web stranica KTF-a (Knjižnica)

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Fundamentals of organic chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Fundamentals of organic chemistry

Code

KTL107

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of modern organic chemistry and nomenclature of organic compounds, understanding the structure and properties of organic compounds and the basic mechanisms of organic chemical reactions.
Acquisition of basic skills and techniques required for work in organic-chemical laboratory.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student should be able to:
- use basic rules of organic compounds nomenclature
- differentiate classes of organic compounds according to functional groups
- connect organic compounds molecular structure with their physico - chemical
properties and reactivity
- differentiate organic reaction types and describe general characteristics of organic reactions
- explain reaction mechanisms of main classes of organic compounds
- use basic laboratory techniques for synthesis, isolation and purification of organic compounds as well as their characterization and identification

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures (2 hours weekly):
1st week: Introduction to organic chemistry. The binding in organic molecules.
2nd week: Molecular structure and properties of organic compounds. Isomers. Optical activity and chirality. The absolute configuration. Acid-base properties of organic compounds.
3th week: Types of organic reactions. Classification and nomenclature of organic compounds - functional groups.
4th week: Alkanes. Rotation about single bond. Oxidation. Halogenation. Alkenes.
5th week: Alkenes. Electrophilic Addition. The addition of hydrogen. The addition of halogen. The addition of hydrogen halide (Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov rule). Hydration. Polimerization.
6th week: Alkynes. Reactions of of alkynes. Alkyl halides. Nucleophilic substitution at saturated carbon. SN2-mechanism. SN1-mechanism.
7th tjedan: Elimination reactions. E1 and E2 mechanism. Competition among substitution and elimination. Repetition of the teaching materials.
8th week: 1st partial exam. Alcohols. Ethers.
9th week: Aldehydes and ketones. Nucleophilic addition to the carbonyl group. Reactions at the -carbon (the aldol reaction).
10th tjedan: Carboxylic acids and derivatives. Nucleophilic substitution at the carbonyl group.
11th week: Aromatic hydrocarbons. Electrophilic aromatic substitution. The impact of the groups on electrophilic aromatic substitution. Nucleophilic aromatic substitution.
12th week: Arenes. Phenols. Aromatic amines
13th week: Carbohydrates. Monosaccharides-basic reactions. Oligosaccharides. Polysaccharides.
14th week: Amines. Amino acids. Peptides and proteins.
15th week: 2nd partial exam.
Seminars (1 hour weekly):
Solving problems in organic chemistry.
Exercises (2 hours weekly joined together in 6 lab periods):
1. Laboratory safety and rules. Isolation and purification of organic compounds. Crystallization and melting point determination. Distillation. Extraction. Organic compounds synthesis.
2. Diazotation. Phenol synthesis.
3. Carbonyl compounds-nucleophilic addition. The Cannizzaro reaction – benzyl alcohol and benzoic acid synthesis.
4. Electrophilic aromatic substitution. p-Nitroacetanilide synthesis.
5. Oxidation-reduction reactions. Butan-2-one synthesis.
6. Organic compounds characterization. Characteristic reactions of functional groups.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend lectures and seminars of at least 80% of the times scheduled and to complete all planned laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

4.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam by taking and passing two partial exams (tests) consisting of theoretical questions and seminar problems during the semester. Test passing score is 60%. Each test constitutes 40% of the final exam score. Attendance to the lectures and seminars participate in the final score with 10%.Grades achieved through laboratory exercises will constitute 10% of the final score. Any of the partial exams passed during the semester is valid throughout the academic year.
Students who do not pass one of the partial exam or both of them have to take an written exam in the regular examination periods. Exam passing score is 60%. The exam will constitute 90% and laboratory exercises will constitute 10% of the final score. Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Safety at work
NAME OF THE COURSE Safety at work

Code

KTL109

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Knowledge of the potential hazards when working in a laboratory and plant.
- The basics of working in a safe manner, safeguards and protective devices and agents at work

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Rules of conduct and work in the chemistry lab
- Basic hazards in a chemistry lab
- Ways of marking substance, meaning chemical Card (data on physico-chemical, physiological and toxicological properties of the substance)
- Assessment of the potential dangers of certain chemicals and working with the apparatuses and methods of protection at work

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: an introductory lecture, legislation, codes of conduct in the laboratory
2nd week: the security apparatus in the chemistry lab
3rd week: safety and physico- chemical properties of the substance
4th week: Classification of substances with similar properties and functional groups
5th week: labeling - labels , graphic symbols , diamond hazard label when transporting
6th week: effect of pollutants on human health - basic concepts of toxicology and physiological properties of the substance, MAC, LD50
7th week: effect of pollutants on human health - division and features matter to the physiological properties
8th week: assessment (first colloquium);
9th week: burning processes and fire danger
10th week: appliances and equipment for fire fighting
11th week: Model Fire Extinguishers
12th week: types of harmful atmosphere and breathing apparatus
13th week: protection of electricity
14th week: dangerous products - the formation, classification according to UN figures, storage, recycling and waste
15th week: assessment (2nd colloquium).
Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1. Stability of the alkali metal
Exercise 2. Material flammability test
Exercise 3. Determination of ignition point by Marcusson
Exercise 4. Determination of physico - chemical properties of the solution
with the aim of assessing the potential hazards

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80 %, and laboratory exercises in the amount of 100 % of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.8

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation: The entire test can be applied over two exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60 %. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 35 %. Laboratory exercises participate in the evaluation of 20 %. The presence of lectures in 80-100 % amount is 10 % of the grade.
Final evaluation: Students who have passed the preliminary one, it is recognized as part of the exam and a 35 % score. The remaining part is laid in the regular examination period. Students who have not passed any preliminary examination, written examination in the regular examination period laid the whole subject matter. Passing threshold is 60 %, and a written examination form to participate in the evaluation by 80 %. Laboratory work involved in assessing the proportion of 20 %.
Rating: sufficient (60-70 %), good (71-80 %), very good (81-90 %), excellent (91-100 %).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Dabić, Sigurnost pri radu, Autorizirana predavanja, 2013.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

R. H. Hill, D.C. Finster, Laboratory Safety for Chemistry Students, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, New Jersey, 2010.

1

P. Dabić, Vježbe iz kolegija sigurnost pri radu, KTF, Split, 2010.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

B. Uhlik, Zaštita od požarno opasnih, toksičnih i reaktivnih tvari (I-III), Hrvatsko
društvo kemijskih inženjera, Zagreb, 1998., 2000., 2003. i 2013.
Zakon o zaštiti na radu, Zavod za istraživanje i razvoj sigurnosti, Zagreb, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Fundaments of mechanical structures
NAME OF THE COURSE Fundaments of mechanical structures

Code

KTL110

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Lovre Krstulović-Opara

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Prof Željko Domazet

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

30 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Basic knowledge in technical drawing, strength of materials, and parts of machinery in chemical industry

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- being capable to read and understand technical drawing
- understanding the need for dimensioning machinery parts
- recognising basic machinery parts
- recognising basic parts in chemical industry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction to mechanical structures. National codes. Technical drawing – basics.
Week 2: Technical drawing – cross sections, displays, dimensions.
Week 3: Technical drawing – surface finishes, tolerances
Week 4: Technical drawing – CAD, rapid prototyping, 3D scanning
Week 5: Basics of mechanics (statics, kinematics, dynamics). Materials for mechanical design. (steel alloys, cast steel materials)
Week 6: Materials for mechanical design. (copper and aluminium alloys)
Week 7: Materials for mechanical design (sinter materials, polymers). Dimensioning of structures.
Week 8: 1st colloquium. Introduction to parts of machinery.
Week 9: Bolts, springs, welding and soldering
Week 10: Shafts and clutch
Week 11: Bearings and transmissions (belt drives, friction drives)
Week 12: Gearing and chain transmissions
Week 13: Mechanical parts in chemical industry (tubes and valves)
Week 14: Vessels and seals
Week 15: 2nd colloquium

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending 70% of courses

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Exam is written. Exam can be passed by partially by passing two colloquiums and gaining 50% (50 points of maximum 100). Minimum for passing exam is gaining 50% on colloquiums or regular exam. Requirement for attending second colloquium is gaining 25% (25 points) on first colloquium. Colloquiums can be repeated during first two exams. Marks: 50%-61% - minimum (2), 62%-74% - good (3), 75%-87% -very good (4), 88%-100% - excellant (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Ž. Domazet, L. Krstulović-Opara, Skripta iz Osnova strojarstva, KTF, Split, 2006.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V. Hrgešić i J. Baldani, ”Mehaničke Konstrukcije”, Sveučilište u Zagrebu - Elektrotehnički Fakultet, Zagreb, 1990.
E. Hercigonja, Tehnička grafika, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.
K.-H. Decker, Elementi strojeva, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb, 1980

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Thermodynamics and thermotechnics
NAME OF THE COURSE Thermodynamics and thermotechnics

Code

KTL201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Vanja Martinac

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to provide students with wide knowledge of basic thermodynamic principles related to their application in engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students are expected to:
1. specify and define the units of measurements of basic thermodynamic magnitudes and the state equations (for ideal and real gases)
2. specify and correctly interpret the basic laws of thermodynamics
3. specify and explain thermodynamic changes of the state of ideal and real gases
4. define and explain the processes of expansion and compression
5. define and explain maximum work, technical work and exergy
6. define and explain clockwise circular processes
7. define and explain irreversible processes (throttling, mixing of gases)
8. discern and analyse processes in devices used to obtain low temperatures
9. define and explain the principle of corresponding states, fugacity, partial molal quantities
10. apply the knowledge acquired to solving tasks related to changes of the state of ideal and real gases and liquids, compression processes, clockwise and counter-clockwise circular processes, and processes in technical heat exchangers.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. week: General consideration. Maximum work of the system.
2. week: Application of the second law of thermodynamics to energy transformation - exergy and anergy.
3. week: Reversible processes for ideal gases. Cyclic processes.
4. week: Technical plants for cyclic processes. Irreversibility and losses in cyclic processes.
5. week: Compressors - processes in compressors.
6. week: Real gases and steams. Water vapor. Thermodynamic diagrams and tables for variables of state.
7. week: Vapour power cycles.
8. week: Refrigerators - processes in refrigerators. Heat pump.
9. week: Liquefaction of gases according to Linde, Claude and Kapica.
10. week: Thermodynamic properties of fluids. Equations of state of real gases and their mixtures.
11. week: The principle of corresponding states. Application to gases and liquids. Improved principle of corresponding states – the Pitzer correlation.
12. week: Fugacity. Methods of calculating fugacity.
13. week: Solutions – partial molal quantities. Methods of calculation of partial molal quantities.
14. week: Thermotechnics – Modes of heat transfer. Laws of heat transfer. Combined modes of heat transfer.
15. week: Applied of heat transfer to some special cases. Heat exchangers.
Numeric examples demonstrating the topics covered are analysed during the course, making an integral whole with the lectures.
Examples from the engineering practice are solved during exercises.
List of Exercises:
Exercise 1. Mixing of Ideal Gases at V = const.
Exercise 2. Mixing of Ideal Gases at p = const.
Exercise 3. Rankine Cycle – Superheated
Exercise 4. Methods for Increasing the Thermal Efficiency of Vapour Power Plants
Exercise 5. Regenerative Vapour Power Cycle
Exercise 6. Comparison Gas Power and Gas Refrigeration Systems
Exercise 7. Comparison Vapor power and Vapor-Compression Refrigeration Systems

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous assessment through partial preliminary exams (three times in a semester) allows for exemption from the written exam. The passing threshold is 60 %. Partial preliminary exams are not mandatory. Preliminary exams are not eliminatory. Each passed preliminary exam participates with 12 % in the rating. Attendance to lectures and seminars (80%-100%) participates with 5% in the rating. Activity in exercises participates with 5% in the rating. The oral part of the exam participates with 54% in the rating. A written and an oral exam are taken in examination periods. The oral exam is mandatory for all students, and the written one is mandatory only if the student is not exempt from it. A passed preliminary exam (prior activity) in the summer examination period participates with 10% in the rating. The written exam participates with 36% and the oral one with 54%. Students who have not passed the written exam through preliminary exams take the full exam (final exam) consisting of the written and the oral exam in regular examination periods. The passing threshold is 60 %, and each exam form participates in the rating with 50 %. The written part of the exam participates in the rating with 46%, and the oral part with 54%. Ratings: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 71%-80% - good, 81%-90% - very good, 91%-100% - excellent

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Petric, I. Vojnović, V. Martinac, Tehnička termodinamika, 2 izdanje, on line (2007-01-09), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2007.

0

on line

V. Martinac, Termodinamika i termotehnika (priručnik - formule i tablice), on line (2008-12-09), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2008.

0

on line

M. J. Moran, H. N. Shapiro, D. B. Daisie, M. B. Bailey, Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2010.

1

Yunus A. Cengel, Introduction to Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer, 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2008.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Y. A. Cengel, M. A. Boles, Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, 7th Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2011.
R. E. Sonntag, C. Borgnakke, G. J. Van Wylen, Fundamentals of thermodynamics, 8th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2012.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Unit operations
NAME OF THE COURSE Unit operations

Code

KTL202

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Renato Stipišić

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

25

5

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring the knowledge required for understanding chemical engineering problems related to unit operations that are applied in the chemical and related industries (food, pharmaceutical etc.)

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Undergraduate courses: General and Inorganic Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry, Principles of Physical Chemistry, Mathematics, Chemistry and computing.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Basic mechanisms of mass and energy transfer (transport phenomena)
- Conservation of momentum, energy, mass
- Occurrence in fluid flow
- Equipment for the fluids and solids transport
- Flow past immersed bodies.
- Methods and equipment for separation
- Heat transfer equipment.
- Mass Transfer Operations

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction and overview of the course content. Fundamentals of fluid mechanics. Fluid properties.
2nd week: Fluid statics. Fluid dynamics.
3rd week: Pressure drop in pipes and fittings.
4th week: Transportation of fluids and solids.
5th week: Centrifugal pumps.
6th week: Size reduction. Screening.
7th week: Flow past immersed bodies. Sedimentation.
8th week: Fluidization. Separation.
9th week: Filtration. Mixing.
Examination I
10th week: Heat Transfer. Conduction.
11th week: Convection. Radiation.
12th week: Heat exchangers .
13th week: Mass Transfer. Absorption.
14th week: Drying. Extraction.
15th week: Distillation.
Examination II
Exercises:
1. Determination of flow types and critical Re-number visual observation.
2. Determination of pressure drop in pipes and fittings.
3. Fluidization - determination of fluidized bed.
4. Filtration - determination of the constants and the average specific filtration resistance.
5. Mixing - determination power consumption of agitated vessels.
6. Heat exchangers - determination of heat transfer coefficients.
7. Absorption - pressure drop and capacity of filled towers.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at lectures in the amount of 80% of the hourly rate.
Attendance of the exercises in the amount of 100% of the hourly rate.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

2.0

Experimental work

Report

2.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two written exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each exam involved in the assessment with 50%. The examination periods shall be taken oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Rating: 60 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W.L. McCabe, J.C. Smith, P. Harriott, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, McGraw-Hill, 6thedition, New York, 2001.

1

M. Hraste, Mehaničko procesno inženjerstvo, HINUS, Zagreb, 2003.

10

R.M. Felder, R.W. Rousseau, Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.H. Perry, D.W. Green, J.O. Maloney, Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, 7th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1999.
V. Koharić, Mehaničke operacije, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Electrochemical engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Electrochemical engineering

Code

KTL203

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

5.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Student will be able to use acquired knowledge of electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering and applied it to industrial electrochemistry processes.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Fundamentals of physical chemistry - enrolled.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student is able to:
- describe the components and processes in the electrochemical reactor
- explain the structure of electrified phase boundary
- differentiate between the concepts of polarization and overvoltage
- explain the causes of different overvoltage types
- set the voltage balance, material balance and energy balance
- ddistinguish between primary and secondary current distribution and potential
- indicate the main types of electrochemical reactors
- describe the basic methods of connecting electrodes and reactors in practice
- specify the materials used in electrochemical reactors manufacturing.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Constituent parts and operation in electrochemical reactor. Electrochemical conversion - quantum lows.
2nd week: Electrified phase boundary. Thermodynamic of electrified phase boundary.
3rd week: Double-layer structure.
4th week: Electrochemical systems in non-equilibrium conditions. Anodic and cathodic processes.
5th week: Electrochemical reaction mechanism and rate determining step. Polarization and overpotential. Overpotential types
6th week: Electrochemical overpotential.
7th week: Diffusion overpotential. Reaction ovrepotential. Crystallization overpotential.
8th week: First test. Voltage balance and material balance in electrochemical reactor.
9th week: Energy balance in electrochemical reactor. Current efficiency. Transport phenomena in electrochemical system.
10th week: Dynamic of electrolyte solutions. Thermal effects in electrochemical reactor.
11th week: Distribution of current and potential in electrochemical reactor - primary and secondary distribution.
12th week: Technological demands in electrochemical engineering. Types of electrochemical reactors.
13th week: Monopolar and bipolar electrodes connecting. Electrical connection of multiple reactors on a common power source. Circulating of electrolyte.
14th week: Materials selection for construction of electrochemical reactors.
15th week: Second test.
Exercises: Electrolyte decomposition voltage. Electrogravimetric analysis. Determination of hydrogen overpotential on various metals. Electrochemical production of calcium gluconate. Electrorefining of silver. Distribution of potential during the electrolysis (plate shaped anode / ring shaped anode). Electrocatalysis - selection of an optimal electrode material. Determination of the dependence of the limiting current density on electrolyte flow rate.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 40 %. The fraction of laboratory exercises is 20%. In the exam period the student has to attend to oral exam. Grades: 60-69% sufficient, 70-79% good, 81-89% very good, 90-100% excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. Despić, Osnove elektrokemije 2000, Zavod za udžbenike i nastavna sredstva, Beograd, 2003.

1

F. Goodridge, K. Scott, Electrochemical process engineering, a guide to the design of electrolytic plant, Plenum Press, New York, 1995.

1

Đ. Matić, Elektrokemijsko inženjerstvo, Zagreb, 1988.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

H. Wendt, G. Kreysa, Electrochemical engineering: science and technology in chemical and other industries, Springer, Berlin, 1999.
D. Pletcher, F.C. Walch, Industrial electrochemistry, Charman and Hall, New York, 1990.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemical reactors
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemical reactors

Code

KTL204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be acquainted with the basic knowledge in the field of chemical reaction engineering and different types of chemical reactors as well as basic knowledge of software Mathcad and kinetic of homogenous and heterogeneous reaction in reactors.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with:
- definition of reactor
- definition of the rate of reaction, the reaction order, the reaction rate constant
- the differences between kinetics in homogenous and heterogeneous systems, definition of the slowest step in the process
- characteristics of the basic types of the reactors
- types of multiphase reactors
- application and types of experimental catalytic reactors

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: introduction, reactor as a processing unit in a technological process
2nd week: classification and characteristics of main types of reactors
3rd and 4th week: kinetics of chemical reactions in homogenous systems, the reaction order, the reaction rate constant
5th week: classification of chemical reactions, forward and reverse reaction
6th week: kinetics of chemical reactions in heterogeneous systems
7th week: ideal reactors, heat and mass balance for the basic types of chemical reactors
8th week: ideal batch reactor
9th week: partial knowledge test
10th week: ideal tubular reactor
11th week: ideal continuous-stirred tank reactor; CTSRs in series
12th week: catalysis and experimental catalytic reactors
13th week :multiphase reactors
14th week: reactors evaluation and ratings
15th week: microreactors
partial knowledge test
Exercises: Mathcad basic - toolbars, calculator, graph, formatting, units, functions, method of least squares. Kinetics of homogenous reaction. Kinetics of heterogeneous reactions: influence of agitation speed on rate-controlling step, influence of particle size on rate-controlling step.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance and active participation at lectures and exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam. Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-79% good (3); 80-92% very good (4); 93-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Z. Gomzi, Kemijski reaktori, HINUS, Zagreb, 1998.

10

S. G. Fogler, Elements of, Chemical Reaction Analysis and Design, Prentice-Hall, Englewood, N.J.,2006

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. G. Fogler, Elements of, Chemical Reaction Analysis and Design, Prentice-Hall, Englewood, N.J.,2006.; S. Zrnčević, Kataliza i katalizatori, HINUS, Zagreb, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Metal construction materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Metal construction materials

Code

KTL205

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

5.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

20

10

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will get the complete knowledge of metallic materials, their physical and chemical properties relevant to their application, as well as the possibilities of their surface treatment and joining.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Describe the basic characteristics of metallic structural materials.
- Compare the methods for the surface treatment of metals.
- Present methods for metal investigation.
- Describe the methods of joining metals.
- Analyse the recycling and disposal options for scrap metal.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Description and view the contents of the curse. Introduction. Types of
metal materials.
2nd week: Physical and chemical properties of metallic materials
3rd week: Iron production. Classification and properties of iron and its alloys.
Application.
4th week: Steel Production. Classification of steels. Application.
5th week: Light and non-ferrous metals and their alloys.
6th week: Production of aluminum and alloys.
7th week: Special metals. Norms. (I. partial written exam)
8th week: The mechanical properties of the metal. Basic non-destructive and
destructive methods of testing of metals.
9th week: Corrosion behavior of metals under exposure conditions.
10th week: Processing and methods for the improvment the properties of metallic
materials.
11th week: Surface treatment of metals.
12th week: Review of techniques for joining and cutting of materials. Riveting.
Soldering.
13th week: Welding and Cutting. Build up by welding.
14th week: Recycling and disposal of scrap metal.
15th week: Repetition. (II partial writen exam).
LABORATORY EXERCISES:
Phase diagram, thermal analysis. Investigation of strength, hardness, bending resistance and impact resistance different steels materials. Joining of metallic materials by soldering and welding methods. Investigations of welded joints with penetrants and ultrasonic method. Investigations of metal materials microstructure by metallographic microscope. Chemical formation of a zinc coating on copper alloys. Passivation of stainless steels.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80%. All laboratory exercises successfully finished.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 50%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 50%.
On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: - 50% insufficient, 50%-60% - sufficient, 61% -74% - good, 75% -87% very good, 88% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Filetin, F. Kovačićek, J. Indolf, Svojstva i primjena materijala, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2002.

2

M. Gojić, Površinska obradba materijala, Metalurški fakultet, Zagreb, 2010.

1

M. Gojić, Tehnike spajanja i razdvajanja materijala, Metalurški fakultet, Zagreb, 2008.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

T. Filetin, Pregled razvoja i primjene suvremenih materijala, Hrvatsko društvo za materijale i tribologiju, Zagreb, 2000.
S. Brkić, Nehrđajući čelici u farmaceutskoj, prehrambenoj i kemijskoj industriji, DeVeDe d.o.o., Zagreb, 2007.
F. Kovačićek, D. Španicek, Materijali, osnove znanosti o materijalima, FSB, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2000.
E. Stupnišek-Lisac, Korozija i zaštita konstrukcijskih materijala, Fakultet kemijskog inženjerstva i tehnologije Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb 2007.
ASM Handbook, volume 10, Materials characterization, ASM International, USA, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Measuring and control technique
NAME OF THE COURSE Measuring and control technique

Code

KTL206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Renato Stipišić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of knowledge in working with measuring instruments to control the process and the acquisition of knowledge in the theory of process control.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- basic principles of measuring instruments
- choose a quality instrument is required to measure the physical quantities essential for process control
- spot the sources of error in measuring
- principles of automatic process control
- elements of the control loop and their assignment

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Description and view the contents of the lecture. The principles of the measurement. General characteristics of the measuring instruments.
2nd week: Pressure Measurement. Division of pressure instruments. Liquid manometers.
3rd week: Manometers with solid weights. Deformation manometers. Vakuummeters.
4th week: Temperature measurement. Dilatation thermometers. Thermocouples.
5th week: Heat resistant thermometers. Radiation pyrometers.
6th week: Flow measurement. Dynamic flowmeters. Surface flowmeters.
7th week: Turbine flowmeters. Flowmeters based on fluid properties.
8th week: Ionization flowmeters. The ultrasonic flowmeters. Fluid velocity sensors.
9th week: Level measurement of liquids and solids.
Examination I
10th week: Introduction to process control. Basic concepts and procedures.
11th Week: Types of process control. Examples process control.
12th week: The outline view of the control loop. Property of the control loop.
13th week: Synthesis and analysis of the control loop.
14th week: Regulators.
15th week: Control valves. Other components in the control loop.
Examination II
Exercises:
1. Static characteristics of the measuring instrument.
2. Dynamic characteristics of the measuring instrument.
3. Simulation of kinetics.
4. Laplace transforms.
5. Systems of first order.
6. Determination of transfer functions.
7. Analysis of system with no controller and with P and PI controller.
8. Analysis of the chemical reactions kinetics.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at lectures in the amount of 80% of the hourly rate.
Attendance of the exercises in the amount of 100% of the hourly rate.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

1.5

Experimental work

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two written exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each exam involved in the assessment with 50%. The examination periods shall be taken oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Rating: 60 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Božičević Temelji automatike I, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

16

J. Božičević Temelji automatike II, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

16

R. Žanetić, R. Stipišić, Mjerni pretvornici u procesnoj industriji, Skripta za internu upotrebu, KTF- Split, 2005.

3

web

R. Žanetić, Vođenje procesa u proizvodnji, Skripta za internu upotrebu, KTF- Split, 2006.

3

web

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Seborg, D. E., T. F. Edgar & D. A. Mellichamp, Process Dynamics and Control, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2010.
W. Altman, D. Macdonald, Practical Process Controlfor Engineers and Technicians, Elsevier, London, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Polymerization processes
NAME OF THE COURSE Polymerization processes

Code

KTL207

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- knowledge about mechanisms of polymerization reactions (step-growth and chain growth) and their technological implementation
- ability to work in the production facilities and/or laboratories
- understanding the importance of polymers in modern society

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to:
- differentiate the basic types of polymers
- differentiate the basic polymerization reaction
- explain the basic parameters of the polymerization processes
- explain which commodity polymers are obtained by which polymerization reaction
- to perform selected polymerization reaction at laboratory scale
- conclude about the importance of polymers in modern society
- use the acquired knowledge in engineering practice

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: introduction, the historical development of synthetic polymers, nomenclature, types of polymers, world production of polymers, polymer applications.
2nd week: the production of monomers (from non-renewable and renewable resources). Polymerization reactions: step-growth and chain reactions.
3rd week: step-growth polymerization - characteristics, mechanism, kinetics, Carothers equation.
4th week: the average molecular weight - definition, types. Molecular weight distribution in step-growth polymerization. Step-growth copolymerization.
5th week: thermoplastic polymers of step-growth polymerization: polyesters (poly(ethylene terephthalate), polycarbonate), polyamides (aliphatic, aromatic), polyimides, polysulfones, polyurethanes.
6th week: thermoset polymers of step-growth polymerization: unsaturated polyesters, alkyd polymers, formaldehyde polymers, epoxies.
7th week: repetition, discussion, conclusions. Continuous assessment (the first colloquium).
8th week: chain polymerization - characteristics Radical polymerization - initiators, mechanism, kinetics. Radical copolymerization - types of copolymers, kinetics.
9th week: polymers of radical polymerization and copolymerization: polyethylenes and copolymers, polystyrene and copolymers, poly(vinyl chloride), acrylic polymers.
10th week: anionic polymerization - catalysts, mechanism, kinetics. Anionic ”living” polymerization. Anionic polymers: copolymers of butadiene and styrene, polysiloxanes.
11th week: cationic polymerization: catalysts, mechanism, kinetics. Cationic ”living” polymerization. Cationic polymers: polyoxymethylene, polyisobutene, poly(tetrahydrofurane) .
12th week: coordination (stereospecific) polymerization and copolymerization - catalysts, mechanism, kinetics. A coordination polymers: polypropylene, polyisoprene, polybutadiene, ethylene/propylene/diene copolymer.
13th week: the technical implementation of polymerization processes: homogeneous polymerization processes (in mass, in solution) and heterogeneous polymerization processes (in mass, in solution, in the gas phase, suspension polymerization, emulsion polymerization, interfacial polycondensation)
14th week: the industrial plants for production of commodity polymers (polyethylene, polypropylene, poly(vinyl chloride), polystyrene and poly(ethylene terephthalate))
15th week: final lecture, discussion, conclusions. Continuous assessment (the second colloquium).
Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1. Synthesis of phenol-formaldehyde resin.
Exercise 2. Polyesterification of adipic acid with diethylene glycol.
Exercise 3. Synthesis of modified alkyd resin.
Exercise 4. Suspension polymerization of styrene.
Exercise 5. Emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate.
Exercise 6. Preparation of poly(vinyl alcohol ) by alcoholysis of poly(vinyl acetate).
Exercise 7. Synthesis of polyamide 610 by interfacial polymerization

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount, and laboratory exercises in the 100% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.3

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.7

Written exam

0.7

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 35% in a final grade. Laboratory exercises (50-100% success) participate with 20% in a final grade, while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 40%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa, Zagreb, 1997.

2

Web stranice KTF-a

R. O. Ebewele, Polymer Science and Technology, CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, 2000.

1

H. Ulrich, Introduction to Industrial Polymers, Hanser, Munich, 1992.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. R. Stanley, W. Karo, J. Bonesteel, E. M. Pearce, Polymer Synthesis and Characterization: A Laboratory Manual, Academic Press, San Diego, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Materials in the construction engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Materials in the construction engineering

Code

KTL208

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring basic theoretical and practical knowledge about the materials used in construction as well as manufacturing process conditions and preparation of composite materials. Acquiring basic Principe about the methods of characterization and protection of materials in the different environment conditions of use.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
1. Prepare samples for standard test procedures in construction materials
2. Conduct tests of physical and chemical parameters essential for mineral binders in accordance with the procedures prescribed standard norms for mineral binders
3. Assess the type of bonding material suitable for use in a variety of application conditions of building materials
4. Prepare mortars and concretes by default specifications
5. Evaluate materials suitable for waterproofing

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1.Week L Description and overview of the course contents. Introductory remarks. The division of materials and their properties, Natural materials, Artificial materials, Materials applied as a structural and / or insulating materials
E
2.Week L Physical and mechanical properties of materials, Chemical properties of the material. Checking the quality of the material.
E
3.Week L The basics of building materials (stone, wood, building ceramics, glass, metals, polymeric materials). Mineral binders (air and hydraulic binders). Mortars and plasters.
E
4.Week L The processes of thermal decomposition of carbonate and technology of production the lime as mineral binder. Standard test methods and characterization of lime
E Preparation of lime and measure the reactivity of lime
5.Week L Technology of production of gypsum, and its application as construction materials, Standard methods for testing gypsum for application as construction materials
E
6.Week L The First colloquium
E
7.Week L Technology for production of Portland cement. Standards and types of the cements, Chemical and mineralogical composition of the cement.
E Determination of the specific surface area, density and particle size of the cement as mineral binder.
8.Week L Cement hydration. Cements for special purposes. Mineral admixtures for cement
E Determination of normal consistency, time for start and end of setting time. Determination of constancy of cement composites volume.
9.Week L Chemical additives for cement. The quality control of cement. Cement mortars. Examination of physical properties of mortars
E Preparation of cement mortars with and without additives, rheological properties of cement composites (mortar, concrete)
10.Week L The technology of preparation of concrete. Test methods for testing production of concrete and produced hardened concrete. Concrete for special purposes. Aggregates for the preparation of concrete, Production of concrete aggregates, The physical properties of aggregates. Methods of testing aggregates.
E Testing of the mechanical properties of cement mortars
11.Week L Resistance cements composites in terms of exposure to aggressive environments. Additives used to increase the durability and stability of the composite materials, Methods of monitoring (monitoring) the condition of structures,
E Rapid method of measuring the resistance to penetration of cement composites chloride
12.Week L Clay and clay minerals as mineral raw materials for production of building materials.
E Determination of capacity exchange cations (CEC value) of clays minarals
13.Week L Materials suitable for thermal and sound insulation used as construction materials
E
14.Week L Waterproofing materials used for protection and decoration of constructions. Techniques and methods of repairing of the buildings.
E Adhesion of waterproofing materials on concrete (pull off test)
15.Week L The Second colloquium
E

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.7

Report

0.3

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.6

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 50% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 40% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 50% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 25% and verbal has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and oral exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam and oral part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 50%-61% - sufficient, 62%-74% - good, 75%-87% very good, 88%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. Đureković; Cement, cementni kompozit i dodaci za beton, Školska knjiga, Zagreb 1996.

1

H.F.W. Taylor; Cement chemistry, 2nd edition, Thomas Telford Publishing, Thomas Telford Services Ltd, London, 1997.

1

Pierre-Claude Aïtcin, Sidney Mindess; Sustainability of Concrete, Spon Press, Oxon 2011.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Corrosion and metals protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Corrosion and metals protection

Code

KTL209

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Maja Kliškić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

After completed course students will have acquired knowledge necessary to prevent corrosion and solve problems caused by corrosion.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completed course students will be able to:
- define and classify corrosion processes
- determine the possible application of certain metallic materials in specific corrosive environments
- implement the necessary corrosion tests
- choose an adequate system of protection against corrosion under specific conditions and assess its durability

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Definition and importance of corrosion. Classification of corrosion processes.
2nd week: Chemical corrosion.
3rd week: Electrochemical corrosion. Passivity.
4th week: The types of electrochemical corrosion of metals. Corrosion rate.
5th week: Corrosion of metallic materials - influence of the media.
6th week: Corrosion under specific conditions: in the atmosphere, water, sea water.
7th week: Corrosion in the soil.
8th week: Corrosion caused by microorganisms.
First test
9th week: Corrosion protection by materials selection and proper designing.
10th week: Materials protection using corrosion inhibitors.
11th week: Electrochemical methods of protection.
12th week: Surface protection. Selection of coatings and paints.
13th week: The importance of inspection and maintenance.
14th week: Corrosion tests.
15th week: Standards.
Second test.
Laboratory exercises: Monitor of atmospheric corrosion. Investigations of metals corrosion rate by polarization methods. Determination of critical pitting temperature of stainless steels. Optical microscopy investigations of corroded metal surfaces. Protection of aluminum and its alloys by anodizing and treatment of the oxide film. Determination of efficiency of organic corrosion inhibitors. Cathodic protection by protector (sacrificial anode)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 40% and exercises with 20%. On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: - 60% insufficient, 61 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.R. Davis, Corrosion – understanding the basic, ASM International, 2000.

1

B. Jarić, A. Rešetić, Korozija i katodna zaštita, Korexpres, Zagreb, 2003.

1

I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Babolan, Corrosion Tests and Standards, Amer. Tech. Pulbl. Ltd. New York, 1995.
P. Marcus, J. Oudar (Eds.), Corrosion Mechanisms in Theory and Practice, M. Dekker, New York, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Technology of the pretreatment of raw water
NAME OF THE COURSE Technology of the pretreatment of raw water

Code

KTL210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic theoretical knowledge about the quality of raw water as well as modern technologies, which are used in the purpose of the preparation raw water for the different industry. Acquiring basic practical knowledge about the management and process control water softening.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
- Identify the basic physical and chemical properties of water
- Assess according to set requirements on the quality of the feed water softening appropriate procedure
- Determine the effectiveness of the technological process of softening water
- Apply the means for softening water

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1.Week L Introductory lecture and notes related to the course, Water and its physical and chemical properties
E
2.Week L Water in nature, Global hydrological cycle of water, Physical and chemical properties of surface and groundwater, Pollution of the ground and surface water. Regulations on water quality
E
3.Week L Technical features of water for industry, Technological parameters of water quality, Chemical composition and water modes and interpretation of results, Measurement marks and names
E
4.Week L Water as a working fluid in Chemical Engineering, Requirements for water quality in the implementation of technological processes of the chemical industry. General conditions for the quality of the water in heating unit systems, Standards for thermodynamic properties of water (IFC, IAPWS-IF97)
E
5.Week L Salts dissolved in the raw water, Defining the hardness of water and salts which makes the water hardness, Units of measure and mark, Methods of determining water quality.
E
6.Week L Gases dissolved in the raw water, the possible adverse effects on the process equipment. Methods of the degasification water.
E
7.Week L Preparation of process water for thermal power plants, sludge formation and the related negative effects on the process equipment and economy, First test
E Laboratory methods for determining physical and chemical properties of the raw water
8.Week L The processes of preparation raw water by application sedimentation process, Theory of the sedimentation, Water softening agents for sedimentation procedures, Methods for control optimal addition of chemicals and implementation process of softening water.
E Water treatment by combination of the chemical precipitation processes and filtration process, with the use of the lime as a precipitant in a fast reactor
9.Week L The processes of the preparation of process water chemical clarification, Theoretical fundamentals about the processes and agents for coagulation, agglomeration, sedimentation and flotation, Parameters that affect the implementation process, How to choice of chemicals for clarification, Process Equipment.
E Chemical clarification raw waters by application of sedimentation and flocculation process simultaneous together with the process of decarbonization in the accelerator
10.Week L Application of filters devices for the preparation of process water, Types and characteristics of filter cartridge, Effects of application the filter unit, Speed and capacity of filtration, Process equipment for filtration,
E
11.Week L Application of ion exchangers in the preparation of process water, Types and classification of ion exchangers. Physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers, How to applied ion exchangers and cycles of lifetime of ion exchangers, Regeneration process of the ionic mass
E Softening raw water by using neutral type of the ionic exchangers in the process and regeneration of ion exchange resin.
12.Week L The application of membrane processes for the preparation of process water, Types of membranes and their physical and chemical properties, Industrial application of the process: Reverse osmosis, Electrodeionisation
E Demineralization and deionization process waters by using ion exchange
13.Week L How to remove iron, manganese, chloric and oil from the process water, Methods and apparatus for purification
E
14.Week L Specific methods of treatment of process water for various purposes disinfection / sterilization by oxidation (Chlorination, Chlorine Dioxide, Ozone, Peroxone ...) and non oxidizing agents (UV radiation, membrane micro and ultra filtration, microfiltration layer), Water disinfection oligodynamically action of heavy metal ions
E
15.Week L Second Test
E

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

0.3

0.6

Essay

Seminar essay

0.3

Tests

0.4

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 50% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 40% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 50% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 25% and verbal has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and oral exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam and oral part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 50%-61% - sufficient, 62%-74% - good, 75%-87% very good, 88%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Šivak, Tehnologija pripreme tehničkih voda u termoenergetici, Nakladnička djelatnost Marijan Šivak, Zagreb 2002.

1

Frank Kemer, Nalkov priručnik za vodu, Savez inženjera i tehničara Srbije, Beograd, 2005.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 - monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

 

 

Methods for characterization of materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Methods for characterization of materials

Code

KTL301

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Sanja Perinović Jozić
Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of theoretical knowledge about different techniques and methods for characterization of materials, and practical knowledge about the preparation of samples and the application of simple and advanced instrumental techniques and methods.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After successful completion of the course the student will be able to:
1. optimally use numerous possibilities of individual instruments
2. conclude which instrumental technique and method can be applied to determine predicted properties of materials
3. properly prepare samples and adjust a instrument for a particular measurement, i.e. to calibrate the instrument
4. independently carry out measurements and determine basic parameters of the measured data

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. week: L Introductory notes related to the course. Structure and properties of inorganic, organic and composite materials.
E -
2. week: L Development of techniques and methods for characterization of materials throughout the history. Introduction to methods for characterization of materials. The accuracy and precision of the measurement. Statistical deviation of the measurement. Basic terminology in the instrumental characterization of materials (calibration, recalibration, baseline, standards, systematic errors..).
E -
3. week: L Physical and chemical properties of materials. Basic notations and terminology.
E -
4. week: L Electromagnetic radiation. The interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter. Instrumental methods and techniques. X-ray radiation. The interaction of X-ray radiation with electrons. The interaction of X-Ray with atoms. Basics of X-ray fluorescence techniques and methods. Calibration and calibration standards of instruments. Interpretation of the results.
E Determination of the elemental composition using fluorescence techniques.
5. week: L Basics application of X-ray diffraction on the polycrystalline samples. Determination of the basic parameters of the diffraction pattern. Industrial application diffraction technique and instrument and performance limitations.
E Rapid methods for characterization of materials using X-ray diffraction.
6. week: L Assessment of knowledge (I. test). Spectroscopic techniques and methods for characterization of materials. Theoretical background of infrared spectroscopy.
E -
7. week: L Basics interactions of infrared radiation with a matter. Important terminology related to infrared spectroscopy and its possible application. Methods suitable for a sample preparation. Methods and techniques of measurement. Practical guidelines for the measurement on infrared spectrometer.
E Application of infrared spectroscopy in the characterization of the materials.
8. week: L Theoretical background of ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Possible applications of ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Sample preparation. Practical guidance for measurement of spectra.
E Application of ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in characterization of materials.
9. week: L Introduction to thermal techniques and methods. Fundamental terminology. Types of thermal techniques and methods. Thermal analysis: Factors which influence on the results.
E -
10. week: L Theoretical background of thermogravimetry. Standards for calibration and calibration methods of thermogravimeter and differential thermal analyser. Determination of the baseline and measurement interpretation. Importance of instrument calibration, measurement program, working conditions, preparation of samples. Interpretation of thermogravimetric curves. Possible applications of thermogravimetry (examples). Mistakes that occur in the measurement.
E Determination of thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of materials with thermogravimetric method.
11. week: L Assessment of knowledge (II. test). Theoretical background of differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis. Instrumental designs of these techniques.
E -
12. week: L Importance of instrument calibration, measurement program, working conditions, preparation of samples for differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis. Standards for calibration and recalibration of instruments. Determination of a baseline and measurement interpretation. Possible applications (examples) and possible problems. Mistakes that occur in the measurement.
E Determination of thermal properties of material using differential scanning calorimetry.
13. week: L Theoretical background of the thermomechanical analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis. Construction of the thermomechanical system. Calibration of the instrument, measurement program, working conditions, sample preparation, etc. Thermomechanical curves. Possible applications (examples) and possible problems/solution.
E -
14. week: L Construction of dynamic mechanical system. Calibration of the instrument, measurement program, working conditions, sample preparation, etc. Dynamic mechanical curves. Possible applications (examples) and possible problems/solution.
E -
15. week: L Repetition of course content. Assessment of knowledge (III. test).
E -

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

0.6

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire exam can be passed over three tests during the semester. Minimum for successfully passed tests is limit of 50% of resolved test. Each test participates with a share of 25% in total grade. During the regular examination period students pass the exam over a written and oral exam. Minimum for passage is 50% of resolved test. Each previously passed test (previous activity) is valid only in the summer examination period with a share of 10% in total grade. The written exam participates with 20% (two previously passed tests) and 30% in total grade (one previously passed test), while the oral exam participates with a share of 35% in total grade. For students who will take the exam during the regular examination period only through the written and oral exam limit for passage is 50% of resolved test. The written exam participates with a share of 35% in total grade while the oral exam participates with a share of 40% in total grade.
Class attendance in the amount of 70% to 100% presents the share of 10% in total grade, while the implementation of experimental work of 100% presents the share of 15% in total grade.
Grading: 50%-61% - sufficient, 62%-74% - good, 75%-87% very good, 88%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

H. Günzler and H. Gremlich, Uvod u infracrvenu spektroskopiju, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2006.

1

T. Kovačić, Struktura i svojstva polimera, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2010.

1

Michael E. Brown, Introduction to Thermal Analysis, Techniques and Applications (2nd edition), Kluwer Academics Publishers, New York, 2004.

1

B.E. Warren, X-Ray diffraction, Dover Publications, New York, 1990.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

1. Roger N. Clark, Spectroscopy of Rocks and Minerals, and Principles of Spectroscopy, John Wiley and Sons, Inc, New York, 1999.
2. Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

polymeric materials
NAME OF THE COURSE polymeric materials

Code

KTL302

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

25

5

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining the basic theoretical and practical knowledge on polymeric materials, their properties and application.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Polymerization processes - enrolled.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student is able to:
- explain the temperature dependent behaviour of polymers
- differentiate the solubility of polymers vs. low-molecular substances
- identify conventional plastics on the base of their physical properties
- place the certain polymer in the pyramid of polymeric materials
- recognize the resources and application of naturally occurring polymers
- be acquainted with basic components of polymer blends and composites in order to prepare blends and composites
- explain the causes of polymer degradation.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to polymers. Plastics in modern world. History of polymers development. General terms in polymers chemistry.
2nd week: Molecular structure of polymers: configuration and conformations. Supermolecular structure of polymers.
3rd week: Physical properties and deformations of polymers. Thermomechanical curve. Mechanical properties. Stress-strain curves.
4th week: Solubility of polymers. Swelling of polymers. Polyelectrolytes and ionomers.
5th week: Resource based classification of polymers. Synthetic polymers based polymeric materials: manufacture, application, pyramid of polymers.
6th week: E, EVA, PP, PVC: properties and application.
7th week: PS: homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers, cellular PS, properties and application.
First test.
8th week: Principles of impact strength modification using styrene terpolymers. PET, PAs and other polymers. Thermosets: epoxide resins, unsaturated polyester resins, vinyl-ester resins.
9th week: Phenol-formaldehyde resins. Thermosets hardening reactions. Elastomers. Thermoplastic elastomers. Naturally occurring polymers. Cellulose and its derivatives.
10th week: Starch and other polysaccharides. Proteins: structure and conformations. Natural rubber and its derivatives. Vulcanization. Rubber products (tyres, expanded rubber etc.)
11th week: Inorganic polymers. Liquid crystalline polymers. Biodegradable polymers. High-temperature polymers. Fibers: cellulose fibers.
12th week: Modified cellulose fibers. Protein fibers. Synthetic fibers. Behavior of fibers on burning. Adhesives. Surface coatings.
13th week: Additives in polymeric materials. Degradation of polymers. Heat and photo stabilizers. Antioxidants. Plasticizers. Antistatic agents.
14th week: Polymer blends. Composites with polymer matrix. Plastic and rubber recycling.
15th week: Second test.
Laboratory exercises: Solvents and non-solvents for polymers. Swelling of polymers. Density determination. PVC modification. Separation and identification of components in polymeric materials. Identification of natural and synthetic polymers by burning tests. Preparation of casein glue.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.5

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.9

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 50 % and the fraction of each test is 35 %. The fraction of laboratory exercises (successfulness 50-100%) is 20% in all cases. Attendance on lectures (80-100%) is further 10 % of final grade. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 50 %). Previous activity (one passed test) is valid in the winter exam period with fraction of 10%. Written exam is 30% and oral exam is 40% of final grade. Students without any successful previous activity attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 50 %) both with fraction of 40%.
Grades: successful (50% – 61 %), good (62% – 74 %), very good (75% – 87 %), excellent (88% – 100 %).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

B. Andričić: Polimerni materijali, recenzirana predavanja, ppt, 2010.

0

Web stranice KTF-a

Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, HDKI-Kemija u industriji, Zagreb, 1997.

5

B. Andričić, Prirodni polimerni materijali, Priručnik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2008.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

T. A. Oswald, G. Menges, Material Science of Polymers for Engineers, Hanser Publ., Munich, 1995.
I. M. Campbell, Introduction to Synthetic Polymers, Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Industrial wastewaters
NAME OF THE COURSE Industrial wastewaters

Code

KTL303

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

27

3

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students get to know the source and types of wastewaters, the indicators of their pollution, wastewater treatments and the methods of wastewater sludge disposal.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- wastewater treatment and relationship with sustainable development
- sources and types of waste water and their characteristics
- processes of the preliminary, first, second and third phase of wastewater treatment
- selection of processes of wastewater treatment based on wastewater characteristics and composition
- biogas production and its useful application
- disposal of sludge remain after treatment of wastewater from different industries
- natural wastewater treatment systems
- legislation related to wastewater treatment

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Water importance for human. Water use. Water distribution on the Earth. Hydrological cycle. Importance of hydrological cycle on recovery of water source. Seminar with examples of purification of waste water from different industries is given to students.
2nd week: Fresh water supply on Earth. The impact of anthropogenic activities on the hydrological cycle. Water and sustainable development. Contamination and pollution of natural water.
3rd week: Wastewater pollution indicators. Point and nonpoint source of pollution.
4th week: Urban wastewater. Industrial wastewater. (I written evaluation)
5th week: Cooling wastewater. Rainfall wastewater. Leachate wastewater from landfill. Calculation of the wastewater loading with harmful substances expressed as population equivalent (PE)
6th week: Physical, chemical and biological process of autopurfication. Disorders of aquatic ecosystems. Eutrophication.
7th week: Wastewater treatment. Preliminary and first phase of wastewater treatment
8th week: Second phase of biological wastewater treatment. Aerobic processes. (II written evaluation)
9th week: Performance of aerobic process. Anaerobic processes. Third phase of wastewater treatment. Natural wastewater treatment systems.
10th week: Treatment and disposal of sludge.
11th week: Seminar- Legislation related to wastewater treatment: Water Act (NN 153/09, 130/11, 56/13), Regulation on water classification (NN 77/98 i 137/08), State water protection plan (NN 08/99), Regulation on hazardous substances in water (NN 78/98 i 137/08) Regulation on limit values and other hazardous substances in water (NN 40/99, 94/08), Regulation on limited values of emission in wastewater (80/13). (III written evaluation)
12th week: Seminar: Technological solution of wastewater treatment from different industries (beer production, production and processing of meat and meat products, fish processing and dairy industry)
13th week: Seminar: Technological solution of wastewater treatment from different industries (pulp and paper industries, textile industries, chemical industries)
14th week: Seminar: Technological solution of urban wastewater treatment from different cities such as Zagreb, Split and Zadar
15th week: Seminar: Oral presentation of student seminars (IV oral evaluation)
Exercise 1-Determination of basic physical and physical-chemical parameters in wastewater samples.
Exercise 2-Determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using dichromate method.
Exercise 3-Determination of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) using Winkler method.
Exercise 4-Treatment and removal of dissolved substance of heavy metals - zinc ions removal from wastewater by neutralization and precipitation.
Exercise 5-Effect of adding demulsifies and dewatering agent on separation of phase from oily wastewater.
Exercise 6-Characterisation of bioactive sludge: sedimentation of active sludge in Imhofe and determination of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) of active sludge
Fieldtrips for visiting of wastewater treatment plants.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars, laboratory exercises and field work 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.2

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Every laboratory exercises include oral exam before exercise and writing of final report. The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation and one oral evaluation of seminar during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 70% -80% - good, 80% -90% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Hendricks, Water treatment unit processes, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, 2006.

1

Metcalf & Eddy, Wastewater Engineering, Irwin McGraw-Hill, New York, 1991

1

B. Tušar, Pročišćavanje otpadne vode, Kigen d.o.o. i Geotehnički fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2009.

1

B. Tušar, Ispuštanje i pročišćavanje otpadne vode, Croatiaknjiga, Zagreb, 2004.

0

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, HDGI, Zagreb, 1997.

1

J. Margeta: Oborinske i otpadne vode: teret onečišćenja i mjere zaštite; Sveučilište u Splitu, Građevinsko-arhitektonski fakultet, Split, 2007.

1

J. Perić, N. Vukojević Medvidović, I. Nuić, Inženjerstvo otpadnih voda, Priručnik za laboratorijske vježbe, Kemijsko tehnološki fakultet Sveučilišta u Splitu, lipanj 2012. (http://www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/inzenjerstvo_otpadnih_voda.pdf).

0

web

Znanstveni i stručni radovi iz područja obrade otpadnih voda

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.T. Wright and B.J. Nebel, Environmental Science, 9th edition, Prentice Hall Inc, New Jersey, 2004.
L.D. Benefield, et al., Process Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Treatment, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1982.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Coatings
NAME OF THE COURSE Coatings

Code

KTL304

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining the basic theoretical and practical knowledge on structure and characteristics of paint and surface coatings, industrial paint-making processes, as well as on application of coatings in different fields.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student should be able to:
- define types and functions of coatings
- list components of coatings and to explain its characteristics
- describe manufacturing process of coatings
- explain importance of rheological characteristics of coatings
- perform experiment and measurement in laboratory and to interpret collected data
- participate in team work and to present results of project

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction: characteristics, definitions and historical development of coatings,
2nd week: Classification and application of coatings. Composition of coating and role of basic components.
3rd week: Binders: Natural polymers, Oils and fatty acids, Oleoresinous media
4th week: Alkyd resins, Polyurethane and urethane alkyd,
5th week: Acrylic polymers, Amino resins
6th week: Phenol-formaldehyde resins, Epoxy resins, Polyester resins
7th week: Vinyl polymers, Silicone resins, Chlorinated rubber
8th week: Emulsion and dispersion polymers, Non-aqueous dispersion polymers, Water-borne systems
Written test (first)
9th week: Resins for electrodeposition, High solids coatings, Radiation-curing coatings, Powder-coatings compositions.
10th week: Pigments: required qualities of pigments, pigment classification, particulate nature of pigments and the dispersion process, corrosion-inhibiting pigments.
11th week: Solvents and thinners, solvent power, solubility parameters, solvent effect on viscosity, evaporation solvent from coatings
12th week: Additives for coatings
13th week: Industrial paint-making process, methods of dispersion and machinery
14th week: Rheological properties of coatings: definitions, solution and dispersion viscosity, viscosity of polymer solutions,
15th week: Rheology of coatings during manufacture, storage and application, Methods of coating application.
Written test (second)
Laboratory exercise:
1. Synthesis of polymer suitable as resin for organic coating; Analysis of raw materials and product
2. Analysis of alkyde and acrylic coatings by FT-IR spectroscopy
3. Analysis of coating by DSC
4. Determination of volatile matter in coatings
5. Determination of thermal stability of coatings by TG

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

3.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

CONTINUOUS EVALUATION
The complete exam can be passed through two partial tests during semester.
Attendance on lectures, A1(successfulness =70 -100 %), share in grade, k1 =0,10
Laboratory exercises, A2(successfulness =50 -100 %), share in grade, k2 =0,20
1st test, A3 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k3 =0,35
2nd test, A4 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k4 =0,35
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,20A2 + 0,35A3+ 0,35A4
FINAL EVALUATION
Students who did not take or pass partial tests have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods.
Activities A1 and A2 are evaluated in the same way as indicated above.
Written exam, A5 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k5 =0,20
Oral exam, A6 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k6 =0,40
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,15A2 + 0,20A5 + 0,40A6
FINAL GRADE: successful (50% – 61 %), good (62% – 74 %), very good (75% – 87 %), excellent (88% – 100 %).
In the case that student passed only one test during continuous evaluation, he/she have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods. The passed test will be recognized by the end of the academic year as a part of the written exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Stipanelov Vrandečić: Premazi, nastavni materijali, 2010.

0

mrežne stranice KTF-a

I.R. Lambourne and T.A. Strivens (Edit.), Paint and surface coatings, Woodhead publishing Ltd., Cambridge, 1999.

1

D. Stoye and W. Freitag, Resins for Coatings, Hanser Publisher, Cincinnati, 1996.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Janović: Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa , Zagreb, 1997

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Durability of non-metallic materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Durability of non-metallic materials

Code

KTL305

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Jelica Zelić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

26

4

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring basic theoretical knowledge about the processes of decay and corrosion in the resistance and durability assessment of commercial inorganic non-metallic materials under natural conditions of their application

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Materials in cnstruction engineering, Corrosion and protection of metals

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Distinguish the mechanism of corrosion of metals and non-metals
- Categorize the types of chemical corrosion of concrete, mortar and cement composites as a result of the interaction of concrete (mortar, cement composite) and aggressive environment
- A model to explain the chemical action of seawater on concrete or reinforced concrete
- Assess the impact of atmospheric corrosion and deterioration of technical and decorative stone
- To predict the effects of alkali-aggregate reaction
- Assess the impact of pozzolanic additives and other additives (for example, finely ground limestone) on the prevention of corrosion and improve the durability of concrete, mortar and cement composites
- Explain the process of wear and / or corrosion of technical glass surface under the influence of atmospheric
- Apply the methods of testing the impact of the aggressive environment on the durability of structures
- Evaluate and propose protection measures in order to improve the durability of selected inorganic non-metallic materials.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week : Description and view the contents of the case. Economic and ecological significance of material protection. Types of corrosion and destructive phenomena in corrosion of metals and non-metals.
2nd week : Technical important non-metallic inorganic materials . The relationship of the structure and properties of materials in the evaluation of their resistance and durability of the natural conditions of their application.
3rd week : Influencing factors in the breakdown structure of concrete , mortar and cement composites . Types and mechanisms of chemical corrosion depending on the aggressive environment.
4th week : Chemical corrosion in soil , seawater and process industry . Selected examples of chemical corrosion betoba and reinforced concrete structures. Sulfuric corrosion, products and effects of concrete corrosion
5th week : Influence of cement , sulphate concentrations , types of cations bonded to the sulfate ion , temperature and exposure time on corrosion rate of concrete.
6th week : Test methods . Protection measures in practice .
7th week : New composite materials with high corrosion resistance and durability .Repetition of material . Examination (I colloquium ) .
8th week : Rocks. Definition. Division. The structure of the stone and the application
9th week : Influencing factors in the breakdown of the structure of technical and decorative stone . Types and mechanisms of chemical corrosion depending on the aggressive environment . Alkali- silica reaction . Causes and consequences .
10th week : Chemistry emergence of ”black crust ” on the rock carbonate origin ( limestone, marble ) and wear of the stone under the influence of environmental factors (H2O , SO2 , CO2 , soot ) . Mediterranean patina . Hypothesis formation.
11th week : Test methods . Protection measures in practice.
12th week : Glass. Definition. Composition of technical glass. Holders of the structure and types of technical glass.
13th week : The kinetics and mechanism of wear and / or corrosion of the glass surface by weathering . Hydration and hydrolysis of Na- silicate glass.
14th week : Hydrolytic resistance of glass . Test methods. Protection measures.
15th week : Repetition . Examination (II colloquium).
EXERCISES :
1. Determination of sulphate resistant cement mortar samples in a solution of Na2SO4
a) without replacement supplements
b ) to the alternate addition of siliceous
c ) to the alternate addition of finely ground limestone
by measuring the strength ( compressive and flexural ) cement mortar , modulus of elasticity, volume due to swelling, and amounts of the unleached calcium hydroxide.
2. Determination of sulphate resistant cement mortar samples in a solution of MgSO4
a) without replacement supplements
b ) to the alternate addition of siliceous
c ) to the alternate addition of finely ground limestone
by measuring the strength (compressive and flexural ) cement mortar, modulus of elasticity, volume change due to swelling, and amounts of the unleached calcium hydroxide.
3. Determination portlandita methods of thermal analysis (DTA / TG) in the hydrated cement mortar samples with and without pozzolanic additions.
4. Testing effect of acid on different types of rocks. Testing of alkali - aggregate reaction.
5. Characterization of ” Mediterranean patina ” on the rock carbonate origin FTIR method.
6. Determination of hydraulic resistance of technical glass.
7. Visual observation of objects on the ground, and field trials.
8. Seminar essay

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 45%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one colloquium (previous activity) is true in the summer examination period with a share of 10% in the assessment. Written exam has a share of 40% and 50% verbal. Students who have not passed the exam by tests take the examination through written and oral exams in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 71% -81% - good, 82% -92% very good, 93% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Zelić, Z. Osmanović, Čvrstoća i trajnost cementnih kompozita, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet Sveučilišta u Splitu, 2014. (u postupku recenzije)

1

www.ktf-split.hr

J. Zelić, Praktikum iz procesa anorganske industrije, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013.

1

www.ktf-split.hr

Z. Osmanović, J. Zelić, Proizvodnja Portland-cementa, univerzitetski udžbenik, Univerzitet u Tuzli,Tuzla, 2011.

5

www.knjiga.ba http://www.knjiga.ba/proizvodnja_portlandj_cem

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Zelić, Engineering of Selected Inorganic Materials, sveučilišni udžbenik (na engleskom jeziku), Sveučilište u Splitu u Splitu, Split, 2013. , u postupku recenzije
J. Zelić, Engineering of Selected Inorganic Materials/Inženjerstvo odabranih anorganskih materijala, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2013. http:// www.ktf-split.hr/bib/nm/Inzenjerstvo_odabranih_anorganskih_materijala_en.pdf
R. A. McCauley, Corrosion of Ceramics Materials, 3rd Ed., CRC Press, 2013.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Solid waste and recycling
NAME OF THE COURSE Solid waste and recycling

Code

KTL306

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

10

5

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will get the basic knowledge about environmental pollution with solid waste, the causes of its formation and its impact on the environment. They will also learn about the possibilities of solving the waste problems by separating the components of solid waste that can be used as raw materials for production of new usable products or energy production.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Distinguish types of solid waste.
- Compare methods of waste segregation.
- Present ways of utilization of various types of waste.
- Interpret waste management legislation in Croatia.
- Describe the basic features of communal landfills.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Definition of waste and basic terms related to waste. Types and distribution of solid waste.
2nd week: Hazardous waste.
3rd week: Transfer of pollutants through the soil and its interaction with the soil.
4th week: Collection, transport, separation and mechanical processing of solid
waste.
5th week: Getting usable materials from solid waste. Direct recycling and recycling
systems.
6th week: Sanitary waste disposal. Composting.
7th week: Thermal treatment and pyrolysis. (I. partial written exam).
8th week: Energy production from solid waste.
9th week: Production of ethanol end methane from biomass.
10th week: Processing of waste from agro-industry and agriculture. Waste disposal from forestry.
11th week: Management of the pesticides packaging waste.
12th week: Recycling of paper and textile materials.
13th week: Tyres recycling.
14th week: Electrical and electronic waste. Automobile and household batteries.
15th week: Landfills. (II partial writen exam)
LABORATORY EXERCISES:
The beneficial use of citrus peel. Production of ethanol by distillation of fermented grape marc. Production of calcium tartarate. Processing the recycled paper.
Separation and recycling of metallic materials. Fieldwork on landfill Karepovac.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80%. Laboratory exercises 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 50%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 50%.
On examination shedule students will have oral exam.
Scoring: - 50% insufficient, 50%-60% - sufficient, 61% -74% - good, 75% -87% very good, 88% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

G. Tchobanoglous, F. Kreith, Handbook of solid waste management, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2002.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kalambura, T. Krička, D. Kalambura, Gospodarenje otpadom, Veleučilište Velika Gorica, 2011.
N. P. Cheremisinoff, Handbook of solid waste menagement and waste minimization technologies, Butterworth Heinemann, USA, 2003.
M. Kliškić, Kruti otpad i recikliranje, upute za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Processing and recycling of polymers
NAME OF THE COURSE Processing and recycling of polymers

Code

KTL307

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

15

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Understanding the modern polymer processing procedures
- Understanding the modern methods of polymer waste recovery
- The application of acquired knowledge in finding optimal solutions in the processing and recycling of polymers

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to:
- understand the properties and behavior of the polymer during processing and application
- explain the importance of polymer additives
- describe the main polymer processing procedures
- identify and classify components of plastic waste
- differentiate between material and energy recovery of polymer waste
- select the optimal methods of waste recovery
- conclude on the importance of polymers in modern society

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: types of polymers. Polymer processing properties (thermal properties).
2nd week: polymer processing properties - continued (mechanical properties, rheology).
3rd week: additives for polymers.
4th week: primary shaping procedures: continuous (extrusion, calendering and coating).
5th week: primary shaping procedures: discontinuous (compression moulding, transfer moulding, injection moulding, casting, sintering).
6th week: secondary shaping procedures: warm and cold secondary shaping, blowing, drawing, shrinkage. Bonding, welding.
7th week: surface improvement of plastics. Production of foamy and reinforced polymer products. Environmental impacts of plastic production stage.
8th week: continuous assessment (the first colloquium). Global consumption of polymers and environmental impacts of plastic products using stage. Polymers and sustainable development.
9th week: labeling polymer products. Types of plastic waste. Homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic waste. Compatibility of polymers.
10th week: sorting procedures (plastic from other waste, plastic-plastic separation).
11th week: size reduction of plastic waste. Mechanical recycling. Primary and secondary recycling of plastic waste.
12th week: recycling of homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic waste. Chemical recycling. Solvent recycling.
13th week: energy recovery. Biodegradation. Behavior of plastic waste in the landfill and compost. Environmental impacts of the plastic recycling.
14th week: LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) method.
15th week: final comments, discussion, conclusions. Continuous assessment (the second colloquium).
Laboratory exercises :
Exercise 1. Manual sorting of plastic packaging waste.
Exercise 2. Sorting of plastic waste by float-sink method .
Exercise 3. Sorting of plastic waste by infrared spectroscopy .
Exercise 4. Effect of repeated recycling the thermal properties of polymers.
Exercise 5. Chemical recycling of poly (ethylene terephthalate).
Exercise 6. Separation and identification of additives in polymeric material.
Field work: visit to factories AD Plastik Inc., Solin and Fornix Ltd. , Dugi Rat

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount, and laboratory exercises in the 100% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.4

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

0.4

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 35% in a final grade. Laboratory exercises (50-100% success) participate with 20% in a final grade, while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 40%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A. Rogić, I. Čatić, D. Godec, Polimeri i polimerne tvorevine, Društvo za plastiku i gumu, Zagreb, 2008.

2

Web stranice KTF-a

A. Azapagic, A. Emsley, I. Hamerton, Polymers, The Environment and Sustainable Development, Wiley, 2003.

1

M. Šercer, D. Opsenica, G. Barić, Oporaba plastike i gume, mtg topograf d.o.o., Zagreb, 2000.

1

J. Scheirs, Polymer Recycling: Science, Technology and Applications, John Wiley&Sons, Chichester, 1998.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Čatić, F. Johannaber, Injekcijsko prešanje polimera i ostalih materijala, Društvo za plastiku i gumu, Zagreb, 2004.
H. F. Gilles, Jr., J. R. Wagner, Jr., E. M. Mount, III., Extrusion: The Definitive Processing Guide and Handbook, William Andrew, Inc., New York, 2005.
L. Lundquist, Y. Leterrier, P. Sunderland, J.E. Manson, Life Cycle Engineering of Plastics, Elsevier, Oxford, 2000.
A. L. Andrady, Plastics and the Environment, Wiley-Interscience 2003.
Z. Janović, Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa, Zagreb, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Composite materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Composite materials

Code

KTL308

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić
Prof Matko Erceg

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- knowledge about new composite materials with improved or special properties in the moder society
- knowledge about technologies for their production

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to:
- define and distinguish types of composite materials
- describe the processes for the preparation of composite materials
- correlate composition, structure, preparation and properties of composite materials
- conclude on the importance of composite materials in modern society

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: composites - definition, basic concepts and systematization, the historical development of composite materials, polymer composites, market, application.
2nd week : polymer matrices (thermoplastic, thermosetting) - properties, applications, advantages and disadvantages.
3rd week: polymer composites with particles and fibers (properties, characterization)
4th week: polymer composites with particles and fibers (properties of interface, adhesion, compatibility and compatibilization)
5th week: procedures for the preparation of polymer composites (manual and continuous laminating, spraying, winding, centrifugal casting, vacuum bag moulding, hot press moulding , autoclave primary shaping, compression moulding, pultrusion)
6th week: polymer nanocomposites: methods of preparation (melt intercalation, solution intercalation, in-situ polymerization, sol- gel process), properties and applications, methods of characterization
7th week: recycling of polymer composites
8th week: comments, discussion, conclusions. Continuous assessment (the first colloquium)
9th week: inorganic composite materials, types and comparison with conventional inorganic materials, overview of technologies for their preparation and applications
10th week: advanced inorganic composite materials: micro and nanostructured material, composite materials strengthened with micro and nanofibers
11th week: overview of technologies for preparation of advanced composite materials: physical, chemical and plasma vapor deposition, types and properties of composites
12th week: overview of technologies for preparation of advanced composite materials: sol-gel processes, types and properties of composites
13th week: overview of technologies for preparation of advanced composite materials: hydrothermal processes, types and properties of composites
14th week: characterization of inorganic composites, durability and recycling
15th week: final comments, discussion, conclusions. Continuous assessment (the second colloquium)
Laboratory exercises :
Exercise 1. Preparation of biodegradable polylactide/olive stone flour composites
Exercise 2. Preparation of poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites
Exercise 3. Preparation of cement composites with the addition of nanofillers
Exercise 4. Preparation of inorganic polymer nanocomposites
Exercise 5. Composite materials based on thermoplastic polymers and red mud
Exercise 6. Analysis of composite materials using infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and EDXRF technique

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount, and laboratory exercises in the 100% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.2

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.7

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.7

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 35% in a final grade. Laboratory exercises (50-100% success) participate with 20% in a final grade, while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 40%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

L.P. Durand, Composite materials research progress, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York, 2008.

1

Web stranice KTF-a

A.M. Brandt, Cement-based composites: materials, mechanical properties and performance, Taylor & Francis Group, New York, 2009.

1

W. Krenkel, Ceramic Matrix Composites, Willey-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co., Weinheim, 2008.

1

C.A. Harper, Handbook of Plastics, Elastomers, and Composites, Fourth Edition The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., New York, 2002.

1

T.W. Chou, Structure and properties of composites, Vol. 13 in Materials science and technology, R.W. Chan, P. Haasen & E.J. Kraemer, Eds., VCH Publishers Inc, New York, 1993.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Gay, Composite materials, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2003.; K.S. Mazdiyasni, Fiber reinforced ceramic composites: materials, processing, and technology, Noyes Publications, New Jersey, 1990.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Composite materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Composite materials

Code

KTL308

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- knowledge about new composite materials with improved or special properties in the moder society
- knowledge about technologies for their production

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to:
- define and distinguish types of composite materials
- describe the processes for the preparation of composite materials
- correlate composition, structure, preparation and properties of composite materials
- conclude on the importance of composite materials in modern society

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: composites - definition, basic concepts and systematization, the historical development of composite materials, polymer composites, market, application.
2nd week : polymer matrices (thermoplastic, thermosetting) - properties, applications, advantages and disadvantages.
3rd week: polymer composites with particles and fibers (properties, characterization)
4th week: polymer composites with particles and fibers (properties of interface, adhesion, compatibility and compatibilization)
5th week: procedures for the preparation of polymer composites (manual and continuous laminating, spraying, winding, centrifugal casting, vacuum bag moulding, hot press moulding , autoclave primary shaping, compression moulding, pultrusion)
6th week: polymer nanocomposites: methods of preparation (melt intercalation, solution intercalation, in-situ polymerization, sol- gel process), properties and applications, methods of characterization
7th week: recycling of polymer composites
8th week: comments, discussion, conclusions. Continuous assessment (the first colloquium)
9th week: inorganic composite materials, types and comparison with conventional inorganic materials, overview of technologies for their preparation and applications
10th week: advanced inorganic composite materials: micro and nanostructured material, composite materials strengthened with micro and nanofibers
11th week: overview of technologies for preparation of advanced composite materials: physical, chemical and plasma vapor deposition, types and properties of composites
12th week: overview of technologies for preparation of advanced composite materials: sol-gel processes, types and properties of composites
13th week: overview of technologies for preparation of advanced composite materials: hydrothermal processes, types and properties of composites
14th week: characterization of inorganic composites, durability and recycling
15th week: final comments, discussion, conclusions. Continuous assessment (the second colloquium)
Laboratory exercises :
Exercise 1. Preparation of biodegradable polylactide/olive stone flour composites
Exercise 2. Preparation of poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites
Exercise 3. Preparation of cement composites with the addition of nanofillers
Exercise 4. Preparation of inorganic polymer nanocomposites
Exercise 5. Composite materials based on thermoplastic polymers and red mud
Exercise 6. Analysis of composite materials using infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and EDXRF technique

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the 80% amount, and laboratory exercises in the 100% amount of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.2

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.3

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.7

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.7

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire exam can be passed over two colloquium during the semester. Pass threshold for each colloquium is 50%. Each colloquium participates with 35% in a final grade. Laboratory exercises (50-100% success) participate with 20% in a final grade, while attending lectures in 80-100% amount is 10% of a final grade.
Final evaluation:
One passed colloquium (previous activity) is recognized as 10% of a final grade. The remaining part is taken on written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Written exam accounts for 30%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Students who did not take or pass colloquiums take written and oral exam at prescribed examination terms. Passing threshold is 50%. Written exam accounts for 40%, oral exam for 40%, while laboratory exercises account for 20% of a final grade, respectively.
Grades definitions and percentages: sufficient (50-61%), good (62-74%), very good (75-87%), excellent (88-100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Gay, Composite materials, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2003.; K.S. Mazdiyasni, Fiber reinforced ceramic composites: materials, processing, and technology, Noyes Publications, New Jersey, 1990.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Technology and treatment of aluminium
NAME OF THE COURSE Technology and treatment of aluminium

Code

KTL310

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

12

3

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Knowledge of the technology of alumina and aluminium production
- Acquiring knowledge about aluminum processing, finalizing products and recycling of aluminum material

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Define and differentiate basic types of raw materials - bauxite
- Basics of technological process of preparing raw materials and obtaining alumina
- Basics of technological process of preparing an anode and electrolysis of alumina
- Types of aluminum alloys and processing procedures
- Ways of recycling aluminum

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction, basic properties, the importance of aluminum in the world, the amount and use of industry and everyday life
2nd week: Bauxite, species, characterization of bauxite deposits, production and prices
3rd week: Technology processing of certain types of bauxite
4th week: Bayer process of alumina obtaining
5th week: The process of obtaining graphite anodes and test raw materials, raw and baked anodes
6th week: An electrolytic cell, the basic components and structures rectifying plant for electricity supply
7th week: The process of alumina electrolysis
8th week: Assessment (first colloquium);
9th week: Refining and casting of aluminum logs and blocks
10th week: Aluminum alloy, types and properties, basic application
11th week: Processing of aluminium alloy forging
12th week: Processing of aluminium alloy casting
13th week: Recycling aluminum
14th week: Final comments, discussion, conclusions. Assessment (second colloquium).
Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1 Analysis of bauxite and alumina by EDXRF method
Exercise 2 Direct chemical coloring of aluminum
Exercise 3 Anodizing of aluminum
Exercise 4 Aluminum anodizing and coloring using eosin

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80 %, and laboratory exercises in the amount of 100 % of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.1

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

Written exam

0.1

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be applied over two exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60 %. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 35 %. Laboratory exercises participate in the evaluation of 20 %. The presence of lectures in 80-100 % amount is 10 % of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed the preliminary one, it is recognized as part of the exam and a 35 % score. The remaining part is laid in the regular examination period.
Students who have not passed any preliminary examination, written examination in the regular examination period laid the whole subject matter. Passing threshold is 60 %, and a written examination form to participate in the evaluation by 80 %. Laboratory work involved in assessing the proportion of 20 %.
Rating: sufficient (60-70 %), good (71-80 %), very good (81-90 %), excellent (91-100 %).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

G. E. Totten, D. S. MacKenzie, Handbook of Aluminum: Alloy production and materials manufacturing, Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, 2003.

1

P. G. Sheasby, R. Pinner, The Surface Treatment & Finishing of Aluminium & its Alloys, 6th Edition, ASM International, Novelty, 2004.

1

Ch. Schmitz, Handbook of Aluminium Recycling, Vulkan-Verlag GmbH, Essen, 2006.

1

P. Dabić, Predlošci za predavanja, KTF

1

Web stranice KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

K. Grjotheim, Tehnologija proizvodnje aluminija, teorija i primjena, (prijevod), Aluminium-Verlag GmbH, Düsseldorf, 1980.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Water protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Water protection

Code

KTL311

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

28

0

15

2

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will become familiar with the types, distribution and quality of water in nature, the properties of aquatic ecosystems, and the methods and legislaton to preserve their quality.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the outcome of learning to provide knowledge about:
- understanding the concepts ecosystem, biotope, biocenose, food chain
- cycling of matter and energy in the ecosystem
- abiotic and biotic ecological factors
- importance of water and its physico-chemical properties
- characteristics of fresh water and seawaters
- physical, chemical and biological indicators of water quality
- water resource management
- sustainable use of water
- water protection through preservation of good water condition, preventing the devastation of waters that are under risk, and remediation of degraded water status in order to preserve human health and the environment
- point and nonpoint sources of pollution
- protection from the harmful effects of water
- classification of fresh waters and coastal sea
- reuse of treated wastewater
- guidelines for water reuse
- legislation for wastewater and treated water
- final disposal of sludge generated in the wastewater treatment plant.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Ecosystem. Biotope. Ecological factors.
2nd week: Fresh waters. Seawater.
3rd week: Physicochemical properties of water.
4th week: Indicator of water quality.
5th week: Disorders in aquatic ecosystems quality. Eutrophication. (I written evaluation)
6th week: Autopurification of water systems
7th week: Water management. Water legislation.
8th week: Classification of fresh waters and coastal seas. The state plan for water protection.
9th week: Planning and environment management.
10th week: Conservation and improvement of water quality. (II written evaluation)
11th week: Monitoring of natural waters quality.
12th week: Legislation for effluent disposal.
13th week: Wastewaters treatment.
14th week: Field trip - visiting the technological facilities for the drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment.
15th week: Waste management and conservation of aquatic environment.
(III written evaluation)
Exercises 1-Characterization of water samples (color, taste, odor, turbidity, pH, and el. conductivity).
Exercises 2-Determination of total solids (TS), total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS) in the water sample.
Exercises 3-Adsorption of dissolved organic matter and removal of odor and color on activated carbon by batch process.
Exercises 4-Determination of organic compounds by oxidizing method with KMnO4.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars, laboratory exercises and field work 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.8

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Every laboratory exercises include oral exam before exercise and writing of final report. The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed written evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60%-70% - satisfactory, 70%-80% - good, 80%-90% very good, 90%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, HDGI, Zagreb, 1997.

1

Strategija upravljanja vodama, Hrvatske vode, AKD Zagreb, 2009.

1

D. Mayer, Kvaliteta izaštita podzemnih voda, HDZVM, Zagreb, 1993.

1

B. Tušar, Ispuštanje iprocišcavanja otpadne vode, Croatija knjiga, Zagreb, 2004.

1

D. Dikic et al.,Ekološki leksikon, Ministarstvo zaštite okoliša i prostornog uređenja RH,O.P. Springer (ur.), Zagreb, 2001.

1

Laboratorijske vježbe iz Zaštite voda (interna skripta)

0

web

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

H.D. Sharma and S.P. Lewis, Waste Containment System, WasteStabilization, and Landfills, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 1994
D. Mayer, Voda od nastanka do upotrebe, Prosvjeta, Zagreb, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Industrial waste
NAME OF THE COURSE Industrial waste

Code

KTL312

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

12

3

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- The acquisition of knowledge about the sources, types and quantities of industrial
waste material
- The possibilities of permanent and environmentally safe disposal of industrial
waste
- Recycling and getting new products.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is expected to know:
- Substances that make industrial waste
- Definitions and law prescribed limits
- Sources, types and amounts of industrial waste materials
- Recycling and getting of new products
- Permanent and environmentally safe disposal

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction, the impact on the environment , legislation on industrial waste
2nd week: Sources and types of industrial waste
3rd week: Mining and rites of raw materials and the production of harmful substances
4th week: Technological processes which produce harmful waste products – metallurgical and hydrometallurgical processes
5th week: The production of inorganic binders and building materials and industrial waste
6th week: Scrap metal working industries and recovery procedures
7th week: Construction waste and options for disposal or recovery
8th week: Assessment (first colloquium);
9th week: Technological processes using industrial waste as raw material
10th week: Technological processes of solidification and stabilization of industrial waste material
11th week: Physico - chemical characterization methods of waste
12th week: Hydration and optimization of additives in cement matrix
13th week: Methods of testing new building products with addition of industrial waste - use value
14th week: Methods of testing new products with industrial waste - ecological
acceptability - leaching tests
15th week: Final comments, discussion , conclusions. Assessment (2nd colloquium).
Laboratory exercises :
Exercise 1 Determination of heavy metals in the waste motor oil.
Exercise 2 Solidification and stabilization of mud from the galvanizing plant .
Exercise 3 Recovery of building materials - concrete, brick and glass .
Exercise 4 Analysis of cement kiln dust and usability.
Exercise 5 Recovery of saturated zeolite .
Exercise 6 Leaching tests of soil and ashes from the furnace

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80 %, and laboratory exercises in the amount of 100 % of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.1

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

Written exam

0.1

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be applied over two exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60 %. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 35 %. Laboratory exercises participate in the evaluation of 20 %. The presence of lectures in 80-100 % amount is 10 % of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed the preliminary one, it is recognized as part of the exam and a 35 % score. The remaining part is laid in the regular examination period.
Students who have not passed any preliminary examination, written examination in the regular examination period laid the whole subject matter. Passing threshold is 60 %, and a written examination form to participate in the evaluation by 80 %. Laboratory work involved in assessing the proportion of 20 %. Rating: sufficient (60-70 %), good (71-80 %), very good (81-90 %), excellent (91-100 %).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

K-Y. Show, X. Guo, Industrial Waste, InTech, Rijeka, 2012.

1

L. K. Wang, Y.-T. Hung, H.H. Lo, C. Yapijakis, Handbook of Industrial and Hazardous Wastes Treatment, Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, 2004.

1

N. L. Nemerow, Industrial Waste Treatment, Elsevier Science & Technology Books, London, 2006.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Siddique, Waste Materials and By-Products in Concrete, Springer, Berlin, 2008.
G.R. Woolley, J.J.J. Goumans, P.J. Wainwright, Waste Materials in Construction, Pergamon Press, Amsterdam, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Environmental engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Environmental engineering

Code

KTL313

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Renato Stipišić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring the knowledge required for understanding chemical engineering problems related to unit operations that are applied to protect environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Undergraduate courses: Unit Ooerations.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Basic mechanisms of mass and energy transfer
- Conservation of momentum, energy, mass
- Flow past immersed bodies.
- Separation methods.
- Equipment for sedimentation, flotation, dedusting
- Fundamental principles end equipment for adsorption
- Membrane processes

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

First week: Introduction and overview of the course content. Unit operations in environmental engineering.
Second week: Separation methods. Separator efficiency.
3rd week: Flow past immersed bodies.
4th week: Sedimentation
5th week: Sedimentation equipment.
6th week: Centrifugal sedimentation.
7th week: Centrifuges.
8th week: Hydrocyclones.
Examination I
9th week: Flotation.
10th week: Dedusting. Cyclones.
11th week: Scrubbers.
12th week: Adsorption.
13th week: Adsorption equipment..
14th week: Membrane processes.
15th week: Membrane processes.
Examination II
Exercises:
1. Granulometric analysis.
2. Sedimentation test.
3. Sedimentation – surface determination.
4. Centrifuges – particle size determination.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at lectures in the amount of 80% of the hourly rate.
Attendance of the exercises in the amount of 100% of the hourly rate.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two written exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each exam involved in the assessment with 50%. The examination periods shall be taken oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Rating: 60 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W.L. McCabe, J.C. Smith, P. Harriott, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, McGraw-Hill, 6thedition, New York, 2001.

1

M. Hraste, Mehaničko procesno inženjerstvo, HINUS, Zagreb, 2003.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 1997.
V. Koharić, Mehaničke operacije, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 1996.
H.S. Peavy, D.R. Rowe, G. Tchobanoglous, Environmental Engineering, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1985.
R. Stipišić, Operacije odvajanja u zaštiti okoliša, Skripta za internu upotrebu, KTF-Split, Split, 2011.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Introduction to entrepreneurship
NAME OF THE COURSE Introduction to entrepreneurship

Code

KTL314

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Mira Krneta

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introduction to Entrepreneurship provides (1) an overview of the definition of terms entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial activity and entrepreneur, impact of the entrepreneurship on the development and importance of entrepreneurial culture and infrastructure; (2) understanding and acquisition of practical knowledge and skills which is important for a business idea generation and evaluation in regard to market, technical and financial sustainability.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

MS Office tools (Word, Excel, PowerPoint).

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Graduates will be able to:
- Distinguish the entrepreneurship from other forms of the economic activity and entrepreneurs from small business owners.
- Define main elements of the business model for generating business ideas.
- Implement, individually and/or as a team work, process of definition, analysis and evaluation of the business idea sustainability.
- Distinguish the advantages and disadvantages of the different forms of entrepreneurial activity.
- Distinguish the different source of financing, including evaluation of the costs related to each source.
- Describe specific aspects of the business idea sustainability, in the form of written document.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction: objectives, scope and content of the course; teaching and assessment methods (team work).
2nd week: Entrepreneurship, entrepreneur, entrepreneurial process: conceptual definition of the entrepreneurship and entrepreneurs; differences between entrepreneurs, managers and owners of independent businesses; models measuring the frequency and intensity of the entrepreneurial activity; stages of the entrepreneurial process, the importance of entrepreneurial activity and impact on employment growth, competitiveness, targeted groups. Entrepreneurial propensity of participants (questionnaire: self-assessment entrepreneurial skills, entrepreneurial aptitude, expectations of participants, the skills related to MS office).
3rd week: Entrepreneurial idea, opportunity, intent and project: defining of the idea, opportunity, intent and project concept, business ideas sources, models for evaluation business ideas sustainability, the business idea and business plan differences. In teamwork, carrying out processes of business ideas, generating, ranking and defining the business ideas list.
4th week: Business model: explain of the term, main elements and benefits of defining of the business model, using of the business model’s examples, discuss with participants about the elements of a business model based on the identified business ideas. Using a business model’s template for define the elements of the business model for each of the entrepreneurial ideas.
5th week: Industry analysis: explanation of the importance of the industry analysis for entrepreneurial planning, explanation of the scope, content and methods of the industry analysis; explanation of the main elements of competition analysis, using examples. In teamwork, for each business project, determination of the corresponding industry, identification of the major trends of the industry and sources of the statistical data.
6th week: Market analysis: explanation of the market analysis importance, scope and content, possible approaches and methods; explanation of what is the market segmentation and the method of determining the target market explanation of the selling prices methods. Conducting market analysis, for each business project.
7th week: Marketing plan: explanation of the marketing strategy content and scope, the sales process activities and way of defining the promotional mix; explanation of the distribution channels content and scope. Creating a marketing plan for each business project.
8th week: Technical aspect of the entrepreneurial project: explanation of the terms, scope, content and technical aspects of the entrepreneurial planning, the importance of the definition of the project’s micro and macro location, including the environmental protection and cost. Determining the technical aspect of the entrepreneurial project: various forms of assets (fixed and current assets), the location of the project.
9th week: Technological aspect of the entrepreneurial project: explanation of the terms, scope, content of the technological aspects of entrepreneurial planning explanation of the elements of the production and business processes, business functions, and elements of the organizational structure. Identifying the way of realization of production and business processes, organizational structure, management structure, business support functions.
10th week: Assessment of investment value and source of the funding: explanation of the importance of valuation, structure and dynamics of the entrepreneurial project’s investments; explain possible sources of funding, the cost aspect of individual funding sources and method of estimating the costs of financing investment. For each entrepreneurial project: identifying the investment specific items and funding sources.
11th week: Economic aspect of the entrepreneurial project: explanation of the scope and content of the entrepreneurial project economic aspects, the elements of the entrepreneurial project economic viability. For individual projects: drawing up a table of the income and expenditure values.
12th week: Financial aspect of the entrepreneurial project: explanation of the scope and content of the entrepreneurial project financial aspects, the elements of the project’s financial viability. For individual projects: estimation of the cost of financing and the indicators of the project’s success.
13th week: Risk analysis: explanation of the concept of risk analysis and risk management, explanation of the importance of identifying potential risks and the likelihood of their occurrence; explanation of methods of risk management. For individual projects: identifying potential risks, assessing the likelihood of each risk and determining a way to avoid and reduce risks.
14th week: Sensitivity analysis: explanation of the content and scope of the entrepreneurial project sensitivity analysis, explanation of the sensitivity analysis method. At the project level, identifying the critical factors affecting the entrepreneurial project, determining the relative impact factors, conducting the sensitivity analysis of the project on the impact of each factor.
15th week: - Revision, assessment (test).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class participation and attendance – min. 80%.
Individual (team) work – project.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

1.0

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students’ assessment is performed in the regular examination periods, by passing the written and oral examinations. The written part of the exam is 40% of the total points and the oral 50%. 10% of the total points are determined on the basis of lecture attendance, participation in discussions and group work (project).
It is possible to pass the exam during the semester through: (1) passing the test (theoretical aspect of entrepreneurship), with more than 50% out of the total points, (2) successful development of the individual part of project within the group work and (3) regular attendance at lectures and participation in discussions.
Rating scale: (1) 55-65% - satisfactory, (2) 66-76% - good, (3) 77-89% - very good, (4) 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Morris, Michael; 2012.; Practical Guide to Entrepreneurship – How to turn an idea into a profitable business; KoganPage, London.

1

Spinelli, Stephen, Jr; 2012.; New Venture Creation – Entrepreneurship for the 21th Century; 9th Edition; McGraw-Hill International Edition.

1

Kuratko, Donald, F.; 2009.; Entrepreneurship Theory, Process and Practice; South-Western College Pub; 8th edition.

1

Buble, Marin; Kružić, Dejan; 2006.; Poduzetništvo – realnost sadašnjosti i izazovi budućnosti; RRIF, Zagreb.

1

Marsh, Clive; 2013.; Businee and Financial Models; KoganPage, London.

1

Pisani materijali pripremljeni za predavanja i rad u grupi (projektu).

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Barrow C.P.; Barrow R.; 2005.; Brown The Business Plan Workbook: The Definitive Guide to Researching, Writing up and Presenting a Winning Plan; 6th edition; Kogan Page; London and Philadelphia.
Bendeković, J. i sur.; 2007.; Priprema i ocjena investicijskih projekata; FOIP 1974 d.o.o., Zagreb.
European Commision; 2003.; Green Paper – Entrepreneurship in Europe; www.studentstarter.eu.
Good Finance Guide for Small Businesses: How to raise, manage and grow your company’s cash; A & C Black; London.
Leburić, A.; Krneta, M.; 2003.; Profil poduzetnika; Naklada Bošković, Split.
Nugus, N.; 2006.; Financial Planning using Excel: Forecasti

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring of students suggestions and reactions during semester
- students evaluation organized by University

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Final Thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Final Thesis

Code

KTLOZR

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

3. STUDY PERFORMANCE CONDITIONS

3.1. Places of the study performance

Buildings of the constituent part (name existing, under construction and planned buildings)

Identification of building

Zgrada tri fakulteta

Location of building

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Year of completion

2015

Total square area in m2

29500

Identification of building

Zgrada u Kaštel Sućurcu

Location of building

Kaštel Sućurac

Year of completion

1961

Total square area in m2

3000

3.2. List of teachers and associate teachers

 

Course Teachers and associate teachers

Assoc Prof Renato Tomaš

Prof Vanja Martinac

Analytical chemistry

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović
Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Chemical Calculus

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Chemical reactors

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Coatings

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Composite materials

Prof Pero Dabić
Prof Matko Erceg

Computer application

Prof Dražan Jozić

Corrosion and metals protection

Prof Maja Kliškić

Durability of non-metallic materials

Prof Jelica Zelić

Electrochemical engineering

Prof Senka Gudić

Environmental engineering

Renato Stipišić

Final Thesis

 

Fundamentals of organic chemistry

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Fundaments of mechanical structures

Prof Lovre Krstulović-Opara
Prof Željko Domazet

General and inorganic chemsitry

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Industrial waste

Prof Pero Dabić

Industrial wastewaters

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Introduction to entrepreneurship

Asst Prof Mira Krneta

Materials in the construction engineering

Prof Dražan Jozić

Mathematics

ScM Branka Gotovac
Lucija Ružman

Measuring and control technique

Renato Stipišić

Metal construction materials

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Methods for characterization of materials

Asst Prof Sanja Perinović Jozić
Prof Dražan Jozić

Physics

ScD Mirko Marušić

polymeric materials

Prof Branka Andričić

Polymerization processes

Prof Matko Erceg

Processing and recycling of polymers

Prof Matko Erceg

Proffesional practice

 

Safety at work

Prof Pero Dabić

Solid waste and recycling

Prof Ladislav Vrsalović

Technology and treatment of aluminium

Prof Pero Dabić

Technology of the pretreatment of raw water

Prof Dražan Jozić

Thermodynamics and thermotechnics

Prof Vanja Martinac

Unit operations

Renato Stipišić

Water protection

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

 

3.4. Optimal number of students

The proposed admission quota for the undergraduate study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials is 30 students. In accordance with the expressed interest and the needs of the community, the Faculty Council may change the admission quota.

3.5. Estimate of costs per student

The planned source of financing for the professional study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials is the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports. The Faculty of Chemistry and Technology currently offers professional study programme in Chemical Technology with two major fields of study: Chemical Technology and Materials and Food Technology. The study programme is fully financed by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports.
Admissions quotas for those study programmes are 20 students (Chemical Technology and Materials) and 30 students (Food Technology). With introduction of the study programme Protection and Recycling of Materials, the existing professional study programme would be terminated; therefore the introduction of the new programme would not require any additional funds.

3.6. Plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance

In keeping with the European standards and guidelines for internal quality assurance in higher education institutions (according to “Standards and Guidelines of Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area”) on the basis of which the University of Zagreb defines procedures for quality assurance, the proposer of the study programme is obliged to draw up a plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance.

Documentation on which the quality assurance system of the constituent part of the University is based:

- Regulations on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if existing)
- Handbook on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if it exists)

Description of procedures for evaluation of the quality of study programme implementation

  • Fore each procedure the method needs to be described (most often questionnaires for students or teachers, and self-evaluation questionnaire), name the body conducting evaluation (constituent part, university office), method of processing results and making information available, and timeframe for carrying out evaluation
  • If procedure is described in an attached document, name the document and the article.

Evaluation of the work of teachers and part-time teachers

Monitoring of grading and harmonization of grading with anticipated learning outcomes

Evaluation of availability of resources (spatial, human, IT) in the process of learning and instruction

Availability and evaluation of student support (mentorship, tutorship, advising)

Monitoring of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole

Student satisfaction with the programme as a whole

Procedures for obtaining feedback from external parties (alums, employers, labour market and other relevant organizations)

Evaluation of student practical education (where this applies)

Other evaluation procedures carried out by the proposer

Description of procedures for informing external parties on the study programme (students, employers, alums)