UNIST
U N I V E R S I T Y   O F   S P L I T

FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

 

 

DETAILED PROPOSAL OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Undergraduate university studij

Food Technology

 

 

 
GENERAL INFORMATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

Name of higher education institution

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Address

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Phone

021/ 329-420

Fax

021/ 329-461

E-mail

dekanat@ktf-split.hr

Internet address

https://www.ktf.unist.hr/

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Name of the study programme

Food Technology

Provider of the study programme

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Other participants

Type of study programme

Level of study programm

Academic/vocational title earned at completion of study

Bachelor of Food Technology

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Reasons for starting the study programme

The Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split has been implementing study programmes in the field of food technology and engineering since 1980s, through different major fields of study and university and professional level courses, placing special emphasis on Mediterranean orientation and agricultural crops. Following the recent reform of the study programmes, in line with the Bologna Process, the university graduate study of Chemical Technology offers courses in Mediterranean Cultures. The core subjects of the field of study include food technology, and the academic title awarded following the completion of the studies is Master of Chemical Engineering, subject field Mediterranean Cultures. In parallel, within the framework of the professional study programme in Chemical Technology, a course in Food Technology is offered, awarding a title of Associate of Chemical Engineering. Accordingly, by introducing the undergraduate study programme in chemical technology, the existing professional study programme would be terminated, followed by necessary reorganisation of graduate studies.
One of the strategic goals of the Republic of Croatia is development of food industry that can provide incentive for strong economic growth and more intensive regional cooperation. Coastal area of Croatia and the surrounding territories offer optimal conditions (mild climate, unpolluted soil and water) for food production, and these benefits need to be used to our advantage, as they are so rare in the rest of Europe.
One important reason for proposing this study programme is a lack of undergraduate study programme in food technology in the coastal parts of Croatia, although the region offers significant potential in food production and processing. According to data provided by the Croatian Chamber of Commerce in Split, there is a steady growth in the number of small food processing and production facilities. Small production facilities are mostly engaged in production and processing of food (olives, figs, grapes, spices and medicinal herbs…). The proposal for undergraduate study of food technology is oriented specifically to production technology of products typical for the coastal area, and as such provides a wide range of employment opportunities, whether in existing companies, or through establishing small specialised processing facilities.
The proposed undergraduate study programme Food Technology would educate experts earning the following qualification at completion of studies Bachelor of Food Technology, thus enabling them recognisability at the labour market. Suitably educated experts are a necessary prerequisite of success in the field of food technology.

1.2. Relationship with the local community (economy, entrepreneurship, civil society, etc.)

With the aim of offering quality education, and equipping the students with practical knowledge necessary for gaining qualifications, the undergraduate study programme in Food Technology is in close correlation with the local community. The correlation shall be manifested through cooperation with the existing companies in the field of food technology, offering field work courses and practical courses for students, cooperation with the County administration institutions (Regional Development Agency of Split-Dalmatia County, RERA), professional associations (Dalmatian Association of Olive Tree Growers and Olive Oil Producers, the Association ”Plavac mali”) and Cooperative Alliance of Dalmatia that provide support to introducing this study programme at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

1.3. Compatibility with requirements of professional organizations

One of the crucial points of the proposed study programme is consolidation with the recommendations of professional associations, namely the Dalmatian Association of Olive Tree Growers and Olive Oil Producers and Cooperative Alliance of Dalmatia and the Association ”Plavac mali”. This is manifested through specific focus of the study programme on processing of food products typical for the Mediterranean area (olives, grapes, other fruit and vegetables, aromatic herbs). Defined orientation of the study programme shall contribute to education of young professionals that would use their knowledge to advance the work of professional associations, as well as promotion of local food products.

1.4. Name possible partners outside the higher education system that expressed interest in the study programme

Potential partners outside higher education system that have expressed interest for cooperation and/or support introduction of the study programme:
- Split-Dalmatia County Institute of Public Health, Food Control Department
- the Association ”Plavac mali”
- Croatian Chamber of Commerce
- Dalmatian Association of Olive Tree Growers and Olive Oil Producers
- Cooperative Alliance of Dalmatia
- Regional Development Agency of Split-Dalmatia County (RERA)
- Town of Split

1.5. Financing

The planned source of financing for the undergraduate study programme Food Technology is the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports. The Faculty of Chemistry and Technology currently offers professional study programme in Chemical Technology, field of study: Food Technology, fully financed by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports. Furthermore, the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology currently offers undergraduate study programme in Chemical Technology, field of study: Chemical Engineering, with admission quota of 90 students. With introduction of the undergraduate study programme Food Technology, the admission quota would be proportionally reduced; therefore the introduction of the new programme Food Technology would not require any additional funds.

1.6. Comparability of the study programme with other accredited programmes in higher education institutions in the Republic of Croatia and EU countries

The proposed study programme Food Technology is basically comparable with the study programmes in food technology at the universities in Zagreb and Osijek. However, the specific nature of the proposed programme lies in its Mediterranean orientation. Furthermore, the study programme is comparable with the study programme in food technology at the University of Ljubljana, the study programme at Cork University and University of Technology in Munich, Germany:
http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/undergrad/what/sefs/foodsci/; http://www.studienfakultaet.de/content/stundenplaene.

1.7. Openness of the study programme to student mobility (horizontal, vertical in the Republic of Croatia, and international)

The study programme is organized in one-semester courses, which is one of the important prerequisites of student mobility. The programme compatibility between the undergraduate study Food Technology and similar studies provides the students with an opportunity to attend one part of the courses at other related faculties in Croatia or abroad. Consequently, the study is open towards student mobility at the University of Split as well as among other universities in Croatia with similar studies, but also towards student mobility in the wider region of Europe (e.g. through ERASMUS programme). Student mobility at national level is an assumption for quality mobility at the international level.

1.8. Compatibility of the study programme with the University mission and the strategy of the proposer, as well as with the strategy statement of the

Preparation of this study programme is in accordance with mission, vision and goals that are partly related to the University of Split Scientific Strategy 2009-2014, encouraging the university constituents to create their own internal development plans. The proposed study programme Food Technology is the only one of this type at the University of Split and in the wider region.
The proposed professional study programme is in agreement with the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology Development Strategy 2008 – 2013: implementation and optimising adopted study programmes in all fields of study, achieving compatibility with other Croatian and European higher education institutions and introduction of new educational programmes. Task 1.1 – Maintain and achieve effective ratio of different study programmes and modules. Indicator 1.1a – Number of accredited study programmes and modules. Indicator 1.1b: Percentage of flexible academic programmes. Task 1.2: Consolidate the ratio of a number of students at professional and university study programmes with labour market demands. Indicator 1.2a – Type of study programme (professional – university). Indicator 1.2b: Number and distribution (professional - university) of students - Benchmark indicator! Task 1.4: Establish undergraduate study of Mediterranean Cultures (Food Technology). Indicator 1.4: Formation document for the undergraduate study programme Mediterranean Cultures (Food Technology). Task 1.8: Increase enrolment rate from the 1st to 2nd year of study to 75% and maintain enrolment rate at over 90% at senior years of study. Indicator 1.8: Percentage of student successfully completing the first year of study. Task 1.14: Increase the number of students coming from wider region, outside the vicinity of the University of Split. Indicator 1.14: Percentage of students coming from other counties.

1.9. Current experiences in equivalent or similar study programmes

Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology has had a few decade experiences in professional study in food technology.

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

2.1. General information

Scientific/artistic area of the study programme

Biotechnical Sciences, Field: Food Technology

Duration of the study programme

3 years (6 semesters)

The minimum number of ECTS required for completion of study

180

Enrolment requirements and admission procedure

Completed 4-year secondary school and secondary school leaving exam.

2.2. Learning outcomes of the study programme (name 15-30 learning outcomes)

Bachelor of food technology would be able to:
- apply an appropriate approach to dissolve the problems using basic knowledge of mathematics, physics or chemistry
- work in the laboratory in safe and professional manner
- analyse and present collected data and results of measurement using personal computer
- list the main characteristics of food types and principles of healthy diet
- identify characteristics of raw materials for the food stuffs
- choose the appropriathe method for food analyses
- distinguish the types of reactors in food industry
- apply different metods for food conservation according good manufacturing practice
- determine and apply the categorization of raw materials, technological processes and products in food industry
- calculate the normatives necessary for processing organization in food industry
- recognize and solve the problems in technological processes of food industry
- recognize the critical control points of the process and analyse risks, apply preventional and corrective measures to ensure food safety
- apply basic law regulations from the field of food technology
- identify the sources of the waste in food industry and suggest the method of waste disposal
- apply the sanitary measures in food industry facilities
- identify the interaction in food-packaging systems
- design creative packaging solutions
- participate in the team work and independently present the professional materials.

2.3. Employment possibilities

- Croatian Chamber of Economy
- Regional Development Agency of Split-Dalmatian County
- Trenton d.o.o.
- Bioplan d.o.o.
- Dalmaconsult d.o.o.
- Lavanda d.o.o.
- Vinoline d.o.o.
- Vinarium d.o.o.
- Herba Dalmatica d.o.o.
- Dalmacija eko d.o.o.
- Sardina d.d. Postira
- Dalmed d.d.
- Apidal d.o.o.
- Olma Topić d.o.o.
- Bimita d.o.o.
- Babić d.o.o.
- Novak Makarska d.o.o.

2.4. Possibilities of continuing studies at a higher level

Higher level studies are possible at the corresponding graduated studies in Croatia and abroad as well.

2.5. Name lover level studies of the proposer or other institutions that qualify for admission to the proposed study

Not applicable.

2.6. Structure of the study

STUDY PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
Within the structure of the undergraduate study programme Food Technology, core courses are placed in the first four semesters, while the fifth and sixth semesters contain core and elective courses. With the aim of continuous improvement of the programme, updating of core and elective courses can be achieved by adding new ones. A new course is proposed by the professor to the Teaching Committee which has the authority to act towards the Faculty Council of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology. Following the second year of study, students take practical courses. The study programme is completed after passing all the exams and drafting and defending the final thesis.
ECTS
All courses are one-semester courses, carrying an appropriate number of ECTS credits. During the evaluation of ECTS credits, objective course workload and course professor estimate was taken into account. In case of subjects that are shared with the existing study programmes, the results of a student survey on awarding ECTS credits was also taken into consideration.

2.7. Guiding and tutoring through the study system

2.8. List of courses that the student can take in other study programmes

With the aim of continuing and extending their education, and strengthening and supporting professional training, especially in the context of raising awareness on the interrelation between faculties and universities, students may take courses from other study programmes that offer courses that relate or overlap with the topic of interest of this study programme. The procedure for selecting courses from other faculties is defined in the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

2.9. List of courses offered in a foreign language as well (name which language)

As a rule, the lectures and courses held at the study programme Food Technology shall be provided in Croatian language. Since there are courses included in the programme that are proposed to be taught in English, as necessary these courses will be provided in English.

2.10. Criteria and conditions for transferring the ECTS credits

The criteria and requirements for the transfer of ECTS credits are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the University of Split, Statute of the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split and Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

2.11. Completion of study

Final requirement for completion of study



Requirements for final/diploma thesis or final/diploma/exam

Requirements for final thesis are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam and evaluation and defence of final/diploma thesis

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam is regulated by the Ordinance on final thesis/diploma thesis at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

 

2.12. List of mandatory and elective courses

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTJ111 General Biology 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTK101 Mathematics 30 45 0 0 8.0
KTK102 Physics 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTK103 General Chemistry 45 30 30 0 9.0
KTK104 Computer application 15 0 30 0 4.0
Total
150 105 90 0 31

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTK105 General microbiology 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTK106 Inorganic chemistry 30 15 30 0 7.0
KTK107 Analitical chemistry 60 15 45 0 9.0
KTK108 Food and Nutrition 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTK109 Physical Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.0
Total
180 60 120 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTK201 Organic chemistry 60 15 45 0 10.0
KTK202 Food microbiology 30 0 15 0 5.0
KTK203 Transport phenomena 45 15 15 0 5.0
KTK204 Introduction to Food Technology 15 15 0 0 3.0
KTK205 Raw Materials in Food Industry 30 15 0 0 4.0
Total
180 60 75 0 27

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTK206 Biochemistry 45 15 30 0 7.0
KTK207 Unit operations 45 15 30 0 7.0
KTK208 Thermodynamics 15 15 0 0 3.0
KTK209 Measuring and Control Techique 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTK210 Processes in Food Industry 45 15 20 10 7.0
KTKOSP Professional Practice 0 0 0 0 3.0
Total
180 60 110 10 32

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 5.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTK301 Food Chemistry 45 15 45 0 8.0
KTK302 30 30 0 0 5.0
KTK303 Quality Management 30 15 15 0 5.0
Total
105 60 60 0 18
Elective KTK304 Olive Processing Technologies 30 15 20 10 6.0
KTK305 Technology of Grape Products 30 15 25 5 6.0
KTK306 Fruit and Vegetable Processing 30 15 25 5 6.0
KTK307 30 15 20 10 6.0
KTK308 Milk and Dairy Technology 30 15 25 5 6.0
KTK309 Processing Technology of Herbs and Spices 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTK310 30 0 30 0 4.0

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 3.

Semester: 6.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTK311 Basic Biotechnology 30 0 0 0 3.0
KTK312 Food Packaging 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTK313 Water Technology 26 15 30 4 5.0
KTKOZR Final Thesis 0 0 0 0 10.0
Total
86 15 45 4 22
Elective KTK314 Food Product Development 15 30 0 0 4.0
KTK315 Food Industry Waste Engineering 30 0 10 5 4.0
KTK316 Mineral Raw Materials From Seawater 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTK317 Safety At Work 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTK318 Introduction To Entrepreneurship 30 15 0 0 4.0

 

 

2.13. Course description

 

General Biology
NAME OF THE COURSE General Biology

Code

KTJ111

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Nada Bezić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Valerija Dunkić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students learn to:
- Introduce students to the relationships of animate and inanimate nature
- Understand the basic principles of cell biology
- mastering the basics of genetics and ecological relationships among organisms

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will after the course unit power:
- Recognize the importance of living organisms in relation to the environment
- To master the basic knowledge of cell biology and evolution of organisms
- Know the basic genetic principles
- Know how environmental changes affect the ecosystem changes

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Animate and inanimate nature.
Prokaryotes, eukaryotes, relationships between plants-animals
Membranes and transport through the membrane, nucleus, nucleolus
DNA, RNA, CD-biology, Endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes
Mitochondria - breathing, chloroplasts - photosynthesis, peroxisomes
Cell cycle, mitosis, meiosis (spermatogenesis, oogenesis), fertilization
The embryonic development model operon differentiation in plants and animals
Aging and death, viruses (HIV), tumors
The basics of inheritance, Mendel’s laws, mutations
Ecological concepts and relationships of organisms in the biocenosis

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures of at least 70%, as well as seminars and seminar work in 100% of scheduled classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The obligation is to the students during the course of hearing preparation seminar that also must know the present. Upon completion of the lecture can be the time to take the entire test period courses in writing.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Autorizirana predavanja na webu PMF-a

0

G. M. Cooper, Stanica: molekularni pristup, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2004.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A.Delić i N. Vijtiuk, Prirodoslovlje, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mathematics
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematics

Code

KTK101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Tanja Vučičić

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Lucija Ružman

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

45

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the basic elements of calculus and linear algebra.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After finishing this course the student is expected to be able to:
- identify and sketch graphs of elementary functions, to determine the domain of the given function
- find the derivative of the given function
- apply the dervative in practice (tangents and normals, maximum, minimum and inflection points) and to interpret the shape of graphs
- apply the techniques of integration (integration by substitution, integration by parts)
- use the definite integral in its geometrical applications
- solve the system of linear equations (by matrix inversion, by Gaussian elimination)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Sets: Notion. Algebra of sets. Sets of numbers.
2. Functions: Notion. Composite functions. Inverse function.
3. Elementary functions.
4. Sequences: Notion. Limits. Functions: Limits. Continuity.
5. Derivative and application: Notion. Interpretation. Derivative techniques.
6. Differential. Higher order derivatives.
7. Theorems of differential calculus. Maximum, minimum points.
8. Inflection points. Asymptotes. Graphs sketching.
9. Integral and its application: Indefinite integral. Techniques of integration.
10. Definite integral.
11. Application of definite integral.
12. Matrices and vectors: Matrix algebra. Determinants. Inverse matrix.
13. Linear systems of equations.
14. Vector algebra.
15. Course review. Revision.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance of classes.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Examination: either by continuously checking and grading students’ progress during the semester or in exam terms by passing written and oral exam.
At the beginning of the course students will be informed of in detail elaborated rules for both models of examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bradić, R. Roki et. al., Matematika za tehnološke fakultete, Element, Zagreb (više izdanja)

47

B.P. Demidovič, Zadaci i riješeni primjeri iz više matematike, Tehnička knjiga, Zagreb (više izdanja)

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

S. Kurepa, Matematička analiza I i II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1997.
I. Slapničar, Matematika 1, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje u Splitu, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2002. (http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat1)
I. Slapničar, Matematika 2, Fakultet elektrotehnike, strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2008. (http://lavica.fesb.hr/mat2)
Hughes-Hallett, Gleason et al., Calculus, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physics
NAME OF THE COURSE Physics

Code

KTK102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

ScD Mirko Marušić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring theoretical knowledge and developing the ability to differentiate properties and concepts of classical and modern physics. Creating an adequate attitude towards interpreting physical phenomena and their applications. Mastering the scientific physical approach to experimental observations and methods required in the physical laboratory.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

none

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to:
- know basic physical measures and units of measure,
- understand properties of motion and forces in the classical theory,
- be able to identify the characteristics of the exact approach the micro world phenomena,
- understand basic principles of electricity and magnetism, as well as the wave properties of electromagnetic radiation,
- be able to describe the phenomena associated with the dual nature of light,
- understand principles of geometrical and physical optics,
- have basic knowledge of modern physics,
- be able to apply the acquired knowledge to problem-solving tasks,
- be able to use the methods of measuring the chosen physical measures and carry our experiments autonomously,
- have developed the skill of graphic processing of measured data and the skill of writing reports on the experiment conducted and results obtained.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Motion and Forces
2nd week: Energy and Work
3rd week: Systems of particles. Rotation.
4th week: Elasticity. Oscillation. Elastic waves.
5th week: Partial assessment (1st preliminary test)
6th week: Molecular-kinetic theory. Heat.
7th week: Fluids. Transport phenomena.
8th week: Electrostatics and Magnetostatics
9th week: Electromagnetism. Electric Current and Electric Circuits.
10th week: Partial assessment (2nd preliminary test)
11th week: Electromagnetic Waves. Light. Geometrical Optics. Optical instruments.
12th week: Physical Optics.
13th week: Elements of Quantum mechanics.
14th week: Laser Light. Radioactivity.
15th week: Partial assessment (3rd preliminary test)
Seminars: Exercises on selected topics (40 - 60 exercises)
Seminars for advanced students on the topics of food physics.
Exercises:
Measuring of the basic physical quantities. Taking basic physical measures. Numerical and graphical processing of the measured data. Measurement errors. Torque and moment of inertia. Conservation of energy. Oscillators. Heat capacity. The laws of hydrostatics. Surface phenomena. Electrical circuits. The laws of geometrical optics. The phenomena of physical optics and their applications. Spectroscopy.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.8

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.2

Report

0.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.2

Oral exam

1.2

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

In course of the semester, the entire exam can be passes by taking and passing the three preliminary tests consisting of theoretical questions as well as practical exercises and 10 laboratory tests.
In the examination periods first written and then oral exam is taken.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Herak, Osnove kemijske fizike, Farmaceutsko-biokemijski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2001.

10

P. Kulišić, L. Bistričić, D. Horvat, Z. Narančić, T. Petrović i D. Pevec. Riješeni zadaci iz mehanike i topline. Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2002.

10

E. Babić, R. Krsnik, M. Očko, Zbirka riješenih zadataka iz fizike, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 1990.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley, New York, 2003.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE General Chemistry

Code

KTK103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

9.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

30

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To familiarize students with the basic chemical laws and principles and to enable students to master the chemical items that follow General Chemistry. To develop students ability to think critically about the experiments performed in the laboratory and about the involvement of of chemistry in everyday life.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the the course students will be able to:
1) Understand the nature and properties of the substance, differentiate elementary substances from compounds, distinguish homogeneous from heterogeneous mixtures, assume procedures for separating mixtures into pure substances.
2) Understanding the problem-solving approach to the balance of substances in chemical changes
3) Understand the structure of atoms and existing models of chemical bonds in such way that they can predict certain properties and reactivity of chemical elements and their ionic and covalent compounds
4) Discern the nature of certain chemical reactions.
5) Adopt the concept of pH, and assume direction of the chemical reactions on the basis of knowledge of chemical kinetics and equilibrium.
6) Independently and safely perform simple chemical experiments

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
1. Introduction - Natural sciences and chemistry. Units of measurement and measurement. Classification of matter. Pure substance. Decomposition of the substance to the pure substance.
2. Properties of a pure substances, physical and chemical properties. Atom and chemical element. The chemical symbols of elements. The laws of chemical combination by weight and volume. The atomic theoryes from the early ideas to John Dalton. Avogadro’s hypothesis.
3. The discovery of the structure of atoms. The discovery of X-rays and radioactivity. Rutherford model of the atom. X-rays and crystal structure. Bragg equation. Isotopes and the structure of the atomic nucleus.
4. The structure of pure substances. The atomic structure of substances. Types of a crystal systems and crystal characteristics. Cubic crystal system. The molecular structure of substances. The nature of the gas. The nature of the fluid. The concept of temperature. The kinetic theory of gases.
5. Gas laws and the equation of state of an ideal gas. Real gases. Relative atomic and molecular weight. Methods for determining relative atomic (Dulong - Petit method, X-ray diffraction, mass spectrograph) and molecular weight (density of the gas, the method of Victor Mayer, Hoffman method). Periodic table of the elements and the periodic law.
6. Electronic structure of atoms - Bohr model of the atom, quantum numbers. Quantum theory of the electronic structure of atoms. Atomic orbitals.
7. Periodic Classification of elements and the periodic table. Periodic changes in physical properties. Atomic radius. Ionization energy. Electron affinity. Electronegativity.
8. Chemical bonding and molecular structure - Electronic valence theory, ionic and covalent compounds. Electronegativity and degree of oxidation. Writing Lewis structures and the octet rule. Formal charges. Exceptions from the octet rule. VSEPR model and geometry of the molecule.
9. Bond characteristics. Valence bond theory and theory of molecular orbitals.
10. Intermolecular forces. Dipole moment, Van der Waals and London forces, hydrogen bond.
11. The structure and properties of the liquid and solid. Physical properties of solutions. Types of solution. Expression of concentration.
12. The liquid in the liquid solution. Solutions of solids in liquids. Solutions of gases in liquids. Effect of temperature on the solubility. Effect of pressure on the solubility of gases. Colligative properties of solutions: nonelectrolyte and electrolyte solution.
13. Chemical reactions - types of chemical reactions, redox reactions, complex reactions (protolytic reactions and precipitation reactions and dissolution), complex reactions.
14. Chemical kinetics, reaction rate, reaction mechanism, the activation energy. Chemical equilibrium - term equilibrium, chemical equilibrium and chemical equilibrium constant. Factors that affect the chemical equilibrium.
15. Equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Balance in the electrolyte solutions - equilibrium in solutions of acids and bases , the equilibrium of the complex in solution, the equilibrium between the solution and the insoluble crystals, redox balance
Seminars:
1. The oxidation number: definition, rules for determining in ions and molecules. Examples and training.
2. Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry. Names of monoatomic cations and monoatomic anions. Names of poliatomic cations and anion. The names of the ligands. Names of complex ions. Names of oxo acid and their salts.
3. Naming of inorganic compounds - training.
4. Balancing chemical equations, balancing redox equations.
5. Writing redox equations - practice.
6. The stoichiometry: Qualitative and quantitative relationships in chemical reactions. Molar method.
7. Stoichiometry: Quantitative relationships. Yield in chemical reactions and processes: the relevant reactant, the reactant in excess of the theoretical amount of reactants, the theoretical amount of product, yield and loss.
8. The stoichiometry: volume and mass in chemical reactions.
9. Electronic configuration of atoms and ions
10. Lewis structural formula
11. Electronic structural formula
12. Chemical equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems
13. Chemical equilibrium in electrolyte solutions.
Exercises :
Exercise 1
The basic rules of laboratory work, safety precautions and protection in the lab, basic laboratory equipment. Washing, cleaning and drying of dishes. Basic laboratory operations, chemicals and dealing with them. Decomposition of the substance to the pure substance. Decomposition of heterogeneous and homogeneous mixture
Exercise 2
Decomposition of the mixture to the pure substance, Decomposition of heterogeneous substances, Sedimentation, decanting, centrifuging, filtering, Buchner funnel, distillation and fractional distillation, sublimation of iodine. Extraction of iodine from aqueous solutions
Exercise 3
Physical and chemical changes, the law of conservation of weight, Gay - Lussac’s law of connected volumes. Exercise with models of unit cells. Determining the relative atomic mass of zinc. Determination of the empirical formula of copper chloride.
Exercise 4
Gas Laws: Determination of the molar volume of oxygen, Boyle’s law, Charles Gay - Lussac’s law, the pressure dependence of the temperature in gases.
Exercise 5
Solutions and their properties. Expressing of concentration. Preparation of the solution with given concentration. Solutions of liquids in liquids. Solutions of gases in liquids. Dependence of solubility on the nature (structure) of the substance. Dependence of solubility on temperature. Dissolution of liquids in liquids. Dissolving gases in liquids. Henry’s law. Determination of molar mass by freezing point depression. Illustration of electrolytic dissociation. Illustration of ions traveling to the electrodes. Electrical conductivity of the solution. Redox - reactions of sulfur and oxygen. Redox reaction of dilute nitric acid solution and iron (II) sulfate. Decomposition and formation reactions of complexes. Ligand substitution reaction. Protolytic reactions (acid- base titration).
Exercise 6
Chemical kinetic, effect of concentration of reactants on the rate of chemical reactions. Effect of temperature on the rate of chemical reactions. The catalytic effect on the rate of chemical reactions. Balance in electrolyte solutions. Moving the chemical balance. Determination of the acid dissociation constant, Ka . Determination of pH: Approximately determination of pH using indicators. Determination of pH using pH sensors. Electrolysis - Determination of Faraday’s constant. Electromotive force of galvanic cells - Daniell cell.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars, and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.
Students who obtain a signature from the course General Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows :
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right.
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through three partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Filipović, I., Lipanović, S., Opća i anorganska kemija I dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

Brinić, Slobodan. „Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Opće kemije“ Veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Grubač Z.: „Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Opće kemije“ Veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Sikirica, M., Stehiometrija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb

0

Vježbe iz Opće kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

http://www.ktf-split.hr/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Darrell D. Ebbing and Steven D. Gammon, General Chemistry, 9th edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 2009.
Raymond Chang, Chemistry, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Computer application
NAME OF THE COURSE Computer application

Code

KTK104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Dražan Jozić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of computers and computer systems. Knowledge about the use of Internet content and protect your computer from malicious programs. Basic skills about the content management (folders and files) on PCs using the Windows operating system. Basic skills using programs offered in the MS Office software.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will be able to:
1. Manage content on PC computer (files and folders)
2. Use the MS Word in the purpose of the editing the file according to the specified requirements (defining the shape and page layout, inserting the images, finished elements, tables, graphs ...)
3. Use the MS Excel for analysis, calculation, sorting, graphical presentation and format tables.
4. Use the MS PowerPoint to create presentations
5. Set up and use MS Outlook for editing and emailing
6. Find reliable sources of information on the Internet

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week L General information about the course and mode of examination, Introduction to computers application, Information activity and technology, Computerization, Computer applications in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
E
2. Week L Hardware (PC), Von Neumann’s model computers, Computer hardware, Computer types, Basic terms in theComputer Engineering and informatics, Basic parts (components) of the PC, Central processing unit (CPU), Computer memory, Motherboards and connectors, Input and Output devices
E
3. Week L Operating systems and applications, The BIOS (Basic Input / Output System), Preparing disks and drives for installation of the OS, File system (FAT, NTFS), Computer Programs, System programs, Application programs, Operating systems
E
4. Week L Basics commands for MS-DOS, GUI (Graphical User Interface), Properties GUI, History of developing the MS Windows OS, Example Installations operating systems (Windows OS), Customizing the User Interface, Library, Customize settings on PC computer, Firewall, Windows Defender, Windows Update, Action Center, Commercial antivirus programs
E
5. Week L Backup and Restore, Control Panel, Customize the computer, The Device Manager, Accounts, Network and Sharing Center, Troubleshooting, Personalization, BitLocker Drive Encryption, Region and Language, Programs and Features, Installing and uninstalling programs, Display, Devices and Printers, Default Programs, Help and Support, Accessories and system tools, Shortcuts in Window OS, Changing the language of Windows OS
E
6. Week L Malicious software (malware), Computer viruses, Computer worms, Trojan horses, Logic bombs, Spyware, Advertising Programs (Adware), INTERNET, History of the Internet, TCP / IP protocol
E
7. Week L First test
E
8. Week L Internet, Computer network and classification networks, Internet protocols: HTTP, HTTPS and FTP, Web browsers, Copyright Law
E
9. Week L MS Office, MS Word, How to start the MS Word, Layout MS Word window, The status bar, Tabs and tools, Copy and paste data, Special characters, Styles, Tabs, Sections, Creating a new document, Copy text, Headers and footers, Page numbers
E MS Word: How to insert and edit the text and its formatting. Paragraph formatting. Lists of lists. Working with documents. formatting documents
10. Week L How to insert and edit the formulas and equations, Application of the finished style characteristics, Input tables and formatting, input images in the document, the entry of bibliographic data entry page breaks and section breaks (define different sections of the document), display the contents of the document
E MS Word: Insert pictures, tables and SmartArt elements in the document. Formatting headers and footers document. Entering references and footnotes in the document. Insert the page break, Section break, Application of different style for document
11. Week L MS Excel, How to start MS Excel, Layout MS Excel windows, Toolbar for quick access, Status bar, Tabs and tools, Tabs formulas, Editing data within a worksheet, Graphic data presentation, Input data string in the table, Add the trend data, Sorting data set
E MS Excel: Working with the tables. Entering data into tables and data formatting. Entering a series of data. Entering data from different files. Displaying data graphically.
12. Week L Conditional Formatting Data, Creating and deleting equations, Addresses cells (relative, absolute, mixed), Types of functions, Logical operators, Boolean functions, Examples of application functions (IF, AND, OR, COUNTIF ..), MS PowerPoint, MS PowerPoint Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating presentations, add themes, Themes Edit, Insert object (images, tables, links, media content ...)
E MS Excel: Data processing, Calculating with tables, Input and syntax for creating mathematical equations. Showing the trend curve.
13. Week L MS Outlook, MS Outlook Startup, The appearance of windows, tabs and tools, Creating a user account , Creating a new e-mail
E MS Power Point: Creating presentations. Choosing the design, How to make redesign of an existing template.
14. Week L Databases, What databases they are?, Fields in databases, How databases are developed?, Center for online databases, Bibliographic databases, Citation databases, Databases with full-text, Sciencedirect databases, Scopus databases, Web database, Bibliography
E
15. Week L Second Test
E

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance in the amount of 70% to 100%, and to experimental work of 100% from total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.6

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The written exam can be finished over the two tests during the semester. Minimum for successful tests is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Each test in assessing participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Presence at lectures 70-100% participates with a share of the 5% of the final grade while the presence of the laboratory exercises from 100% participates with a share of the 15% of the final grade. Practical part of exam participates with a share of the 50% of the final grade. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Minimum for successful written exam is the limit of the 60% resolved test. Passing one test (previous activity) is valuable in the summer semester examination period with a share of the 20% of the final grade. Written exam has a share of the 20% and practical part of exam has a share of the 40% of the final grade. Students who have not passed any tests during the semester they take the examination through written and practical exams in the regular examination period. Minimum for successful tests the limit of the 50% resolved test. Written part of exam participates with a share of the 30% of the final gradeand practical part of examwith a share of the 50% of the final grade.
The final grade: 50%-61% - sufficient, 62%-74% - good, 75%-87% very good, 88%-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D.Jozić, Predavanja iz kolegija:Primjena računala, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Interna skripta, Split, 2013.

1

WallaceWang, Office 2010 For Dummies, WileyPublishingInc., Indiana, 2010.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected articles from journals recommended by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

General microbiology
NAME OF THE COURSE General microbiology

Code

KTK105

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ana Maravić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

This course is designed to give students understanding of basic concepts in microbiology including various microorganisms their physiology, morphology, genetics, ecology, pathogenicity and application used of laboratory methods and techniques in microbiological research.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

No

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students completing this course should be able to:
- better understanding of the evolutionary relationships between structure, diversity and replication of different groups of microorganisms.
- learn about genetic mechanisms of adaptation of prokaryotic microorganisms in a variety of environmental conditions.
- applied methods of physiological and biochemical tests for the identification of the different groups of microorganisms.
- identify the mechanisms of pathogenicity of microorganisms that cause diseases in humans and animals as well as the mechanisms used by the hosts to defend themselves against pathogens.
- determine the number of microorganisms in the sample and calculate the growth of microorganisms in controlled laboratory conditions.
-

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction. Historical development of microbiology. (2 hours)
2. The distribution of microorganisms and their role in biogeochemical processes in nature. (2 hours)
3. Eukaryotes, Archaea and Bacteria; structure and function. Morphology, nomenclature and classification of microorganisms. (2 hours)
4. Basic structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (2 hours)
5. Microbial genetics, genome organization, mobile genetic elements. (2 hours)
6. The growth of microorganisms and the basic growth factors, nutrients, temperature, oxygen, pH and osmotic pressure. (2 hours)
7. Metabolic activity of microorganisms. Identification of microorganisms using various physiological and biochemical tests. (2 hours)
8. Microorganisms and diseases, resistance, relationship microorganisms and host immune responses to infection. (2 hours)
9. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics and other chemical substances. (2 hours)
10. Basic morphological characteristics of fungi, yeasts and molds and their pathogenicity. Diseases caused by fungi, and their toxins. (2 hours)
11. Application of microorganisms in biotechnology. (2 hours)
12. Basic morphological characteristics and development cycles of parasites.
13. The role of microorganisms in the biodegradation of heavy metals, nitrate, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. (2 hours)
14. Basic morphological characteristics of viruses, viroids and prions. Classification and nomenclature of viruses. Methods of studying properties of the viruses. (2 hours)
15. Control the growth of microorganisms by physical and chemical methods. (2 hours)
Lab topics will include: Techniques in aseptic conditions, methods of preparation and staining of various preparations. Isolation of pure cultures of microorganisms, preparation of culture media, culture and use of different methods of isolation and identification of bacteria. Basic macro and micromorphological characteristics and yeasts and molds. Cultivation of yeasts and molds on nutrient media, isolation and identification. The main morphological features of the parasite. Sampling and preparation of samples for identification of parasites. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance of bacteria to antibiotics and other chemical substances and to determine the sensitivity of microorganisms to antibiotics. Methods for determining the number of bacteria in different samples of food and water dilution method, the spectrophotometric method and membrane filtration.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures in the amount of at least 70% of the times scheduled. Completed all planned laboratory exercises and seminar essay.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade of the student is compiled from the combination of lecture, seminar, laboratory. Final course grade will be based on: Mid‐term exam 30%; End of term exam 35%; Seminar 10%; Lab course 15%. Course grade will be based upon a percentage of total points obtained using the following scale: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Duraković, S.Redžepović, Uvod u opću mikrobiologiju, Kugler, Zagreb, 2002.

5

e-learning portal

S. Kalenić, E. Mlinarić-Missoni i sur., Medicinska bakteriologija i mikologija, Merkur A.B.D., Zagreb, 2005.

5

Z. Brudnjak, Medicinska virologija, Merkur A.B.D., Zagreb, 2002.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.A. Harvey, P.C. Champe, B.D. Fisher, Microbiology, 2th ed., Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2007.
R.M. Patrick, S.R. Ken, A.P. Michael, Medical Microbiology, 5th ed. Elsevier/Mosby, Philadelphia, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at different levels: Keeping records of his attendance; Annual performance analysis examination; Student surveys in order to evaluate teachers; Self-evaluation of teachers; Feedback from students who have already graduated from the relevance of content items.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Inorganic chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Inorganic chemistry

Code

KTK106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introduce students to the chemical reactivity of elements along the periodic table, and with the properties and composition of common chemicals. To develop students ability to notice similarities and differences between inorganic compounds and inorganic substances. Understanding of the changes in the various physical and chemical conditions

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students upon completion of the course:
1) will know the basic characteristics and producing of chemical elements for the major groups of periodic table of elements (PTE)
3) be able to identify the type and properties of chemical compounds of main group
3) be able to identify the type and properties of transition metal compounds
4) to classified compounds on the base of their characteristics
5) to predict acidic, basic and amphoteric properties of salts
6) to know common salt crystal structure
7) to predict the possible reaction mechanisms and outcomes of chemical reactions
8) to independently and safely perform simple chemical reactions

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
1. Hydrogen position in PTE, hydrogen properties and production, positive oxidation state and hydrides
2. Noble gases, properties of group, obtaining and using of xenon compounds
3. Introduction to halogens, elements properties in order to oxidation state
4. Fluorine production and properties, differences between the fluorine and the other members of the group, fluorine compounds. Chlorine producing and properties, compounds of chlorine, bromine and Iodine
5. Introduction to chalcogen elements, elements properties in order to oxidation state
6. Oxygen properties and production, the compounds of oxygen, oxides, water
7. Sulfur properties and production, oxides and sulfur acids, other sulfur compounds, compounds of selenium and tellurium,
8. A group of nitrogen, elements properties in order to oxidation state
9. Nitrogen, properties of the production, ammonia, nitric acid and other nitrogen compounds, nitrogen fixation
10. Phosphorus, properties and production, oxides and acids of phosphorus, arsenic, antimony and bismuth
11. A group of carbon, elements properties in order to oxidation state
12. Carbon allotropes, carbon properties and production, carbon oxides, carbides, carbonates and bicarbonates. The compounds of silicon, germanium, tin and lead, semiconductor properties of silicon and germanium
13. A group of boron, elements properties in order to oxidation state, boranes, boric acid
14. Production and properties of aluminum, aluminum compounds, gallium, indium, thallium
15. Alkali and alkaline earth metals
Seminars :
1. Balancing chemical reactions, writing and balancing redox reactions in one line
2. Common reactions of hydrogen, the reducing action of hydrogen
3. Common reactions of chlorine, the disproportionation of chlorine in alkaline solutions, the oxidation activity of the halogens compounds
4. Common reactions of chalcogen elements, reaction of oxygen and ozone, the oxidizing action of oxygen,
5. The reaction of sulfur, the reactions which translate elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid, the oxidizing action of sulfuric acid, a dehydrating effect of sulfuric acid
6. Common reactions of nitrogen, the nitrogen production reactions, the reaction of ammonia oxidation to nitric acid, the oxidizing action of nitric acid.
7. Common reactions of phosphorus, oxidation reactions of phosphorus to phosphorus and phosphoric acid
8. Common reactions of carbon, oxides of carbon production, reducing effect of CO, binding of CO2 from the air, the precipitation of carbonates, cation hydrolysis
9. Common reactions of the boron group elements, reaction of boric acid production, dissolution of borax in water, production of crystalline boron acid, base properties of aluminum hydroxide,
10. Aluminum reducing action, aluminotermic reaction, common reactions of metals and metal production,
11. Common reactions of alkali and alkaline earth metals with water and their salts
12. Common reactions of transition metals, proving of peroxide with titanyl ion, oxidation states of vanadium, oxidative properties of permanganate, equilibrium between chromate and dichromate, iron compounds
13. Noble metals, zinc, cadmium and mercury
14. Sea - a mixture of inorganic substances. The chemical composition of sea water, salinity, pH and speciation
15. Mixed problems
Exercises :
1. Exercise: HYDROGEN
2. Exercise: 17th GROUP (Halogens )
3. Exercise: 16th GROUP (Chalcogens)
4. Exercise: 15th GROUP
5. Exercise: 14th GROUP and 13th GROUP, 1st and 2nd groups (Alkali and earth alkali metals)
6. Exercise: TRANSITION ELEMENTS (groups 3 to 7)
7. Exercise: TRANSITION ELEMENTS (groups 8 to 12)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.
Students who obtain a signature from the course Inorganic Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right .
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through three partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part .

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Filipović, S. Lipanović, Opća i anorganska kemija II dio, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1995

10

S. Brinić: Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

web KTF-a

Z. Grubač: Recenzirana predavanja iz odabranih poglavlja Anorganske kemije, veljača 2012. KTF-Split. 30.1.2014.

0

web KTF-a

Vježbe iz Anorganske kemije (interna skripta), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2013.

0

web KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

F. Albert Cotton et al., Basic Inorganic Chemistry, New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analitical chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Analitical chemistry

Code

KTK107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Credits (ECTS)

9.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

60

15

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring basic basic theoretical knowledge of analytical chemistry, the role and application of analytical chemistry in various fields

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Completing the course: General Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will will be able to
- Define the concept of analytical chemistry
- Differentiate between the concepts of qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis
- Understand the concept of quantitative chemical reactions
- Understand the concept of gravimetric and volumetric determination
- Understand the precipitation, neutralization, complexometric and redox titrations
- Solving numerical problems from a qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

First week : Description and review of curriculum. Definitions of analytical chemistry. Division of Analytical Chemistry. The concept of the analytical signal. Seminar: Solving numerical problems from theoretical lecture
Second week : The concept and definition of chemical analysis - qualitative and quantitative. Seminar: Solving numerical problems; homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium in analytical chemistry.
3rd week : Qualitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of acids and bases. Consideration of acid-base balance. Seminar: Solving problems
4th week : The concept and definition of complex ions., complexometric equilibrium .Seminar: Solving problems
5th week : The concept and definition of electrochemical reactions. Consideration of electrochemical equilibrium. Seminar: Solving problems
6th week: The concept and definition of heterogeneous equilibrium. process of dissolution and precipitation. Seminar: Solving problemsl
7th week .Recapitulation of theoretical and seminars lecture I partial exam .theoretical lecture and seminars
8th week . Quantitative chemical analysis. The concept and definition of gravimetric determination. Seminar: Solving problems,
9th week . optimization of precipitationcondition. Seminar: Solving problems.
10th week : The concept and definition of standards and standard solutions - primary and secondary. The concept and definition of the volumetric determination; Seminar: Solving problems.
11th week : The concept and definition of volumetric determinations- Argentometric titration; Seminar: Solving problems.
12 weeks The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on neutralization reactions - acid-base titration; Seminar Solving problems
13th week . The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on the complex - complexometric titrations; Seminar Solving problems
14th week . The concept and definition of volumetric determinations based on redox reactions. Seminar Seminar Solving problems
15th week : Recapitulation of theoretical and seminars lecture II partial exam .theoretical lecture and seminars.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 80% and completing exercises

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

3.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 50% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, Osnove analitičke kemije, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.

6

A. Prkić, Vježbe iz analitičke kemije, Preddiplomski studij kemijske tehnologije, interna recenzirana skripta, Split, 2008.

0

na web-stranici Zavoda za analitičku kemiju

R. Kellner, J.M. Mermet, M. Otto, M. Varcarcel, H.M. Widmer, Analytical Chemistry (A Modern Approach to Analytical Science, 2nd Edition) Wiley-VCHVerlag Gmbh&Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2004.

0

D. A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 9th edition, Brooks&Cole, SAD, 2014.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Z. Šoljić, Računanje u analitičkoj kemiji, Zagreb, 1998.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food and Nutrition
NAME OF THE COURSE Food and Nutrition

Code

KTK108

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Višnja Katalinić
Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge on
- the role of food in human health (the role of macro- and micronutrijets from food)
- on energy and nutritive value of food
- on unnaceptable food components
- digestion processes and absorption rate of macronutrients
- determination of energy and nutritive value of food

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of food science, which includes:
- identifying and naming of macro- and micronutrients in food
- learn about the daily energety intake
- learn to calculate the body mass index
- lean on healthy diet regime

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction. Role of food (2 hours)
2. Food components: Macronutrients (sugars, lipids, proteins). (6 hours)
3.Micronutrients (water soluble vitamins, liposoluble vitamins, minerals). (4 hours)
4.Macronutrients digestion. (2 hours)
5.Daily energy requierements. (2 hours)
6.Non-nutritive food components – phytochemicals. (2 hours)
7.Healty diet principles. (2 hours)
8.Planning the diet. (2 hours)
9.The role of nutrition in human evolution process. (2 hours)
10.Vegetarian i macrobiotic diet. (2 hours)
11.Mediterranean diet. (2 hours)
12.Food alergenes. (2 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 70% of full schedule; attendance on seminar work – at least 80% of full schedule. To design the seminar work on selected topic

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester, two written exams are provided (as partical examinations). Test will be carried out within 60 minutes. Students who obtain positive mark from both exams, will have oral examination in order to obtain the final mark. During semester, students should present their seminar work on selected topic within this course. The final mark of this course will count the mark from seminar work, marks from written exams, and mark from oral exams.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

V. Katalinić: Temeljno znanje o prehrani, sveučilišni priručnik, 2011. g.

0

web stranica fakulteta

T. Bilušić: Osnove znanosti o hrani, autorizirana predavanja, KTF, 2013.g.

0

web stranica fakulteta

T. Bilušić: Dijetetika, autorizirana predavanja, KTF, 2013.g.

0

web stranica fakulteta

G. Krešić. Trendovi u prehrani, Fakultet za menadžment u ugostiteljstvu i turizmu, Opatija, 2012.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Živković: Dijetetika, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2002.
J. S. Garrow, W.P.T. James: Human nutrition and dietetics. 10th Edition, Churchill Livingostone, Co. London, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physical Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Physical Chemistry

Code

KTK109

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Renato Tomaš

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aims of the course are to enable students to:
- understand basic concepts, laws and principles of thermodynamic and kinetic approaches to physical and chemical changes,
- resolve different physicochemical problems,
- perform measurements in the laboratory individually or in a team, present and process measurement data,
- apply acquired knowledge and skills in professional and specialist courses.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Course enrollment prerequisite is General Chemistry.
Required competences are knowledge of Mathematics (Calculus) and fundamentals of Physics and Chemistry.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to:
1. Describe basic concepts, laws and principles of thermodynamic and kinetic approaches to physical and chemical changes.
2. Explain different physicochemical dependencies of the examined systems.
3. Calculate physicochemical parameters using thermodynamic and kinetic equations.
4. Perform experiments and measurements in the laboratory.
5. Interpret experimental and numerical data.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures (2 hours weekly):
1st week: Introduction: Physical chemistry - course contents. Basic terms. System and surroundings. Intensive and extensive thermodynamic variables. Progress of the reaction. Zeroth low of thermodynamics.
1st and 2nd week: Properties of gases: The perfect gas equation of state. The ideal gas temperature scale. Ideal gas mixtures and Dalton’s law. The kinetic model of gases. Real gases. The van der Waals equation of state.
2nd, 3rd and 4th week: First law of thermodynamics: Work and heat. Internal energy. Enthalpy. Heat capacities. Joule-Thomson expansion. Adiabatic processes with gases. Thermochemistry. Enthalpy of formation. Calorimetry.
4th, 5th and 6th week: Second and third laws of thermodynamics: Direction of spontaneous change. Entropy as a state function and the second law. Entropy changes in system and surroundings. Entropy changes in irreversible processes. Entropy change accompanying a phase transition. Entropy of mixing ideal gases. Calorimetric determination of entropies and the third law. Gibbs energy. Properties of the Gibbs energy.
6th and 7th week: Phase equlibria-pure substances: Condition of stability. Variation of Gibbs energy with pressure. Variation of Gibbs energy with temperature. Phase diagrams, phase boundaries and location of phase boundaries. The phase rule. Significance of the chemical potential. Fugacity.
8th i 9th week: Properties of mixtures: Partial molar properties. Gibbs-Duhem equation. The chemical potentials of liquids. Spontaneous mixing. Ideal solutions. Ideal-dilute solutions. Real solutions: activities. Colligative properties. Phase diagrams of mixtures.
10th and 11th week: Principles of chemical equilibrium: Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. The reaction Gibbs energy. Reactions at equilibrium. Equilibrium constants and determination of equilibrium constants. Standard reaction Gibbs energy. Effect of temperature on the equilibrium constant. Effect of pressure, initial composition, and inert gases on the equilibrium composition.
11th and 12th week: Ionic equilibria: Activity of electrolytes. Debye-Hückel theory. Proton transfer equilibria. Salts in water. Solubility equilibria.
12th and 13th week: Electrochemistry: Ions in solution and migration of ions. Conductivity of electrolyte solutions. Viscosity. Strong and weak electrolytes. The drift speed. Ion mobilities. Mobility and conductivity. Measurement of transport numbers. Electrochemical cells. Varietes of cell. The cell reaction and electromotive force. Cells at equilibrium. Standard potentials. Determination of pH. Membrane potential.
13th i 14th week: Chemical kinetics: Empirical chemical kinetics. Reaction rates. Rate laws and rate constants. Reaction order. Half-lives and time constants. The temperature dependence of reaction rates. The relation between rate constants and equilibrium constants. Parallel and consecutive reactions.
15th week: Properties of surfaces: Properties of liquid surfaces. Colloidal systems. Adsorption on solid surfaces. Adsorption isotherms. Catalytic activity at surfaces.
Seminars (one hour weekly):
Solving numerical problems in physical chemistry.
Exercises (five hours weekly):
By working out 6 exercises student evidences in practice some of the principles presented through lectures and seminars: Coligative properties. Viscosity. Chemical equilibrium. Phase diagrams of ternary system. Conductivity and conductometric titration. Kinetics of inversion saccharose by polarimetric method.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture and seminar attendance and active participation of at least 70 percent of the planned schedule.
Complete all laboratory exercises.
The exam can be taken continuously (cumulatively) through colloquiums (partial tests) combining theoretical and practical tasks or as one comprehensive exam (written and oral).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.2

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continually evaluation: (success (%) / share in evaluating (%):
- presence and activities in the classroom: (70 - 100 / 10)
- laboratory exercises: (100 / 15)
- first partial test: (60 - 100 / 25)
- second partial test: (60 - 100 / 25)
- third partial test: (60 - 100 / 25)
Final evaluation: (success (%) / share in evaluating (%):
- written exam with numerical tasks: (50 - 100 / 40)
- oral exam: (50 - 100 / 45)
- priviously activities from continually evaluation: (50 - 100 / 15)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Atkins, J. de Paula, Elements of Physical Chemistry, 4th Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005.

2

R. J. Silbey, R. A. Alberty, M. G. Bawendi, Physical Chemistry, 4th Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New Jersey, 2005.

1

R. Tomaš, Predavanja iz fizikalne kemije, ppt-prezentacija, 2009.

0

digitalni zapis

J. Radošević, Lj. Aljinović, Fizikalna kemija, Laboratorijske vježbe, Sveučilišna naklada Liber, Split, 1980.

25

I. Tominić, Fizikalna kemija II, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

0

www.ktf-split.hr

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Mekjavić, Fizikalna kemija 1, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 1996.
I. Mekjavić, Fizikalna kemija 2, Golden marketing, Zagreb, 1999.
A. M. Halpern, Experimental Physical Chemistry, A Laboratory Textbook, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Organic chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Organic chemistry

Code

KTK201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Credits (ECTS)

10.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

60

15

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge of basic organic chemistry that involves understanding the structure and properties of organic compounds and mechanisms of organic reactions, mastering practical laboratory techniques used in the synthesis, isolation, purification and identification of organic compounds present in living systems and food.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of organic chemistry, which includes:
- identifying and naming of organic compounds according to functional groups and compare their physico - chemical properties;
- learn about the organic compounds isomerism, stereochemical designations, features, and separation;
- learn about organic compounds structure determination by spectroscopy (MS, NMR, IR, and UV/Vis);
- analyze the reactivity of organic compounds with respect to their structure and stereochemistry;
- propose appropriate reaction mechanisms of organic molecules that include addition, substitution and elimination;
- identify and interpret division, structure and properties of natural organic compounds ( carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids ).
- After performing laboratory practice student will be able to use laboratory techniques (such as extraction, distillation, reflux, chromatography, recrystallization, infrared spectroscopy, etc.), for (i) purification, (ii) isolation, (iii) synthesis, and (iv) identification of the organic compounds.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

 LECTURES AND SEMINARS:
1. Introduction: What is organic chemistry? History of organic chemistry and its modern role. The main concepts of organic chemistry (functional groups, stereochemistry, curly arrows) (2 hours)
2. The nature of chemical bonds: Electronegativity. Bonds polarity, dipol, and formal charge. Lewis structure. Atomic orbitals. Molecular orbitals. Hybridization (sp3, sp2, sp). Length and energy of the bonds. The molecular geometry. The modified hybrid orbitals. VSEPR theory. (4 hours)
3. Physical properties and intermolecular connections: Van der Waals forces. Dipole - dipole. ”Hydrogen bond”. Solubility in solvents. (2+1 hours)
4. Nomenclature and classes of organic compounds. Hydrocarbons (alkanes, cycloalkanes). Functional groups and acronyms. The nomenclature of hydrocarbons (alkenes, alkynes). Nomenclature organohalogenated compounds, alcohols, amines. Nomenclature of aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives. Systematic (IUPAC) nomenclature. Examples. (7+2 hours)
5. Structure of molecules and isomerism. Constitutional isomers. Alkanes. Isomers. Shapes of molecules and IHD. Stereochemistry. Conformations of alkanes (ethane, butane) and rings (C3, C4, C5, cyclohexane). Mono-substituted cycloalkanes. (3+1 hours)
I. PARTIAL EXAM (written, 1hour and 10 min)
6. Configuration of the cis / trans and E / Z; CIP rule. Conformations of disubstituted cycloalkanes. Alkenes. Chirality and the plane of symmetry. Molecules with one stereocenter. Enantiomers and racemic mixtures. The properties of the enantiomers. Optical activity. Polarimeter. Determination of tetrahedral stereogenic center. Fischer projections. Relative configuration. Molecules with two stereocenter. The properties of enantiomers, diastereomers and meso compounds. The separation of the racemate. Chiral molecules without stereocenter. (9+2 hours)
7. Determining organic structures. Introduction. Mass spectrometry (MS). Resolution. Molecular ion. Isotopes. Fragmentation. Examples of mass spectra. Electromagnetic radiation. Ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis). Infrared spectroscopy (IR). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). 13C NMR. 1H NMR. Chemical shift. Spin-spin coupling. Examples of IR, and NMR spectra. (6+3 hours)
8. Organic reactions. Definitions of basic terms. The division of reactions to the change of structure and to the reaction type. Acidity, basicity, and pKa. Factors that enhance the acidity (the size of atoms, electronegativity, resonance, hybridization, inductive effects, charge, solvation, steric effects). Acid - base reactions. The rules for determining the oxidation state of carbon. Oxidation - reduction reactions. Usage of the curly arrows in the reaction mechanism. Intermediates. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. (4 hours)
II. PARTIAL EXAM (written, 1hour and 10 min)
9. Alkanes and cycloalkanes. Oxidation. Halogenation. Alkyl halides. Nucleophilic substitution at the saturated carbon (SN1 and SN2 mechanism). Elimination reactions (E1, E2 mechanisms). Alkenes and alkynes. Electrophilic additions and free radical, polymerization. Conjugated unsaturated compounds. 1,2 - and 1,4 - addition. Aromatic compounds. Electrophilic and nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Phenols. Alcohols and ethers. Organometallic compounds. Aldehydes and ketones. Nucleophilic addition to the carbonyl group. Carboxylic acids and derivatives. Nucleophilic substitution at the carbonyl group. Amines. Heterocyclic compounds. (18+5 hours)
10. Carbohydrates. Amino acids. Nucleic acid. Lipids. (5+1 hours)
III. PARTIAL EXAM (written, 1hour and 10 min)
IV. PARTIAL EXAM (oral, 30 min)
 LABORATORY EXERCISES:
Laboratory safety and rules. Isolation and purification of organic compounds. Crystallization and melting point determination. Distillation. Extraction. Organic compounds synthesis. Diazotation. Carbonyl compounds-nucleophilic addition. Carboxylic acid derivatives-nucleophilic substitution. Electrophilic aromatic substitution. Oxidation-reduction reactions. Chromatography. Thin-layer chromatography. Column chromatography. Organic compounds characterization. Characteristic reactions of functional groups. Methods of spectroscopic analysis.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

4.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Course is divided into three sections that students take over 3 partial written and 1 oral exam or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The student pass the exam if achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. H. Pine: Organska kemija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.

9

Vodič kroz IUPAC-ovu nomenkalturu organskih spojeva, preveli: Bregovec, Horvat, Majerski, Rapić, Školska knjiga , Zagreb, 2002.

1

I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2009.

1

Da, na web stranicama KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V. Rapić: Postupci priprave i izolacije prirodnih spojeva, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.
S. Borčić, O. Kronja, Praktikum preparativne organske kemije, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 1991.
V.Rapić: Nomenklatura organskih spojeva, Školska knjiga , Zagreb, 2004.
S. E. Meislich, H. Meislich & J. Scharefkin, 3000 Solved Problems in Organic Chemistry, The McGraw-Hill, 1994.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food microbiology
NAME OF THE COURSE Food microbiology

Code

KTK202

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ana Maravić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students learn to understand the role of microorganisms in the food processing, preservation and safety and their impact on food spoilage, diseases transmitted by food as well as application of laboratory methods and techniques used in the control of microorganisms and food safety, quality and food safety control and the role of microorganisms in health promotion.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Attended General microbiology

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students completing this course should be able to:
- understand the role of microorganisms in food processing, preservation and safety;
- describe the factors that influence microbes in food, which can cause food spoilage;
- identify some of the standard methods and some recent rapid and automated methods for detection and enumeration of microorganisms;
- explain the various physical methods of food preservation, the role of antimicrobial chemicals and industrial strategies of ensuring safe foods;
- apply basic skills in isolation, analysis and identification of microorganisms that cause spoilage of food, microorganisms used in the production of food and microorganisms that can cause diseases by consuming contaminated food.
- understand the causes of diseases transmitted by food and its etiology;
- estimate the necessary measures to control undesirable microorganisms in food.
- effectively and collegially work with others in the microbiology laboratory and class setting.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. History and development food microbiology. Microbes in foods-characteristics and sources. (2 hours)
2. Microbial Growth Response in the food. Factors influencing microbial growth in food. (2 hours)
3. Microorganisms as indicators of food safety and microbiological criteria GMP, GHP, HACCP. (2 hours)
4. Indicators of food contamination. Determination of the number of fecal coliforms and enterococci in various food samples, and Escherichia coli. (2 hours)
5. Food spoilage-important factors affecting food spoilage; spoilage of different food groups and associated microorganisms. (2 hours)
6. Food poisoning and foodborne infection-Important facts in foodborne diseases; causes of food borne diseases, role of microorganisms, importance of predisposing factors in the occurrence of a foodborne disease; foodborne intoxications; foodborne infections; new and emerging foodborne pathogens.
(2 hours)
7. Gram-positive bacteria in food (Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus, Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes). Isolation and micromorphology, colonial morphology and biochemical identification. (2 hours)
8. Gram-positive sporogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, B. anthracis, Clostridium perfringens, C. botulinum). Isolation and identification spore forming bacteria.
(2 hours)
9. Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Enterobacter sakazakii, Yersinia enterocolitica). Isolation and identification Gram-negative bacteria. (2 hours)
10. Yeasts and molds mycotoxins (aflatoxins, patulin, ochratoxin, F-2 toxin) in food and feed. (2 hours)
11. Viruses: Hepatitis, Rotaviruses Caliciviruses Norwalk and Norwalk-like viruses, prions: new variant CJD. (2 hours)
12. Worms: Taenia and Trichinella and Protozoa: Sarcocystis, Giardia and Toxoplasma. (2 hours)
13. Control of microorganisms in foods-Cleaning and sanitation; physical removal, heat, low temperature, Aw, low pH and organic acids, modified atmosphere, antimicrobial preservatives, irradiation. (2 hours)
14. Uses of microorganisms in the food industry- microorganisms used in food fermentations; fermented food and beverage production; production of food ingredients and enzymes of microbial origin. (2 hours)
15. Special projects: Microbial analysis, isolation and identification of bacteria in different food samples. (2 hours)
Lab exercises will include: Enumeration of the total number of bacteria (CFU - standard plate count ) milk , water , shellfish and meat. Determination of fecal coliforms and enterococci in various food samples, and Escherichia coli. Isolation and identification of Gram-positive bacteria in the food (Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus, Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes ). Enumeration of Gram-positive sporogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, B. anthracis, Clostridium perfringens, C. botulinum). Isolation and identification of Enterobacteriaceae (Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Enterobacter sakazakii, Yersinia enterocolitica). Micromorphology, colonial morphology, biochemical identification Gram-negative bacteria (Campylobacter, Vibrio, Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Yeast and molds and canned foods. Isolation and identification worms: Taenia and Trichinella and protozoa: Sarcocystis, Giardia and Toxoplasma. Detection of antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria in foods.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures in the amount of at least 70% of the times scheduled. Completed all planned laboratory exercises, seminar essay and projects.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.5

Project

0.5

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade of the student is compiled from the combination of lecture, seminar, laboratory and project. Final course grade will be based on: Mid‐term exam 30%; End of term exam 35%; Seminar 10%; Project 10%; Lab course 15%. Your course grade will be based upon a percentage of total points obtained using the following scale: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Duraković S., Delaš F., Stilinović B., Duraković L.: Moderna mikrobiologija namirnica - knjiga prva. Sveučilišni udžbenik (ured. S. Duraković). Kugler d.o.o., Zagreb, 2002.

5

Duraković S., Delaš F., Duraković L.: Moderna mikrobiologija namirnica - knjiga druga. Sveučilišni udžbenik (ured. S. Duraković). Kugler d.o.o., Zagreb, 2002.

5

Duraković S., Duraković L.: Mikrobiologija namirnica - osnove i dostignuća - knjiga prva. Sveučilišni udžbenik (ured. S. Duraković). Kugler d.o.o., Zagreb, 2001.

5

Jay, James M.; Loessner, Martin J.; Golden, David A. Modern Food Microbiology. 7th edition, Springer 2005.

0

e-portal

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Food Microbiology: An Introduction by T.J. Montville, K.R. Matthews & K.E. Kniel, Third edition, ASM Press, 2012.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at different levels: Keeping records of his attendance; Annual performance analysis examination; Student surveys in order to evaluate teachers; Self-evaluation of teachers; Feedback from students who have already graduated from the relevance of content items.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Transport phenomena
NAME OF THE COURSE Transport phenomena

Code

KTK203

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge about the principles of transfer of momentum, heat and mass transfer on the principle of a unified approach to transport phenomena. This knowledge forms the basis of chemical engineering unit operations, and they are therefore essential for a fuller understanding of process engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- how to apply the laws of conservation of the fluid flow
- about molecular and convective mechanisms of transport of momentum, energy and mass
- how to recognize the major resistance at transport phenomena and how to intensifying the observed transfer
- how to gain insight into the functional dependence of the characteristics of a given system by the use of similarity theory and dimensional analysis
- the analogy of transfer of momentum, energy and mass

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to physical transport phenomena. Conservation law. Molecular and convective transport mechanisms.
2nd week: Stationary and non-stationary processes. Rate of transport processes. Momentum, heat and mass fluxes. Fluid characteristics (density, relative density, specific weight...)
3rd week: Momentum transfer. Newton’s low of viscosity. Momentum flux. Application of momentum and mass balances in fluid mechanics.
4th week: Application of heat balance in fluid mechanics: Bernoulli equation and its application in process engineering.
5th week: Theories of similarity. Dimensional analysis. Flow phenomena. Laminar flow. Stationary laminar flow between two flat horizontal plates.
6th week: Stationary laminar flow through a horizontal circular tube. Hagen-Poiseuille law. Turbulent flow. Pressure drop in straight channels and in pipe systems. Moody diagram.
7th week: Flow around obstacles. Rate of sedimentation.
8th week: Flow through beds of particles. Fluidization.
9th week: Fundamental principles of heat transfer. Stationary heat conduction. Heat conduction through walls and through cylindrical walls.
10th week: Heat transfer by forced convection. Thermal boundary layer. Partial and overall heat transfer coefficients. Heat transfer during laminar and turbulent flows in pipes. Heat transfer during condensation.
11th week: Heat transfer during boiling. Heat transfer around obstacles. Heat transfer during natural convection.
12th week: Heat transport by radiation.
13th week: Fundamental principles of mass transfer. Stationary diffusion. Equimolar counterdiffusion and one-component diffusion.
14th week: Mass transfer with forced convection. Mass transfer by natural convection.
15th week: Interphase mass transfer. Analogy between heat and mass transfer.
Laboratory exercises:
Determination of fluid flow type and the critical Reynolds number; Applying the Bernoulli’s theorem: Dynamic and Surface Flow Meters - Calibration of orifice plate and rotameter; Determination of pressure drop in the pipeline; Determination of particle sedimentation rate in a stationary fluid. Determination of fluidized bed characteristics; Determination of partial and overall heat transfer coefficients; Complex heat transfer by radiation and convection; Interphase mass transfer.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

0.5

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.2

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Test passing score is 55%. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of theoretical (oral) and written part. Exam passing score is 55%. Written part will constitute 25% and the theoretical part of the exam 45 % of the test score. Laboratory exercises (passing score 50-100%) will constitute 30% of the final score.
Grades depending on the test score: 55% - 65% - satisfactory, 66% -77% - good, 78% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. J. Beek, K. M. K. Muttzall, J. W. van Heuven, Transport Phenomena, 2nd ed., J. Wiley and Sons Inc., London, 1999.

3

N. Kuzmanić, Prijenos tvari i energije, Priručnik za predavanja (za unutarnju uporabu), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split, 2012.

0

Web stranice KTF-a

R. Byron Bird, W. E. Stewart, E. N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, 2nd ed., J. Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, 2002.

2

J. Welty, J. W. Wicks, R. E. Wilson, G. L. Rorrer, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th ed., J. Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 2007.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Mitrović-Kessler: Prijenos tvari i energije, Tehnološki fakultet Split, Split, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Introduction to Food Technology
NAME OF THE COURSE Introduction to Food Technology

Code

KTK204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Višnja Katalinić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students get aquainted with field of work and food technology development guidelines.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

No

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
- identify the work /research area of Food science; Food engineering and Food technology;
- define and explain the basic principles of division of food technologies considering: a) row materials /products and b) processing techniques
- describe the difference between technological and unit processes in food industry
- indicate basic food quality parameters
- understand the importance and know how to use legal regulations pertaining to food safety and quality
- understand development trends in food sector

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Global food needs: current situation and future trends
2nd week: Field of food science and technology
3rd -4th week: Food science and food engineering as a base of food industry development (major discoveries)
5h week: Categories of food technologies (according to the row materials/products and processing techniques)
6th week: Technological process flow-chart
7th week: 1. colloquium
8th -9th week: Insight into Selected food production procesess
10th week: Food quality (consumer demands; government regulations)
11th week-12th week: Food safety considerations; government regulations pertaining to food safety
13th week: The largest food and beverage comapnies (RH, world) and their most important products
14th week: Development trends in food sector
15th week: 2. colloquium

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures and seminars of at least 70% of the times scheduled.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over
partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam
is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is
based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied;
60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100%
excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Fellows, Food Processing Technology, 2nd Edition CRC Press, 2000;

0

Da

G. Campbell-Platt, Food Science and Technology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2009.

0

Da

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Professional / Scientific Articles chosen by lecturer

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Raw Materials in Food Industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Raw Materials in Food Industry

Code

KTK205

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge on
- main classes of food
- nutritive and non-nutritive food components
- chemical composition of food from different classes: cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and dairy products, fish, oils, conditors
- the influence of processing and food preparation on change of the chemical composition of food
- the understanding of processing influence as well as storage conditions on change of the chemical composition of food

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of raw materials in food industry, which includes:
- to distinguish the food belonging to different food classes
- to apply the optimal parameteres for protection of nutritive value and chemical composition of food
- to identify the risks for food safety
- to apply optimal parameters of processing of food in order to keep the chemical composition and nutritive value

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction. Classification of food. L (2h)
2. Plant-derived foods: Cereals. L (2h), S (1h)
3. Plant-derived foods: Fruits. L (2h), S (1h)
4. Plant-derived foods: Vegetables. L (2h), S (1h)
5. Plant-derived foods: Mushrooms. L (2h), S (1h)
6. Plant-derived foods: Oilseeds. L (2h), S (1h)
7. Animal-derived foods: Red meat. L (2h), S (1h)
8. Animal-derived foods. White meat. L (2h), S (1h)
9. Animal-derived foods: Milk and dairy products. L (3h), S (1h)
10. Animal-derived foods: Fish. L (2h), S (1h)
11. Animal-derived foods: Crustaceans. L (2h), S (1h)
12. Food additives. L (2h), S (1h)
13. Parameters for optimal storing of food. L (3h), S (1h)
14. Parameteres for optimal preparation of food. P (3h), S (1h)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 70% of full schedule; attendance on seminar work – at least 80% of full schedule. To design the seminar work on selected topic

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester, two written exams are provided (as partical examinations). Test will be carried out within 60 minutes. Students who obtain positive mark from both exams, will have oral examination in order to obtain the final mark. During semester, students should present their seminar work on selected topic within this course. The final mark of this course will count the mark from seminar work, marks from written exams, and mark from oral exams.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bilušić: Osnove znanosti o hrani, recenzirana predavanja, KTF, 2013. g.

0

web stranica fakulteta

Lj. Tratnik. Mlijeko – tehnologija, biokemija i mikrobiologija, HMU, Zagreb, 1998.

3

B. Šimundić, V. Jakovljević, V. Tadejević. Poznavanje robe. Tiskara Rijeka, 1994.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

N. Potter, J. Hotchkiss: Food Science, Fifth edition, 1998, Aspen Publication

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Biochemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Biochemistry

Code

KTK206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Mladen Miloš

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

20 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

During this course the students learn the basis of biochemistry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

First year of study.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Understand the basic principles of protein structure and their impact on the structure of biological function.
- Understand the basic principles of enzyme kinetics and inhibition of enzyme activity.
- Know and explain the basic concepts and principles of metabolism.
- Know and explain the structure of biological membranes.
- Understand the structure and biological function of nucleic acids.
- Understand the ways of conducting signals in living organisms.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

History of biochemistry (1 hour) . Elementary constitution of living organisms (1 hour). Water, bioelements, biomolecules and kinds of chemical bonds in living organisms. Exchanges of energy between cell and environment (2 hours). Amino acid (1 hour). Peptides and proteins (1 hour). Structure, chemical and biological properties of proteins (2 hours). Myoglobin and hemoglobin (2 hours). Enzymes (1 hour). Enzyme catalysis and regulation of biochemical processes (2 hours). Nonprotein catalysts: ribosimes, coenzymes and vitamins (1 hour). Carbohydrates and Glycoconjugates. Chemical properties nad biological role of carbohydrates (3 hours). Lipids. Fats, phospholipids, glycolipids and sphingolipids: chemical properties and biological role (2 hours). Biomembranes. Common features of biological membranes. Membrane proteins and membrane transport (2 hours). Purine and pyrimidine bases, nucleosides, nucleotides, nucleic acid, chemical and physical properties (2 hours). Structure and biological properties of RNA and DNA (1 hour). The discoveries of RNA and DNA (2 hours). Energy in biological systems. ATP as the universal currency of free energy in biologic systems. Electrochemical and concentrational gradients. Ireversible and reversible processes. A thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can be driven by a favorable one (3 hours). Metabolism: basic concepts and design (1 hour). Carbohydrate catabolism - glycolysis (1 hour). Fatty acid catabolism - -oxidation (1 hour). Protein catabolism - amino acid catabolism and the urea cycle (1 hour). Citric acid cycle. Oxidative phosphorylation (2 hour). Basic principles of cell signaling (3 hours).
Laboratory exercises: Acid-base properties of amino acids (6 hours). Qualitative and quantitative determination of proteins (6 hours). Enzymes (6 hours). Isolation and detection of lipids and phospholipids (6 hours). Qualitative detection of carbohydrates (6 hours).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class attendance, perform lab exercises and preparation of seminar papers

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Partial exams. Oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Biokemija , J.M. Berg, J.L. Tymoczko and L. Stryer, Prijevod VI izdanja, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2013

4

Školska knjiga Zagreb

Predavanja iz Osnova biokemije, Mladen Miloš, Interna skripta, 2009

0

Web stranice fakulteta

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Harperova ilustrirana biokemija, R.K. Murray, D.A. Bender, K.M. Botham, P.J. Kennelly, V.W. Rodwell, P.A. Weil, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2011.
Stanica, G.M. Cooper, R.E. Hausman, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Unit operations
NAME OF THE COURSE Unit operations

Code

KTK207

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students gain knowledge about the basic unit operations in the process engineering through theoretical expressions based on the mass and energy balances. Students are also acquainted with the working principles of the most used devices and selection of their optimum working conditions regarding minimization of energy consumption and product quality.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Students gain knowledge about the basic unit operations in the process engineering through theoretical expressions based on the mass and energy balances. Students are also acquainted with the working principles of the most used devices and selection of their optimum working conditions regarding minimization of energy consumption and product quality.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- fundamental principles of mechanical and of heat and mass transfer operations
- explain the laws that follow performance of each of the various operation
- explain the influence of operating variable on each operation
- bring up the most common used equipment for particular operation and explain their working principle
- for a given process, select the equipment that would be the most effective
- some of the most common operating problems encountered in the process industry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to chemical engineering processes. Fluid transport.
2nd week: Coarse dispersed systems. Milling.
3rd week: Classification. Granulometric analysis.
4th week: Separation. Classification and separation equipment.
5th week: Filtration theory. Filtration equipment.
6th week: Mixing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.
7th week: Mixing of particulate solids. Selection and dimensioning of mixing equipment.
8th week: Heat and mass transfer operations. Heat exchangers.
9th week: Condensers and vaporizers.
10th week: Theory of absorption and absorption equipment.
11th week: Drying in process engineering. Drying equipment.
12th week: Crystallization. Crystallization equipment.
13th week: Distillation.
14th week: Rectification and stripping. Fractionation.
15th week: Theory of extraction and leaching. Extraction equipment.
Laboratory exercises:
Milling - determination of the degree of particle size reduction. Particle size classification. Mixing - power consumption determination. Filtration - determination of filtration coefficient and filtration cake resistance. Heat exchanger - determination of overall heat transfer coefficient. Absorption. Drying rate determination. Crystallization – determination of nucleation and crystal growth rate. Distillation - determination of the number of theoretical plates.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

0.5

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester student may take the exam by two theoretical (oral) and two calculation (written) tests. Test passing score is 55%. After passing all tests the average score for oral and written parts is calculated and the grade for each part is determined by the following criteria: 55%-66% - satisfactory, 67%-78% - good, 79%-89% - very good, 90%-100% - excellent.
The final grade is calculated form the grades obtained for oral and written part and from exercises. For laboratory exercises passing score is also 55 %. Theoretical part constitutes 50% of grade while written part and exercises by 25 %. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination periods. The exam consists of theoretical (oral) and written part. Final grade is determined by previously notated criteria.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. L. McCabe, J. C. Smith, P. Harriot, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, seventh ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2004.

2

C. J. Geankoplis, Transport Prosesses and Separation Process Principles (Includes Unit Operations), fourth ed., Pearson Eucation, Inc.,New Jersey, 2007.

1

M. Hraste, Mehaničko procesno inženjerstvo, 2. izdanje, HINUS, Zagreb, 2003.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Welty, J. W. Wicks, R. E. Wilson, G. L. Rorrer, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer, fifth ed., J. Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, 2007.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Thermodynamics
NAME OF THE COURSE Thermodynamics

Code

KTK208

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Vanja Martinac

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The course of Thermodynamics covers the basics of general thermodynamic principles and their application in engineering. The goal is for students to master the knowledge of basic thermodynamic principles and their application in engineering, which will be helpful in their further studies as well as in their work.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students are expected to:
- specify and define the units of measurements of basic thermodynamic magnitudes and the state equation
- specify and correctly interpret the basic laws of thermodynamics
- specify and explain thermodynamic changes of the state of ideal gases
- define and explain the processes of expansion and compression
- define and explain cycles processes
- define and explain irreversible processes (throttling, mixing of gases)
- specify and describe heat properties and changes of the state of real gases
- discern and analyse processes in devices used to obtain low temperatures
- define thermodynamic properties of moist air and processes with moist air
- apply the knowledge acquired to solving tasks related to changes of the state of ideal and real gases and liquids, compression processes, cycles processes, processes in devices used to obtain low temperatures and processes with moist air.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: General concepts. Heat and energy parameters in thermodynamic processes.
2nd week: Basic laws of thermodynamics. The first law of thermodynamics using internal energy and enthalpy.
3rd week: Thermodynamic changes of the state of ideal gases (isobaric, isochoric, isothermal, adiabatic and polytrophic changes of state).
4th week: The second law of thermodynamics, reversibility, irreversibility, thermal diagram and changes of the state in thermal diagrams.
5th week: Cycles processes. Carnot and thermal efficiency degree.
6th week: Compression and expansion processes.
7th week: Processes with external and internal combustion.
Exam (I preliminary exam)
8th week: Real gases: liquid state, evaporation, wet and dry saturated steam, superheated steam, fundamental processes.
9th week: Thermal properties and changes of the state of real gases. Thermodynamics diagrams and tables for variables of state.
10th week: Water vapour – thermodynamic parameters of the state.
11th week: Vapour power cycles
12th week: Thermodynamic fundamentals of the cooling process. Vapor-compression refrigeration. Coefficient of performance.
13th week: Processes in devices for gas liquefaction.
14th week: Moist air.
15th week: Processes with moist air.
Exam (II preliminary exam)
Numeric examples demonstrating the topics covered are analysed during the course, making an integral whole with the lectures.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Attendance to lectures and seminars is registered (not included in the rating). A written and an oral exam are held in the examination periods. The passing threshold is 60 %. The oral exam is mandatory for all students, and the written exam is mandatory if a student is not exempt from it. Continuous assessment through partial preliminary exams (twice in a semester) allows for exemption from the written exam. The passing threshold is 60 %. Partial preliminary exams are not mandatory. Preliminary exams are not eliminatory. Each passed preliminary exam participates with 25 % in the rating. A passed preliminary exam also participates with 25 % in the autumn examination period. The written exam participates with 25 %, and the oral one with 50 %. Students who have not passed the written exam through preliminary exams take the full exam (final exam) consisting of the written and the oral exam in regular examination periods. The passing threshold is 60 %, and each exam form participates in the rating with 50 %.
Ratings: 60 %-70 % - satisfactory, 71 %-80 % - good, 81 %-90 % - very good,
91 %-100 % - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. J. Moran, H. N. Shapiro, D. B. Daisie, M. B. Bailey, Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2010.

2

N. Petric, I. Vojnović, V. Martinac, Tehnička termodinamika, 2 izdanje, on line (2007-01-09), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2007.

0

On line

V. Martinac, Termodinamika i termotehnika (priručnik - formule i tablice), on line (2008-12-09), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2008.

0

On line

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Y. A. Cengel, M. A. Boles, Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, 7th Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2011.
R. E. Sonntag, C. Borgnakke, G. J. Van Wylen, Fundamentals of thermodynamics, 8th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2012.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Measuring and Control Techique
NAME OF THE COURSE Measuring and Control Techique

Code

KTK209

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Renato Stipišić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of knowledge in working with measuring instruments to control the process and the acquisition of knowledge in the theory of process control.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Undergraduate courses: Physics, Computer application, Mechanical engineering.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- basic principles of measuring instruments
- choose a quality instrument is required to measure the physical quantities essential for process control
- spot the sources of error in measuring
- principles of automatic process control
- elements of the control loop and their assignment

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

First week: Description and view the contents of the lecture. The principles of the measurement. General characteristics of the measuring instruments.
Second Week: Pressure Measurement. Division of pressure instruments. Liquid manometers.
3rd week: Manometers with solid weights. Deformation manometers. Vakuummeters.
4th week: Temperature measurement. Dilatation thermometers. Thermocouples.
5th week: Heat resistant thermometers. Radiation pyrometers.
6th week: Flow measurement. Dynamic flowmeters. Surface flowmeters.
7th week: Turbine flowmeters. Flowmeters based on fluid properties.
8th week: Ionization flowmeters. The ultrasonic flowmeters. Fluid velocity sensors.
9th week: Level measurement of liquids and solids.
Examination I
10th week: Introduction to process control. Basic concepts and procedures.
11th Week: Types of process control. Examples process control.
12th week: The outline view of the control loop. Property of the control loop.
13th week: Synthesis and analysis of the control loop.
14th week: Regulators.
15th week: Control valves. Other components in the control loop.
Examination II
Exercises:
1. Static characteristics of the measuring instrument.
2. Dynamic characteristics of the measuring instrument.
3. Simulation of kinetics.
4. Laplace transform.
5. Systems of first order.
6. Determination of transfer functions.
7. Analysis of system with no controller and with P and PI controller.
8. Analysis of the chemical reactions kinetics.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance at lectures in the amount of 80% of the hourly rate.
Attendance of the exercises in the amount of 100% of the hourly rate.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

1.5

Experimental work

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two written exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each exam involved in the assessment with 50%. The examination periods shall be taken oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Rating: 60 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Božičević Temelji automatike I, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

16

J. Božičević Temelji automatike II, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.

16

R. Žanetić, R. Stipišić, Mjerni pretvornici u procesnoj industriji, Skripta za internu upotrebu, KTF- Split, 2005.

3

web

R. Žanetić, Vođenje procesa u proizvodnji, Skripta za internu upotrebu, KTF- Split, 2006.

3

web

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Seborg, D. E., T. F. Edgar & D. A. Mellichamp, Process Dynamics and Control, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2010.
W. Altman, D. Macdonald, Practical Process Control for Engineers and Technicians, Elsevier, London, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of students throughout the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Processes in Food Industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Processes in Food Industry

Code

KTK210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Višnja Katalinić

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

20

10

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The course is designed to give basic knowledge of food processing principles and applications. By the end of the course student should know the meaning of the major, general and specific, operations in food-processing engineering. Student should know the most important principles of food preservation and understand the basic principles and applications for major food processing techniques of commercial importance.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to:
- define different food sector activities and major processes in the food-process engineering,
- define objectives and methods of the basic preparatory and specific operations in the food industry,
- understand the significance and basic principles of food conservation,
- describe and understand food thermal processing methods
- define and understand food low-temperature preservation methods (cooling, freezing)
- understand the water activity concept and the implementation of environment control in food degradation control and contamination limitation
- know and understand the methods of food preservation by dehidratation
- describe fermentation and explain food bioconversion principles
- describe methods of conservation through addition of sugar, salt and preservatives
- understand basic principles of food conservation using microwaves and ionizing radiation

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to process operation; Common terms and definitions; Classification of processing techniques; The major processes in food-processing engineering
2nd week: Mechanical and physical processes; general-preliminary and specific operations in food industry; removing of impurities; separation; removing of inedible parts; sorting, grading,...).
3rd week: Specific operations: emulsification/; extrusion; operations specific for chocolate manufacturing: refining, conching, tempering; depectination
4th week: Importance of food conservation; The main causes of food spoilage; GMP.
5th week: Thermal processing: (Classification an principles of thermal processes; Thermal resistance of microorganisms; Lethality concept; Characterization of heat penetration date and thermal process calculation for pasteurization
6th week: Commercial Canning operation: raw material selection, washing; sorting/grading; blanching; peeling/preparation, filling; Thermal processes equipment; Quality improvement in thermal processed food; Novel thermal processing techniques);
7th week: Low-temperature conservation; Refrigerated storage and common storage systems; CA
8th week: I. Colloquium
9th week: Food freezing: Thermo-physical properties of food undergoing freezing; The freezing process; Freezing time and rate; Thawing time prediction; Freezing methods; Commercial freezing equipment; Quality and stability of frozen food.
10th week: Food dehydration (Concept of water activity; Dehydration fundamentals; Common drying systems; Novel drying techniques; Quality and storage stability of dehydrated foods; Trends)
11th week: Separation and Concentration (Introduction, Evaporation, Membrane processing; Freeze Concentration; Extraction; Supercritical fluid extraction; Osmotic dehydration; Future trends)
12th week: Fermentation practices and principles involved in the bioconversion of foods. Food preservation by the use of sugar, salt and preservatives
13th week: The principles involved in microwave and ionizing radiation for the preservation of foods
14th week: Food packaging: Packaging materials and their transport and other properties; The atmosphere in package (Vacuum; CAP; MAP; Active packaging)
15th week: II. Colloquium
Exercises: Creation of the scheme of selected technological process; Application of some actions in the selected product processing: a) mechanical and thermal operations in processing raw materials (washing, cleaning, sorting, calibration, peeling, pitting, cutting, blanching, dipping, cooking, frying, roasting); b) preservation and changes during the food preservation (cooling, freezing, drying, concentrating, biological preservation, application of natural and chemical additives); c) packaging materials and shapes, labelling. Calculating the degree of process utilization; Normative calculations for different food products; Students visit to selected food industries.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures and seminars of at least 70% of the times scheduled. Students are required to attend laboratory practice and field work 100%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

3.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into three units that students take over
partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam
is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is
based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied;
60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100%
excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Z. Herceg “Procesi u prehrambenoj industriji“ Plejada, Zagreb, 2011

1

Z. Herceg „ Procesi konzerviranja hrane“, Golden marketing-Tehnička knjiga, zagreb 2009.

1

T. Lovrić, Procesi u prehrambenoj industriji s osnovama prehrambenog inženjerstva, Hinus, Zagreb, 2003;

2

G. Campbell-Platt, Food Science and Technology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2009

0

Da

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

H. Ramswamy, M. Marcotte, Food processing: Principles and Applications. Taylor&Francis, Boca Raton, 2006.
Z. Berk, Food Process Engineering and technology; 1st edition; Academic Press, Elsvier, Amsterdam, 2009
J.G. Brennan, Food processing handbook, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2005
P. Fellows, Food Processing Technology, 2nd Edition CRC Press, 2000;
M.S. Lewis, Physical properties of Foods and Food Processing Systems, VCH Publishers, 1987.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Food Chemistry

Code

KTK301

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Mladen Miloš

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be introduced in major food components (water, proteins, enzymes, lipids, aroma substances, minerals, vitamins) and their changes during the food processing, preservation and storage.
They will understand the contribution of the one food component in total food quality and will learn about chemical, biochemical and physical processes in food systems.
Students will be familiarized with interactions between food ingredients and additives during the processing, preservation and storage.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Basic knowledge of chemistry, biochemistry and food microbiology as well as terms and facts from courses Processes in Food Industry and Raw materials in Food Industry.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will:
- Know the major food components and understand their changes (chemical, physical, biochemical, microbiological, enzymatic, etc.) during the food processing, preservation and storage.
- Recognize the potential degradation processes in food materials regarding the handling.
- Know the parameters that affect the degradation processes and actions which could those degradations prevent/slow down/delay.
- Know functional, nutritive and toxicological food parameters.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: What is food chemistry? Water: structure, phases of matter, properties, water activity, water food interactions.
2nd and 3rd week: Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins: classification, representative compounds, chemical and enzymatic reactions during processing and storage.
4th and 5th week: Enzymes: mechanisms and kinetics of the enzyme-catalyzed reactions; enzyme activity: effect of pH, temperature, pressure, water, most important enzymes and enzymatic reactions during food processing.
6th week: Lipids: classification, lipids in diet, cholesterol, changes of lipids during food processing and storage (enzymatic reactions, oxidation processes).
7th week: I. colloquium
8th week: Carbohydrates: classification, structure, properties, representative compounds,
9th week: Chemical reactions of carbohydrates (reduction, caramelization, Maillard reaction, Strecker reaction...).
10th week: Aroma substances: basic terms (threshold value, aroma value, off-flavors), individual aroma substances, interactions with other food constituents.
11th week: Vitamins: classification, vitamins in food, biological role, stability and degradation of vitamins. Minerals: main and trace elements.
12th week: Functional food components.
13th week: Food additives.
14th week: Food contamination (toxins).
15th week: II. colloquium
Exercises: Food analysis: Water content determination; Determination of proteins and amino acids; Determination of lipids; Determination of sugars; Determination of vitamins and minerals; Determination of additives.Changes of food components during processing: Protein hydrolysis and coagulation; Lipid oxidation kinetic; enzymatic reactions during food processing; Carbohydrate changes; Influence of the processing and storage parameters on pigmentation and vitamin content.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

0.5

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied; 60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

H.D. Belitz, W. Grosch, Schieberle Food Chemistry, 3rd revised Edition, Springer, Berlin, 2004.

1

B. Šimundić, V. Jakovlić, V. Tadejević, Poznavanje robe: živežne namirnice s osnovama tehnologije i prehrane. Tiskara Rijeka d.d., Rijeka, 1993.

1

D. Matasović, Poznavanje prehrambene robe, 6. izdanje, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.

1

S.S. Nielsen (2003) Food analysis laboratory manual, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Lawely, L. Curtis, J. Davis, The Food Safety Hazard Guidebook, RSC Publishing, 2008.
B. Caballero, (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Food Science and Nutrition, Academic Press, 2003.
T. Shibamoto, K. Kanazawa, F. Shahidi, C. T. Ho, Functional Food and Health, American Chemical Society, 2008.
G. Campbell-Platt, Food Science and Technology, John Wiley & Sons, 2008.
Znanstveni članci odabrani po preporuci predmetnog nastavnika.
S. Ötleş (2005) Methods of Analysis of Food Components and Additives, Taylor & Francis, CRC Press.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Food Chemistry

Code

KTK301

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

8.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

45

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will be introduced in major food components (water, proteins, enzymes, lipids, aroma substances, minerals, vitamins) and their changes during the food processing, preservation and storage.
They will understand the contribution of the one food component in total food quality and will learn about chemical, biochemical and physical processes in food systems.
Students will be familiarized with interactions between food ingredients and additives during the processing, preservation and storage.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Basic knowledge of chemistry, biochemistry and food microbiology as well as terms and facts from courses Processes in Food Industry and Raw materials in Food Industry.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will:
- Know the major food components and understand their changes (chemical, physical, biochemical, microbiological, enzymatic, etc.) during the food processing, preservation and storage.
- Recognize the potential degradation processes in food materials regarding the handling.
- Know the parameters that affect the degradation processes and actions which could those degradations prevent/slow down/delay.
- Know functional, nutritive and toxicological food parameters.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: What is food chemistry? Water: structure, phases of matter, properties, water activity, water food interactions.
2nd and 3rd week: Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins: classification, representative compounds, chemical and enzymatic reactions during processing and storage.
4th and 5th week: Enzymes: mechanisms and kinetics of the enzyme-catalyzed reactions; enzyme activity: effect of pH, temperature, pressure, water, most important enzymes and enzymatic reactions during food processing.
6th week: Lipids: classification, lipids in diet, cholesterol, changes of lipids during food processing and storage (enzymatic reactions, oxidation processes).
7th week: I. colloquium
8th week: Carbohydrates: classification, structure, properties, representative compounds,
9th week: Chemical reactions of carbohydrates (reduction, caramelization, Maillard reaction, Strecker reaction...).
10th week: Aroma substances: basic terms (threshold value, aroma value, off-flavors), individual aroma substances, interactions with other food constituents.
11th week: Vitamins: classification, vitamins in food, biological role, stability and degradation of vitamins. Minerals: main and trace elements.
12th week: Functional food components.
13th week: Food additives.
14th week: Food contamination (toxins).
15th week: II. colloquium
Exercises: Food analysis: Water content determination; Determination of proteins and amino acids; Determination of lipids; Determination of sugars; Determination of vitamins and minerals; Determination of additives.Changes of food components during processing: Protein hydrolysis and coagulation; Lipid oxidation kinetic; enzymatic reactions during food processing; Carbohydrate changes; Influence of the processing and storage parameters on pigmentation and vitamin content.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

0.5

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied; 60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Lawely, L. Curtis, J. Davis, The Food Safety Hazard Guidebook, RSC Publishing, 2008.
B. Caballero, (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Food Science and Nutrition, Academic Press, 2003.
T. Shibamoto, K. Kanazawa, F. Shahidi, C. T. Ho, Functional Food and Health, American Chemical Society, 2008.
G. Campbell-Platt, Food Science and Technology, John Wiley & Sons, 2008.
Znanstveni članci odabrani po preporuci predmetnog nastavnika.
S. Ötleş (2005) Methods of Analysis of Food Components and Additives, Taylor & Francis, CRC Press.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Quality Management
NAME OF THE COURSE Quality Management

Code

KTK303

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic and practical knowledge on principles, methodology, techniques of quollity assurance on food in RH and EU

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Completing the course: General Biology, Analytical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Microbiology of Food

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will will be able to
- Know basics information of international, European and Croatian legislation on food safety,
- Understand the theory and practice of quality management of food and implement a quality system
- Understand and be able to apply management tools
- They shall be ablle to to make case study in feeld of food business,
- Knowledge of HACCP, prerequisite programs, documentation
- Knowledge of ISO 9000, ISO 22000, IFS, BRC, 17025 and Accreditation System

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

First week : Introduction - Food Safety and Food Safety Management Systems: Seminar on Food Safety and Quality Management Systems
Second week : International, European and Croatian legislation in the area of food safety; Seminar on Quality Management Systems
.3rd week : total quality management, TQM; Seminar: quality tools, PDC cycle
.4th week : Food safety, Food safety management systems; Seminar: application of food safety in food industry,
5th week : Prerequisite programs (PRP) documentations, implementation of prerequisite programs; Seminar:, documentations and implementation of prerequisite programs
6th week . traceability and product recall; Seminar: traceability, documentation, product recall
7th week . I partial exam .
8th week: HACCP system, documentation and application; Seminar: HACCP
9th week . HACCP system, documentation and application; Seminar: HACCP.
10th week : Audit, certification, recertification; Seminar: Audit, certification, recertification
11th week : accreditation system; Seminar: accreditation
12 weeks . The basic concept of ISO 9001 and ISO 22000; Seminar: Application of ISO 9001 and ISO 22000
13th week . The basic concept of the BRC and IFS standards; Seminar: application of BRC and IFS standards
14th week autochthonous products, documentation and protection; Seminar: documentation and registration
15th week :II partial exam .

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 80% and completing seminars

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 50% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

V. Turčić. HACCP i higijena namirnica. Filedata, Zagreb, 2000.

1

R. K. Guthrie. Food Sanitation. Avi, New York, 1988.

1

N. G. Marriot, R.B. Gravani. Principles of Food Sanitation. Springer, 2006.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A Asaj. Zdravstvena dezinskecija u nastambama i okolišu. Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 1999.
A. Asaj. Deratizacija u praksi. Medicinska naklada. Zagreb, 1999.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Olive Processing Technologies
NAME OF THE COURSE Olive Processing Technologies

Code

KTK304

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivica Ljubenkov

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

20

10

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will acquire the basic practical knowledge on the production of olives and their processing in olive oil and table olives.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is able to:
- Suggest appropriate procedures for planting of olive trees, selection of varieties, fertilization, plant protection, pruning and harvesting,
- Demonstrate the basic steps in making olive oil and table olives production,
- Independently perform basic tests of olive oil and table olives quality evaluation,
- Choose the correct approach in solving the problems with waste materials from olive oil and table olives production,
- Know the basic legislation in the field of olive oil and table olives.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Historic part - olives and olive oil through the history of the Mediterranean region and in Croatia
2nd week: Olive production - soil preparation, variety selection, fertilization, pruning, protection and irrigation
3rd week: Olive oil production - harvesting, transport, storage, processing methods of olive oil (2 and 3-phase systems), pressing
4th week: Filtering, packaging and storage of olive oil, refined olive oil and olive pomace oil
5th week: Physico-chemical and sensory analysis of olive oils, introduction to the methods of analysis
6th week: Health benefits of olive oil, impact of the individual ingredients
7thweek: Legislation in the field of olive oil
8th week: I Colloquium
9th week: Table olives processing, harvesting, transport, storage, production (preservation) methods, HACCP
10th week: Secondary table olives processing
11th week: Evaluation of the table olives quality, introduction to the physico-chemical and sensory testing methods for table olives
12th week: Microbiology of olives and olive oil
13th week: Legislation in the field of table olives
14th week: Waste materials from the production of olive oil and table olives, types and quantities of waste from the production of olive oil and table olives, its use and recycling methods
15th week: II. Colloquium
Practice: Olive analyses (maturity index, the yield of water and oil), Determination of olive oil parameters (free fatty acids, peroxide number, saponification number, iodine number), Table olives preservation methods (brine preparation, debittering, Greek and Spanish way of preserving, ”dry” preservation), Brine analyses (pH value, acidity, salt content), visit to olive processing factory and olive oil mils.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars 80%, laboratory practice and field work 100%) and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied; 60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Boskou, Olive Oil-Chemistry and Technology, AOCS press, Champaign, Illinois, 1996, ISBN 0-935315-73-X.

1

Maslina i maslinovo ulje A-Ž, (Zadro, B. i Perica, S., ur.), Naklada Zadro, Zagreb, 2007, ISBN 978-953-182-075-2.

1

O. Koprivnjak, Djevičansko maslinovo ulje: od masline do stola, MIH, Poreč, 2006, ISBN 953-95365-2-9.

1

B. Škarica i sur., Maslina i maslinovo ulje visoke kakvoće u Hrvatskoj, Mario Bonifačić, Punat, 1996.

1

S. Kailis i D. Harris, Producing Table Olives, Landlink Press, Collingwood, 2007. ISBN: 9780643092037

1

S. Bulimbašić, Proizvodnja maslinovog ulja i konzerviranje masline, Mediteranska poljoprivredna knjiga, 2013

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Technology of Grape Products
NAME OF THE COURSE Technology of Grape Products

Code

KTK305

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Višnja Katalinić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

25

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Enable students to gain basic knowledge on grape production and processing, main grape products and production methods, factors affecting the quality of raw material and final product, as well as respective legal limitations.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to:
- understand the potential of grapes as raw-material and define the main grape products
- define the grape structure and most major chemical constituents of grapes and wines
- describe table-grapes quality parameters and cold-storage conditions
- describe and understand the grape-raisin production process
- understand and be familiar with grape juice production and preservation
- define main steps of the vinification process and distinguish the red and white wine production process specificities
- understand the role of ordinary prefermentation and post-fermentation operations
- define and understand the importance of alcohol and malolactic fermentation
- define role of sulfur dioxide in wine making as well as legal limitations of its use
- understand the importance of disposal and possible reuse of the vinification by-products

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction; Global trends in grape production and processing;
The main and other grape products.
2nd and 3rd week: Grape structure and chemical composition;
4th week: Influence of some factors on grape quality; Grape cultivars (table grapes; wine grapes);
5th week: Post-harvest technology for fresh grapes (table grapes-growing industry, harvesting table grapes, storage, transportation
6th week: Raisins production (row material; harvesting and drying; inspection and storage; processing and quality control);
7th week: Grape juice: production and preservation;
8th week: I Colloquium
9th week: Wine-making technology: production overview (from vineyard to bottle); Classification of wines; Specificities of winemaking processes for white, red and rose wines.
10th week: Wine cellar equipment, organization and sanitation; Grape maturity and harvest; Sugar, potential alcohol, pH and acidity, total phenols and anthocyanins determination
11th week: Fermentation (preparation for fermentation; primary alcohol fermentation; secondary malolactic fermentation);
12th week: Maturation; Blending, fining and stabilization; Filtration and bottling; Protecting the wine (oxidation; microbial spoilage); Significance of some enological processes and operations;
13th week: Recommended analysis (panels); Laws and regulations in wine production; Example of HACCP implementation in wine production process;
14th week: Utilization of winery by-products into high added value products.
15th week: II. Colloquium.
Exercises: Grape analysis (Determination of moisture and dry matter content in grapes, Mechanical properties of grapes); Raisins production; Must analysis (sugars, potential alcohol content, must acidity); Alcoholic fermentation; Vinification and control of its parameters; Wine analysis (ethanol, wine extract, sugars, volatile acidity, sulphur dioxide); Acidity correction; Blending wines; Wine fining; Wine colour analysis; Wine phenolics, Antioxidant activity determination; Wine organoleptic analysis. Field trip- Winery visit

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures and seminars of at least 70% of the times scheduled. Students are required to attend laboratory practice and field work 100%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

1.3

Experimental work

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into three units that students take over
partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam
is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is
based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied;
60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100%
excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Riberau-Gayon et.al. Handbook of enology Vol 1Vol 2; John Wiley&Sons, Ltd., Chichester, 2006.

0

Da

R.S. Jackson, Wine Science, Academic Press, New York, 2000.

0

Da

J.L. Jackobson, Introduction in wine laboratory practices and procedures, Springer, New York, 2006.

0

Da

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

B.W. Zoecklein, K.C. Fugelsang, B.H. Gump, F.S. Nurs, Wine analysis and production, Kluwer Ac./Plenum Pubishers, New York, 1995.
M.A. Amerine, C.S. Ougs, Methods for analysis of musts and wines, John Wiley&Sons, 2000.
R.P. Vine, Winemaking: Form grape growing to market place, Springer, New York, 2002.
M.A. Amerine; H.W. Berg, R.E. Kunkee, C.S. Ough, V.L. Singleton, A.D. Webb, Technology of winemaking, Avi Publishing Co., Westport, Connecticut, 1980.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Fruit and Vegetable Processing
NAME OF THE COURSE Fruit and Vegetable Processing

Code

KTK306

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

25

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge on
- fruit and vegetable storing and distribution process (control of fruit respiration, maturation, control of fruits quality during distribution)
- fruit processing (fruit juices, pectin-based products, dried fruits…)
- vegetable processing (canned vegetables, dried vegetables, fermented vegetables…)

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of fruit and vegetables processing, which includes:
- the understanding of biochemical and physiological changes in fruit after maturation process
- the knoweldge on nutritive and healthy aspects of fresh fruits and vegetables and their products
- the understanding of the influence of paramteres related to fruit shelf-life and quality during storage
- the understanding of factors influencing the change of nutritive value and chemical composition of fruit during processing
- the knowledge on control systems for food safety in fruit and vegetables processing

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Fruit and vegetables classification. Healthy and nutritive aspects of fruit and vegetables.
2. The influence of maturation process on chemical composition and nutritive value of fruit.
3. Biologically active compounds from fruit and vegetables and their role in fruit and vegetable processing.
4. Microbiology of fresh and stored fruit and vegetable.
5. Physico-chemical changes in fruit during storage.
6. Post-harvest technology of fruit and vegetable.
7. Thermic treatments in fruit and vegetable processing.
8. Enhancement of nutritive value of fruits and vegetables after thermic treatments.
9. Fruits and vegetables juices processing.
10. Pectin-based products.
11. Canned and fermented vegetables.
12. Dried fruits and vegetables.
13. Minimally processed fruits and vegetables.
14. Novel technologies in fruits and vegetables processing: vacuum technology, edible coating films, the use of high pressure, new modified atmosphere technology, the use of bioctechnology in fruits and vegetables processing.
15. Fruits and vegetables and their products characteristic for Dalmatian region.
Laboratory exercises:
- Determination of physical and chemical parameteres, the amount of pigments (carotenoids, anthocyanins) and biologically active compounds (total phenols, flavonoids) in fruits and vegetables after thermic treatments (blanching, cooking under high temperature)
- monitoring of physical and chemical parameters (water amount, amount of reducing sugars, pH, acidity) in fruits and vegetables during maturation process (climacteric and non-climacteric fruits)
- determination of carotenoids content in fruits during maturarion period
- pulpes of fruits preparation
- fruits juices processing
- fruits clarification
- vegetables juices processing
- preparation of fruit compotes
- preparation of minimally processed fruits and vegetables
- fermented vegetables (sauerkraut)
- pectin-based products preparation: jam, jellies
dried fruits and vegetables preparation

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 70% of full schedule; attendance on seminar work – at least 80% of full schedule. To design the seminar work on selected topic

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester, two written exams are provided (as partical examinations). Test will be carried out within 60 minutes. Students who obtain positive mark from both exams, will have oral examination in order to obtain the final mark. During semester, students should present their seminar work on selected topic within this course. The final mark of this course will count the mark from seminar work, marks from written exams, and mark from oral exams.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

L. De la Rosa, E. Alvarez-Parilla, G. Gonzalez-Aguilar: Fruit and Vegetable Phytochemicals, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010

0

W. Jongen: Fruit and Vegetable Processing-Improving Quality, CRC, 2002

0

Y.H. Hui et al. Handbook of Fruits and Fruit Processing, Blackwell Publishing, 2006

0

N.K. Sinha et al. Handbook of Vegetables and Vetegable Processing, Blackwell, 2005

0

V. Katalinić, I. Generalić, D. Skroza: Tehnologija mediteranskog voća i povrća, skripta za laboratorijske vježbe, KTF, 2010.

0

web stranica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P.R. Ashurst: Chemistry and Technology of Soft Drinks and Fruit Juices, Blackwell, 2005; W.V. Cruess: Laboratory Manual of Fruit and Vegetable Products, General Book, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Fruit and Vegetable Processing
NAME OF THE COURSE Fruit and Vegetable Processing

Code

KTK306

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

25

5

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge on
- fruit and vegetable storing and distribution process (control of fruit respiration, maturation, control of fruits quality during distribution)
- fruit processing (fruit juices, pectin-based products, dried fruits…)
- vegetable processing (canned vegetables, dried vegetables, fermented vegetables…)

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of fruit and vegetables processing, which includes:
- the understanding of biochemical and physiological changes in fruit after maturation process
- the knoweldge on nutritive and healthy aspects of fresh fruits and vegetables and their products
- the understanding of the influence of paramteres related to fruit shelf-life and quality during storage
- the understanding of factors influencing the change of nutritive value and chemical composition of fruit during processing
- the knowledge on control systems for food safety in fruit and vegetables processing

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Fruit and vegetables classification. Healthy and nutritive aspects of fruit and vegetables.
2. The influence of maturation process on chemical composition and nutritive value of fruit.
3. Biologically active compounds from fruit and vegetables and their role in fruit and vegetable processing.
4. Microbiology of fresh and stored fruit and vegetable.
5. Physico-chemical changes in fruit during storage.
6. Post-harvest technology of fruit and vegetable.
7. Thermic treatments in fruit and vegetable processing.
8. Enhancement of nutritive value of fruits and vegetables after thermic treatments.
9. Fruits and vegetables juices processing.
10. Pectin-based products.
11. Canned and fermented vegetables.
12. Dried fruits and vegetables.
13. Minimally processed fruits and vegetables.
14. Novel technologies in fruits and vegetables processing: vacuum technology, edible coating films, the use of high pressure, new modified atmosphere technology, the use of bioctechnology in fruits and vegetables processing.
15. Fruits and vegetables and their products characteristic for Dalmatian region.
Laboratory exercises:
- Determination of physical and chemical parameteres, the amount of pigments (carotenoids, anthocyanins) and biologically active compounds (total phenols, flavonoids) in fruits and vegetables after thermic treatments (blanching, cooking under high temperature)
- monitoring of physical and chemical parameters (water amount, amount of reducing sugars, pH, acidity) in fruits and vegetables during maturation process (climacteric and non-climacteric fruits)
- determination of carotenoids content in fruits during maturarion period
- pulpes of fruits preparation
- fruits juices processing
- fruits clarification
- vegetables juices processing
- preparation of fruit compotes
- preparation of minimally processed fruits and vegetables
- fermented vegetables (sauerkraut)
- pectin-based products preparation: jam, jellies
dried fruits and vegetables preparation

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 70% of full schedule; attendance on seminar work – at least 80% of full schedule. To design the seminar work on selected topic

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester, two written exams are provided (as partical examinations). Test will be carried out within 60 minutes. Students who obtain positive mark from both exams, will have oral examination in order to obtain the final mark. During semester, students should present their seminar work on selected topic within this course. The final mark of this course will count the mark from seminar work, marks from written exams, and mark from oral exams.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P.R. Ashurst: Chemistry and Technology of Soft Drinks and Fruit Juices, Blackwell, 2005; W.V. Cruess: Laboratory Manual of Fruit and Vegetable Products, General Book, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Milk and Dairy Technology
NAME OF THE COURSE Milk and Dairy Technology

Code

KTK308

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

25

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge on
- The chemical composition, nutritive and healthy value of milk and dairy products
- Milk and dairy products processing
- the control of milk and dairy products safety during and after processing
- the work of control laboratory (control of chemical composition, sensory evaluation, microbiological tests)
- cheese production (processing control and quality control)

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of milk and dairy products technology, which includes:
- to determine the chemical compostion and sensory value of milk and dairy products
- to recognize risks factors for milk and dairy products safety
- to apply the knowledge on milk and dairy products processing (yogurth, cheese, fermented milk)
- to apply the knowledge on beneficial microorganisms important in milk and dairy technology in production of fermented products
- to define the nutritive and healthy importance of milk and dairy products in daily diet

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction. Types of milk. L (1h)
2. Chemical composition of milk: milk fat. L (1h), S (1h)
3. Chemical composition of milk: lactose; proteins in milk. L (2h), S (2h)
4. Chemical composition of milk: enzymes, vitamins, minerals. L (2h)
5. Nutritive value of milk. L (1h), S (1h)
6. Sensory evaluation of milk and dairy products. L (1h)
7. Primary and secondary microorganisms in milk. Types of fermentation proces sin milk and dairy prodcts. L (2h), S (1h)
8. Processing milk. The use of high temperature in milk processing. P (2h), S (1h)
9. The use of membrane separation techniques in milk products. L (1h), S (1h)
10. Fermented dairy products clasiffication. (L1h), S (1h)
11. The role of probiotics in processing of fermented dairy products. L (1h), S (1h)
12. Nutritive and health effects of fermented dairy products. L (2h), S (1h)
13. Introduction to cheese industry. Cheese classification. L (2h), S (1h)
14. Basic knowledge on cheese processing. L (2h)
15. Cogulation process in cheese processing. L (2h)
16. The role of maturation process in cheese production. L (2h), S (1h)
17. Butter processing. Ice-cream processing. L (2h), S (1h)
Laboratory exercises:
- sensory evaluation of milk and dairy products (pasteurized and sterilized milk, fermented milk, yogurts, cheeses)
- microbiological tests (resazurin test, test using methylene blue, rapid cooking test, MILKBACT tests)
- determination of physical and chemical parameteres in milk: density, water content, ash, lactose, protein, fat
- test for pasteurization control (phosphatase test)
- test for antibiotics in milk
- casein isolation
- preparation of casein and albumin types of cheeses
- preparation of yogurt

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 70% of full schedule; attendance on seminar work – at least 80% of full schedule. To design the seminar work on selected topic

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester, two written exams are provided (as partical examinations). Test will be carried out within 60 minutes. Students who obtain positive mark from both exams, will have oral examination in order to obtain the final mark. During semester, students should present their seminar work on selected topic within this course. The final mark of this course will count the mark from seminar work, marks from written exams, and mark from oral exams.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Lj. Tratnik. Mlijeko-tehnologija, biokemija i mikrobiologija. Hrvatska mljekarska udruga. Zagreb, 1998.

3

R. Božanić, I. Jeličić, T. Bilušić. Analiza mlijeka i mliječnih proizvoda. Priručnik Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Plejada, 2012.

1

J. Havranek, V. Rupić, S. Golc-Teger. Mlijeko: od farme do mljekare. Hrvatska mljekarska udruga, Zagreb, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Spreer. Milk and Dairy Products Technology, CRC Press, 1998.
Y.W. Park. Bioactive Components in Milk and Dairy Products. Wiley Blackwell, 2009.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Processing Technology of Herbs and Spices
NAME OF THE COURSE Processing Technology of Herbs and Spices

Code

KTK309

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković
Prof Višnja Katalinić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

By the end of the course, students will know and understand the most important techniques in the processing of medicinal herbs and spices. They will acquire basic knowledge of plant families and species that are commonly used in the food industry and the main methods of preparing herbal preparations (teas and tea blends, spice powders, herbal extracts, concentrates).

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam students will be able to:
- describe basic terms, types of species and medicinal herbs, preparation of extracts and their useful application
- demonstrate basic procedures of processing species and medicinal plants and extraction methods
- determine appropriate analysis methods of the obtained extracts or plant materials and methods of determination of antioxidant and antibacterial properties
- suggest appropriate procedures of processing of species and medicinal plants considering basic postulates of extraction, analysis of extracts considering artefacts formation and impact to composition and properties of the product
- select appropriate approach in solving the problems in the area of processing of species and medicinal herbs, starting from knowledge from chemistry, technology and biotechnology

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction, history and use of medicinal herbs; Definition of medicinal herbs and aromatic plants
2nd week: taxonomy, nomenclature and classification; Distribution in Croatia and abroad; wild and cultivated plants; potential of the Mediterranean climate.
3rd and 4th week: Selected species of medicinal plants and herbs and their importance in the food industry, representatives of some major plant families (legumes, daisies, cloves, roses, anemones, lilies, wheat or grass, meadow grass).
5th and 6th week: Production steps: Select and Collection/Harvesting (seeds, leaves, roots), Transportation, Quality of raw material (the determination of pesticides, mycotoxins, microbiological...);
7th week: Mulching; Drying (chamber and tunnel dryers, microwave drying, spray freeze and reverse osmosis), cleaning, packaging and labeling products; Preservation.
8th week: I. colloquium
9th week: Herbal preparations (liquid and dry extracts), liquid extract (the degree of fragmentation, extraction tool, extraction);
10th week: First group of extraction methods (maceration, bimaceration, digestion, infusion, decoction, turboextraction, ultrasonic extraction);
11th week: Second group of methods of extraction (percolation, repercolation, diacolation, evacolation).
12th and 13th week: Active and effective substances, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of biologically active compounds from herbs and aromatic plants, analysis of plant material; Factors affecting the quality of active ingredients.
14th week: The most important products, teas and tea blends, spice powders, spice extracts and concentrates, legal restrictions.
15th week: II. colloquium
Exercises:
The quality analysis of raw materials and finished products; Herbal preparations using different extraction procedures, testing the influence of extraction parameters on the composition and properties of herbal preparations (degree of fragmentation of plant material, extraction solvent, duration, temperature, stirring, ultrasound); Determination of major components in herbal preparations by spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods, testing the biological activity of herbal preparations (antioxidant and/or antimicrobial properties); Application of herbal products in the selected food products.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars 80%, laboratory practice and field work 100%) and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam. The exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60% (60-70% successful (2), 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5))
The final grade is based on the evaluation of:
Presence and activities on lectures and seminars: 5%
Laboratory exercises: 10%
First partial exam: 43%
Second partial exam: 42%

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S.S. Handa, S.P.S. Khanuja, G. Longo, D.D. Rakesh, Extraction Technologies for Medicinal and Aromatic Plants. International Centre for Science and High Technology, Trieste, 2008

1

I. Jerković, Kemija aroma, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, 2011.

1

da

K. V. Peter, Handbook of Herbs and Spices, Volumen 2, CRC Press, 2006.

1

da

K.T. Galle, Hrvatsko ljekovito bilje, Mozaik knjiga, Zagreb, 2001.

1

da

M. Maffei, Dietary Supplements of Plant Origin: A Nutrition and Health Approach, Taylor & Francis, London, UK, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Herbs, spices and essential oils: Post-harvest operations in developing countries, UNIDO and FAO 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Processing Technology of Herbs and Spices
NAME OF THE COURSE Processing Technology of Herbs and Spices

Code

KTK309

Year of study

0.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

By the end of the course, students will know and understand the most important techniques in the processing of medicinal herbs and spices. They will acquire basic knowledge of plant families and species that are commonly used in the food industry and the main methods of preparing herbal preparations (teas and tea blends, spice powders, herbal extracts, concentrates).

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam students will be able to:
- describe basic terms, types of species and medicinal herbs, preparation of extracts and their useful application
- demonstrate basic procedures of processing species and medicinal plants and extraction methods
- determine appropriate analysis methods of the obtained extracts or plant materials and methods of determination of antioxidant and antibacterial properties
- suggest appropriate procedures of processing of species and medicinal plants considering basic postulates of extraction, analysis of extracts considering artefacts formation and impact to composition and properties of the product
- select appropriate approach in solving the problems in the area of processing of species and medicinal herbs, starting from knowledge from chemistry, technology and biotechnology

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction, history and use of medicinal herbs; Definition of medicinal herbs and aromatic plants
2nd week: taxonomy, nomenclature and classification; Distribution in Croatia and abroad; wild and cultivated plants; potential of the Mediterranean climate.
3rd and 4th week: Selected species of medicinal plants and herbs and their importance in the food industry, representatives of some major plant families (legumes, daisies, cloves, roses, anemones, lilies, wheat or grass, meadow grass).
5th and 6th week: Production steps: Select and Collection/Harvesting (seeds, leaves, roots), Transportation, Quality of raw material (the determination of pesticides, mycotoxins, microbiological...);
7th week: Mulching; Drying (chamber and tunnel dryers, microwave drying, spray freeze and reverse osmosis), cleaning, packaging and labeling products; Preservation.
8th week: I. colloquium
9th week: Herbal preparations (liquid and dry extracts), liquid extract (the degree of fragmentation, extraction tool, extraction);
10th week: First group of extraction methods (maceration, bimaceration, digestion, infusion, decoction, turboextraction, ultrasonic extraction);
11th week: Second group of methods of extraction (percolation, repercolation, diacolation, evacolation).
12th and 13th week: Active and effective substances, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of biologically active compounds from herbs and aromatic plants, analysis of plant material; Factors affecting the quality of active ingredients.
14th week: The most important products, teas and tea blends, spice powders, spice extracts and concentrates, legal restrictions.
15th week: II. colloquium
Exercises:
The quality analysis of raw materials and finished products; Herbal preparations using different extraction procedures, testing the influence of extraction parameters on the composition and properties of herbal preparations (degree of fragmentation of plant material, extraction solvent, duration, temperature, stirring, ultrasound); Determination of major components in herbal preparations by spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods, testing the biological activity of herbal preparations (antioxidant and/or antimicrobial properties); Application of herbal products in the selected food products.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars 80%, laboratory practice and field work 100%) and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam. The exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60% (60-70% successful (2), 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5))
The final grade is based on the evaluation of:
Presence and activities on lectures and seminars: 5%
Laboratory exercises: 10%
First partial exam: 43%
Second partial exam: 42%

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Herbs, spices and essential oils: Post-harvest operations in developing countries, UNIDO and FAO 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Basic Biotechnology
NAME OF THE COURSE Basic Biotechnology

Code

KTK311

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining of basic theoretical knowledge in biotechnology as well as the role and application of microorganisms and enzymes in different areas.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Biochemistry - enrolled.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- definition of term biotechnology
- differentiate the primary and secondary cell metabolism and its application in biotechnology
- explain of microbe cell growth diagram
- explain the advantages of isolated enzymes in biotechnology
- describe of basic bioreactor design
- describe the basic methods of intracellular products isolation
- outline some examples of biotechnological processes.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Description and overview of the course. Definitions of biotechnology, interdisciplinary of the field, history development, application areas.
2nd week: Perception of biotechnology in society. Metabolism and control of metabolic processes; primary and secondary metabolism, substrates.
3rd week: Anaerobic and aerobic metabolism. Microorganisms in biotechnology (bacterial, fungi (yeasts and moulds). Microbial growth kinetics. Determination of specific growth rate and Monod constant.
4th week: Enzyme technology (enzyme characteristics as the biocatalysts, advantages and disadvantages compared to whole cells). Enzyme kinetics.
5th week: Enzyme sources. Selection, production and immobilization of enzymes.
6th week: Biocatalysts in non-conventional processes. Bioreactors, photo-bioreactors, design.
7th week: Oxygen transfer and oxygen concentration determination. Heat transfer in bioreactor. An overview of the previous lecture for the test.
First test.
8th week: Extracellular, periplasmic and extracellular products of metabolism. Down-stream processing: separation solid-liquid, isolation of intracellular products.
9th week: Concentration and purification of products from bioreactor. Purification process control.
10th week: Process economy: cost estimation and an example of process design. An overview of biotechnological processes – basic scheme of biotechnological process.
11th week: Alcohol fermentation and its application in industry.
12th week: Lactic acid fermentation and its application in industry. Anaerobic biomass fermentation.
13th week: Biotechnology in pharmacy. Bacterial polymers.
14th week: Biotechnology in environmental protection and waste water treatment. Biosensors.
15th week: An overview of the previous lecture for the test. Second test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.6

Written exam

0.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 45%. Attendance on lectures (80-100%) is further 10% of final grade. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%). Previous activity (one passed test) is valid in summer exam period with fraction of 10%. Written exam is 40% and oral exam is 50%. Students without any successful previous activity attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%) both with fraction of 50%.
Grades: successful (60% – 70%), good (71% – 80%), very good (81% – 90%), excellent (91% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

C. Ratlege, B. Kristiansen, Eds. Basic Biotechnology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2006.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J.E. Smith, Biotechnology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food Packaging
NAME OF THE COURSE Food Packaging

Code

KTK312

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To provide an understanding of basic functions of packaging in accordance with the characteristics of the food product and market requirements.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student should be able to:
- define the main functions of packaging
- identify the characteristics of different kind of food and its sensitivity on external influences
- describe and identify various packaging materials for food
- describe the manufacturing of packaging
- identify the interactions in food - packaging system
- design packaging solution
- perform analysis of packaging materials in laboratory and interpret collected data
- participate in team work and to present seminar essay

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction.
2nd week: Classification of packaging
3rd week: Functions of packaging
4th week: Types and characteristics of foodstuff
5th week: Packaging materials: wood; paper; paperboard; metals
6th week: Polymeric materials: characteristics and classification; cellulose materials, polyethylene, polypropylene, vinyl polymers
7th week: Polystyrene, polyesters, polyamides, polyurethanes; biodegradable polymeric materials
8th week: Manufacturing of polymer packaging.
9th week: Multilayer packaging materials. Glass.
First test.
10th week: Packaging forms
11th week: Interactions between food and packaging materials. Packaging for cereals, bakery and confectionery goods
12th week: Packaging for fruits and vegetables; meat and fish;
13th week: Packaging for milk and diary products, alcoholic and soft beverages
14th week: Packaging waste and environment
15th week: Presentation of students seminar essays
Second test.
Laboratory exercises: Analysis of packaging material dimensions; Analysis of paper; Analysis of metal packaging materials; Analysis of polymeric packaging materials; Analysis of multilayer packaging materials

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %. The preparation and presentation of seminar essay (team work)

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.7

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.3

Oral exam

0.8

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

CONTINUOUS EVALUATION
The complete exam can be passed through two partial tests during semester.
Attendance on lectures, A1(successfulness =70 -100 %), share in grade, k1 =0,1
Laboratory exercises, A2(successfulness =50 -100 %), share in grade, k2 =0,15
Seminar essay +presentation , A3(successfulness =50 -100 %), share in grade, k3 =0,15
1st test, A4 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k4 =0,30
2nd test, A5 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k5 =0,30
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,15A2 + 0,15A3+ 0,30A4 + 0,30A5
FINAL EVALUATION
Students who did not take or pass partial tests have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods.
Activities A1, A2 and A3 are evaluated in the same way as indicated above.
Written exam, A6 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k6 =0,20
Oral exam, A7 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k7 =0,40
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,15A2 + 0,15A3+ 0,20A6 + 0,40A7
FINAL GRADE: successful (50% – 61 %), good (62% – 74 %), very good (75% – 87 %), excellent (88% – 100 %).
In the case that student passed only one test during continuous evaluation, he/she have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods. The passed test will be recognized by the end of the academic year as a part of the written exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Stipanelov Vrandečić: Ambalaža, recenzirana interna skripta, Kemijsko tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

1

web knjižnica KTF-a

I. Vuković,K. Galić i M. Vereš: Ambalaža za pakiranje namirnica, Tectus, Zagreb, 2007.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Pravilnik o ambalaži i ambalažnom otpadu (NN/2005)
Pravilnik o zdravstvenoj ispravnosti materijala i predmeta koji dolaze u neposredni dodir s hranom (NN/2008)
Z. Janović: Polimerizacije i polimeri, Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera i tehnologa , Zagreb, 1997

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Water Technology
NAME OF THE COURSE Water Technology

Code

KTK313

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

26

15

30

4

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will introduce to procedures for the preparation of water used in the food industry, as well as associated wastewater treatment processes.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Passed exam in subject Analytical chemistry.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Explain the processes for the preparation of drinking water used in the food industry
- Water quality requirements for different types of food industry
- Procedures for softening water
- Methods of test facilities biodegradable substances in water
- Conventional methods of wastewater treatment
- Advanced methods of wastewater treatment
- Basic regulations relating to water quality in the nature and maximum permissible concentrations of harmful substances in wastewater prior to discharge into the environment.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Hydrology. The water cycle, evaporation, infiltration, precipitation, underground and surface runoff. Condition of natural waters in Croatia. The division of water in nature.
2nd week: The water quality in Croatia, well-developed system of water supply and drainage. Preparation of drinking water. The use of water in the chemical and food industry.
3rd week: Physical and chemical properties of water. Indicators of water quality. Technological processes of water treatment. Filtration, membrane processes.
Seminar: Evaluation of water quality in the nature on the basis of chemical composition.
4th week: The application of membrane processes in the industry. Desalination. Adsorption. Adsorbents in water treatment technology.
Seminar: Calculation of capacity of different adsorbents. Ion exchange, the possibilities of performances, calculation of ion exchange capacity.
5th week: Application of ion exchange processes in the preparation of process water. Seminar: Calculation of water hardness on the basis of chemical composition. The written knowledge tests.
6th week: The use of ion exchange in removal of heavy metal ions from water. Seminar: Design of ion exchanger, preparation of seminar works in the working groups.
7th week: Coagulation and Flocculation. Choosing a coagulant in the industry. The carbonate hardness. Water softening. Seminar: The calculation of precipitating agent dose, preparation of seminar works in the working groups.
8th week: Wastewater treatment. Selection methods and pathways for wastewater treatment. Seminar: preparation of seminar works in the working groups.
9th week: Biological treatment of wastewater. Aerobic and anaerobic treatment methods, design of bioreactors. Seminar: preparation of seminar works in the working groups. The written knowledge tests.
10th week: Phosphorus and nitrogen compounds in the treated effluent. Removal of nutrients from the water. Seminar: preparation of seminar works in the working groups.
11th week: Overview of advanced water purification process. Examples of multiple use of water in industry. Seminar: Oral presentation of the seminar works.
12th week: Examples of methods of wastewater treatment industry of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Seminar: Oral presentation of the seminar works.
13th week: Examples of methods of wastewater treatment industries of dairy products. Seminar: Oral presentation of the seminar works.
14th week: Examples of methods of wastewater treatment industry of meat and associated products. Field work - Visit the plant for the preparation of drinking water.
15th week: Field work - Visit the plant for sewage wastewater treatment. The written knowledge tests.
1st Laboratory exercise: Monitoring the process of adsorption of dissolved organic matter on the activated carbon by batch method using COD. Calculation of main process parameters.
2nd Laboratory exercise: Kinetic monitoring of biochemical degradation of organic matter using BOD. Calculation of the kinetic parameters.
3rd Laboratory exercise: Testing of coagulation and flocculation of colloidal particles dispersed in the aqueous solutions using jar test.
4th Laboratory exercise: Water softening using milk lime.
5th Laboratory exercise: Removal of total hardness of water neutral cation exchanger
6th Laboratory exercise: Removal of Pb2+ using zeolite fixed bed method. Calculation of removal capacities in relation to the operating conditions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

0.2

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

0.3

Tests

0.3

Oral exam

0.2

Written exam

0.3

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The requirement for admission to laboratory exercises is passed an oral colloquium for each exercise. Overall assessment can be applied over three written tests and one oral assessment. Written tests are related to material adopted in lectures, seminars, field work and laboratory exercises. The oral test is related to the presentation of the seminar work.
Ratings on the written exam and the written exams: 60-69% is sufficient, 70-79% good, 80-89% is very good, 90-100% excellent.
Students who have not passed the exam through the assessment should have the regular exam. Regular exam means written test and oral exam. The rating, which is entered in the index, is the mean score of written test, oral test and laboratory exercises.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Hendrics, Water Treatment Unit Processes, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, 2006.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

S. Tedeschi, Zaštita voda, HDGI, Zagreb, 1997

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

R.D. Noble, P.A. Terry, Principles of Chemical Separations with Environmental Applications, Cambridge University press, 2004

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

N.G. Wung Jern, Industrial Wastewater Treatment, Imperial College Press, London, 2006.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

F. N. Kemmer, Prijevod: I. Begovic, D. Vidić, Nalkov priručnik za vodu, Građevinska knjiga 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Consultation with students
- Continuous writing assessment
- Results on the written knowledge tests
- Student’s questionnaire.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food Product Development
NAME OF THE COURSE Food Product Development

Code

KTK314

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Višnja Katalinić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

30

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of this course is to familiarizes student with reasons for developing food product. Students will get basic knowledge about the main steps (5D) in food product development and understand that food-product development comprises many disciplines. Student will learn to design, produce and evaluate a food product.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
- define new food product
- understand the reasons for developing food product
- identify and discuss five major steps in food product development
- understand the importance of team work and interdisciplinary approaches in
the development of food product

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Definition of new food product; Introduction to food product development - Reasons for developing food product.
2nd week: Five phases to developing and marketing a new food product known as the 5D’s (Decide, Discover, Define, Develop and Deploy);
3rd week: Brainstorming, establishing the goals and market demands;
4th week: Develop and refine the concept establishing processing, packaging, preservation and regulatory guidelines;
5th week Coolloquium1
6th week- 7nd week: Concept testing and prototyping; Product refinement, costing, manufacturing and packaging
8th week: Shelf-life testing, sensory analysis, physical, chemical and biochemical properties tested;
9th week: In use testing and customer acceptance testing; Product launch and roll out, investor presentation, marketing and trade shows
10 th week: Coolloquium2
11 th week: Students decision on new food product to research and develop;
12 th -14 th week: Competitive work of student groups
15 th week: Presentation and defence of seminar paper

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures and seminars of at least 70% of the times scheduled

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

2.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams and evaluation of seminar work. The share of seminar work evaluation in the final grade is 40%.
Grades: <60% not satisfied; 60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M.D. Earle, R.L. Earle, Creating New Foods. The Product Developer’s Guide - the Web Edition http://www.nzifst.org.nz/creatingnewfoods/

0

Da

Nutrition for Health and Development, WHO Progress Report 2000., WHO, Diet, Nutrition and Prevention of Chronic Diseases, FAO expert report, Geneva: World Health Organisation, 2003.

0

Da

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Gibson, M.W.Williams: Functional foods. CRC Press, Woodhead
Publishing Limited, Boca Raton, Boston, New York, Washington, DC, 2000.
Stručni/znanstveni članci po izboru nastavnika.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food Industry Waste Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Food Industry Waste Engineering

Code

KTK315

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Maja Kliškić
Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

10

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

After completed course students will have acquired knowledge about food industry waste management, current food process waste regulations and disposal practices and understanding of waste beneficial reuse and bio-processing.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completed course students will be able to:
- identify the diverse types of waste generated by various branches of the food industry,
- interpret environmental protection laws and regulations related to food industry waste,
- present methods for the treatment of waste from food processing industry,
- present principles and methods of recycling waste from food processing industry present possibilities of waste energy utilization.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Food industry waste. Technological, economic and social aspects of disposal and/or utilization of wastes.
2nd week: Laws and regulations related to environmental protection considering food industry waste.
3rd week: Waste management; health and safety policies and procedures.
4th week: Waste disposal. Types of landfills, safety and activities at landfill.
5th week: Development of optimized systems for the treatment of food industry waste.
6th week: Principles and methods of recycling waste of the food industry - sanitary landfills, composting.
7th week: Incineration and pyrolysis.
8th week: New technologies.
First test.
9th week: Development and application of biological methods for the recovery of organic waste and byproducts.
10th week: Waste energy utilization; waste as alternative fuel, generation of heat energy.
11th week: Generation of electricity. Biogas.
12th week: Biomass as a source of energy.
13th week: Technologies of converting biomass into energy.
14th week: Hydrogen as a fuel – biohydrogen. Hydrogen production processes from biomass and biodegradable waste.
15th week: Hydrogen production processes from biomass and biodegradable waste.
Second test.
Exercises: Reuse/recycle citrus peels. Ethanol production by distillation of fermented grape pomace. Calcium tartrate production. Fieldwork at the Karepovac landfill. Fieldwork at the Cijan d.o.o. company.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Exercises attendance: 100 %. Field work attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 40% and exercises and field work with 20%. On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: - 60% insufficient, 61 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

G. Tchobanoglous, F. Kreith, Handbook of Solid Waste Menagement (2nd ed.), McGraw-Hill, New York, 2002.

1

I. S. Arvanitoyannis, Waste Management for the Food Industries, Academic Press, 2007.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

L. K. Wang, Y.-T. Hung, H. H. Lo, C. Yapijakis, Waste Treatment in the Food Processing Industry, CRC Press, 2005.
M. Kliškić, Kruti otpad i recikliranje, Upute za vježbe, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, Split 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mineral Raw Materials From Seawater
NAME OF THE COURSE Mineral Raw Materials From Seawater

Code

KTK316

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Vanja Martinac

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Through the program of lectures and exercises, the students master the knowledge of basic properties of seawater and methods of exploiting mineral raw materials from seawater.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, students are expected to:
- explain and discern physical and chemical properties of seaware
- discern macro and micro constituents in seawater
- carry out the analysis of seawater for the content of calcium and magnesium independently according to work instructions
- carry out the analysis of seawater for the boron content independently according to work instructions
- determine the CO2 content in seawater independently according to work instructions
- describe technological processes of extracting mineral raw materials (magnesium, sodium chloride, bromine and fresh water) from seawater

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Seawater – a source of mineral raw materials.
2nd week: The basic properties of seawater.
3rd week: Physical and chemical characteristics of the seawater.
4th week: Composition of seawater. Classification of components dissolved in seawater.
5th week: Concentration and chemical forms of elements in seawater.
6th week: Constant ratios of major components of seawater.
7th week: Minor components of seawater.
8th week: Isothermal evaporation of seawater and separation of individual salts.
9th week: The effect of climactic and other factors on the evaporation process.
10th week: Evaporation of concentrated sea bittern.
11th week: Possibilities of technological exploitation of seawater.
12th week: Extraction of common salt.
13th week: Extraction of bromine from seawater.
14th week: Recovery of magnesium and magnesium compounds from seawater.
15th week: Extraction of fresh water from the seawater – desalination processes.
Exercises: During exercises, seawater is chemically analysed for the content of calcium, magnesium, boron and free CO2. Practical knowledge is obtained of technological processes of extracting mineral raw materials (magnesium oxide and sodium chloride) from seawater. List of Exercises: Analysis of seawater for its content of magnesium oxide and calcium oxide, Analysis of seawater for its content of CO2, Determination of boron in seawater, Recovery of magnesium oxide from seawater (seawater pretreatment, precipitation with 80% of the stoichiometric quantity of dolomite lime, washing and filtration, calcinations of magnesium hydroxide, chemical analysis of magnesium oxide from seawater), The visit to industrial plant – salt works - extraction of common salt from seawater.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attendance to lectures for 80% of the total number of hours. Full attendance to exercises and field work (100% of the total number of hours).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Attendance to lectures is registered (not included in the rating). During the semester students have to perform exercises (lab and field work). Exercises participate with 30% in the rating. An oral exam is held in the examination periods. The oral exam is mandatory for all students.
Ratings: 60 %-70 % - satisfactory, 71 %-80 % - good, 81 %-90 % - very good,
91 %-100 % - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

F. J. Millero, Chemical Oceanography, 3th Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2005.

1

V. Martinac, Magnezijev oksid iz morske vode (on line 2010-12-13), Sveučilišni priručnik, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.

0

on line

Desalination, Trends and Technologies, Ed by M. Schorr (on line 2011-02-28), InTechOpen, 2011.

0

on line

M. J. Kennish, Practical Handbook of Marine Science, 3rd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2001.

1

V. Martinac, M. Labor, More kao izvor mineralnih sirovina, laboratorijske vježbe (on line 2011-01-18), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2011.

0

on line

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

M. E. Q. Pilson, Introduction to the Chemistry of the Sea, 2st edition, Prentice Hall, 2013.
K. Stowe, Exploring Ocean Science, Wiley, New York, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Safety At Work
NAME OF THE COURSE Safety At Work

Code

KTK317

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Prof Pero Dabić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- Knowledge of the potential hazards when working in a laboratory and plant.
- The basics of working in a safe manner, safeguards and protective devices and agents at work

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is expected to know:
- Rules of conduct and work in the chemistry lab
- Basic hazards in a chemistry lab
- Ways of marking substance, meaning chemical Card (data on physico-chemical, physiological and toxicological properties of the substance)
- Assessment of the potential dangers of certain chemicals and working with the apparatuses and methods of protection at work

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: an introductory lecture, legislation, codes of conduct in the laboratory
2nd week: the security apparatus in the chemistry lab
3rd week: safety and physico- chemical properties of the substance
4th week: Classification of substances with similar properties and functional groups
5th week: labeling - labels , graphic symbols , diamond hazard label when transporting
6th week: effect of pollutants on human health - basic concepts of toxicology and physiological properties of the substance, MAC, LD50
7th week: effect of pollutants on human health - division and features matter to the physiological properties
8th week: assessment (first colloquium);
9th week: burning processes and fire danger
10th week: appliances and equipment for fire fighting
11th week: Model Fire Extinguishers
12th week: types of harmful atmosphere and breathing apparatus
13th week: protection of electricity
14th week: dangerous products - the formation, classification according to UN figures, storage, recycling and waste
15th week: assessment (2nd colloquium).
Laboratory exercises:
Exercise 1 Stability of the alkali metal
Exercise 2 Material flammability test
Exercise 3 Determination of ignition point by Marcusson
Exercise 4 Determination of physico - chemical properties of the solution
with the aim of assessing the potential hazards

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures in the amount of 80 %, and laboratory exercises in the amount of 100 % of the total number of lessons.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.1

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

Written exam

0.1

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation:
The entire test can be applied over two exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60 %. Each colloquium in assessing participates with 35 %. Laboratory exercises participate in the evaluation of 20 %. The presence of lectures in 80-100 % amount is 10 % of the grade.
Final evaluation:
Students who have passed the preliminary one, it is recognized as part of the exam and a 35 % score. The remaining part is laid in the regular examination period.
Students who have not passed any preliminary examination, written examination in the regular examination period laid the whole subject matter. Passing threshold is 60 %, and a written examination form to participate in the evaluation by 80 %. Laboratory work involved in assessing the proportion of 20 %.
Rating: sufficient (60-70 %), good (71-80 %), very good (81-90 %), excellent (91-100 %).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

P. Dabić, Sigurnost pri radu, autorizirana predavanja, 2013.

1

R. H. Hill, D.C. Finster, Laboratory Safety for Chemistry Students, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, New Jersey, 2010.

1

P. Dabić, Vježbe iz kolegija sigurnost pri radu, KTF, Split, 2010.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

B. Uhlik, Zaštita od požarno opasnih, toksičnih i reaktivnih tvari (I-IV), Hrvatsko društvo kemijskih inženjera, Zagreb, 1998., 2000., 2003. i 2013.
- Zakon o zaštiti na radu, Zavod za istraživanje i razvoj sigurnosti, Zagreb, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Keeping records of class attendance
- Annual analysis of examination performance
- Monitoring suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Introduction To Entrepreneurship
NAME OF THE COURSE Introduction To Entrepreneurship

Code

KTK318

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Mira Krneta

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introduction to Entrepreneurship provides (1) an overview of the definition of terms entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial activity and entrepreneur, impact of the entrepreneurship on the development and importance of entrepreneurial culture and infrastructure; (2) understanding and acquisition of practical knowledge and skills which is important for a business idea generation and evaluation in regard to market, technical and financial sustainability.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

MS Office tools (Word, Excel, PowerPoint).

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Graduates will be able to:
- Distinguish the entrepreneurship from other forms of the economic activity and entrepreneurs from small business owners.
- Define main elements of the business model for generating business ideas.
- Implement, individually and/or as a team work, process of definition, analysis and evaluation of the business idea sustainability.
- Distinguish the advantages and disadvantages of the different forms of entrepreneurial activity.
- Distinguish the different source of financing, including evaluation of the costs related to each source.
- Describe specific aspects of the business idea sustainability, in the form of written document.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction: objectives, scope and content of the course; teaching and assessment methods (team work).
2nd week: Entrepreneurship, entrepreneur, entrepreneurial process: conceptual definition of the entrepreneurship and entrepreneurs; differences between entrepreneurs, managers and owners of independent businesses; models measuring the frequency and intensity of the entrepreneurial activity; stages of the entrepreneurial process, the importance of entrepreneurial activity and impact on employment growth, competitiveness, targeted groups. Entrepreneurial propensity of participants (questionnaire: self-assessment entrepreneurial skills, entrepreneurial aptitude, expectations of participants, the skills related to MS Office).
3rd week: Entrepreneurial idea, opportunity, intent and project: defining of the idea, opportunity, intent and project concept, business ideas sources, models for evaluation business ideas sustainability, the business idea and business plan differences. In teamwork, carrying out processes of business ideas, generating, ranking and defining the business ideas list.
4th week: Business model: explain of the term, main elements and benefits of defining of the business model, using of the business model’s examples, discuss with participants about the elements of a business model based on the identified business ideas. Using a business model’s template for define the elements of the business model for each of the entrepreneurial ideas.
5th week: Industry analysis: explanation of the importance of the industry analysis for entrepreneurial planning, explanation of the scope, content and methods of the industry analysis; explanation of the main elements of competition analysis, using examples. In teamwork, for each business project, determination of the corresponding industry, identification of the major trends of the industry and sources of the statistical data.
6th week: Market analysis: explanation of the market analysis importance, scope and content, possible approaches and methods; explanation of what is the market segmentation and the method of determining the target market explanation of the selling prices methods. Conducting market analysis, for each business project.
7th week: Marketing plan: explanation of the marketing strategy content and scope, the sales process activities and way of defining the promotional mix; explanation of the distribution channels content and scope. Creating a marketing plan for each business project.
8th week: Technical aspect of the entrepreneurial project: explanation of the terms, scope, content and technical aspects of the entrepreneurial planning, the importance of the definition of the project’s micro and macro location, including the environmental protection and cost. Determining the technical aspect of the entrepreneurial project: various forms of assets (fixed and current assets), the location of the project.
9th week: Technological aspect of the entrepreneurial project: explanation of the terms, scope, content of the technological aspects of entrepreneurial planning explanation of the elements of the production and business processes, business functions, and elements of the organizational structure. Identifying the way of realization of production and business processes, organizational structure, management structure, business support functions.
10th week: Assessment of investment value and source of the funding: explanation of the importance of valuation, structure and dynamics of the entrepreneurial project’s investments; explain possible sources of funding, the cost aspect of individual funding sources and method of estimating the costs of financing investment. For each entrepreneurial project: identifying the investment specific items and funding sources.
11th week: Economic aspect of the entrepreneurial project: explanation of the scope and content of the entrepreneurial project economic aspects, the elements of the entrepreneurial project economic viability. For individual projects: drawing up a table of the income and expenditure values.
12th week: Financial aspect of the entrepreneurial project: explanation of the scope and content of the entrepreneurial project financial aspects, the elements of the project’s financial viability. For individual projects: estimation of the cost of financing and the indicators of the project’s success.
13th week: Risk analysis: explanation of the concept of risk analysis and risk management, explanation of the importance of identifying potential risks and the likelihood of their occurrence; explanation of methods of risk management. For individual projects: identifying potential risks, assessing the likelihood of each risk and determining a way to avoid and reduce risks.
14th week: Sensitivity analysis: explanation of the content and scope of the entrepreneurial project sensitivity analysis, explanation of the sensitivity analysis method. At the project level, identifying the critical factors affecting the entrepreneurial project, determining the relative impact factors, conducting the sensitivity analysis of the project on the impact of each factor.
15th week: - Revision, assessment (test).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Class participation and attendance – min. 80%.
Individual (team) work – project.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

1.0

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students’ assessment is performed in the regular examination periods, by passing the written and oral examinations. The written part of the exam is 40% of the total points and the oral 50%. 10% of the total points are determined on the basis of lecture attendance, participation in discussions and group work (project).
It is possible to pass the exam during the semester through: (1) passing the test (theoretical aspect of entrepreneurship), with more than 50% out of the total points, (2) successful development of the individual part of project within the group work and (3) regular attendance at lectures and participation in discussions.
Rating scale: (1) 55-65% - satisfactory, (2) 66-76% - good, (3) 77-89% - very good, (4) 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Morris, Michael; 2012.; Practical Guide to Entrepreneurship – How to turn an idea into a profitable business; KoganPage, London.

1

Spinelli, Stephen, Jr; 2012.; New Venture Creation – Entrepreneurship for the 21th Century; 9th Edition; McGraw-Hill International Edition.

1

Kuratko, Donald, F.; 2009.; Entrepreneurship Theory, Process and Practice; South-Western College Pub; 8th edition.

1

Buble, Marin; Kružić, Dejan; 2006.; Poduzetništvo – realnost sadašnjosti i izazovi budućnosti; RRIF, Zagreb.

1

Marsh, Clive; 2013.; Businee and Financial Models; KoganPage, London.

1

Pisani materijali pripremljeni za predavanja i rad u grupi (projektu).

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Barrow C.P.; Barrow R.; 2005.; Brown The Business Plan Workbook: The Definitive Guide to Researching, Writing up and Presenting a Winning Plan; 6th edition; Kogan Page; London and Philadelphia.
Bendeković, J. i sur.; 2007.; Priprema i ocjena investicijskih projekata; FOIP 1974 d.o.o., Zagreb.
European Commision; 2003.; Green Paper – Entrepreneurship in Europe; www.studentstarter.eu.
Good Finance Guide for Small Businesses: How to raise, manage and grow your company’s cash; A & C Black; London.
Leburić, A.; Krneta, M.; 2003.; Profil poduzetnika; Naklada Bošković, Split.
Nugus, N.; 2006.; Financial Planning using Excel: Forecasti

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Professional Practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Professional Practice

Code

KTKOSP

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Final Thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Final Thesis

Code

KTKOZR

Year of study

3.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

10.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

3. STUDY PERFORMANCE CONDITIONS

3.1. Places of the study performance

Buildings of the constituent part (name existing, under construction and planned buildings)

Identification of building

Zgrada tri fakulteta

Location of building

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Year of completion

2015

Total square area in m2

29500

Identification of building

Zgrada u Kaštel Sućurcu

Location of building

Kaštel Sućurac

Year of completion

1961

Total square area in m2

3000

3.2. List of teachers and associate teachers

 

Course Teachers and associate teachers

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Asst Prof Vida Šimat

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Analitical chemistry

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović
Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Basic Biotechnology

Prof Branka Andričić

Biochemistry

Prof Mladen Miloš

Computer application

Prof Dražan Jozić

Final Thesis

 

Food and Nutrition

Prof Višnja Katalinić
Prof Tea Bilušić

Food Chemistry

Prof Mladen Miloš
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Food Industry Waste Engineering

Prof Senka Gudić
Prof Maja Kliškić
Asst Prof Ivana Smoljko

Food microbiology

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić
Asst Prof Ana Maravić

Food Packaging

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Food Product Development

Prof Višnja Katalinić
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Fruit and Vegetable Processing

Prof Tea Bilušić
ScD Danijela Skroza

General Biology

Prof Nada Bezić
Assoc Prof Valerija Dunkić

General Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

General microbiology

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić
Asst Prof Ana Maravić

Inorganic chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić
Prof Zoran Grubač

Introduction To Entrepreneurship

Asst Prof Mira Krneta

Introduction to Food Technology

Prof Višnja Katalinić
ScD Danijela Skroza
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Mathematics

Assoc Prof Tanja Vučičić
Lucija Ružman

Measuring and Control Techique

Renato Stipišić

Milk and Dairy Technology

Prof Tea Bilušić
ScD Danijela Skroza

Mineral Raw Materials From Seawater

Prof Vanja Martinac
Assoc Prof Miroslav Labor

Olive Processing Technologies

Asst Prof Ivica Ljubenkov

Organic chemistry

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Physical Chemistry

Assoc Prof Renato Tomaš

Physics

ScD Mirko Marušić

Processes in Food Industry

Prof Višnja Katalinić
ScD Danijela Skroza
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Processing Technology of Herbs and Spices

Prof Igor Jerković
Prof Višnja Katalinić

Professional Practice

 

Quality Management

Prof Tea Bilušić
Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić

Raw Materials in Food Industry

Prof Tea Bilušić
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Safety At Work

Prof Pero Dabić

Technology of Grape Products

Prof Višnja Katalinić
ScD Danijela Skroza
Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Thermodynamics

Prof Vanja Martinac

Transport phenomena

Prof Nenad Kuzmanić
ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Unit operations

Assoc Prof Marija Ćosić
ScD Antonija Čelan
Renato Stipišić

Water Technology

Prof Marina Trgo

 

3.4. Optimal number of students

In this programme admission quota is 30 students. According to the needs and interests of the corresponding the Faculty Council can change the admission quota.

3.5. Estimate of costs per student

The Faculty of Chemistry and Technology currently offers professional study programme in Chemical Technology, field of study: Food Technology, fully financed by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports. Furthermore, the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology currently offers undergraduate study programme in Chemical Technology, field of study: Chemical Engineering, with admission quota of 90 students. With introduction of the undergraduate study programme Food Technology, the admission quota would be proportionally reduced; therefore the introduction of the new programme Food Technology would not require any additional funds.

3.6. Plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance

In keeping with the European standards and guidelines for internal quality assurance in higher education institutions (according to “Standards and Guidelines of Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area”) on the basis of which the University of Zagreb defines procedures for quality assurance, the proposer of the study programme is obliged to draw up a plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance.

Documentation on which the quality assurance system of the constituent part of the University is based:

- Regulations on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (draft version)
- Handbook on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (draft version)

Description of procedures for evaluation of the quality of study programme implementation

  • Fore each procedure the method needs to be described (most often questionnaires for students or teachers, and self-evaluation questionnaire), name the body conducting evaluation (constituent part, university office), method of processing results and making information available, and timeframe for carrying out evaluation
  • If procedure is described in an attached document, name the document and the article.

Evaluation of the work of teachers and part-time teachers

Monitoring of grading and harmonization of grading with anticipated learning outcomes

Evaluation of availability of resources (spatial, human, IT) in the process of learning and instruction

Availability and evaluation of student support (mentorship, tutorship, advising)

Monitoring of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole

Student satisfaction with the programme as a whole

Procedures for obtaining feedback from external parties (alums, employers, labour market and other relevant organizations)

Evaluation of student practical education (where this applies)

Other evaluation procedures carried out by the proposer

Description of procedures for informing external parties on the study programme (students, employers, alums)