UNIST
U N I V E R S I T Y   O F   S P L I T

FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

 

 

DETAILED PROPOSAL OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Graduate university studij

Chemistry

 

 

 
GENERAL INFORMATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

Name of higher education institution

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Address

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Phone

021/ 329-420

Fax

021/ 329-461

E-mail

dekanat@ktf-split.hr

Internet address

https://www.ktf.unist.hr/

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Name of the study programme

Chemistry

Provider of the study programme

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Other participants

Type of study programme

Level of study programm

Academic/vocational title earned at completion of study

Master of Chemistry

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Reasons for starting the study programme

Chemistry permeating the entire modern society, are represented in all developed regions of the EU countries and, therefore, need to take an appropriate position in the Split-Dalmatia County and beyond through the activities of University education institutions.
Chemistry, as a fundamental field of natural sciences and one of the oldest scientific disciplines, has grown up on three mutually related contents: theory, synthesis and analysis. In the global development of contemporary society chemistry was and has remained an unavoidable widely applicable scientific field focusing on industry, environmental protection, pharmacy and nutrition. It is necessary to foster, promote and develop the educational programmes of chemistry at all levels for the purposes of continual extending of knowledge of chemistry and the realization of educational support for the future superstructure of graduate and postgraduate study programmes from other scientific fields like chemical engineering and technology, environmental protection, biology, pharmacy, medicine, agronomy, food technology, agronomy, forensics, etc.

1.2. Relationship with the local community (economy, entrepreneurship, civil society, etc.)

Possible partners outside the high school system who have so far expressed interest and established cooperation (some are teaching base of the Faculty and the University of Split), and planned employment of young people who have completed university undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate study program in chemistry are: companies from Dalmatia ( eg. AD Plastik, Brodosplit, CEMEX, Cian), the entire Croatian (the pharmaceutical industry (eg., PLIVA Croatia, Adriatic galenic laboratory), the oil industry (INA), the food industry, cosmetics industry, paints and varnishes, the company dealing with the protection environment, etc.) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (eg. aluminum), institutes (eg, Institute for Adriatic Crops and karst Reclamation, Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Mediterranean Institute for life Sciences), educational institutions of different levels (high school, polytechnic) VIK, County Institute of public health, the Croatian army and police, various inspection services at the national and regional level, ect.

1.3. Compatibility with requirements of professional organizations

One of the basic preconditions for quality implementation of the proposed program is educational, professional and research cooperation of all relevant factors that may contribute to the process of training and education of students. Teachers who teach in the study Chemistry are members of various professional associations and bodies in Croatia (Croatian Chemical Society, Association of Chemical Engineers Split, Croatian Society of Chemical Engineers, Parent Committee for the natural sciences, field chemistry, Regional scientific council for natural Science, Croatian Academy of Engineering, Croatian standards Institute, etc.) and abroad (eg. American Chemical Society).

1.4. Name possible partners outside the higher education system that expressed interest in the study programme

Some of the specialized industry places and laboratories, teaching bases and the so-called places with whom Faculty of Chemical Technology cooperates (usually for the purpose of maintaining the placement of students - practical and field work and the preparation of the final work of students) are: companies from Dalmatia (eg. AD Plastik, Brodosplit, CEMEX, Cian), the entire Croatian (pharmaceutical industry, oil industry, food industry, cosmetics industry, paints and varnishes, the company dealing with the protection of the environment, etc.) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (eg. aluminum) and others. Partners faculties and institutes are as follows: Ruder Boskovic, Institute for Adriatic Crops and karst Reclamation, Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Mediterranean Institute for life Sciences.

1.5. Financing

Graduate study program Chemistry financed as all other study programs at the Faculty of Chemical Technology in Split (earmarked funds MZOS).

1.6. Comparability of the study programme with other accredited programmes in higher education institutions in the Republic of Croatia and EU countries

In developing the curriculum of undergraduate study Chemistry analyzed the comparability with similar programs of university studies in the world, including comparable programs exist in the following institutions University of Maribor (http://www.fkkt.um.si/sl/node/1462), Maribor , Slovenia, University of Ljubljana (http://www.fkkt.uni-lj.si/sl/studij/), Ljubljana, Slovenia, Universite de Geneve (http://www.unige.ch/sciences/Enseignements/ProgrammeCours_en .html), Geneva, Switzerland, Universite de Provence (http://chimie-sciences.univ-amu.fr/master-chimie), Marseille, France, University of Oxford (https://www.ox.ac.uk / admissions / undergraduate / courses-listing / chemistry? WSSS = 1), Oxford, United Kingdom, etc.

1.7. Openness of the study programme to student mobility (horizontal, vertical in the Republic of Croatia, and international)

The study is organized through one semester courses, which is one of the important preconditions for mobility. Compliance programs Chemistry with similar studies in the Republic of Croatia and the EU allows mobility of students and teaching staff. Mobility can be achieved through enrollment in certain courses in studies of other faculties, the whole semester at similar colleges or through the development of the final project.
The Faculty has signed the agreement for Erasmus mobility of teachers and students from the Universite Techniche Dresden, Dresden, Germany, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, Universita di Trieste, Trieste, Italy, AGH University of Science ant Technology, Krakow, Polonia, Polytecnich institutes of Braganca, Braganca, Portugal, University of Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia, Polymer technology college, Maribor, Slovenia and others. Chemistry and technology in Split participate in multilateral cooperation with the possibilities of mobility of students and teachers across the Central European Exchange Program for University Studies ( CEEPUS). Through this program, the cooperation with the following foreign institutions: 1) Faculty of Material Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland, 2) Institute für Analytische Chemie, Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz, Austria, 3) department of Analytical Chemistry, Slovak University of Technology, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, 4) Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic, 5) Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Slovenia.

1.8. Compatibility of the study programme with the University mission and the strategy of the proposer, as well as with the strategy statement of the

Program is aligned with the Strategy of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, University of Split, and its mission and vision, but also the strategy of the University of Split.

1.9. Current experiences in equivalent or similar study programmes

Faculty of Cemistry and Technology in Split was founded in 1960. During the last period, the Faculty has made a mark in the scientific production of Croatian and is thus confirmed his college education and maturity level. After his scientific productivity has become a major research institution located outside the Croatian Zagreb. The Faculty of Medicine published a considerable number of scientific papers, of which a significant number covered by the scientific bases Web of Science and Current Contents.
University teaching activity Faculty since its foundation is based on two scientific fields: chemistry and chemical engineering, which belong to different scientific fields (natural and technical).
Undergraduate study program Chemistry grew out of the former 45-year-old teaching and research experience of the faculty. Teachers College for many years involved in the teaching of chemistry in other faculties and departments of the University of Split, as well as at other universities abroad.

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

2.1. General information

Scientific/artistic area of the study programme

Natural sciences

Duration of the study programme

2 years (4 semesters)

The minimum number of ECTS required for completion of study

120

Enrolment requirements and admission procedure

Completed aappropriate undergraduate study.

2.2. Learning outcomes of the study programme (name 15-30 learning outcomes)

Master of chemistry will be able to:
- demonstrate the understanding of major concepts in all five major disciplines of chemistry: analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic and physical
- employ critical thinking and scientific methods to design, carry out, record and analyze the results of chemical experiments
- demonstrate proficiency in the use of appropriate instrumentation to collect and record data from chemical experiments.
- demonstrate the ability to use computers for chemical simulation and computation
- employ modern library search tools to locate scientific information
- demonstrate proficiency in writing and speaking about chemistry topics in clear and concise manner to both chemists and non-chemists according to the professional standards
- work in diverse teams in both classroom and laboratory effectively
- communicate and collaborate with colleagues effectively and respectfully
- know and follow proper procedures and regulations for safe handling, use and disposal of chemicals
- demonstrate an awareness of the impact of chemistry on the environment, society and other cultures outside the scientific community
- contribute their own knowledge and experiences to their community and the broader society by participating in professional and/or community activities
- gain entry into professional schools, graduate programs, or the job market.

2.3. Employment possibilities

Graduates students can be employed by the aforementioned business entities with which the faculty cooperates, as well as in educational institutions, various inspection services at the national and regional leve, ect.

2.4. Possibilities of continuing studies at a higher level

At the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology are graduate study Chemistry and Chemical Technology, and besides opportunities to continue studying at the Faculty, graduates of university undergraduate study Chemistry can continue their studies at other universities at home and abroad, especially in the field of European Higher Education.

2.5. Name lover level studies of the proposer or other institutions that qualify for admission to the proposed study

Not applicable.

2.6. Structure of the study

Terms and method of studying at a university undergraduate degree in chemistry are based on the Regulations on the Study and Study System Chemical Technology that complies with the Rules of Study and Study System of the University of Split. For example, mention rules detailed provision requirements for enrollment in the next academic year, regular or compulsory exams and exam dates and the like.

2.7. Guiding and tutoring through the study system

At the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology there is a model teacher-mentor through which students can get help, advice and support. There is also a mentoring system when creating the final work.

2.8. List of courses that the student can take in other study programmes

For graduate study Chemistry students may choose electives for a small number of cases (eg, English, sports activities) from other studies at the University of Split in accordance with the rules of the University who may or may not enter the workload which yields a specific decision for each student.

2.9. List of courses offered in a foreign language as well (name which language)

Teaching at undergraduate level of Chemistry, generally will run in the Croatian language. Since the program there are objects which carries a possibility of realization of teaching in English, it is possible that in these courses as needed realizes teaching in English.

2.10. Criteria and conditions for transferring the ECTS credits

Criteria and transfer credits shall be prescribed by agreement between the institutions of higher education, the Rules on Study and Study System at the University of Split, the Statute of Chemical Technology in Split and the Regulations on Study and Study System of Chemical Technology in Split.

2.11. Completion of study

Final requirement for completion of study



Requirements for final/diploma thesis or final/diploma/exam

Requirements for final thesis are regulated by the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam and evaluation and defence of final/diploma thesis

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam is regulated by the Ordinance on final thesis/diploma thesis at the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split.

 

2.12. List of mandatory and elective courses

Environmental Chemistry

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTH101 Physical chemistry of electrolyte solutions 30 15 30 0 7.5
KTH103 Quantum Chemistry 30 15 0 0 5.0
KTH104 Organic Analysis 30 15 60 0 10.0
KTH210 Chemometrics 30 45 0 0 7.5
Total
120 90 90 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTH215 Quality Assurance and Accreditation in Laboratory Practice 30 15 28 2 6.5
KTI102 Chemistry of Materials 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTI103 Analytical Environmental Chemistry 30 15 45 0 7.5
KTI104 Surface Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTI1S Experimental seminar paper 0 0 0 0 3.0
Total
120 60 133 2 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTI201 Chemistry of Sea 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTI202 Atmospheric Chemistry 45 15 15 0 7.5
KTI203 Soil Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTI204 Water Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.5
Total
135 60 105 0 27
Elective KTH216 Microemulsions in applied chemistry 15 15 30 0 3.0
KTH217 Selected chapters from biochemistry 30 15 0 0 3.0
KTH218 Chemical sensors and biosensors 30 0 15 0 3.0

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTIODR Diploma Thesis 0 0 0 0 18.0
Total
0 0 0 0 18
Elective KTC217 Energy and Development 30 0 0 0 2.0
KTH102 Physical methods of analysis 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTH205 Environmental menagment system 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTH214 Colloid Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTI101 Methods of separation and speciation 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTI205 Chemistry and Technology of Aromatic Plants 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTI206 Chemical Ecology 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTI207 Solid State Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTI208 Solid State Physics 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTI209 Corrosion and Materials Protection 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTI210 Mathematical Tools in Chemical Engineering 30 0 15 0 4.0

 

Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTH101 Physical chemistry of electrolyte solutions 30 15 30 0 7.5
KTH103 Quantum Chemistry 30 15 0 0 5.0
KTH104 Organic Analysis 30 15 60 0 10.0
KTH210 Chemometrics 30 45 0 0 7.5
Total
120 90 90 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTC103 General microbiology 30 0 30 0 5.5
KTH105 Organic Synthesis 30 15 60 0 10.0
KTH106 Chemistry and Technology of Aromatic Plants 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTH107 Introduction to molecular biology 30 15 15 0 5.0
KTH1S Experimental seminar paper 0 75 0 0 3.0
Total
120 120 135 0 30

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTH201 Flavour chemistry 30 15 30 0 7.5
KTH203 Biochemical engineering 30 15 30 0 7.5
KTH204 Synthesis of Biologically Active Compounds 30 0 45 0 7.5
KTH212 Physical biochemistry 15 15 15 0 4.5
Total
105 45 120 0 27
Elective KTH216 Microemulsions in applied chemistry 15 15 30 0 3.0
KTH217 Selected chapters from biochemistry 30 15 0 0 3.0
KTH218 Chemical sensors and biosensors 30 0 15 0 3.0

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTHODR Diploma Thesis 0 0 0 0 18.0
Total
0 0 0 0 18
Elective KTC217 Energy and Development 30 0 0 0 2.0
KTH102 Physical methods of analysis 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTH205 Environmental menagment system 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTH211 Analytical Environmental Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTH213 Naturally occuring polymeric materials 30 0 30 0 6.0
KTH214 Colloid Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTH215 Quality Assurance and Accreditation in Laboratory Practice 30 15 28 2 6.5
KTI101 Methods of separation and speciation 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTI104 Surface Chemistry 30 15 30 0 6.5
KTI302 Chemistry of Materials 30 15 30 0 6.0

 

 

2.13. Course description

 

General microbiology
NAME OF THE COURSE General microbiology

Code

KTC103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić

Credits (ECTS)

5.5

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Ana Maravić

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

This course is designed to give students understanding of basic concepts in microbiology including various microorganisms their physiology, morphology, genetics, ecology, pathogenicity and application used of laboratory methods and techniques in microbiological research.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

No

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students completing this course should be able to:
- better understanding of the evolutionary relationships between structure, diversity and replication of different groups of microorganisms.
- learn about genetic mechanisms of adaptation of prokaryotic microorganisms in a variety of environmental conditions.
- applied methods of physiological and biochemical tests for the identification of the different groups of microorganisms.
- identify the mechanisms of pathogenicity of microorganisms that cause diseases in humans and animals as well as the mechanisms used by the hosts to defend themselves against pathogens.
- determine the number of microorganisms in the sample and calculate the growth of microorganisms in controlled laboratory conditions.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Introduction. Historical development of microbiology. (2 hours)
2. The distribution of microorganisms and their role in biogeochemical processes in nature. (2 hours)
3. Eukaryotes, Archaea and Bacteria; structure and function. Morphology, nomenclature and classification of microorganisms. (2 hours)
4. Basic structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (2 hours)
5. Microbial genetics, genome organization, mobile genetic elements. (2 hours)
6. The growth of microorganisms and the basic growth factors, nutrients, temperature, oxygen, pH and osmotic pressure. (2 hours)
7. Metabolic activity of microorganisms. Identification of microorganisms using various physiological and biochemical tests. (2 hours)
8. Microorganisms and diseases, resistance, relationship microorganisms and host immune responses to infection. (2 hours)
9. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics and other chemical substances. (2 hours)
10. Basic morphological characteristics of fungi, yeasts and molds and their pathogenicity. Diseases caused by fungi, and their toxins. (2 hours)
11. Application of microorganisms in biotechnology. (2 hours)
12. Basic morphological characteristics and development cycles of parasites.
13. The role of microorganisms in the biodegradation of heavy metals, nitrate, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. (2 hours)
14. Basic morphological characteristics of viruses, viroids and prions. Classification and nomenclature of viruses. Methods of studying properties of the viruses. (2 hours)
15. Control the growth of microorganisms by physical and chemical methods. (2 hours)
Lab topics will include: Techniques in aseptic conditions, methods of preparation and staining of various preparations. Isolation of pure cultures of microorganisms, preparation of culture media, culture and use of different methods of isolation and identification of bacteria. Basic macro and micromorphological characteristics and yeasts and molds. Cultivation of yeasts and molds on nutrient media, isolation and identification. The main morphological features of the parasite. Sampling and preparation of samples for identification of parasites. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance of bacteria to antibiotics and other chemical substances and to determine the sensitivity of microorganisms to antibiotics. Methods for determining the number of bacteria in different samples of food and water dilution method, the spectrophotometric method and membrane filtration.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures in the amount of at least 70% of the times scheduled. Completed all planned laboratory exercises and seminar essay.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade of the student is compiled from the combination of lecture, seminar, laboratory. Final course grade will be based on: Mid‐term exam 30%; End of term exam 35%; Seminar 10%; Lab course 15%. Course grade will be based upon a percentage of total points obtained using the following scale: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. Duraković, S.Redžepović, Uvod u opću mikrobiologiju, Kugler, Zagreb, 2002.

5

e-learning portal

S. Kalenić, E. Mlinarić-Missoni i sur., Medicinska bakteriologija i mikologija, Merkur A.B.D., Zagreb, 2005.

5

Z. Brudnjak, Medicinska virologija, Merkur A.B.D., Zagreb, 2002.

5

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.A. Harvey, P.C. Champe, B.D. Fisher, Microbiology, 2th ed., Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2007.
R.M. Patrick, S.R. Ken, A.P. Michael, Medical Microbiology, 5th ed. Elsevier/Mosby, Philadelphia, 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Energy and Development
NAME OF THE COURSE Energy and Development

Code

KTC217

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

ScD Mirko Marušić

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Obtaining basic theoretical knowledge in the field of energetics. Introduction to basic information needed for active participation in classes in the field of termotechnics and energetics.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Describing the ways of energy conversion and comparing conventional energy sources.
- Describing the ways in which electricity can be produced.
- Describing the ways in which nuclear energy can be used and analyizing the operation of a nuclear power plant.
- Defining and describing the types of renewable energy sources.
- Describing the basic characteristics of water energy usage.
- Describing the ways in energy of the sun can be used and its basic characteristics.
- Describing the basic characteristics of the usage of wind energy.
- Describing the ways in which geotermal energy and biomass energy can be used, as well as their basic characteristics.
- Defining and describing the basic elements of energetic planning and energetic policy.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

- 1st week: Energy: definition and units, energy inflow the on Earth, Earth′s energy balance - energy crises, enegy resources, energy supplays, energy conversion and heat.
- 2nd week: Consumption of energy; historical development, regional consumption, influence on the life quality, consumption and saving of energy in basic sectors (industry, traffic, households), estimation of global energetics development.
- 3rd week: Energy of fossil fuels: coal.
- 4th week: Energy of fossil fuels: oil.
- 5th week: Energy of fossil fuels: natural gas. Partial assessment (1st preliminary test)
- 6th week: Thermal power plant, influence on environmente (greenhouse effects, acid rains, particulates, heat contamination), exploitation of waste heat, magnetohydrodynamic generators.
- 7th week: Hydroenergy: basic characteristics of water flow, hydro-electric power plants.
- 8th week: Nuclear energy: fission.
- 9th week: Nuclear reactors.
- 10th week: Nuclear fuels. Partial assessment (2nd preliminary test)
- 11th week: Nuclear fusion, projects of fusion devices.
- 12th week: Influence of nuclear energy on mankind and environmente.
- 13th week: Solar energy: conversion in heat energy (active and passive solar systems, solar furnaces, solar-electric power plants), photovoltaic conversion (photovoltaicells and photovoltaic systems), application of nanotechnology, bioconversion (cultivation and energetical exploitation of biomass).
- 14th week: Wind energy: basic characteristics, wind turbines, wind-electric power plants.
- 15th week: Energy of oceans and seas: energy of high and low tide, energy of waves, heat energy. Geothermal energy: hydrogeothermal and petrogeothermal energy supplays, influence on environmente. Storage of energy. Partial assessment (3nd preliminary test).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

In course of the semester, the entire exam can be passes by taking and passing the three preliminary tests consisting of theoretical questions.
In the examination periods oral exam is taken.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Internal script

0

Web portal KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

D. Krpan-Lisica, Osnove energetike, Hinus, Zagreb, 2001.
C.J. Cleveland, Editor, Encyclopedia of Energy, Vol.1-6, Elsevier, San Diego 2004.
H. Požar, Osnove energetike 1,2, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1992.
V. Knapp, Novi izvori energije 1, Školska knjiga, Zagareb, 1993.
P. Kulišić, Novi izvori energije 2, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1991.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physical chemistry of electrolyte solutions
NAME OF THE COURSE Physical chemistry of electrolyte solutions

Code

KTH101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Credits (ECTS)

7.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is a systematic review and extension of basic knowledge of structural, thermodynamic and transport properties of electrolyte solutions derived from lectures in physical chemistry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to:
1) explain the main characteristic whereby electrolytes are distinguished from other solutions, 2) apply the thermodynamic quantities for the treatment of equilibrium conditions, 3) explain the different conductivity chemical models, 4) understand the theoretical treatment of transport properties based on the interionic attraction theory of Debye and Huckel 5) independently determine the equilibrium constant for the reaction of ionic associations, 6) interpret the experimental and theoretical data.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures
1st week: Introduction. Classification of solvents and electrolytes. Non-electrostatic interactions. Triple-ion formation.
2nd week: Spectroscopic studies of association. Ionizing solvation reactions. Thermodynamic energy functions and their variables. The chemical potential of electrolytes in solutions.
3rd week: Partial molar quantities. Attractive potentials of spatially fixed ions and dipoles. Van der Waals potential. Ions and molecules in homogeneous dielectric media.
4th week: Dipole molecule in a homogeneous dielectric medium. Reaction field. Complete ion-ion interaction potentials in solutions.
5th week: Particle size parameters (solvent molecules, inorganic and organic ions). Ions and molecules in the gas phase, (gas phase equilibria of electrolytes, ion clustering by solvent molecules. Ion solvation in the liquid phase. Extrapolation methods and extrathermodynamic assumptions.
6th week: Examples of solvation studies. Diffusion (measuring methods, self-diffusion, coupled diffusion.
7th week: Charge transport. Single ion conductivities. Empirical investigation on electrolyte conductivity. Viscosity. Dielectric polarization.
8th week: Static permittivity. Measurement of high-frequency permittivity. Phenomenological aspects. Relaxation processes of pure liquids and their mixtures.
9th week: Relaxation spectra of electrolyte solutions (solvent and ion pairs relaxation). Dielectric decrement. Solvent relaxation time. Distribution and correlation functions.
10th week: Chemical model at low electrolyte concentrations - lcCM. The mean force potential, the activity coefficient of the lcCM, the ion pair concept of the lcCM.
11th week: Properties of electrolyte solutions at the lcCM. Measurement of the solvent activity. Activity coefficients and osmotic coefficients.
12th week: Experimental osmotic coefficients. Fitting equations for osmotic and activity coefficient. Pitzer equations, extended lcCM equation. Partial molar enthalpy.
13th week: Chemical kinetics as a test for chemical models on the MM level. Primary kinetic salt effect.
14th week: Solvent effects. Transport equations on the lcCM level. Hydrodynamic ion-ion interactions.
15th week: Electrophoretic term of the conductivity equation. Limiting law of conductivity.
Seminars
Solving numerical problems.
Laboratory exercises
1. Molar conductivity of symmetrical electrolytes. 2. The chemical model of conductivity. 3. Thermodynamic quantities for the association reaction. 4. Determination of stability constants of chlorocadmium complexes in water by direct potentiometry. 5. Thermodynamic study of CdCl2 in water from potential difference measurements. 6. Determination of limiting transference number for sodium ion from aqueous solutions of NaCl using potentiometry method.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars 80%, and laboratory exercises 100%) and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The written exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied, 60-69% successful (2), 70-79% good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.M.G. Barthel, H. Krienke, W. Kunz, Physical Chemistry of Electrolyte Solutions, Modern Aspects, Steinkopff, Darmstadt, 1998.

1

R. A. Robinson, R.H. Stokes, Electrolyte Solutions, 2nd Revised Edition, Dover Publications, 2002.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P. Atkins, J. de Paula, Atkins’ Physical Chemistry, 8th Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2006.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physical methods of analysis
NAME OF THE COURSE Physical methods of analysis

Code

KTH102

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge about the physical methods of analysis based on optical and electrochemical phenomena. To enable students to understand and apply the acquired knowledge in practice in the analysis of complex samples

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Completed appropriate undergraduate study

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Adoption of the basic knowledge and principles of the application of spectroscopic techniques for analysis of complex samples
2. Understand and apply the methods of sample preparation for chemical analysis
3. Apply spectroscopic analysis methods in the analysis of complex samples.
4. Implement separation analysis methods in the analysis of complex samples.
5. Apply the principles of validation of the analytical method

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. week: Analytical system. Sampling from the environment. Seminar: Solving problems.
2. Week: Preparation of the sample for analysis. Seminar: Solving problems.
3. week: Method of isolation of the analyte from the nuts: solid phase extraction, microwave ultrasonic extraction. Seminar: Solving problems.
4. Week: Spectroscopic methods. Molecular Spectroscopy. Seminar: Solving problems.
5. Week: Atomic absorption spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy. Seminar: Solving problems.
6. week: Chromatographic methods: gas, ion, thin layer chromatography. Seminar: Solving problems.
7. Week : 1st. partial exam, solving the test
8. week: High performance liquid chromatography. Seminar: Solving problems.
9. week: Validation of methods. Comparison of methods. The choice of the appropriate method. Seminar: Solving problems
10. Week: Statistical analysis and evaluation of results, and obtain information about the sample. Seminar: Solving problems
11. Week: Validation of spectoscopic methods, examples. Seminar: Solving problems
12.Validation of chromatographic methods examples. Seminar: Solving problems
13 Week: Automation in the analytical laboratory. Segmented flow method. Seminar: Solving problems
14. Week: flow-injection method. An automated analytical systems. Seminar: Solving problems
15. Week : 2 nd partial exam , solving the test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 80% and completing exercises

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

2.5

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

1.0

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 50% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. A.Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Seventh Edition, Saunders College Publishing, New York, London, 1996. { šesto izdanje (englesko) 1992, prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.};

6

A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 9th edition, Brooks&Cole, SAD, 2014.; 3.D.C.Harris, Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Eighth Edition, W.H.Freeman and Company, New York, 2010.

0

na web-stranici Zavoda za analitičku kemiju

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Quantum Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Quantum Chemistry

Code

KTH103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introducing the students to the principles of quantum theory and application of this theory to the topics of chemistry. Establishment of modern methodologies for the theoretical study of the structure and spectra of atoms and molecules, molecular dynamics and molecular interactions.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

none

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Understanding of the basic principles of quantum chemistry and its role in modern chemical research
- Knowledge of and ability to apply mathematical methods used in quantum chemistry
- Extended theoretical knowledge needed to fully understand the physics of atoms and molecules
- Ability to analyze the structure of molecules and their energy states
- Mastering modern methods of quantum chemistry at the level of operational knowledge acquisition for computing structure and spectra.
- Extended and an improved knowledge and understanding of interactions between molecules, the behavior of molecules in external fields and methodological approaches to research these phenomena
- Drawing conclusions about developments related molecules based on the analysis of experimental data
- The ability of using presented models (electronic structure of organic molecules; cages, clusters, nanomaterials and crystals; studies of polymers, proteins and drugs).

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Problems of the classical theory: stability and dimensions of atoms and molecules, photoelectric effect, black body radiation spectrum of the hydrogen atom, Bohr model of the atom. The old quantum theory. Quantum theory: the wave nature of particles, Schrodinger equation, spin, postulates. Particle in a box. Harmonic oscillator. Hydrogen atom, atomic orbitals. Spin. Multielectron atoms. Atomic spectra. Born-Oppenheimer approximation, Heitler-London’s approach. Molecular orbitals. Correlation diagram. Hybridization. Huckel molecular orbitals. Electronic structure of crystals. Ligand field theory. The molecular spectra. Molecular mechanics. The interaction of molecules. The molecules in external fields. Application of presented models. Prediction of molecular properties.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.3

Tests

1.4

Oral exam

1.3

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be passed via midterm exams and seminar essays -calculations..
During the final exams period, the final exam shall be taken after presenting the seminar essays.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Attila Szabo, Neil S. Ostlund, Modern Quantum Chemistry, Dover Publications, Mineola, NY, 1996

1

N. Trinajstić, Molekularne orbitale u kemiji, Suvremena kemija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1974.

4

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

W. G. Richards, J. A. Horstley, Ab initio Molecular Orbital Calculations for Chemistrc, Clarendom Press, Oxford, 1970
A. Graovac, I. Gutman, N. Trinajstić, Topological Approach to the Chemistry of Conjugated Molecules, Springer, Berlin, 1977.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Organic Analysis
NAME OF THE COURSE Organic Analysis

Code

KTH104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Credits (ECTS)

10.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

60

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim is to teach students the methods for isolation, purification and identification of diferent organic compounds classess by interpreting spectra obtained by modern spectroscopic techniques.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Organic chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of organic analysis, which includes:
- isolating different classes of organic compounds from complex mixtures
- selection of appropriate spectroscopic methods
- combining individual spectroscopic methods for structure elucidation;
- the use of spectroscopic methods to monitor the reaction process;
- application of acquired knowledge in research projects.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

 Lectures and seminars (L+S):
1. Classical methods of analysis. (12 + 4)
Biological samples. Reaction products. Commercial samples. Processing of the sample, isolation and concentration. Separation based on solubility, volatility, and the acid-base properties. Separation of the enantiomers. Polarimetry.
2. Chromatographic separation (TLC, GC, HPLC). (1 + 0 )
3. Molecular formulas and what can be learned from them? (0.5 + 1)
Molecular formulas. Index of hydrogen deficiency. The rule of thirteen.
I. Partial exam (written, 1hour and 30 min)
4. Spectroscopy analysis methods. (0.5 + 0)
Spectroscopic techniques used in organic compound structure elucidation.
5. Mass spectrometry (MS). (3 + 1.5)
Theory, instrumentation, and techniques. Isotopic masses. Isotopic abundances, and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Fragmentation in EIMS: influence of functional groups on fragmentation. Examples of different classes of organic compounds.
6. Ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis) (3 + 1)
Electromagnetic spectra. The nature of electronic excitations. The origin of UV band structure. Principles of absorption spectroscopy. Presentation of spectra. Solvents. What is a chromophore. Effect of conjugation. What to look for in ultraviolet spectra. Examples of different classes of organic compounds.
7. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) (4 + 1.5)
Introduction, Theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation. C,H,O-containing functional groups. Effect of ring size, conjugation and electron-withdrawing groups. Examples of different classes of organic compounds.
8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). (6 + 2)
Basic concepts. 1H NMR Chemical shifts. Spin-Spin Coupling. Magnetic anizotropy. 13C NMR Chemical shifts. Aromatic compounds – substituted benzene rings. Homotopic, enantiotopic, and diastereotopic systems. 2D NMR spectroscopy. Examples of different classes of organic compounds.
9. Combined structure problems (0 + 4)
II. Partial exam (written, 2 hours)
III. Partial exam (oral, 30 min)
 Laboratory exercises (E)
1. Separation of the water-insoluble mixtures. (5)
2. Separation of the water-soluble mixtures. (5)
3. Racemic mixture. Isolating the enantiomers of 1-phenylethylamine by fractional crystalization. Measuring the rotation of plane-polarized light by polarimeter. (7)
4. Tests for determination of the functional groups of separated compounds. (5)
5. Influence of inter- and intra-hydrogen bonds on melting point: Determination of the melting point on the aluminum block. (2)
6. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. Bathochromic shift: recording absorption spectra (benzene, aniline, phenol, benzoic acid, cinnamic acid, ferulic acid) and determination of auxochrome effect (-OH, -NH2, - OCH3) and conjugation on absorption maximum, λmax. (4)
7. Recording absorption spectra and investigation of the influence of pH on the absorption bands of phenol and aniline. Study of the connection between molecular structure and absorption maxima: spectral acid-base indicators phenolphtalein and thymol blue in acidic and basic media. (4)
8. Hypsochromic effect of auxochrome on n→ π* transition of carbonyl group: Recording spectra of acetone and ethyl-acetate. (4)
9. Effect of solvent on the appearance of absorption band: the recording of UV spectra of phenol in ethanol and hexane. Influence of solvent on λmax (impact on the n → π* transition): spectra of acetone in water, hexane and ethanol. (4)
10. IR spectroscopy. I part: recording the specta of isolated compounds (benzoic acid, sorbitol, thymol, aniline, 1-pentanol, acetone). (5)
11. IR spectroscopy, II part: recording spectra of selected solids and liquids. (5)
12. Analysis of obtained IR spectry and comparison by databases available on Internet (SDBS, NIST,...). Finding and analysing other available spectra in selected databases (MS, NMR,...). (5)
13. NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of NMR spectra (1H i 13C NMR) by using SPINWORKS software. (5)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

5.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Course is divided into three sections that students take over 2 partial written and 1 oral exam or by final exam at the end of the semester. The student pass the exam if he/she achieves at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Mohan, Organic Analytical Chemistry, Theory and Practice, Alpha Science International Ltd., Pangbourne England, 2003.

1

D. L. Pavia, G. M. Lampman, G. S. Kriz, Introduction to Spectroscopy, a guide for students of organic chemistry, Harcourt College Publishers, USA, 2001.

1

E. Pretsch, J. Seibel, J. T. Clerc, Tablice za određivanje strukture organskih spojeva spektroskopskim metodama, SKTH/Kemija u industriji, 1982.

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Pretsch, P. Buehlmann, C. Affolter: ”Structure Determination of Organic Compounds, Tables of Spectral data”, Third Edition, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2000.
H. Günzler, H.-U. Gremlich, Uvod u infracrvenu spektroskopiju, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2006;
E. Breitmaier, Structure Elucidation by NMR in Organic Chemistry, Practical Guide, John Wiley & Sons, 2002;
I. Jerković, A. Radonić, Praktikum iz organske kemije, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Splitu, Split, 2009.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Organic Synthesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Organic Synthesis

Code

KTH105

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Credits (ECTS)

10.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

60

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of advanced knowledge of modern organic synthesis that involves studying practical laboratory techniques that are used in the synthesis of organic compounds.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Organic chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of organic analysis, which includes:
- developing strategy and planning the organic synthesis
- writing the mechanisms in organic synthesis
- analysis of examples of synthesis from published papers in order to sharpen student’s reasoning ability and critical thinking
- conclusion of the synthesis by using the retrosynthetic analysis
- mastering new laboratory procedures used in organic synthesis
- application of acquired knowledge in research projects.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

 Lectures and seminars (L+S):
1. Introduction. Target molecule. The carbon skeleton and functional groups. The main concepts in organic synthesis (mechanistic and retrosynthetic approach). Yields. Selectivity. (2 + 0)
2. Mechanistic approach. Writing mechanisms. Lewis structures, Lewis acids (LA), and bases (LB), LA / LB reactions. Resonance. Carbocation chemistry. Rearrangement. Problems. (3 + 1)
3. Electrophilic reactions to unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds, and aromatic compounds. LA / LB reaction of alcohols, alkenes, alkynes, and epoxides. LA / LB reactions that involving aromatic rings (electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions; Friedel-Crafts reaction and acylation reaction). Problems. (3 + 1)
4. Overview of the main nucleophilic substitution at saturated carbon. Formation of anions (the nucleophiles). Nucleophilic substitution (SN1, SN2). The stereochemistry and conformation of the synthesis. Elimination reaction (thermal and anti sin elimination reaction). Problems. (2 + 2)
5. Chemical reactivity and ring strain. Nucleophilic opening of the epoxide, episulphide and aziridine ring. The reaction with the nucleophile 3-membered species (and selinene halonium ions) and 3- and 4-membered cyclic esters (lactones) and cyclic amides (lactams). Problems. (2 + 1)
6. Nucleophilic addition reaction of aldehydes and ketones. Aldol condensation reaction. Michael addition reactions. The reaction of aldehydes or ketones with Wittig reagent. Problems. (2 + 2)
I. Partial exam (written, 2 hours)
7. Reaction of primary amines with aldehydes and ketones: (imine, Schiff base). Reactions of secondary amines with aldehydes and ketones: (enamines). Problems. (2 + 2)
8. Nucleophilic acyl substitution reactions. Problems. (2 + 1)
9. Retrosynthetic analysis. Fundamental concepts. Sinton and half-reactions. (3 + 0)
10. Strategy and planning. Convergent and linear synthesis of the target molecule. The aim of retrosynthetic analysis: the greatest simplification. Using the symmetry of the target molecule. The introduction of reactive functional groups in the final step of the synthesis. The introduction of functional groups to facilitate the formation of chemical bonds. Problems. (2 + 1)
11. Chemoselectivity and protecting groups. Protection of the carbonyl group to form a cyclic acetal. Protecting the alcohol group. Protection of the amine. Omitting the use of protecting groups. Reaction of one from two identical functional groups. Problems. (3 + 2)
12. Strategy of retrosynthetic analysis. Chemical transform - the guiding principle in retrosynthetic analysis. Diels-Alder cycloaddition as a target chemically transform. The strategy based on identifying the potential reactants, Building blocks and structural subunits (substructures). Topological strategy. Problems. (2 + 1)
13. Stereochemistry and conformation of the synthesis. Stereoselective synthesis and preparation of the optically pure compounds. The syntheses with isotopes of carbon and hydrogen. Examples of the synthesis of complex organic compounds. Problems. (2 + 1)
II. Partial exam (written, 1 hour 30 min)
III. Partial exam (oral, 30 min)
 Laboratory exercises (E)
1. Grignard reactions: Synthesis of phenyl acetic acid. (6)
2. Condensation reaction: Perkin synthesis: Synthesis of cinnamic acid. (6)
3. Addition reaction of carbonyl compounds: Claisen Schmidt condensation: Synthesis of dibenzylacetone. (6)
Multi-step synthesis: Benzoin - benzil - benzilic acid - phenytoin.
4. Synthesis of benzoin (condensation reaction) (6)
5. Synthesis of benzil (oxidation) (6)
6. Synthesis of benzilic acid (Molecular rearrangement - Benzilic rearrangement) (6)
7. Synthesis of phenytoin (Molecular rearrangement – Pinacol rearrangement) (6)
8. Cycloaddition reaction (Diels-Alder reaction): endo - exo selectivity. (6)
9. Beckmann rearrangement: Synthesis of ε-caprolactam. (6)
10. Confirmation of the compounds obtained by the synthesis. Determination of the UV and IR spectrum. (6)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures, seminars, exercises) and actively participate in the learning process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making the final grade.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

5.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Course is divided into two sections that students take over 2 partial written and 1 oral exam or by final exam at the end of the semester. The student pass the exam if he/she achieves at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

W. C. Groutas. Organic reactions mechanisms. John Wiley & Sons Inc. USA, 2000.

1

M. Mintas, S. Raić-Malić, N. Raos, Načela dizajniranja lijekova, Hinus, 2000.

2

A. Vogel, Vogel’s Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry, 5th edit. Longman, London and New York 1996.

2

S. Borčić, O. Kronja, Praktikum preparativne organske kemije, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 1991.

2

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P. Wyatt, S. Warren, Organic synthesis: Strategy and control, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., England, 2007.
E. J.Corey, X. M. Cheng, The Logic of Chemical Synthesis, John Wiley & Sons, New York 1989.
Stanley H. Pine, Organska kemija, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1994.
E. Pretsch, P. Buhlmann, C. Affolter, Structure Determination of Organic Compounds, Springer, 2000;

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemistry and Technology of Aromatic Plants
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry and Technology of Aromatic Plants

Code

KTH106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge on the chemistry and technology of aromatic plants, knowledge of the structures of organic compounds typical for the essential oils, their division and useful properties, knowledge on the biosynthesis of essential oils and methods of their isolation and identification of the oil components.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course, students will be able to:
- describe the basic concepts, essential oils, aromatic plants processing procedures, analyses of isolates obtained and typical use of essential oils
- illustrate the ways of smell perception, the biosynthesis of terpenes and other compounds of essential oils, the basic division of terpenes
- demonstrate basic procedures in the processing of aromatic plants, simple method for isolation of essential oils and aromatic extracts preparation
- determine the appropriate method of analysis of derived isolates (basic physical and chemical values, the application of chromatographic and spectroscopic methods)
- propose suitable procedures for the processing of aromatic plants, taking into account the fundamental principles of distillation and extraction procedures, the analysis of obtained isolates considering the possibility of artefacts formation as well as structural / biosynthetic relationship between the isolated compounds
- choose the correct chemical approach for solving problems in the field of chemistry and technology of aromatic plants, starting from the acquired knowledge from organic chemistry and biochemistry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Introduction to aromatic plants and essential oils - definition, historical development of isolation and research of the essential oils. (3 hours); Natural, natural identical and synthetic essential oils; chemical structures of molecules and smell; activating receptors of smell: ion channels and G-proteins; essential oils in plants, plant formations for storage of the essential oils, chemotaxonomy and chemotypes of essential oils (3 hours).
Chemical composition of the essential oils: terpenes, isoprene rule, division, cyclic and acyclic structures of mono- and sesquiterpenes; phenylpropanoic derivatives and other compounds in the essential oils (3 hours); Chirality and structures of terpenes; glycosidically bound volatile compounds; the basic structure of glycones and aglycones of the glycosides of volatile compounds; Biogenesis of 3-IPP via mevalonic acid; biogenesis 3-IPP over deoxyxylulose phosphate (DXP) (3 hours); Biogenetic isoprene rule - the precursors of terpenes (GPP, FPP, GGPP); biogenesis semiterpenes, acyclic and cyclic mono-and sesquiterpenes. (3 hours)
Processing of aromatic plants: drying and storage; general overview of the methods of isolation and concentration of the essential oils; rate of distillation – hydrodiffusion; hydrolysis and decomposition of labile components of essential oils (3 hours); Hydrodistillation, water-vapour and steam distillation in the laboratory and in industry; comparison of water, water-steam and steam distillation (3 hours); Extraction with organic solvents, extraction with cold and hot fat; overview of the types of the obtained aromatic extracts; extraction with sub-and supercritical fluids (CO2, H2O); microwave extraction; simultaneous distillation-extraction (3 hours); Comparison of conventional and new extraction techniques; fractionation of the essential oils; basic physical and chemical values of the essential oils; chromatographic techniques in the analysis of essential oil (3 hours)
TLC and GC analysis of the essential oil, detectors (FID and MS), types of columns, sample preparation for the analysis of essential oil, retention time and the index, an overlap of peaks and fractionation of essential oils (pre-treatment) (3 hours); Modern chromatographic techniques in the analysis of essential oils: chiral GC, HSGC, MDGC, 2DGC; GC-MS; MS (SIM SCAN technique) - identification of terpenes and phenylpropane derivatives via MS (6 hours)
Overview of common essential oils - chemical composition and application (6 hours); the use of essential oils; mechanism of antibacterial and antioxidant activity; the structure of biologically active compounds of essential oils; undesirable effects of the essential oils (3 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars) and actively participate in the teaching process, which will be evaluated in the final assessment by the weight coefficient of 5%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

4.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students can take two partial tests during the lectures. If not pass partial tests, students will be evaluated by written exam. Rating at partial tests and the final examination is formed as follows: 51-60% sufficient (2); 61-75% good (3); 76-88% very good (4); 89-100% excellent (5). The total score is formed by summing all activities (for each activity % success multiply weigh coefficient): 5% x the presence and activity in lectures and seminars + 10% x success in experimental work + 43% x performance on the first test + 42% x performance on the second test.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

K. H. Basser, G. Buchbauer, Handbook of Essential Oils: Science, Technology and Application, CRC Press, 2010

1

E. Guenther, The Essential Oils, vol. I: History – Origin in Plants – Production – Analysis, Jepson Press, 2008

1

Igor Jerković, Predlošci za predavanja iz Kemije i tehnologije aromatičnog bilja, KTF, 2014.

0

web stranica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. P. Adams, Identification of essential oils by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, Allured Publishing Corporation, 2007
E. Guenther, The Essential Oils, vol. II-VI, van Nostrand Co, Princeton, 1964.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Introduction to molecular biology
NAME OF THE COURSE Introduction to molecular biology

Code

KTH107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Prof Tatjana Zemunik

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge and skills in the field of molecular biology.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Explain the structure of cells and the role of various cellular structures.
- Understanding the structure and role of chromosomal structures.
- Explain and understan the principle, the importance and mechanisms of DNA replication.
- Explain and understan the principle, the importance and mechanisms of transcription.
- Explain and understan the principle, the importance and mechanisms of translation.
- Understand the basic concepts and principles of recombinant technology.
- To know and learn the basic methods and techniques of molecular biology.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

LECTURES:
Introduction to molecular biology. Procaryotic and eucaryotic cell. (3) The structure and function of cells. Cell divisions. (3) The model organisms. (1) Nucleotids and nucleic acids. (1) The DNA organization into chromosomes. (1) DNA identification as the genetic material. (1) DNA replication. (2) DNA repair. (1) DNA recombination. (1) Telomeres. (1) Transcription. RNA processing. (2) Translation (2) Regulation of genes expression. (1) Glycosylation in the ER and Golgi Complex. (2) Folding and processing of proteins (2) Genetic engineering: Restriction endonuclease. Vectors. Cloning. (2) The basic methods and techniques of molecular biology. (2) Molecular medicine. Cancer. (2)
SEMINARS:
The life cycle of cells. (1) Mendel’s laws. (1) DNA replication. (1) Transcription. (1) Translation. (1) Genomes. (1) Prions and prion diseases. (1) Genetically modified organisms. (1) Gene therapy (1) Cancer. (1)
EXERCISES:
DNA isolation. PCR. DNA electrophoresis.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Activity during attendance, presentation of seminar papers, experimental work and final exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

G. M. Cooper, R. E. Hausman. Stanica. 5.izdanje. 2010.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

B. Lewin. Genes IX. 2008.
G. M. Malacinski. Essentials of Molecular Biology. Forth Edition, 2003.
Lodish, Berg, Zipursky, Matsudaria, Batimore, Darnell. Molecular Cell Biology. Forth Edition, 2000

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Experimental seminar paper
NAME OF THE COURSE Experimental seminar paper

Code

KTH1S

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

75

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Flavour chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Flavour chemistry

Code

KTH201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković

Credits (ECTS)

7.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge of flavour chemistry, understanding of the activation of receptors of smell and taste, knowledge of the structure of organic compounds of the typical flavours and their division, knowledge of the basic mechanisms of flavour formation and the flavour isolation methods.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course, students will be able to:
- describe the basic concepts, types of flavours, gustatory active molecule, legal regulations related to the flavour toxicological assessment and allowed concentration of biologically active substances
- illustrate ways of flavour perception (smell and taste), the mechanisms of development of natural flavour, the division of flavouring substances based on the chemical structure
- demonstrate basic procedures of flavour isolation from solid and liquid samples (headspace, volatile, semivolatile and nonvolatile substances)
- identify appropriate mechanisms of flavour origin by specific patterns, particularly flavourings derived from carbohydrates and proteins and lipid oxidation flavours
- propose appropriate methods of the sample processing taking into account the fundamental principles of distillation and extraction and the possibility of artefacts formation, structural linkage between aromatic compounds and suitable mechanism for their origin
- choose the correct chemical approach to solving problems in the field of flavour chemistry, starting from the acquired knowledge in organic chemistry and biochemistry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Introduction to the chemistry of flavour. Classification of flavours. Natural, natural identical and artificial flavouring substances. Flavouring preparations. Thermal process flavourings. Smoke flavour. Blends of flavours. Review of the quality of flavour. (3 hours); A short overview of the development of flavour chemistry. Legal regulations. Natural, natural identical and artificial flavours – differences between the United States and the EU. New EU legislation. (3 hours); Croatian law on flavourings (NN) with emphasis on chemical specifications of flavours and maximum allowed values of biologically active substances in flavoured food. Croatian regulations on food additives (NN). Sweetening agents. Flavour enhancers. (3 hours)
The sense of smell. Activating receptors of smell. The sense of taste - basic taste qualities. Activation of taste receptors. Example of aromagram. (3 hours); Molecules with sensory effects - examples of chemical structures: stinging molecules; molecules for cooling; strong, sharp molecules with heating and hot stimuli, the molecules with the contraction, shrinkage. The taste active molecule - examples of structures: sweeteners (nutritive, nonnutritious sweeteners, natural carbohydrates, noncarbohydrates, artificial sweeteners), salt, acid, bitter and umami substances (monosodium glutamate, inosine monophosphate). (3 hours)
The division of the flavour substances according to the chemical structure: flavouring substances I (C, H, O compounds: alcohols, phenols, acids, ketones, carotenoids, ionones and related compounds, hydrocarbons) - examples; the flavouring substances II (heterocyclic compounds with oxygen: oxiranes, furans, hydrofurans, pyrans and oxepines; heterocyclic compounds with nitrogen and/or sulphur) - examples, flavouring compounds III (compounds containing sulphur: thiols, thioethers, sulphides, heterocyclic compounds with sulphur) - examples (3 hours)
Mechanisms of flavour formation from the starting compounds. Terpenes (biosynthesis through MVA and DXP). Norisoprenoids (the mechanism of degradation of carotenoids). Phenylpropanoic derivatives (shikimate biogenetic pathway). (3 hours); Flavours derived from carbohydrates and proteins. Maillard reactions. Aldol reactions and retro-aldol reactions. Strecker degradations (cysteine, methionine). Comparison of Strecker degradation and Amadori rearrangement. (3 hours); Independent pathways occurrence of Strecker aldehydes. Amadori rearrangement by transamination and Strecker aldehydes formation by decarboxylation of α-oxocarboxylic acids. Strecker degradation and Amadori modelling in the development of flavour and colour. (3 hours); Heterocyclization (formation of furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, 5-methyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone, formyl furol, isomaltol, pyrazine, oxazole and thiazole). Flavours of thermal degradation of vitamin B1. (3 hours); Flavours of lipid oxidation. Triplet and singlet oxygen. Lipid oxidation by radicals (initiation, propagation and termination). Hydroperoxides and hydroperoxides breakup. Lactones. (3 hours); Non-radical lipid oxidation. Enzymatic lipid oxidation (lipoxygenation). Flavours caused by enzymatic reactions and by microorganisms (diacetyl from lactose, the flavours of onion and garlic). (3 hours)
Isolation methods for flavourings. Solvent extraction. Accelerated solvent extraction. Supercritical fluid extraction. The fractionation of the extracts. Concentration of the extracts. (3 hours); Distillation methods. Headspace isolation techniques (static, dynamic). Thermal desorption. Sorption techniques: headspace solid-phase microextraction; headspace extraction and extraction from the stirring stick. (3 hours)
Examples of chemical flavour profiles of selected food products: Honey flavour. Flavour of roasted coffee. Flavour of wine. Flavour of meat products. Cheese flavour. (3 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars) and actively participate in the teaching process, which will be evaluated in the final assessment by the weight coefficient of 5%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

5.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students can take two partial tests during the lectures. If not pass partial tests, students will be evaluated by written exam. Rating at partial tests and the final examination is formed as follows: 51-60% sufficient (2); 61-75% good (3); 76-88% very good (4); 89-100% excellent (5). The total score is formed by summing all activities (for each activity % success multiply weigh coefficient): 5% x the presence and activity in lectures and seminars + 10% x success in experimental work + 40% x performance on the first test + 45% x performance on the second test.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Igor Jerković, Kemija aroma (recenzirana interna skripta), KTF-Split, 2011.

0

web stranica KTF-a

D. Rowe, Chemistry and Technology of Flavours and Fragrances, Blackwell, 2005

2

C. Fisher, T. R. Scott, Food Flavours: Biology and Chemistry, Royal Chemical Society, 1997

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

K. A. Smith, Advances in Flavours and Fragrances, Royal Chemical Society, 2001.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Biochemical engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Biochemical engineering

Code

KTH203

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Davor Rušić

Credits (ECTS)

7.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Mastering the engineering principles in chemistry, biochemistry and Mediterranean cultures

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Student is expected to develop an ability to analyze an engineering aspects od Chemistry and Biochemistry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Definition of areas of biochemical engineering, biochemical engineering significance, connections with other areas of science.
Week 2: The concept of biological systems.
Week 3: Features of engineering fermentation processes.
Week 4: Features of engineering enzymatic processes.
Week 5: Field of the preparation of the substrate.
Week 6: Preparing for the test and systematization of presented lectures
Week 7: First test
Week 8: Area of bioconversion (introduction)
Week 9: The bioreactor as space unfolding biochemical reactions, types of reactors, reactor construction, aerated systems.
Week 10: Bioreaction kinetics (reaction kinetics concept, the influence of product and substrate, thermodynamics of the reaction, biocatalysis)
Week 11: The conditions in the bioreactor (sterility of the bioreactor system, the mode of reaction, the retention of biomass in the reactor, mass transfer, heat transfer, rheology and mechanical strength of the biological material)
Week 12: Design and analysis of bioreactors.
Week 13: Important biotechnological processes in idustry
Week 14: Preparation for second test.
Week 15: Second test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance and active participation at lectures, seminars and exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

1.5

Experimental work

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-79% good (3); 80-92% very good (4); 93-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

E. Bailey,D.F.Ollis,Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals,McGraw-Hill.1986.

0

N.F.Millis, Biochemical Engineering ,Academic Press, N,Y.1978.

0

Z.Gomzi, Kemijski reaktori, Hinus, Zagreb 1977

10

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Synthesis of Biologically Active Compounds
NAME OF THE COURSE Synthesis of Biologically Active Compounds

Code

KTH204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Credits (ECTS)

7.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge about selected classes of biologically active compounds, with emphasis on their chemistry, i.e. structural characteristics that causes biological activity and thereby application in pharmacy and medicine.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam students will be able to:
- specify the most important classes of biologically active compounds and the most important representatives of each class
- recognize and give name to some, important biologically active compounds based on their structural formula and classify them in the appropriate class based on structural features and/or biological activity
- present by structural formula the most important biologically active compounds
- connect biological activity and chemical structure (structure-activity relationship) of important biologically active compounds
- describe briefly synthesis of selected biologically active compounds
- specify significance and application of important biologically active compounds
- perform independently laboratory exercises according to laboratory procedures
- perform independently synthesis, isolation and purification of biologically active compounds as well as their characterization

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures (2 hours weekly):
1st week: Introduction to course (course content, students responsibilities, terms and conditions for passing exam). Biologically active compounds – definition. Chirality and biological activity. Natural bioactive compounds. Biological properties of chiral compounds.
2nd week: Methods for preparation of enantiomerically pure compounds. Synthetic methods for preparation of enantiomerically pure compounds (biotechnological method of synthesis, stereoselective or asymmetric synthesis).
3th week: Synthesis and semisynthesis of selected steroids. Female seks hormones. Estrogens. Progestins. Male seks hormones.
4th week: Synthesis of selected alkaloids. Morphine and morphine derivatives.
5th week: Semisynthetic morphine derivatives. Sympathomimetic drugs. Adrenaline. Ephedrine.
6th week: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Salycilic acid derivatives. Propionic acid derivatives. Arylacetic acid derivatives. p-Aminophenol derivatives.
7th week: Sulfonamides. Sulfonylureas.
8th week: Barbiturates. Benzodiazepines.
9th week: Anesthetics. General anesthetics. Inhalational anesthetic. Intravenous anesthetic.
10th week: Local anesthetic. Ester type local anesthetic of ester type. Amide type local anesthetic.
11th week: Cardiovascular drugs. Vasodilators. -Blockers.
12th week: Calcium channel blockers. ACE inhibitors.
13th week: Antibiotics – definition, classification, mechanism of action. -lactam antibiotics. Penicillins.
14th week: Macrolides. Tetracyclines.
15th week: Synthesis of selected vitamins. Water-soluble vitamins. Fat-soluble vitamins.
Exercises (3 hours weekly joined together in 8 lab periods):
1. Sulfonamides. Sulfanilamide synthesis. (2 lab periods)
2. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Acetysalicylic acid synthesis. (1 lab period)
3. Vitamins. Nicotinic acid synthesis. (2 lab periods)
4. Barbiturates. Barbituric acid synthesis. (2 lab periods)
5. Characterization of synthesized compounds. UV/VIS and FT-IR spectroscopy. Recording and interpretation of spectra. (1 lab period)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend lectures in the amount of at least 80% of the times scheduled and complete all laboratory exercises (100% attendance). Active participation in teaching process will be also evaluated in the final score.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

5.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass the entire exam by taking and passing two partial exams (tests) during the semester. Test passing score is 60%. Each test constitute 45% of the final exam score. Grades achieved through laboratory exercises will constitute 10% of the final score. Any of the partial exams passed during the semester is valid throughout the academic year.
Students who do not pass one of the partial exam or both of them have to take an written exam in the regular examination periods. Exam passing score is 60%.
Grades depending on the test score: 60% - 69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Wilson and Gisvold’s Textbook of Organic Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, J. H. Block, J. M. Beale, Jr. (Editors), Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2004.

1

M. Mintas, S. Raić-Malić, Medicinska kemija, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2009.

1

N. Raos, S. Raić-Malić, M. Mintas, Lijekovi u prostoru, farmakofori i receptori, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2005.

1

S. V. Bhat, B. A. Nagasampagi, M. Sivakumar, Chemistry of Natural Products, Springer-Narosa, Berlin, 2005.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Vardanyan, V. Hruby, Synthesis of Essential Drugs, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2006.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Environmental menagment system
NAME OF THE COURSE Environmental menagment system

Code

KTH205

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The main objective of this course is an introducing students to the steps and processes during the implementation of the ISO 14001 standard in business subjects and in possible problems that arising from the implementation process and to resolve issue. Furthermore, one of the goals of this course is to introduce students to the development and future trends in the development of international norms that it is needed for understanding and applying them in various systems.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

None

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Students will understand the concept of integrated environmental protection, sustainable development, and will have ability to measure and proceed for the protection of the environment.
2. Based on the previous point, students will be able to participate in area planning, according to principles of sustainable development and to be able to estimate the impact on the environment (either Strategic Impact Assessment or any estimation of the environmental impact).
3. Students will have the ability to estimate risk and to manage it, as well as its the quantitative and qualitative representation.
4. Students will be able to participate in the process of planning and management of environment, relating to the study of the environmental impact, and therefore in the Commission for Strategic Studies and Environmental Strategy.
5. By discussing about the Regulations on Environmental Impact Estimation and the steps in the preparation of studies, students will gain knowledge that is inevitable in implementation of various Estimation and Environmental Programme.
6. Students will acquire the competencies that will provide them as experts in selecting the best available technique for a specific activity according to the European guidelines . They will be able to identify and resolve nonconformities that occur during this process .
7. Students will be able to apply the knowledge in organizations that have implemented an Environmental Management System ISO 14001 , and in the segment with its maintenance and improvement.
8. Students will acquire knowledge that will enable them to be an important subjects and managers to establish the system of ISO 14001 in various subjects.
9. Students will be able to apply the knowledge for implementation, maintenance and development of EMS.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: The definition of technology ; similarities and differences ; historical development of the term . Impacts and Challenges of technology . The separations technology.
Lecture 2: Definition ecosystem, classification. Environment Protecting the environment. Pollution and contamination. Legal provisions in the RH.
Lecture 3: Sustainable Development; concepts, vision, future. Sustainable development laws of thermodynamics. The path towards sustainable development.
Lecture 4: Types of Environmental Protection. Integrated approach. The measures and procedures to protect the environment. The political and sociological approach, legal measures.
Lecture 5: Planning and management of the area. Basic documents of Environmental Protection. The environmental impact assessment. Risk management. Cost-benefit analysis.
Seminar and Exercise 1 ( 2 × 4 hours): Consideration and discussion of objectives and approach strategies, programs, studies on the process of planning and environment management.
Lecture 6: A study of the environmental impact - steps in the preparation . Legal provisions.
Seminar and Practice 2 ( 2 × 4 hours): Consideration and discussion of goals and approach to the study of the environmental impact. The debate about the roles of various professionals, overlapping powers and competencies, and suggestions dismissal of the non-compliance! The interest of the community vs. capital interest.
Lecture 7: Methodology of the best available techniques.
Seminar and Exercise 3 ( 2 × 4 hours): A critical review of the methodology for the assessment of best available techniques - debates , discussions, debates , proposals . Development of algorithms and schemes for assessing best available techniques.
Seminar and Exercise 4 ( 2 × 4 hours): Evaluating and choosing the best available techniques for different procedures with the help of the guidelines . Landfills, waste gases , waste incinerators , cement industry , etc ....
Lecture 8: Systems - definition. Standards and Standardization. Croatian Standards Institute. Accreditation and certification. Types of norms.
Lecture 9: ISO. ISO 14001 Environmental Policy. Plan.
Seminar and Exercise 5 ( 2 × 4 hours): Development of ISO 14001 on examples of different organizations. Environmental policy. Plan.
Lecture 10: ISO 14001 Implementation and operational phases. Testing and verification.
Seminar and Exercise 6 ( 2 × 5 hours): Development of ISO 14001 on examples of different organizations. Implementation and operational phases. Testing and verification.
Lecture 11: The definition of quality. Family 9001 standard procedure of introducing a system of quality.
Lecture 12: General requirements of quality management systems and requirements relating to documentation.
Lecture 13: ISO 9001 Document Control and inspection records. Management responsibility and quality policy.
Lecture 14: Planning Quality Management System. Resource management. Control and improve the system. Self-evaluation.
Lecture 15: Integration of standards 14001 and 9001 in a joint management system. Similarities and differences .
Seminar and Exercise 7 ( 2 × 5 hours): Integration of standards 14001 and 9001 in a joint management system for the various economic operators.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester two exams will be performed. Final examinations will be administered during formal examination periods. The following percentage equivalents apply to final grade: <55% Failure; 56%-66% (2); 67%-78% (3); 79%-90% (4);> 90% (5). After written exam, student will attend to oral exam. Lecturers do not give grades. Students earn grades.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Buzuk, Sustavi upravljanja okolišem (u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

osobno

Tonći Lazibat, Poznavanje robe i upravljanje kvalitetom, Sinergija, Zagreb, 2005.

0

poštom

Smjernice za najbolje raspoložive tehnike_MZOIP

0

mreža

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

 

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemometrics
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemometrics

Code

KTH210

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Credits (ECTS)

7.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

45

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introduce students to the importance of the use of mathematical and statistical methods for processing experimental data, conduct multi-variety data, and planning experiments. Allow them to work on computers and familiar with standard software packages (MS Excel, Wolfram Mathematica, MatLab, Statistica).

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Completed appropriate undergraduate

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Define the data distribution.
2. Apply second statistical hypothesis tests in chemistry.
3. Use third method of exploration data on real chemical systems.
4. Know the fourth design an experimental procedure.
5. Put the methods of modeling and optimization, and extract the useful information to know.
6. Know calibrate the analytical system, process measurement signal in order to obtain useful information

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction to chemometrics. Types of experimental data. The relation between the experimental data, information and knowledge. Seminar: Basic statistical concepts in MS Excel
Week 2: Basic Statistics in chemometrics. Probability. The distribution of the data. Descriptive statistics. The accuracy and precision. Seminar: Basic statistical concepts in Wolfram Mathematica
Week 3: Tests hypotheses. Parametric tests. Significance tests - t-test, F-test, ANOVA test for normality of distribution. Seminar: Basic statistical concepts in Statistics
Week 4: The one-factor analysis of variance. Multi-factor analysis of variance. Seminar: Significance tests in MS Excel
Week 5: Experimental design and optimization. Seminar: Tests of significance in Wolfram Mathematica.
Week 6: The quality of analytical measurement - assessment of variability, comparative tests, measurement uncertainty. Seminar: Tests of significance in Statistics
Week 7: Regression analysis, least squares method: linear models, tests of significance of regression parameters. Seminar: Regression analysis in MS Excel
8th week: Exploratory Data Analysis. A complex pattern. Identifying the sample. Methods for identification of the sample with and without an external teacher. Rotation. Seminar: Regression analysis in Wolfram Mathematica.
Week 9: Principal Component Analysis. Covariance matrix. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The principles of reducing the number of dimensions. Seminar: Regression analysis in statistics.
10th week: Hierarchical cluster analysis. Distance and similarity. Single, full and centroid connections. Dendrograms. Seminar: Analysis of the main components in Wolfram Mathematica
11th week: Classification. Linear and nonlinear model of classification. Method K-nearest neighbors. Method independent modeling class analogy. Seminar: Principal Component Analysis in Statistics
12th week: Signal processing. Signal detection, limit of detection, limit choices and limit of quantification. Scaling. Filling. Averaging. Filtering. Leveling. Multi-point sampling. Fourier transformation. Modulation signal. Derivatives signal. Decompression. Seminar: Fourier Transform in Wolfram Mathematica
13th week: Optimization. The functions of the evaluation criteria. Making decisions based on multiple criteria. Pareto optimality. Derringer function. Seminar: Fourier Transform in MatLab
14th week: Algorithms for optimization. Simplex. Genetic algorithms. Basic principles, purpose and usage examples. Seminar: Linear and nonlinear models of classification in Statistics
15th week: molecular modeling. Optimization of the structure. Calculation of descriptors. Linking the physical and chemical properties of the structural properties of the molecules. Seminar: Algorithms for optimization in Statistics

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

1.0

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire examination can be applied over the two partial test of theoretical and seminar materials during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each colloquium in the assessment accounts for 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written, oral and written and oral examination. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test from any part (previous activity) is valid throughout the current academic year. Written exam has a share of 30% of oral and written with 60% and 10% verbal. Students who did not pass the exam by the partial tests take the exam through written, oral and written-oral examination in the regular examination periods. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the assessment with 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - a good 80% -89% -very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Paul GemeprlineEd.Practical Guide to Chemometrics, 2nd Ed. CRC Press, Taylor & FrancisG roup, 2006, Boca Raton, USA, 2006.

0

Richard G. Brereton: Chemometrics Data Analysis for the Laboratory and Chemical Plant, John Wiley & Sons Ltd, West Sussex, UK, 2003.

0

Peter C. Meier,Richard E. Zund, Statistical Methods in Analytical Chemistry, 2nd Ed. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, New York, USA, 2000.

0

Ivan Šošić, Primijenjena statistika, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, Hrvatska, 2004.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Registration of the presence of students
- Annual analysis of student
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analytical Environmental Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Code

KTH211

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic objective of the course is the application of analytical methods and techniques in environmental analysis.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Gateways must have a good basic knowledge of analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, but are not necessary to master the material..

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. to know and explain the interactions that occur between different phases in the environment (water-to-air, ground-to-air, water-soil)
2. independently sampling plan (accidentally uozkovanje, stratified sampling, systematic sampling, intuitive sampling)
3. to sample (air, water, soil, sediment and biological samples).
4. prepare samples for analysis, use of modern methods of sample preparation
5. Use a variety of techniques for environmental analysis (classical methods, instrumental methods, the technique, other techniques.
6. exert biological control (environmental indicators, biomarkers)
7. process the results of analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction - environmental science and environmental analytical chemistry
Lecture 2: Chemical Principles in the environment. Sampling from the environment
Lecture 3: analytical separation, sample preparation for analysis
Seminar 1 (2 hours): interpretation and data processing. Standard deviations, errors
Lecture 4: The application of analytical methods and techniques in environmental analysis. Elektoroanalytical methods (potentiometry)
Seminar 2 (2 hours): Quantitatively the composition of solutions - expressing concentration
Lab course 1 (5 hours): Potentiometric determination of fluoride and chloride. Determination of iron in drinking water.
Lecture 5: Voltammetry, coulometry
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Calculating the pH of water of different composition and nature (sea, river, rain)
Lab course 2 (5 hours): Determination of the pH of various types of water (river, rain)
Lecture 6: Conductometry, spectrometric techniques
Lecture 7: Absorption Spectrometry, induced absorption spectrometry, emission spectrometry
Lab course 3 (5 hours ): Determining the concentration of transition metal in the pure aqueous solutions of UV-VIS spectrophotometry
Lecture 8: Instrumental separation techniques, gas chromatography
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): Calculations data spectrometric measurements
Lab course 4 (5 hours ): Determination of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium in wastewater by spectrophotometry
Lecture 9:. Liquid chromatography, the state and development of chromatographic techniques
Seminar 5 (2 hours): Calculations of trace metals in the environment
Lecture 10: Other techniques (thermal techniques, radiochemical techniques)
Seminar 6 (2 hours): The calculation of the concentration of particulate matter in the environment and display the result
Lab course 5 (5 hours ): Determination of phosphorus in the solid plant
Lecture 11: Trace elements in the environment: natural level and chemical form of pollution
Seminar 7 (2 hours): Statistical analysis of the results of the analysis of environmental samples (air, water, soil)
Lecture 12: Determination of trace organic compounds
Lecture 13: Biological indicators and methods
Lecture 14: The radiation and radioactivity in the environment. contamination of soil
Lab course 6 (5 hours ): Voltammetric determination of ascorbic acid in multivitamins
Lecture 15: Evaluation and interpretation of analytical data from the environment. specific applications
Seminar 8 (1 hour): Correlations (Spearman, Pearson,)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed. The student has the right to exercise fail one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Ašperger et al, Analitika okoliša, HINUS&FKIT, Zagreb 2013.

1

F.W. Fifield, P.J. Haines, Environmental Analytical Chemistry, Blackie academic& professional, London, 1996

1

E. P. Popek Sampling and analysis of environmental chemical pollutants, AP, 2003.

1

Vježbe iz Analitičke kemije okoliša (interna skripta u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C.E. Kupchella, M. C. Hyland, Enviromental science, Massachusetts, 1989

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physical biochemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Physical biochemistry

Code

KTH212

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Mladen Miloš

Credits (ECTS)

4.5

Associate teachers

ScD Vesela Torlak

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

33 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The goal of course Physical biochemistry is to connect and comprehensive understanding of the knowledge that students have gained learning courses of Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Understanding (1) the application of thermodynamic principles in biochemistry, (2) the concept of chemical equilibrium, (3) chemical kinetics, (4) electrochemical processes, (5) bioenergetics and membrane processes and (6) the modern methods in biochemistry.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Introduction, Concepts of Thermodynamics in Biochemistry (1 hour). Acids, bases and buffers in biochemistry (titration curves and electric charge, titration curves and protein isoelectric point) (1 hour). Thermodynamic concepts in biochemistry (open systems and the environment, work, energy and heat, the tool states, entropy and Gibbs free energy, thermodynamics and metabolism (2 hours). Bioenergetics and mebranski transfers (1 hour). Biochemical reactions and balance (1 hour) . Electrochemistry and biochemical processes (1 hour). interaction of protein - ligand (dissociation constant of singlet binding sites, dissociation constant of the inhibitor, the number of binding sites, thermodynamics of protein-ligand interactions (2 hours). Chemical kinetics of biochemical reactions, enzyme kinetics (2 hours) . Modern methods in biochemistry: Spectroscopic methods, methods of isolation, purification and identification of proteins, DNA molecules research methods, methods based on radioactivity (4 hours).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Activity during attendance, presentation of seminar papers in the form of a Power Point presentation and final oral exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Interna skripta Fizikalna biokemija

0

Web stranice fakulteta

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

N. C. Price et al., Principles and problems in Physical chemistry for Biochemists, Third edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2001.
- P. Atkins and J. De Paula, Physical chemistry, 8ed, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Naturally occuring polymeric materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Naturally occuring polymeric materials

Code

KTH213

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Branka Andričić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining of the basic theoretical and practical knowledge on origin and properties of naturally occurring polymers and their application.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- distinguish naturally occurring polymers and their resources
- be ble to explain the structure and properties of naturally occurring polymers
- be acquainted with application fields of naturally occurring polymers
- distinguish naturally occurring polymers according burning characteristics

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: An overview of basic terms in polymers and polymeric materials. Basic characteristic of macromolecules.
2nd week: Definition of naturally occurring polymers in narrow and broad sense. PLA and PHB: synthesis and properties. Molecular and supermolecular structure of polymers.
3rd week: Starch: structure and properties. Modification and application of starch.
4th week: Structure and properties of cellulose. Microcrystalline cellulose. Natural cellulose fibres. Mercerization and crosslinking of cotton fibres.
5th week: Regenerated cellulose. Cellulose derivates. Alginic acid and alginates. Structure and application of alginates. Ion exchange.
6th week: Other polysaccharides. Structure, properties and application of lignin.
7th week: Ponavljanje. First test.
8th week: Amino acides in proteins. Primary, secondary and tertiary structure of proteins.
9th week: Protein fibres. Structure and properties of silk fibre. Structure and properties of wool.
10th week: Structure and properties of collagen. Collagen based materials.
11th week: Casein: structure, phase separation, application. An overview of natural fibres properties.
12th week: Natural caoutchouc. Derivates of natural caoutchouc. Mastication and vulcanization.
13th week: Shaping of caoutchouc and production of rubbery products (tires etc.) Reuse and recycling of rubber. Regeneration of caoutchouc.
14th week: Plastic and rubbery waste management system. Natural resins.
15th week: Ponavljanje. Second test.
Laboratory exercises:
1. Preparation of thermoplastic starch
2. Regeneration of cellulose. Identification of natural fibres by burning tests.
3. Immobilization of bakers yeast on alginate
4. Gelatine swelling
5. Isolation of casein and preparation of casein glue

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

0.5

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.8

Oral exam

0.4

Written exam

0.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The complete exam can be passed through two tests during semester. The passing score is 60 % and the fraction of each test is 35%. In final grade laboratory exercises has fraction of 25% and the seminar essay has fraction of 5%. In the exam period the student has to attend to written and oral exam (passing score is 60%). Written exam is 35% and oral exam is 35%.
Grades: successful (60% – 70%), good (71% – 80%), very good (81% – 90%), excellent (91% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

B. Andričić, Prirodni polimerni materijali, Priručnik, Sveučilište u Splitu, Split, 2008.

1

Web knjižnica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C. E. Carracher, Seymour/Carraher’s Polymer Chemistry, 4th Ed., Marcel Dekker, New York, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Colloid Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Colloid Chemistry

Code

KTH214

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will expand basic knowledge of colloid chemistry obtained from lectures in Physical Chemistry. They will learn principles and applications of surface and colloid chemistry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will upon completion of the course
1) know the modern instrument methods of separation, purification and identification of colloids, 2) be able to interpret properties and effects of surfactants (micellar colloids), 3) be able to explain the kinetic phenomena of colloidal solutions, 4) understand the electrokinetic phenomena, 5) be able to explain the rheological properties of colloidal system.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures
1st week: Introduction. Classification of colloidal systems. Aggregation of colloidal particles.
2nd week: Micelle formation. Properties and structure of micelles in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions.
3rd week: Purification and separation of colloids, ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis.
4th week: Dialysis, lyophilization, gel filtration.
5th week: Size and shape of colloidal particles. Experimental techniques for determining the size and shape of the colloidal particles.
6th week: Kinetic properties of the colloidal systems, sedimentation, diffusion, osmotic pressure.
7th week: Interface Phenomena: liquid-gas, liquid-liquid, solid-liquid interface.
8th week: Viscosity of colloidal systems.
9th week: Experimental techniques for determining the surface composition.
10th week: Rheology of colloidal systems.
11th week: Electrical double layer, electrophoresis.
12th week: Electrokinetic potential and electrical mobility, electrokinetic phenomena.
13th week: Coagulation and stability of colloids.
14th week: Gel, membrane, biological membrane.
15th week: Emulsions and microemulsions.
Laboratory exercises
1. Microemulsions, size of microemulsions aggregates and dynamic. 2. Surface tension. 3. Critical micelle concentration. 4. Standard Gibbs energies of micellization of surfactants in aqueous solutions at different electrolyte concentrations. 5. Microstucture and stability in surfactant free microemulsions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over
partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam
is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is
based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied;
60-69% successful (2) 70-79% good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90-100%
excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

K. S. Birdi, Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Principles and Applications, CRC Press, Boca Raton, London; New York, 2010.

1

P. C. Hiemenz, R. Rajagopalan, Principles of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, 3rd Edition, Marcel Dekker, New York, 1997.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Duncan J. Shaw, Introduction to Colloid and Surface Chemistry, 4th Edition, Butterrorth-Heinemann, Oxford, 1992.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Quality Assurance and Accreditation in Laboratory Practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Quality Assurance and Accreditation in Laboratory Practice

Code

KTH215

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

28

2

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

30 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge about basic concepts and principles of quality management, requirements and criteria of testing laboratories according to the requirements of EN ISO / IEC 17025 standard.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Completed appropriate undergraduate study

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Understanding the quality menagement system in the laboratory including accreditation process laws and standards for accreditation
2. Apply laboratory tests, methods, the process of mesurements, uncertainty, quality control and documentation of the laboratory
3. Understand evaluation off laboratories tests, accreditation of laboratories, the system of authorization and accreditation in Europe and Croatia.
4. Apply knowledge in practice and link the theoretical knolidge with real problems in the laboratorywork.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Analytical system. Sampling from the environment. Seminar: Solving problems.
2nd week: Preparation of the sample for analysis. Seminar: Solving problems.
3rd week: Method of isolation of the analyte from the nuts: solid phase extraction, microwave ultrasonic extraction. Seminar: Solving problems.
4th week: Spectroscopic methods. Molecular Spectroscopy. Seminar: Solving problems.
5th week: Atomic absorption spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy. Seminar: Solving problems.
6th week: Chromatographic methods: gas, ion, thin layer chromatography. Seminar: Solving problems.
7th Week : 1st. partial exam, solving the test
8th week: The standard methods and reference materials, validation. Seminar: Solving problems
9th week: sample for analysis, records, process evaluation and report, Seminar: Solving problems
10th week: subcontracting, external services and procurement; appeal. Seminar: Solving problems
11th week: GLP-principles, and procedures. Seminar: Solving problems
12th week: A system of authorization and accreditation in Europe and Croatia, principles and rules. Seminar: Solving problems
13th week:. The requirements of EN ISO / IEC 17025 (current edition). Seminar: Solving problems
14th week: The requirements of EN ISO / IEC 17025 (current edition). Seminar: Solving problems
15th week : 2nd partial exam , solving the test
List of Exercises
documentation of good laboratory practice
individual documentation for ISO / IEC 17025: 2005
Development of manual quality
internal audits
visit to the Veterinary Institute Split

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 80% and completing exercises

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

1.0

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 50% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

HRN EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 - Opći zahtjevi za osposobljenost ispitnih i umjernih laboratorija; , zakoni, propisi; Guide to Quality in Analytical Chemistry, CITAC/EURACHEMGUIDE Edition (2002)

3

Na web stranici Zavoda http://www.eurachem.ul.pt/guides/val

M.Kaštelan-Macan, Kemijska analiza u sustavu kvalitete, Školska knjiga, Zagreb (2003)

4

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Microemulsions in applied chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Microemulsions in applied chemistry

Code

KTH216

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

ScD Perica Bošković

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Emphasize to students the importance and width of the field of application of micro-emulsions in various industries such as food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile, as well as in biomedicine, biotechnology and synthesis of nanoparticles.
Acquisition of fundamental knowledge on the physico-chemical properties of conventional microemulsion and surfactant-free-microemulsion systems based on green chemistry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will be able to successfully master the subject:
- to describe the structure of classical microemulsions and microemulsion systems without the presence of a surfactant so-called ”Surfactant-Free-Microemulsions”; to define the differences in comparison to emulsion
- to explain the role of the surfactant and the importance of thermodynamic parameters in achieving a stable microemulsion system
- to determine the size and shape of the microemulsion aggregates and explain the dynamics of their growth
- to describe the basic principles and possibilities for application of different methods (spectroscopy, conductometrics, measuring viscosity, surface tension measurement, AFM, TEM, SANS) in the study of microemulsion systems
- to recognize the principles on which Green Chemistry reduces the negative effects of chemical processes and technologies on the environment
- to plan the laboratory procedures and independently to conduct an experiment in accordance with the plan of research
- to implement appropriate computer programs for numerical processing of experimental data and graphic representation of the results obtained; discuss the results and reach a conclusion at the end

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lectures:
Week 1.: Introduction to microemulsion.
Week 2.: Characteristics and structure of microemulsion.
Week 3.: Differences between microemulsions and emulsions.
Week 4.: Conditions of of phase equilibrium and phase diagrams.
Week 5.: The surfactants and co-surfactants, and their characteristics.
6. and 7. week: Rheology of microemulsion and emulsion systems.
Week 8.: First partial exam.
9. and 10. week: Methods and experimental techniques of research microemulsion system.
Week 11.: Surface tension and critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.).
Week 12: The microstructure of microemulsion aggregates.
Week 13.: The microemulsions without the presence of surfactant (”Surfactant-Free-Microemulsions”).
Week 14.: The application of microemulsion. Examples.
Week 15.: The second partial exam.
Laboratory exercises:
1.Ternary phase diagram - determination of characteristic areas of microemulsion system.
2. Conductometric determination of critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.) and thermodynamics of micellization reaction in the presence of surfactant.
3. Determination of solvation properties of microemulsion using UV-Vis spectroscopy - extraction efficiency of toxic analytes from contaminated soil and comparison with conventional solvents.
4. Conductometric determination of nanostructures in the microemulsion without the presence of surfactants.
5. Viscometric determining of percolating threshold of microemulsion system. Size and shape of microemulsion aggregates.
Seminar
Student will present the selected topic from the subject content in written form by seminar paper and oral presentation in PowerPoint.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over
partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam
is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is
based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied;
60-69% successful (2) 70-79% good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90-100%
excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R. Najjar, Microemulsions - An Introduction to Properties and Applications, InTech, 2012.

0

C. Sell, The Chemistry of Fragrances - From Perfumer to Consumer, RSC Publishing, Ashford, UK, 2006.

0

P. K. Bidyut, S.P. Moulik, Uses and applications of Microemulsions, Curr. Sci. 80 (2001) 990.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P. Bošković, V. Sokol, T. Zemb, D. Touraud, W. Kunz. Weak Micelle-Like Aggregation in Ternary Liquid Mixtures as Revealed by Conductivity, Surface Tension, and Light Scattering, J. Phys. Chem. B 119 (2015) 9933.
I. Kralova, J. Sjöblom Surfactants Used in Food Industry: A Review, J. Disper. Sci. Technol. 30 (2009) 1363.
J. Drapeau, M. Verdier, D. Touraud, U. Kröckel, M. Geier, A. Rose, W. Kunz, Effective Insect Repellent Formulation in both Surfactantless and Classical Microemulsions with a Long-Lasting Protection for Human Beings, Chem. Biodivers. 6 (2009) 934.
C. A. Katz, Z. J. Calzola, J. K. N. Mbindyo, Structure and Solvent Pr

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the (1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and (2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Selected chapters from biochemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Selected chapters from biochemistry

Code

KTH217

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The goal of this course is to teach students aboth specific and and important topics in the field of biochemistry .

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Biochemistry I and Biochemistry II

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

- Introduction to the structure and function of muscle tissue and cytoskeleton as well as functions of blood cells, plasma proteins and immunoglobulins.
- Understand the significance of acid-base balance in the body and buffers involved in its maintenance.
- Understand the significance of oxidative processes in the body and the antioxidant systems and methods.
- Learn about metabolism of fructose, galactose and mannose.
- Learn about hormons, signal transduction and lipid second messengers.
- Learn about other products of amino acids metabolism. Learn about porphyrin and heme metabolism and disorders connected with their metabolism.
- Understand the significance of nutrition, digestion and absorption of nutrients as well as micronutrients.
- Understand the significance of glycosylation and glycoproteins.
- Learn about xenobiotic metabolism and bioinformatics.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

LECTURES:
Muscle tissue and cytoskeleton. Blood cells. (2) Plasma proteins and Immunoglobulins.(2) Acid-base balance. (2) Biological Oxidation. Free Radicals. Antioxidants. (4) Metabolism of Other Hexoses.(2) Hormons and signal transduction.(2) Lipid Second Messengers (2) Other products of amino acids metabolism. (2) Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism (2) Micronutrients: Vitamins and Minerals. (2) Nutrition, digestion and absorption.(2) Glycoproteins. (2) Xenobiotic Metabolism. (2) Bioinformatics. (2)
SEMINARS:
Students will review and process the topics related to pathological conditions resulting from biochemical disorders.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Class attendance, preparing seminar papers and taking the final exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R.M.Murray i sur: Harperova ilustrurana biokemija, 28th Ed, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb 2011.

0

J.M. Berg, J.L. Tymoczko, L. Stryer: Biokemija, 5th Ed, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2013.

0

D. Čvorišćec i I. Čapelak (ur.): Štrausova medicinska biokemija. Medicinska naklada, 2009, Zagreb.

0

N. V. Bhagavan,Chung-Eun Ha: Essential of medicinal biochemistry: with clinical cases, Second Edition, Academic Press 2015, San Diegi, CA, USA.

0

D. Voet, J.G.Voet, C.W.Pratt: Fundamental of Biochemistry, Jonn Wiley & Sons Inc., NY, Chichester, Weinheim, Brisbane, Singapore, Toronto,1999 G. M. Cooper, R. E. Hausman. Stanica. 5.izdanje. 2010

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University, (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee, (3) Level of teachers.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemical sensors and biosensors
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemical sensors and biosensors

Code

KTH218

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will get insight into actual achievements in chemical and biochemical sensing systems. Basic principles and kind of chemical and biochemical sensor systems will be presented together with problems that can arise during development process of such sensors systems (sensors material or biomaterial, recognition mechanism, choosing appropriate transducer element, configuration and practical development of sensors. Furthermore, practical applicability of chemical sensors and biosensors in medical, industrial and environmental analysis will be given.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. To recognize and characterize sensors systems.
2. To propose and to development novel sensors systems, together with improvement of current ones.
3. To use a knowledge in selection of appropriate sensors systems for various analytes in different area of application.
4. To get specific insight into recognition principles, amplification and transduction of chemical signal into various outcome signals.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. General aspects and introduction in chemical sensors and biosensors-definition, terminology.
Classification of sensors (electrochemical, optical, piezoelectrical, termal, aqoustic). Phenomenon (recognition mechanism) that can be applied in sensors systems. Novel trends and scopes in sensors development (nanotechnology, nanostructure, ”smart” sensors, in vivio sensors)
2. Basic construction concepts of sensors and biosensors. Example of commercial sensors and biosensors (ion-selective electrodes, glucometer, Elisa assay). Chemical and biochemical recognition mechanism. Recognition elements: ionophores, enzymes, crystals. Criterion for recognition elements selection. Biochemical selectivity and stability of recognition elements-problems.
3. Matrix material of sensors. Role and characteristics of matrixes. Recognition element immobilization methods. Incorporation of recognition elements into various matrixes (gels, polymers: conducting or non-conducting, carbon materials: paste, screen-printing, carbon nanotubes). Covalent binding of enzymes, cross-linking, physical adsorption.
4. Transducer for electrochemical, optical, piezoelectrical sensors. Selection of transducing element. Electrochemical sensors: potentiometric, amperometric. Modiffied electrodes. Preparation of ion-selective electrodes-techniques. Conducting surface, modified layer, signal transducing. Microelectrodes, FET sensors.
5. Optical sensors. Absorption, UV absorption, reflectometry, luminescence. Optical fibers sensors. Intrinsic and extrinsic sensors. Application of optical sensors in sensing of pH, pressure, temperature, humidity. Determination of biomolecules with optical sensors-luciferase in ATP detection and bacterial redox systems with luciferase in NADPH detection.
6. Piezoelectrical sensors. General aspects. Acoustic sensors. Incorporation of recognition elements.
7. Biosensors. Electrochemical, optical, immunosensors, optical sensors. First, second and third generation of biosensors.
8. Examples of the three generation of biosensonsors-amperometric determination of glucose. Redox interference. Oxygen dependence of the signal. Peroxide role. in vitro and in vivo continuously monitoring of glucose. Modern scopes in development of glucometers. Commercialization of sensors.
9. Immunosensors. Antibody-antigen bonding as mechanism of recognition. Electrochemical, optical, immunosensors, optical immunosensors. Examples of immunosensors for hemoglobin, erythrocytes, t-lymphocytes, viruses and bacterial. ELISA test.
10. DNA detection. DNA electrochemical sensors. Electrochemistry of DNA and detection principles. Immobilization of DNA sequences onto different materials. Electrodes processes-hybridization. Enzyme labeled DNA sequences.
11. Bionseors for pesticide detection. Enzymes used for pesticide detection. Basic concepts. Inhibition mechanism. Catalytically based biosensors. Immunosensors for pesticides determination. Enzymes reactivation. Microorganism, issue, cells as recognition elements.
12. Nanomaterial in optical and electrochemical biosensors. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biosensors preparation. CNT composite materials.
13. Introduction in direct transfer of electrons by proteins. Protein immobilization techniques. Examples: cytochrome c, myoglobine, hemoglobine. Role of CNT. Direct electron transfer from enzyme onto electrode. Examples: glucose oxidase, catalase, HRP.
14. Evaluation of sensors: selectivity, sensitivity, reproducibility, repeatability. Other types of sensors: impedance sensors, sensors for gases.
15. Highly sophisticated sensors systems: microelectro-machanical systems (MEMS and Bio(MEMS)), Lab-on-a-chip, nanosensors, biochips.
Lab courses:
1. Preparation of potentiometric sensors by incorporation of ionophores in polymer matrix. Components ratio influences onto sensor characteristics. Determination of heavy metals in water. Selectivity of prepared sensor.
2. Amperometric determination of amino acids onto crystal and bismuth modified electrodes. Electrode preparation, characterization, influences of parameters on signal quality.
3. Preparation of the biosensors for determination of glucose. Incorporation of glucoso oxidase into carbon paste. MnO2 as transducing element. Interferences. Role of Nafion® in improvment of the signal. Determination of glucose in real samples

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.
The exam consists of a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through two partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures and lab courses. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part.
Also, essays make a basis for discussions and are rooted in the central parts of the syllabus for the course in question. Essays can be written on the basis of the course literature and lectures and will be presented to all course participants.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Florinel-Gabriel Bănică, Chemical Sensors and Biosensors: Fundamentals and Applications, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2012.

0

E. Palecek, F. Scheller, J. Wang Electrochemistry of Nucleic Acids and Proteins, Elsevier, 2005.

0

Xueji Zhang, Huangxian Ju, Joseph Wang, Electrochemical Sensors, Biosensors and Their Biomedical Applications, Elsevier, 2008.

0

E. Turkušić, Uvod u hemijske senzore i biosenzore, PMF Sarajevo, 2012

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Diploma Thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Diploma Thesis

Code

KTHODR

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

18.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Methods of separation and speciation
NAME OF THE COURSE Methods of separation and speciation

Code

KTI101

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Completing the course: General Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

1. Adoption of fundamental knowledge about the species and speciation analysis
2. Understand and apply the methods of sample preparation for analysis of species
3. Implement the instrumental methods in the analysis of complex species sample.
4. Implement the principles of validation of the analytical method in the analysis of species

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. Week: Analytical system. Sampling processing samples for analysis species. Seminar: Solving numerical examples treated theoretical material.
2. Week: Preparation of the sample for analysis species, validation, measurement uncertainty for sampling Seminar: Solving problems.
3. week: The importance and definition of speciation., Structural areas of speciation, isotopic composition, electronic and oxidation states. Seminar: Solving problems
4. Week: speciation of inorganic and organic compounds and complexes, organometallic compounds, speciation macromolecular compounds. Seminar: Solving problems
5. Week: Methodology specijacijske analysis. Seminar: Solving problems
6. week: Methods and techniques for speciation analysis and application. Seminar: Solving problems
7. Week 1.parcijalni test, solving test
8. week: The standard methods and reference materials, validation. Seminar: Solving problems
9. week: Application spectrometry as a detection system in the analysis of species. Seminar: Solving problems
10. week: Validation of spectroscopic methods and anliza species. Seminar: Solving problems
11. Week: Ion-selective electrode application in the analysis of species. Seminar: Solving problems
12. Week: Analysis of speciation, an example from the environment. Seminar: Solving problems 13 Week. Analysis of speciation, examples of analyzes of food. Seminar: Solving problems
14. Week: flow-injection method, an example of an analysis of species. An automated analytical systems. Seminar: Solving problems
15th week: Examination (II. Partial test theoretical and seminar materials). Solving test
List of exercises:
1. Gravimetric determination of iron species
2. Spectrophotometric determination of iron species
3. Gravimetric determination of chromium species
4. Spectrophotometric determination of chromium species
5. Determination of EDTA species

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 80% and completing exercises

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

1.5

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

1.0

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire test can be applied over two partial tests during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each test in assessing participates with 50%. Lectures presence of 80 to 100% is 10% marks. The examination periods there is a written and oral exam. Passing threshold is 60%. Passing one partial test of any part (previous activity) is valid throughout current academic year. Written exam has a share of 50% and oral examination also 50%. Students who have not passed the partial tests will have oral examination in the regular examination period. Passing threshold is 60% and the examination form to participate in the evaluation by 50%.
Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. A.Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Seventh Edition, Saunders College Publishing, New York, London, 1996. {šesto izdanje (englesko) 1992, prvo izdanje (hrvatsko), Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1999.}

6

A. Skoog, D. M. West i F. J. Holler, S. R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 9th edition, Brooks&Cole, SAD, 2014.; 3.D.C.Harris, Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Eighth Edition, W.H.Freeman and Company, New York, 2010.

0

na web-stranici Zavoda za analitičku kemiju

R. Cornelis et al. Handbook of Elemental Speciation: Techniques and Methodology, Book News, Portland, 2004.

0

https://www.speciation.net/

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- registration of student’s presence in class
- annual analysis of students success in this course
- student’s survey in order to evaluate the professor
- professor’s self-evaluation

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemistry of Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry of Materials

Code

KTI102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

ScM Goran Olujić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic objective of the course is to acquire knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of materials.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. chemical characteristics of the material.
2. physical characteristics of the material: electrical, thermal, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties
3. materials: conductors, semiconductors, metals, ceramics, polymers, composites
4. sampling of different materials
5. preparation of a representative sample for analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction. The chemical characteristics of the material
Lecture 2: Chemical bond, the crystal lattice.
Lecture 3: Physical characteristics of the material: electrical, thermal, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties
Seminar 1 (2 hours): Data analysis and presentation of results. Assignments: Tests of acceptance and rejection results
Lecture 4: Physical characteristics of the material: electrical, thermal, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties
Seminar 2 (2 hours): The standard deviation of error. Calculate the mass of the sample
Lab course 1 (2 hours): Familiarization with laboratories, institutes and exercises that will take place.
Lecture 5: Groups of materials: conductors, semiconductors, metals, ceramics, polymers
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Calculation of the composition of various solid materials. Shares, tasks with different problems
Lab course 2 (5 hours): Standardization PO4. Determination of PO4 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 6: Testing and analysis of real samples
Lecture 7: first partial colloquium
Lab course 3 (5 hours ): Standardization of NO2. Determination of NO2 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 8: Sampling of gases
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): Assignments from the method of discharge. Assignments: interference-extraction
Lab course 4 (6 hours ): Standardization SiO4. Determination SiO4 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 9:. Sampling of liquid
Seminar 5 (2 hours): Separation and error calculation. Calculations of components of the various components in an aqueous system,
Lecture 10: Sampling of solid
Seminar 6 (2 hours): Eligible and illicit quantity calculations for solids
Lab course 5 (5 hours ): Standardization of NO3. Determination of NO3 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 11: Preparation of a representative sample for analysis
Seminar 7 (2 hours): Assignments: gases, calculations composition
Lecture 12: Preparation of a representative sample for analysis
Lecture 13: Decomposition of samples
Lecture 14: Seminar
Lab course 6 (4 hours ): Sandardizacija NH4. Determination of NH4 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 15: 2th partial colloquium
Seminar 8 (1 hour): Assignments: gases, calculations composition
Lab course 7 (3 hours ): Computer and graphical analysis of the results

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed. The student has the right to exercise fail one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Yitzhak Mastai, Materials Science: Advanced Topics, InTech 2013

0

http://www.e-booksdirectory.com/

W.D.Callister Jr.and D.G. Rethwisch, Fundamentals of materials science and engineering; An integrated approach, RP Library, 2010.

0

http://rplib.wordpress.com/

Brian S. Mitchell, an introduction to materials engineering and science for chemical and materials engineers, A JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., New Jersey, 2004.

0

1 U Zavodu

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J.I. Gersten, F.W. Smith, The Physics and Chemistry of Materials, New
York, 2001;

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Analytical Environmental Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Code

KTI103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

7.5

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

45

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic objective of the course is the application of analytical methods and techniques in environmental analysis.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Gateways must have a good basic knowledge of analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, but are not necessary to master the material..

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. to know and explain the interactions that occur between different phases in the environment (water-to-air, ground-to-air, water-soil)
2. independently sampling plan (accidentally uozkovanje, stratified sampling, systematic sampling, intuitive sampling)
3. to sample (air, water, soil, sediment and biological samples).
4. prepare samples for analysis, use of modern methods of sample preparation
5. Use a variety of techniques for environmental analysis (classical methods, instrumental methods, the technique, other techniques.
6. exert biological control (environmental indicators, biomarkers)
7. process the results of analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction - environmental science and environmental analytical chemistry
Lecture 2: Chemical Principles in the environment. Sampling from the environment
Lecture 3: analytical separation, sample preparation for analysis
Seminar 1 (2 hours): interpretation and data processing. Standard deviations, errors
Lecture 4: The application of analytical methods and techniques in environmental analysis. Elektoroanalytical methods (potentiometry)
Seminar 2 (2 hours): Quantitatively the composition of solutions - expressing concentration
Lab course 1 (5 hours): Potentiometric determination of fluoride and chloride. Determination of iron in drinking water.
Lecture 5: Voltammetry, coulometry
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Calculating the pH of water of different composition and nature (sea, river, rain)
Lab course 2 (5 hours): Determination of the pH of various types of water (river, rain)
Lecture 6: Conductometry, spectrometric techniques
Lecture 7: Absorption Spectrometry, induced absorption spectrometry, emission spectrometry
Lab course 3 (5 hours ): Determining the concentration of transition metal in the pure aqueous solutions of UV-VIS spectrophotometry
Lecture 8: Instrumental separation techniques, gas chromatography
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): Calculations data spectrometric measurements
Lab course 4 (5 hours ): Determination of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium in wastewater by spectrophotometry
Lecture 9:. Liquid chromatography, the state and development of chromatographic techniques
Seminar 5 (2 hours): Calculations of trace metals in the environment
Lecture 10: Other techniques (thermal techniques, radiochemical techniques)
Seminar 6 (2 hours): The calculation of the concentration of particulate matter in the environment and display the result
Lab course 5 (5 hours ): Determination of phosphorus in the solid plant
Lecture 11: Trace elements in the environment: natural level and chemical form of pollution
Seminar 7 (2 hours): Statistical analysis of the results of the analysis of environmental samples (air, water, soil)
Lecture 12: Determination of trace organic compounds
Lecture 13: Biological indicators and methods
Lecture 14: The radiation and radioactivity in the environment. contamination of soil
Lab course 6 (5 hours ): Voltammetric determination of ascorbic acid in multivitamins
Lab course 7 (5 hours ): Determination of organic matter in soil
Lecture 15: Evaluation and interpretation of analytical data from the environment. specific applications
Lab course 8 (5 hours ): Determination of grain size characteristics of sediment
Seminar 8 (1 hour): Correlations (Spearman, Pearson,)
Lab course 9 (5 hours ): Determination of the metal in particulate matter

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed. The student has the right to exercise fail one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Ašperger et al, Analitika okoliša, HINUS&FKIT, Zagreb 2013.

1

E. P. Popek Sampling and analysis of environmental chemical pollutants, AP, 2003.

1

Vježbe iz Analitičke kemije okoliša (interna skripta u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

F.W. Fifield, P.J. Haines, Environmental Analytical Chemistry, Blackie academic& professional, London, 1996

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C.E. Kupchella, M. C. Hyland, Enviromental science, Massachusetts, 1989

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Surface Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Surface Chemistry

Code

KTI104

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Zoran Grubač

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Deepen the knowledge of a structure of metallic surfaces, adsorption molecules on surfaces and surface analytical techniques.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the course students will be able to:
- Describe the structure of metallic surfaces
- Define crystalline systems
- Determine the symmetry of unit cell
- Describe the crystal plane using Miller indices and derive the plane spacing
- Conduct complex experiments in the laboratory and interpret collected data and results of measurement
- Change the properties of the surface by conducting experiments

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Structure of Metallic Surfaces, Adsorption of Molecules on Surfaces, The Langmuir Isotherm, Surface Analytical Techniques, Overlayer Structures & Surface Diffraction; Surface Imaging & Depth Profiling
Lectures:
1. The structure of metal surfaces. Unit cell. Crystal systems
2. Symmetry. Symmetry of the unit cell.
3. Lattice planes and Miler indices. The distance between the planes. X-ray diffraction from crystals.
4. Inorganic crystal structures. Hexagonal close packing. Cubic dense packing.
5. ccp, fcc, bcc; Positional coordinates, Bond lengths, sizes of interstitials.
6. The structure of the surface of fcc metals. The structure of the surface hcp metals.
7. Energy of solid surfaces. Relaxation and reconstruction of the surfaces.
8. Molecular adsorption. The curve of potential energy - energy of adsorption.
9. Nucleation, formation and growth of new phase
10. Langmuir adsorption isotherm, ultrahigh vacuum.
11. Methods of preparation and characterization of surfaces I.
12. Methods of preparation and characterization of surfaces II.
Seminars:
1. Unit cell. Calculations with unit cells
2. Miler indices. Drawing surfaces if Miler indices are known. Determination the Miler indices for a known plane.
3. Positional coordinates. Calculate the length of the bond.
4. The structure of the surface of hcp metals
5. Molecular adsorption. Adsorption kinetics.
6. 2D and 3D nucleation. Determination of the number of nuclei.
Laboratory exercises:
1. Development of electrodes for electrochemical measurements
2. Determination of the real surface area of the electrode - assessment criteria or reversibility of reaction of Fe2 + / Fe3 + at different electrodes.
3. Determination of the real surface area of the electrode - estimation by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
4. Potentiostatic formation of oxide / hydroxide film on the electrodes of the magnesium in borate electrolyte with mathematical analysis.
5. Analysis of potentiostatic transients for 2D and 3D nucleation.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.
Students who obtain a signature from the course Surface Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows :
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right.
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through two partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

G.A. Somorjai, Introduction to Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1994.

0

K. Christmann, Introduction to Surface Physical Chemistry, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1991.

0

Zoran Grubač: Predavanja iz Kemije površina

0

web, http://www.ktf-split.hr

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P.W. Atkins and J. de Paula, Physical Chemistry, 7th Ed., Freeman, New
York, 2002.; A. W. Adamson and A. P. Gast, Physical Chemistry of
Surfaces, 6th Ed., Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Experimental seminar paper
NAME OF THE COURSE Experimental seminar paper

Code

KTI1S

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemistry of Sea
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry of Sea

Code

KTI201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Gaining knowledge of the sea; chemical and physical composition and properties of the sea.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. fundamental properties of seawater
2. basic physical properties of the sea
3. chemical composition of seawater
4. marine pollution, sources and types of pollution
5. interactive impact of pollutants on the marine environment
6. chemicals in the sea and the manner of their removal

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction to marine chemistry. The fundamental properties of sea water, the origin of water and salt.
Lecture 2: The composition of the oceans and marine sediment
Seminar 1 (2 hours): The numerical assignments from the properties and composition of seawater.
Lecture 3: The basic physical properties of the sea.
Lecture 4: Chemical composition of seawater. Salinity and density
Seminar 2 (2 hours): Salinity and density
Lecture 5: The chemical species in the sea (major constituents and micro-constituents).
Lecture 6: Gases in the sea .
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Analysis of the gases in the sea
Lecture 7: Dissolved organic matter in the sea.
Lecture 8: Marine pollution, sources and types
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): The numerical assignments from dissolved substances in the sea
Lecture 9:. Metals in the sea
Lecture 10: Degradable and durable organic compounds.
Seminar 5 (2 hours): Numerical problems in organic matter in the sea
Lecture 11: Urban waste. Petroleum and petroleum products. Water from the cooling system. Radioactive waste.
Lecture 12: Pesticides. The impact of pollutants on the marine environment
Seminar 6 (2 hours): Pollutants in the sea
Lecture 13: Plant protection (cleaning) must
Lecture 14: Preventing contamination / pollution from vessels.
Lecture 15: Legal regulations on marine environmental protection.
Seminar 7 (3 hours): Legal regulations on marine environmental protection
Lab course: Determination of salinity and chlorinity of seawater. Determination of the pH and alkalinity.Determination of oxygen. Determination of nutrients. Determination of metals in marine sediments. Determination of organic matter in marine sediments. Determination of carbonate in marine sediments.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed. The student has the right to exercise fail one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Buljan, M. Zore-Armanda: Osnovi oceanografije i pomorske meteorologije, Institut za oceanografiju i ribarstvo-Split, Split, 1971.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

R.B. Clark: Marine Polution, Clarenddon Press, Oxford, 1986.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

B.A. Duxbury, A.C. Duxbury, Fundamental of oceanography, WCB, Melbourn, Oxford, 1993.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Z. Bičanić: Zaštita mora i morskog okoliša; Z. Bičanić-vlastita naklada, Split, 2004

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E Prohić: Geokemija, Targa, Zagreb, 1998.
Stumm, J.J. Morgan, Aquatic Chemistry: Chemical Equilibria and Rates in
Natural Waters, John Wiley&Sons, New York, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Atmospheric Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Atmospheric Chemistry

Code

KTI202

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

7.5

Associate teachers

ScM Nenad Periš
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

45

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To provide students with basic knowledge of the atmosphere; structure, chemical cycles, and pollution, as well as the means for preventing the emission of harmful substances into the environment.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. definition of basic concepts and history of the chemistry of the atmosphere
2. geochemical relationship of the Earth and the Sun.
3. classification of pollutants and their origin in the atmosphere
4. evaluation and screening of air quality
5. thermodynamics and kinetics of formation of oxides in the atmosphere
6. the role of various pollutants in photochemical processes in the atmosphere
7. techniques and sampling procedures of harmful substances in the atmosphere

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Basic characteristics of the atmosphere. The structure of the atmosphere. The composition of the atmosphere
Lecture 2: The atmosphere as the photochemical system. Incoming radiation-solar spectrum. The absorption coefficient of atmospheric gases
Seminar 1 (2 hours): Numerical methods for solving problems related to radiation and the absorption coefficient
Lecture 3: Re-emission radiation-cooling the Earth’s surface. temperature inversions
Lecture 4: Contaminants atmospheres and their origin. Expression of the content of pollutants in the atmosphere. Building an information system based on the list of pollutants, meteorological data and emission measurements
Seminar 2 (2 hours): Solving problems related to the expression of content pollution in the atmosphere
Lecture 5: Rating and projections of air quality. Emission and immission standards
Lab course 1 (3 hours): Determination of PM10 and PM2.5
Lecture 6: The kinetics of formation of carbon (II) oxide and control its emissions
Lecture 7: Thermodynamics and kinetics of formation of sulfur oxides. The basic methods of controlling sulfur oxides
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Numerical methods for solving problems related to the kinetics and thermodynamics of formation of CO2, CO and SOx
Lab course 2 (3 hours): Determination of the metal particulate matter
Lecture 8: Thermodynamics of the formation of NO and NO2 (NOx). Sources of NOx emissions
Lecture 9: The kinetics of formation of NO in the process of combustion. Methods for controlling NOx emissions from stationary sources
Lecture 10: Assessing the weight of compounds of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen in the atmosphere; emission sources, conversion, life time of each compound.
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): Numerical methods for solving problems related to NOx
Lab course 3 (3 hours): Determination of CO, CO2 and SO2
Lecture 11: Analysis of the increase in the acidity of precipitation. Creating monoatomnog oxygen and ozone
Lecture 12: Chemical reduction of the stratospheric ozone protective layer. Photochemical reactions of atmospheric pollution
Seminar 5 (2 hours): Numerical methods for solving problems related to the occurrence of acidity in the atmosphere and photochemical reactions
Lab course 4 (3 hours): Determination of NOx and NH4 +
Lecture 13: The role of various primary pollutants in photochemical processes in the atmosphere
Lecture 14: The lifetime of harmful substances in the lower atmosphere-deposition mechanisms
Seminar 6 (2 hours): Numerical methods for solving problems related to the concentration of NOx, SOx, and NH4 +
Lab course 5 (3 hours): Determination of the concentration of ozone
Lecture 15: Techniques and procedures for sampling of pollutants in the atmosphere
Seminar 7 (3 hours): Statistical analysis of data provided by the monitoring

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed. The student has the right to exercise fail one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Mar Viana, Urban Air Quality in Europe, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

N. P. Cheremisinoff, Handbook of air pollution prevention and control, Elsevier Science (USA), 2002.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

D.J. Jacob, Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 1999.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

S.E. Manahan, Environmental Chemistry, Sixth Edition, Lewis Publishers, London, 1994.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

C. Baird, Environmental Chemistry, W. H. Freeman and Company, New York, 1999.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.M. Harrison, Understanding Our Environment: An Introduction to Environmental Chemistry and Pollution, Second Edition, The Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, 1992.
P. Brimblecombe, Air Composition and Chemistry, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Soil Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Soil Chemistry

Code

KTI203

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Maša Buljac
Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To introduce students to the properties of mineral and organic matter of the soil and their role in chemical processes in the soil. Determine the concentration and composition of the soil solution, the importance and role of soil reaction, acidity, alkalinity and salinity for certain soil properties and processes in the soil. Analyze soil contamination by organic and inorganic compounds.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
- Identify chemical composition pedosphere, the origin of the chemical constituents in the soil
- To compare the natural and anthropogenic processes caused by the transformation of mineral and organic matter in soil
- Establish similarities and differences in the chemical processes in different soils
- The sources of soil contamination as a result of human activity
- Make a plan of chemical analyzes for different needs
- To elaborate obtained knowledge of soil

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction. Definition of basic concepts in chemistry of soil
Lecture 2: The fundamental substrates and processes of pedogenesis
Lecture 3: Mineral soil structure (oxides and hydroxides of Al, Si, Fe, Mn, no silicate minerals, secondary clay minerals, ion dispersion)
Seminar 1 (2 hours): Redox reactions of cations and anions at the solid-liquid
Lab course 1 (4 hours): Soil analysis (determining the acidity of the soil, the determination of total carbonate in the soil).
Lecture 4: The organic structure of the soil (fresh remains on the ground and in the soil, transformation of soil organic matter, mineralization, humus- origin, composition and properties, divisions humus importance of humus for soil fertility).
Lecture 5: The liquid phase of the soil. The properties of the soil solution.
Seminar 2 (2 hours):. soil acidity, soil pH
Lab course 2 (4 hours): Determination of buffering capacity of the soil.
Lecture 6: The processes of precipitation and dissolution
Lecture 7: I. Partial Test
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Methods of measuring soil acidity
Lab course 3 (4 hours): Determination of ammonium nitrogen in the soil with Nessler reagent.
Lecture 8: Reactions of cations and anions at the interface soil-solution
Lecture 9: The acidity of the soil, methods of measuring soil acidity, soil acidity and origin correction of soil acidity.
Seminar 4 (2 hours): The redox potential of the soil and the practical application
Lab course 4 (4 hours): Determination of physiologically active lime (CaO%) by the method of Galeta.
Lecture 10: Alkalinity, salinity, soil buffers. Soil contamination from organic and inorganic compounds
Lecture 11:: The basic principles of electrochemistry.
Seminar 5 (2 hours): The chemical composition of the organic portion of soil.
Lab course 5 (4 hours ): Determination of total nitrogen in plant material and soil by the method of Kjeldahl.
Lecture 12: The redox potential of the soil and practical application.
Lecture 13: The properties of colloids in the environment.
Seminar 6 (2 hours): The liquid phase of the soil
Lab course 6 (5 hours ): Determination of exchangeable aluminum in the soil by the method of Sokolov presented.
Lecture 14: The problems of soil contamination.
Lecture 15: II. partial test
Seminar 7 (2 hours ): oxido-reducing conditions in the soil
Lab course 7 (5 hours ): Determination of humus at Kotzman

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester two exams will be performed. Final examinations will be administered during formal examination periods. The following percentage equivalents apply to final grade: <55% Failure; 56%-66% (2); 67%-78% (3); 79%-90% (4);> 90% (5). After written exam, student will attend to oral exam. Lecturers do not give grades. Students earn grades.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D.L. Sparks, Environmental Soil Chemistry, 2 nd edition Academic Press, London, 2003.

0

Jedan primjerak u zavodu

E. Prohić, Geokemija, Targa, Zagreb, 1998.

0

M. Cresser, K. Killham, T. Edwards, Soil Chemistry and its applications, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1993.;

0

Jedan primjerak u zavodu

A. Škorić, Postanak, razvoj i sistematika tala, Sveučilište u Zagrebu, 1986

0

Jedan primjerak u zavodu

A. Škorić, Sastav i svojstva tla, Fakultet poljoprivrednih znanosti, Zagreb, 1991.

0

Jedan primjerak u zavodu

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

T. G. Spiro, W. M. Stigliani, Chemistry of environment, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1996;
A. Škorić, Priručnik za pedološka istraživanja, Fakultet poljoprivrednih znanosti, Zagreb, 1982.;
C.S. Kupchella, M.C. Hyland, Environmental science, 2nd edition, Allyn and Bacon, Massachusetts, 1989.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring the quality and efficiency of teaching and acquisition of knowledge (skills), monitored at the level of: (1) teachers, by accepting the suggestions of students and colleagues, (2) faculty, conducting the survey participants about the quality of teaching.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Water Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Water Chemistry

Code

KTI204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Credits (ECTS)

6.5

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The main objective of this course is to understand the chemistry and kinetics that take place in natural waters (including the acid- base reactions in natural waters , complexation reactions , dissolution and precipitation , and redox reactions ) for students of chemistry, biology, ecology, geochemistry, etc. In addition to these field of natural sciences, the course offers the fundamental knowledge necessary for understanding processes in environmental engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

It is required a good knowledge of general chemistry. Also, knowledge of analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, organic chemistry is useful but not obligates for understanding of lectures.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. explain the water cycle and the interactions that occur between different phases (water - air, water - solid)
2. to explain carbonate equilibrium, to understand concepts of alkality and buffering capacity of water; to understand the differences in composition, origin of solutes between surface water, groundwater and sea. This includes understanding of pc - pH graphs for open and closed systems. In addition, students will get insight of origin of the sea composition and control of composition of river and sea water.
3. understanding the correlation between the complex reactions (coordination chemistry) and bio-availability and toxicity of metals. This includes creating inorganic complexes and the interaction of heavy metals with organic (mainly humic) substances.
4. understand and calculate equilibrium conditions which lead to deposition in natural waters. This includes the performance of pc - pH graphs in open and closed systems with or without solid phase .
5. to assume that important redox equations can take place in a real system and to develop pe (pE) - pH - pc diagram for chosen species.
6. understand biologically important redox equations that take place under different conditions in natural waters

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Properties of water, structure of water molecules, the water composition (gases, compounds and ions in water , organic matter, trace elements , radioactive elements).
Lecture 2: The composition of sea water, the origin of salt and controls the composition of river and sea water elements in the sea ( permanent elements , circuit elements (nutrients ) adsorptive elements (precipitated elements) , ocean acidity).
Lecture 3: Interactions in the gas - water system , step changes
Seminar 1 (2 hours): Model and conditions of steady surface film - Solving problems and examples
Lecture 4: Carbonate system, Acid-base balance carbonate
Seminar 2 (2 hours): Calculation of pH and composition of the solution to carbonate species, drawing pc - pH diagrams for open and closed system .
Lab course 1 (4 hours): Introduction to methods of chemical analysis of water, Determination of total dissolved carbon, determination of dissolved inorganic carbon, determination of organic carbon
Lecture 5: The concentration of carbonate species in open and closed systems, Akalitet and acidity ( alkalinity and acidity)
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Calculation of alkalinity in water of different composition and nature (sea, river, rain, consumer)
Lab course 2 (4 hours): Determination of alkalinity various types of water (sea , river , rain ) , Determination of total nitrogen and total dissolved nitrogen.
Lecture 6: The metal ions in the aqueous solution , hydrolysis of the metal ion complexes with other inorganic ligands
Lecture 7: The metal ions and humic substances , properties of humic substances , Interaction of humic substances with metals, water hardness
Lab course 3 (4 hours ): Determination of metals in water (calcium, potassium , sodium, iron, zinc )
Lecture 8: Precipitation and dissolution equilibrium calculations , solubility and solubility product , conditional solubility product , log(c) pH diagrams (pc - pH)
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): Construction of PC - pH diagram for Ca2+ in equilibrium with the Ca(OH)2(s) and Mg2+ in equilibrium with Mg(OH)2(s)
Lecture 9: Solubility of salts of weak acids and bases, complexing Effect on solubility , precipitation of Fe(OH)2(s) and Fe(OH)3(s) (pc - pH diagrams), dominating diagrams of species.
Seminar 5 (2 hours): The precipitation of aluminum phosphate , Calculation of the equilibrium concentration of hydroxo complexes of iron , calcium carbonate solubility and stability of the water
Lecture 10: Redox reactions in water, the standard potential, Electronic activity and pe, pe- pc diagrams
Seminar 6 (2 hours): Construction of pe -pc (E-pc) diagrams (Fe species)
Lecture 11: pe - pH diagrams for Cl2 , Other diagrams dominance ( Br , I) , pe - pH (pH - E) plots in the presence of a of a solid phase
Seminar 7 (2 hours): Construction of pe - pH (pH - E) diagrams for chloric and brominated species. Construction of pe - pH diagram for Fe2+ / Fe3+ in the presence of a solid phase
Lecture 12: Chemistry of Iron, Iron in groundwater, Kinetics of oxidation of Fe2+
Lecture 13: The chemistry of chlorine, chlorine species equilibria, reactions of chlorine species with inorganic species
Lecture 14: The reaction of chlorine with organic substances , with organic molecules containing N , reactions with phenols, trihalomethanes, reactions of oxidation
Exercise 4 (3 hours): Determination of chlorine in water and diagram of chlorine species on the basis of experimental data.
Lecture 15: Biologically important redox equations, nitrogen cycle, redox systems with micro-organisms, microbiological yield
Seminar 8 (1 hour): pc - pe diagram for cT,N = 10-3 mol dm -3 in equilibrium with nitrogen ( pN2 = 0.77 atm)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester two exams will be performed. Final examinations will be administered during formal examination periods. The following percentage equivalents apply to final grade: <55% Failure; 56%-66% (2); 67%-78% (3); 79%-90% (4);> 90% (5). After written exam, student will attend to oral exam. Lecturers do not give grades. Students earn grades.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

V.L. Snoeyink, D. Jenkins, Water Chemistry, Wiley, New York, 1980.

0

M. Buzuk, Kemija voda (u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

Vježbe iz Kemije voda (interna skripta u pripremi), Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet, Split, 201X

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

W. Stumm, J.J. Morgan, Aquatic Chemistry, Chemical Equillibria and Rates in Natural Waters, 3. izd., Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1996.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

 

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemistry and Technology of Aromatic Plants
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry and Technology of Aromatic Plants

Code

KTI205

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge on the chemistry and technology of aromatic plants, knowledge of the structures of organic compounds typical for the essential oils, their division and useful properties, knowledge on the biosynthesis of essential oils and methods of their isolation and identification of the oil components.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course, students will be able to:
- describe the basic concepts, essential oils, aromatic plants processing procedures, analyses of isolates obtained and typical use of essential oils
- illustrate the ways of smell perception, the biosynthesis of terpenes and other compounds of essential oils, the basic division of terpenes
- demonstrate basic procedures in the processing of aromatic plants, simple method for isolation of essential oils and aromatic extracts preparation
- determine the appropriate method of analysis of derived isolates (basic physical and chemical values, the application of chromatographic and spectroscopic methods)
- propose suitable procedures for the processing of aromatic plants, taking into account the fundamental principles of distillation and extraction procedures, the analysis of obtained isolates considering the possibility of artefacts formation as well as structural / biosynthetic relationship between the isolated compounds
- choose the correct chemical approach for solving problems in the field of chemistry and technology of aromatic plants, starting from the acquired knowledge from organic chemistry and biochemistry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Introduction to aromatic plants and essential oils - definition, historical development of isolation and research of the essential oils. (3 hours); Natural, natural identical and synthetic essential oils; chemical structures of molecules and smell; activating receptors of smell: ion channels and G-proteins; essential oils in plants, plant formations for storage of the essential oils, chemotaxonomy and chemotypes of essential oils (3 hours).
Chemical composition of the essential oils: terpenes, isoprene rule, division, cyclic and acyclic structures of mono- and sesquiterpenes; phenylpropanoic derivatives and other compounds in the essential oils (3 hours); Chirality and structures of terpenes; glycosidically bound volatile compounds; the basic structure of glycones and aglycones of the glycosides of volatile compounds; Biogenesis of 3-IPP via mevalonic acid; biogenesis 3-IPP over deoxyxylulose phosphate (DXP) (3 hours); Biogenetic isoprene rule - the precursors of terpenes (GPP, FPP, GGPP); biogenesis semiterpenes, acyclic and cyclic mono-and sesquiterpenes. (3 hours)
Processing of aromatic plants: drying and storage; general overview of the methods of isolation and concentration of the essential oils; rate of distillation – hydrodiffusion; hydrolysis and decomposition of labile components of essential oils (3 hours); Hydrodistillation, water-vapour and steam distillation in the laboratory and in industry; comparison of water, water-steam and steam distillation (3 hours); Extraction with organic solvents, extraction with cold and hot fat; overview of the types of the obtained aromatic extracts; extraction with sub-and supercritical fluids (CO2, H2O); microwave extraction; simultaneous distillation-extraction (3 hours); Comparison of conventional and new extraction techniques; fractionation of the essential oils; basic physical and chemical values of the essential oils; chromatographic techniques in the analysis of essential oil (3 hours)
TLC and GC analysis of the essential oil, detectors (FID and MS), types of columns, sample preparation for the analysis of essential oil, retention time and the index, an overlap of peaks and fractionation of essential oils (pre-treatment) (3 hours); Modern chromatographic techniques in the analysis of essential oils: chiral GC, HSGC, MDGC, 2DGC; GC-MS; MS (SIM SCAN technique) - identification of terpenes and phenylpropane derivatives via MS (6 hours)
Overview of common essential oils - chemical composition and application (6 hours); the use of essential oils; mechanism of antibacterial and antioxidant activity; the structure of biologically active compounds of essential oils; undesirable effects of the essential oils (3 hours)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars) and actively participate in the teaching process, which will be evaluated in the final assessment by the weight coefficient of 5%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

4.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students can take two partial tests during the lectures. If not pass partial tests, students will be evaluated by written exam. Rating at partial tests and the final examination is formed as follows: 51-60% sufficient (2); 61-75% good (3); 76-88% very good (4); 89-100% excellent (5). The total score is formed by summing all activities (for each activity % success multiply weigh coefficient): 5% x the presence and activity in lectures and seminars + 10% x success in experimental work + 43% x performance on the first test + 42% x performance on the second test.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

K. H. Basser, G. Buchbauer, Handbook of Essential Oils: Science, Technology and Application, CRC Press, 2010

1

E. Guenther, The Essential Oils, vol. I: History – Origin in Plants – Production – Analysis, Jepson Press, 2008

1

Igor Jerković, Predlošci za predavanja iz Kemije i tehnologije aromatičnog bilja, KTF, 2014.

0

web stranica KTF-a

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. P. Adams, Identification of essential oils by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, Allured Publishing Corporation, 2007
E. Guenther, The Essential Oils, vol. II-VI, van Nostrand Co, Princeton, 1964.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Monitoring of quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee; (3) Academic Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemical Ecology
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemical Ecology

Code

KTI206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Understanding of the basic groups of toxic pollutants, their way of dospjevanja into the environment, the transmission of the environment, their deposit and adversely affected.
Risk assessment and the ability to prevent harmful effects during working with chemicals.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. definition of basic concepts and history of chemical ecology
2. the origin of the chemical constituents in the ecosystem
3. classification and labelling of hazardous chemicals
4. transport mechanisms in the environment
5. sources of pollution as a result of human activity
6. interactive impact of pollutants
7. how to process the obtained knowledge of the toxicological and ecotoxicological information

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction. Definition of basic concepts in ecology
Lecture 2: Identification of chemical components in the ecosystems, natural resources.
Lecture 3: Risk assessment of pollutants
Lecture 4: The main disturbances in ecosystems caused by human activities
Lecture 5: Overview of the sources of pollution as a result of human activity
Lecture 6:Distribution of pollutants. Pesticides, metals, fertilizers, mechanisms of toxicity
Lecture 7: The first midterm test
Lecture 8: Physical and chemical properties
Lecture 9:.The transport mechanisms in soil, water and air
Lecture 10: Bioaccumulation and bioconcentration in organisms and ecosystems
Lecture 11:The excretion of toxic substances from the organism
Lecture 12:Mitigation of biodegradation
Lecture 13: Sources and effects of contamination. Determination of risk from an environmental point of view
Lecture 14: The classification and labeling of hazardous chemicals. Legislation and toxicological tests in Croatia and the EU.
Lecture 15: The second midterm test
Seminar: The seminar consists of practical tasks and student seminars. Determining the kind of interaction of different pollutants in a particular case. To determine the classification of adverse effects. Defining the concentration limit harmful substances.
Students independently produced work on a selected topic on the basis of scientific papers in the relevant scientific databases and presenting it.
Lab course: Methods of preparation materials. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the most important pollutants. Ecotoxicity tests. Determination of metal toxicity biomonitoring. Determination of the harmfulness of fluoride ion in the environmental community in an aqueous medium. Analysis of the results obtained toxicity tests, statistical methods.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed. The student has the right to exercise fail one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

C.H. Walker,S.P.Hopkin, R.M. Sibly, D.B. Peakall. Principles of Ekotoxicology, Taylor&Francis,London, 2006.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

B.L. Carson, H.V.Ellis III, J.L.McCann. Toxicology and biological monitoring of metals in humans, Lewis Publishers, INC.Michigan, 1987.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

F. Plavšić, I. Žuntar. Uvod u analitičku toksikologiju, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 2006.

0

U Zavodu 1 primjerak

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

V.Srebočan. Veterinarska toksikologija, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2009.
L. Robinson, I. Thorn. Toxicology and Ecotoxicology in chemical safety assessment, Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Solid State Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Solid State Chemistry

Code

KTI207

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To obtain the knowledge on design and development of materials with pre-required properties based on understanding the structure of solids in its influence on physical-chemical properties, understanding of phase relations, chemical synthesis, reaction kinetics as well as characterisation methods.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Taken and passed courses in General Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the the course students will be able to:
- Understand and use the terminology of crystallography
- Identify the structure of crystalline compounds
- Assess the characteristics of solids based on the knowledge of its structure
- Understand and describe the techniques of synthesis and preparation of materials
- Understand and describe the structure of materials characterization techniques

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1. lecture: Properties of solid substances, types of bonds in solids - the impact of bonded and non-bonded electrons on the structure and properties of solids.
2. lecture: The structure of metals and alloys. Metal bond theory. Theory of semiconductors and insulators. Superconductivity.
3. lecture: The crystallographic systems - Bravais grid, Miller indices, common crystal structures,
4. lecture: Types of crystal defects and their impact on material properties
5. lecture: Structure is not crystal - amorphous materials, glass, glass-ceramic, metallic glasses
6. lecture: Electrical properties of materials (thermoelectric effects, piezo-, pyro- and ferroelektricity).
7. lecture: Magnetic properties of materials (paramagnetism, ferro-, feri- and anti-ferromagnetism, structure and properties of magnetic materials).
8. lecture: Optical properties (luminescence, lasers). Crystal imperfections and non-stoichiometry. Diffusion.
9. lecture: Ionic conductivity, solid electrolytes.
10. lecture: Phase diagrams and phase transitions (thermodynamics and kinetics)
11. lecture: Synthesis and preparation of materials - particles, films, coatings, single crystals, nanomaterials and composites, physical processes and reaction kinetics, microstructure development, self-organizing structures and macrostructures
12. lecture: Basic methods of characterization of solids, electron microscopy and diffraction, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, spectroscopic methods

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

The 80% presence at lectures and seminars, and completed all laboratory exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

2.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of the material concerned exercises will be verified by tests. All exercises must be completed.
Students who obtain a signature from the course Solid State Chemistry can take the exam. The exam consists of a written and oral examination. The student approached the oral exam must first pass a written examination. The written part of the exam lasts two hours. The written part of the exam is evaluated as follows :
Exactly solved more than 55 % - sufficient
Exactly solved more than 70 % - good
Exactly solved more than 80 % - very good
Exactly solved more than 90 % - excellent
After the written exam on the notice board of the Department will be advertised results of the exam and time when students which did not pass the written exam can view tasks and schedule for oral examinations for students which have acquired this right.
A complete examination or part thereof may be installed through two partial tests during the semester. The tests cover material presented in lectures, seminars and exercises. Written tests are evaluated in the following manner:
Exactly solved more than 55 % - released a written exam
Exactly solved by 60 % - freed written and oral - sufficient
Exactly solved by 70 % - freed written and oral - good
Exactly solved by 80 % - freed written and oral - very good
Exactly solved by 90 % - freed written and oral - excellent
It is necessary to pass all tests in order to pass the exam. Students who did not meet any of the tests must take written and oral exam of that part.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

A.R. West, Basic Solid State Chemistry, 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1999.

0

C.N.R. Rao, J. Gopalakrishnan, New Direction in Solid State Chemistry, 2nd Ed., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997.

0

Brinić, Slobodan: Predavanja iz Kemije čvrstog stanja

0

web, http://www.ktf-split.hr

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. K. Cheetham, P. Day, Solid State Chemistry: Techniques, Reprint edition, Oxford University Press; 1990.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Information from interviews, observations, and consultation with students during lectures
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Solid State Physics
NAME OF THE COURSE Solid State Physics

Code

KTI208

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Analysis of the structure and properties of solids by theoretical and experimental methods, with emphasis on the substances with crystal structure.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the course students should:
- Know the characteristics of the structure and properties of crystalline and amorphous solids;
- Master the structural characterization of solids, using the reciprocal space;
- Be able to determine the parameters of elasticity and plasticity of solids using appropriate methods;
- Use quantum approach when analyzing the properties of crystals;
- Know and understand in detail the properties of metals, semiconductors and dielectrics;
- Understand the mechanisms of selected phenomena in solids;
- Know the possibilities of applying the properties of solids;
- Be able to analyze the relationship between the properties and the dimensionality of solids.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Structural properties of solid bodies. Structure of crystals. (4+2) Diffraction of
waves and reciprocal lattice.(2+2) Experimental diffraction methods.(2+2) Difusion in solid bodies.(3+1) Elastic and plastic properties of solid bodies. (1+2) Fundamentals of quantum mechanics.(1) Energy levels of electrons in solid bodies.(2+1) Static and transport properties of electrons in metals. (3+1) Vibrations waves in crystals – phonons.(2+1) Thermal properties.(2+1) Semiconductors.(2+1) Optical properties of dielectrics and semiconductors.(1+1) Fundamental phenomena and devices.(1) Microstructures and nanostructures.(2) Magnetism.(2)
Number of hours of lectures and seminars (L + S) are indicated in brackets.
Laboratory exercices: diodes and semiconductor diodes (4), photoelectric effect (4), thermoelectric effect (4), the Hall effect (4), data analysis of structural characterization (4), data analysis of morphological characterization (4) data analysis of moduli of elasticity and hardness (2) lasers and semiconductor lasers (4)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.5

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the final exam can be substituted by midterm tests and seminar essays (independent computational tasks).
In the final exam perods the final exam shall be taken after the presentation of seminar essays.
Grades: 55-64% - sufficient; 65-79% - good, 80-89% - very good; 90-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Lučić Lavčević, Osnove fizike čvrstog stanja, 2007, interna skripta

0

osobna web-stranica

V. Šips: Uvod u fiziku čvrstog stanja, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 1993.

1

V. Knapp, P. Colić: Uvod u električna i magnetska svojstva materije, Školska knjiga Zagreb, Zagreb, 1990.

1

C. Kittel: Introduction to solid state physics, John Wiley&Sons, New York, 2005.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

C. Kittel: Introduction to solid state physics, John Wiley&Sons, New York, 2005.
- odabrane web stranice

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Corrosion and Materials Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Corrosion and Materials Protection

Code

KTI209

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Maja Kliškić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective of this course is to achieve a knowledge about fundamentals of corrosion processes and corrosion protection, and methods of corrosion testing and prevention. This course will provide student to acquire an orderly pattern of thought in solving practical corrosion problems in a critical and creative manner.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- define and classify the corrosion processes
- evaluate the resistance of materials for any given conditions
- perform the corrosion tests
- ascertain and select the most effective corrosion protection system for any given conditions – project related and on-site if appropriate – and evaluate its durability

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Definition and importance of corrosion. Classification of corrosion processes.
2nd week: Chemical corrosion. thermodynamic conditions. The mechanism and kinetics of chemical corrosion process. Resistance to chemical corrosion.
3rd week: Electrochemical corrosion. Thermodynamic conditions. The mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical corrosion process. Types of electrochemical corrosion.
4th week: Corrosion of inorganic materials (corrosion of concrete, reinforcement in concrete, ceramics and glass in aggressive environments).
5th week: Corrosion under specific conditions: in the atmosphere, water, sea water.
6th week: Corrosion in soil, in melts.
7th week: Corrosion caused by microorganisms.
8th week: First test
9th week: Corrosion protection by materials selection and proper designing.
10th week: Materials protection using corrosion inhibitors.
11th week: Electrochemical methods of protection.
12th week: Surface protection. Selection of coatings and paints.
13th week: The importance of inspection and maintenance.
14th week: Corrosion tests. Standards.
15th week:. Second test.
Exercises:
Monitor atmospheric corrosion. Examination of corrosion rate by polarization methods. Determination of the critical pitting temperature of stainless steel. Examination of corroded metal samples by optical microscopy. Protection of aluminum alloy anodizing and processing of the oxide film. Determination of the effectiveness of organic corrosion inhibitors. Cathodic protection by means of a protector.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 40% and exercises with 20%. On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: - 60% insufficient, 61 - 69% - sufficient (2), 70 - 79% - good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90 - 100% - excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J.R. Davis, Corrosion – understanding the basic, ASM International, 2000.

1

B. Jarić, A. Rešetić, Korozija i katodna zaštita, Korexpres, Zagreb, 2003.

1

I. Esih, Osnove površinske zaštite, Fakultet strojarstva i brodogradnje Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Babolan, Corrosion Tests and Standards, Amer. Tech. Pulbl. Ltd. New York, 1995.
P. Marcus, J. Oudar (Eds.), Corrosion Mechanisms in Theory and Practice, M. Dekker, New York, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

- Tracking suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester
- Student survey

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mathematical Tools in Chemical Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Mathematical Tools in Chemical Engineering

Code

KTI210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Davor Rušić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To familiarize students with the mathematical tools and their meaning in chemistry and chemical engineering.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

To analyze the problem, conduct calculations, to conclude the possibilities of a mathematics software program used.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Convert text from Word into MathCad and editing text in this tool.
Week 2: Introduction to mathematical tools and application of text from MathCad
Week 3: Data input and graphical display
Week 4: 2D graphics
Week 5: 3D Graphics
Week 7: Mathematical functions and zero point
Week 8: First colloquium
Week 9: The intersection of the curve
Week 10: Derivatives and integrals
Week 11: Matrix algebra
Week 12: Equations
Week 13: The flow function
Week 14: A correlational-regression analysis
Week 15: Second colloquium
Exercises:
Week 1: Convert text from Word into MathCad and editing text in this tool.
Week 2: Introduction to mathematical tools and application of text from MathCad
Week 3: Data input and graphical display
Week 4: 2D graphics
Week 5: 3D Graphics
Week 7: Mathematical functions and zero point
Week 8: First colloquium
Week 9: The intersection of the curve
Week 10: Derivatives and integrals
Week 11: Matrix algebra
Week 12: Equations
Week 13: The flow function
Week 14: A correlational-regression analysis
Week 15: Second colloquium

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Student responsibilities: Regular attendance and active participation at lectures, seminars and exercises

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam
A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-79% good (3); 80-92% very good (4); 93-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Rušić, E. Bacci, Matematički alati

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences:
Quality of the teaching and learning, monitored at the level of the
(1) teachers, accepting suggestions of students and colleagues, and
(2) faculty, conducting surveys of students on teaching quality.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Chemistry of Materials
NAME OF THE COURSE Chemistry of Materials

Code

KTI302

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marija Bralić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

ScM Goran Olujić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The basic objective of the course is to acquire knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of materials.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After course students will be able to :
1. chemical characteristics of the material.
2. physical characteristics of the material: electrical, thermal, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties
3. materials: conductors, semiconductors, metals, ceramics, polymers, composites
4. sampling of different materials
5. preparation of a representative sample for analysis

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Lecture 1: Introduction. The chemical characteristics of the material
Lecture 2: Chemical bond, the crystal lattice.
Lecture 3: Physical characteristics of the material: electrical, thermal, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties
Seminar 1 (2 hours): Data analysis and presentation of results. Assignments: Tests of acceptance and rejection results
Lecture 4: Physical characteristics of the material: electrical, thermal, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties
Seminar 2 (2 hours): The standard deviation of error. Calculate the mass of the sample
Lab course 1 (2 hours): Familiarization with laboratories, institutes and exercises that will take place.
Lecture 5: Groups of materials: conductors, semiconductors, metals, ceramics, polymers
Seminar 3 (2 hours): Calculation of the composition of various solid materials. Shares, tasks with different problems
Lab course 2 (5 hours): Standardization PO4. Determination of PO4 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 6: Testing and analysis of real samples
Lecture 7: first partial colloquium
Lab course 3 (5 hours ): Standardization of NO2. Determination of NO2 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 8: Sampling of gases
Seminar 4 (2 hours ): Assignments from the method of discharge. Assignments: interference-extraction
Lab course 4 (6 hours ): Standardization SiO4. Determination SiO4 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 9:. Sampling of liquid
Seminar 5 (2 hours): Separation and error calculation. Calculations of components of the various components in an aqueous system,
Lecture 10: Sampling of solid
Seminar 6 (2 hours): Eligible and illicit quantity calculations for solids
Lab course 5 (5 hours ): Standardization of NO3. Determination of NO3 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 11: Preparation of a representative sample for analysis
Seminar 7 (2 hours): Assignments: gases, calculations composition
Lecture 12: Preparation of a representative sample for analysis
Lecture 13: Decomposition of samples
Lecture 14: Seminar
Lab course 6 (4 hours ): Sandardizacija NH4. Determination of NH4 from seawater in HDPE and PP bottles and glass tubes
Lecture 15: 2th partial colloquium
Seminar 8 (1 hour): Assignments: gases, calculations composition
Lab course 7 (3 hours ): Computer and graphical analysis of the results

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During the semester, the two partial test to check if the knowledge of students from courses included material. During the semester students will be selected from the lecture topic to make a seminar that will affect the final grade. After completion of the semester, students take a written exam courses included material from the seminar. If the student meets at one of the partial tests during the semester, material from passing the test does not need to take the written exam. After passing the written part of the exam, the oral exam. Prior to joining the laboratory exercises, students’ knowledge of material from the respective exercise will be verified by tests. All exercises must be passed all preliminary exams and completed. The student has the right to exercise fail one exercise, but you will catch up at the end of the semester. For all aspects of teaching evaluation will be conducted according to the following criteria: <55% inadequate; 55% -65% is sufficient; 66% -75% good; 76% -85% very good;> 86% excellent. The final grade will be the arithmetic average of ratings from exercises, written assessment and oral examination.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Yitzhak Mastai, Materials Science: Advanced Topics, InTech 2013

0

http://www.e-booksdirectory.com/

W.D.Callister Jr.and D.G. Rethwisch, Fundamentals of materials science and engineering; An integrated approach, RP Library, 2010.

0

http://rplib.wordpress.com/

Brian S. Mitchell, an introduction to materials engineering and science for chemical and materials engineers, A JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., New Jersey, 2004.

0

1 U Zavodu

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J.I. Gersten, F.W. Smith, The Physics and Chemistry of Materials, New York, 2001;

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Methods Quality assurance will be performed at three levels: (1) University; (2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee of teaching; (3) Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Diploma Thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Diploma Thesis

Code

KTIODR

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

18.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

3. STUDY PERFORMANCE CONDITIONS

3.1. Places of the study performance

Buildings of the constituent part (name existing, under construction and planned buildings)

Identification of building

Zgrada tri fakulteta

Location of building

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Year of completion

2015

Total square area in m2

29500

Identification of building

Zgrada u Kaštel Sućurcu

Location of building

Kaštel Sućurac

Year of completion

1961

Total square area in m2

3000

3.2. List of teachers and associate teachers

 

Course Teachers and associate teachers

Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Analytical Environmental Chemistry

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Atmospheric Chemistry

Prof Marija Bralić
ScM Nenad Periš
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Biochemical engineering

Prof Davor Rušić

Chemical Ecology

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Chemical sensors and biosensors

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk

Chemistry and Technology of Aromatic Plants

Prof Igor Jerković

Chemistry and Technology of Aromatic Plants

Prof Igor Jerković

Chemistry of Materials

Prof Marija Bralić
ScM Goran Olujić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Chemistry of Materials

Prof Marija Bralić
ScM Goran Olujić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Chemistry of Sea

Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Chemometrics

Asst Prof Ante Prkić

Colloid Chemistry

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Corrosion and Materials Protection

Prof Maja Kliškić

Diploma Thesis

 

Diploma Thesis

 

Energy and Development

ScD Mirko Marušić

Environmental menagment system

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Experimental seminar paper

 

Experimental seminar paper

 

Flavour chemistry

Prof Igor Jerković

General microbiology

Assoc Prof Mirjana Skočibušić
Asst Prof Ana Maravić

Introduction to molecular biology

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo
Prof Tatjana Zemunik

Mathematical Tools in Chemical Engineering

Prof Davor Rušić

Methods of separation and speciation

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Microemulsions in applied chemistry

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol
ScD Perica Bošković

Naturally occuring polymeric materials

Prof Branka Andričić

Organic Analysis

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Organic Synthesis

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Physical biochemistry

Prof Mladen Miloš
ScD Vesela Torlak

Physical chemistry of electrolyte solutions

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Physical methods of analysis

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Quality Assurance and Accreditation in Laboratory Practice

Assoc Prof Josipa Giljanović

Quantum Chemistry

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Selected chapters from biochemistry

Assoc Prof Olivera Politeo

Soil Chemistry

Asst Prof Maša Buljac
Prof Marija Bralić
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

Solid State Chemistry

Assoc Prof Slobodan Brinić

Solid State Physics

Assoc Prof Magdy Lučić Lavčević

Surface Chemistry

Prof Zoran Grubač

Synthesis of Biologically Active Compounds

Assoc Prof Ani Radonić

Water Chemistry

Asst Prof Marijo Buzuk
Asst Prof Maša Buljac

 

3.4. Optimal number of students

The optimal number of students at the Undergraduate study who can be enrolled in one year of study in terms of space, equipment and number of full-time teachers is 40 (this represents the enrollment quota).

3.5. Estimate of costs per student

Average annual cost of studying per one student is aproximately 31,500.00 kunas.

3.6. Plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance

In keeping with the European standards and guidelines for internal quality assurance in higher education institutions (according to “Standards and Guidelines of Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area”) on the basis of which the University of Zagreb defines procedures for quality assurance, the proposer of the study programme is obliged to draw up a plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance.

Documentation on which the quality assurance system of the constituent part of the University is based:

- Regulations on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if existing)
- Handbook on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if it exists)

Description of procedures for evaluation of the quality of study programme implementation

  • Fore each procedure the method needs to be described (most often questionnaires for students or teachers, and self-evaluation questionnaire), name the body conducting evaluation (constituent part, university office), method of processing results and making information available, and timeframe for carrying out evaluation
  • If procedure is described in an attached document, name the document and the article.

Evaluation of the work of teachers and part-time teachers

The process of student evaluation of the teaching quality is conducted by the Quality Enhancement Centre (at the level of the University) and the Quality Enhancement Committees (at the level of constituents). The procedure consists of informing students and teachers, student survey questionnaire, the processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results, the adoption of measures to improve quality. The procedure is described in detail in the Regulations on the procedure for student evaluation of teaching at the University of Split. The processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results are under jurisdiction of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Summary results for the each constituent are submitted to the Dean and the leader of the Quality Enhancement Committee.

Monitoring of grading and harmonization of grading with anticipated learning outcomes

Procedures, rules and criteria for grading of students include: method for taking the exams, requirements for taking the exams, method of evaluation through colloquia, seminars, active participation in classes, exams and other obligations, conditions for signature, a list of references for exam preparation, and data about the teacher, assistant, etc. Informations about procedures, rules and criteria for grading students can found on the website of the Faculty and at the introductory lectures.

Evaluation of availability of resources (spatial, human, IT) in the process of learning and instruction

The Faculty provides adequate and appropriate educational resources for the study program and support for teaching and non-teaching activities of students, which are consistent with the specific programs and student needs and readily accessible to students (equipped classrooms, library, computer classrooms, and support for students with disabilities.

Availability and evaluation of student support (mentorship, tutorship, advising)

Student evaluation of the teaching quality, student survey questionnaire.

Monitoring of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole

Analysis of student success at the study is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre of the University of Split. The analysis is carried annually by survey questionnaire at the beginning of the academic year for the previous academic year. The results of the analysis and measures to improve student success are presented to the Senate of the University of Split by leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Likewise, ISVU system allows the student service and ISVU coordinator to keep track of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole.

Student satisfaction with the programme as a whole

Quality Improvement Centre of the University of Split has defined the procedure for conducting a survey on the evaluation of the overall study. The student survey questionnaire for evaluation of the study is conducted by the platform Evasys but after the student has passed the final exam. The aim of the survey is to hear the opinion of students on various aspects of the study which they have completed and to determine flaws in order to increase the quality of the content and implementation of the study. Data is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre and results are submitted to the Head of Department and to leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre.

Procedures for obtaining feedback from external parties (alums, employers, labour market and other relevant organizations)

Former students are contacted in order to express their assessment of the qualifications for the professional requirements. Selected employers can be contacted as well in order to assess their satisfaction with students which have been studing at this the study program. Regular exchange of information at conferences organized by the ALUMNI of the Faculty (AMACTFS).

Evaluation of student practical education (where this applies)

Evaluation of student training is conducted orally by the course teacher. At the same time the student must submit the log and seminar about selected topic of professional practice.

Other evaluation procedures carried out by the proposer

Formal and informal consultation with colleagues in the profession at the Faculty level and beyond.

Description of procedures for informing external parties on the study programme (students, employers, alums)

Results are available on the official web site of the Faculty (https://www.ktf.unist.hr) Brochure (revised annually) The University review. Universitas – supplement of the Slobodna Dalmacija about the University of Split. The participation of staff and students ot the Faculty at the Science Festival and similar events.