UNIST
U N I V E R S I T Y   O F   S P L I T

FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

 

 

DETAILED PROPOSAL OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Graduate university studij

Graduate Study of Food Technology

 

 

 
GENERAL INFORMATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

Name of higher education institution

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Address

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Phone

021/ 329-420

Fax

021/ 329-461

E-mail

dekanat@ktf-split.hr

Internet address

https://www.ktf.unist.hr/

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

Name of the study programme

Graduate Study of Food Technology

Provider of the study programme

Faculty of Chemistry and Technology

Other participants

Type of study programme

Level of study programm

Academic/vocational title earned at completion of study

Master Engineer of Food Technology

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Reasons for starting the study programme

Food production and health benefits of food on human health are essential points in the development strategy of Republic Croatia (Croatian smart specialisation strategy 2016-2020). According to the available data from 2002 to 2012, the share food products in total exports of Republic Croatia was 9.6%, with annual growth of 9.8%. Since Croatia joined European Union (EU), the food production became more export-oriented sector what in last tree years resulted with higher growth rates in export, and reduced in import.
Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, as higher education and scientific institution, has activities in area of food science and food processing for a long time. In 1979, at Faculty of Chemistry and Technology the professional study of chemical engineering with food-engineering orientation was organized and performed, and since 2001/2002 the Faculty educate engineers of chemical technology trough the orientation course of Food Technology. This course was discontinued in 2016 when a new undergraduate study of Food Technology started. At graduate level, since 2001 at Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, an orientation of Mediteanean cultures is performed.
Graduate study of Food Technology on Faculty of Chemistry and Technology would give a strong impulse to the development of agricultural and food sector in Dalmatia and in other regional areas. This study ensure the knowledge on food and raw-material quality, their processing methods and their influence on human health with main goals on prevention chronic diseases (one of the major points of European Union’s Research and Innovation funding program). In the proposal of this study, special focus was devoted to the varieties that are characteristic for Dalmatia region which has been recognised for its biodiversity- olives, seafood products (white and blue fish, shellfish, algae), grapes, honey, medicinal and aromatic herbs which are generally the ground of Mediterranean diet. As the answer to the unemployment problem, that is significant in Split-Dalmatia County, graduate study of Food Technology gives to the student necessary knowledge which could be helpful for them to start their own production; while in cooperation with tourist sector they could offer their products to the tourists who visit Croatia. Furthermore, the aim of this study is to induce the development of new companies based on the commercialisation of the results from different scientific investigation, as well as application of novel technologies and present practice at Faculty of Chemistry and Technology and University of Split.

1.2. Relationship with the local community (economy, entrepreneurship, civil society, etc.)

The proposed study program is based on the scientific knowledge from area of food technology, nutrition, chemistry, biology, biochemistry and microbiology and it enables wide base of skills that result in getting competences for solving complex practical and theoretic problems. Today, education of experts who will be able to connect the knowledge and apply the obtained skills is one of the main challenges currently facing educational system.
Split-Dalmatia County is active regarding stimulation and financing scientific and professional projects, and readily develops cooperation with Faculties and Departments of University of Split, what resulted with financing a scientific project on olive oils that is at this moment active at Faculty of Chemistry and Technology. Beside with Split-Dalmatia County, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology cooperates with Public Health Institute of Split-Dalmatia County which accepts our students for professional practice or by other collaboration segments. Cooperative Association of Dalmatia organise different seminars on olive growth or processing and winemaking, and gather wine and olive oil producers that also support the graduate study of Food technology. Trough this study they recognise the global interest for the community of olive and olive oil producers, especially at this moment when the huge problem regarding the protection of authentic food products has arise. With the Association of olive growers and olive oil producers from Vela Luka, employees of the Department of Food Technology and Biotechnology at Faculty of Chemistry and Technology and Biotechnology participate in the EU founded project Interreg Med. The scientific area of the project is olive oil quality, and Dubrovnik-Neretva County also participate the project. Furthermore, a great number of small and middle companies like Trenton d.o.o., Uje d.o.o., Sardina d.o.o., Herba Croatica d.o.o. employ students who graduated at Faculty of Chemistry and Technology and cooperate with the Faculty trough the professional practice or some other segments of scientific research. Due to their geographic location near to Split-Dalmatia County, production facilities in Herzegovina, like Puđa d.o.o. cheese-making facility and Ledo d.o.o. ice-cream production company also cooperate with Faculty of Chemistry and Technology. As a part of education process, students visit their production facilities every year and see the production and organisation in these companies, the pallete of food products they produce and also they get the information about market demands that are more rigorous every year what is usually the main problem of food technologists.
Faculty of Chemistry and Technology also have collaboration with Split-Healthy City Association by organising presentations of the various books, and also students are included in their projects.

1.3. Compatibility with requirements of professional organizations

One of the major premises for the qualitative realisation of the proposed study programme is educational, professional and scientific connection of all relevant factors that can affect the process of student’s education and training. Teachers who will perform the instructions on graduate study of Food Technology are members of different associations and societies (Croatian Society of Food Technologists, Biotechnologists and Nutritionists, Croatian Society for Clinical Nutrition, Croatian Association of Nutritionists, Croatian Chemical Society). Nowadays, when there is a great threat from so called pseudoscience, it is very important that higher educational institutions base their educational, science and professional activities on the demands of vocational associations, taking care on the protection of the profession basic and ethical principles which are necessary in all segments of public activities.

1.4. Name possible partners outside the higher education system that expressed interest in the study programme

The partners outside higher educational system who support the graduate study of Food technology are numerous, different small and medium companies which are already mentioned, Split-Dalmatia County and Public Health Institute of Split-Dalmatia County, etc. Private companies like Herba Croatica and its sister company Stella Mediteranea infrequently have projects financed by EU funds and therefore are able to employ students from Faculty of Chemistry and Technology. Faculty partners are also institutes as follows: Institute Ruđer Bošković in Zagreb, Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation in Split, Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries in Split, Institute of Agriculture and Tourism in Poreč, Mediterranean Institute for Life Sciences- MedILs, and the cooperation agreement between some of these institutions and University of Split have been already signed.

1.5. Financing

The planned source of financing for the graduate study of Food technology, as well as other study programs at Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, is the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports.

1.6. Comparability of the study programme with other accredited programmes in higher education institutions in the Republic of Croatia and EU countries

During the elaboration of this study program special care was taken to harmonize the subjects and their teaching programs with related studies at other higher education institutions. In that way the programmes are mutually comparable and student and teacher mobility is stimulated.
The proposed program can be compared with the programmes of the following higher education institutions:
Technologie und Biotechnologie der Lebensmittel, Techniche Universitat Munich (TUM),https://portal.mytum.de/studium/studiengaenge/technologie_und_biotechnologie_der_lebensmittel_master
Faculty of Engineering, Lund University (Programme in Food Technology and Nutrition), http://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/lubas/i-uoh-lu-TALIV

1.7. Openness of the study programme to student mobility (horizontal, vertical in the Republic of Croatia, and international)

The study is organised trough the one-semester courses what is one of the basic preconditions for student mobility. The proposed program of the graduate study and its similarity with analogous studies in Croatia and EU allows students` and teachers` mobility. The mobility could be realised by choosing the particular courses from other University studies, as well as whole semester from other related studies or even through the work on the student diploma thesis. The mobility could be easily realised with other Departments and Faculties of University of Split as well as with other Universities in Croatia (Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology from University of Zagreb, Faculty of Food Technology from Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek), or other institutions in EU.
Faculty signed inter-institutional agreements for student`s and teacher`s mobility with institutions: Techniche Universite Dresden, Dresden, Germany, Universita degli studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, Universita di Trieste, Trieste, Italy, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland, Polytecnich Institute of Braganca, Braganca, Portugal, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; University of Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia, Polymer Technology College, Maribor, Slovenia, etc. Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split also participate in multilateral cooperation with possibility of student`s and teacher`s mobility through Central European Exchange Program for University Studies (CEEPUS). The mentioned exchange program provided cooperation with different international institutions like: 1) Faculty of Material Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland, 2) Institute für Analytische Chemie, Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz, Austria, 3) Department of Analytical Chemistry, Slovak University of Technology, Bratislava, Slovakia, 4) Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic, 5) Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Slovenia, 6) Faculty of Pharmacy, Antioxidant Research Group, University of Barcelona, Spain, 7) Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.

1.8. Compatibility of the study programme with the University mission and the strategy of the proposer, as well as with the strategy statement of the

The study program has been compatible with the Development strategy of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology University of Split (2014-2020), and its mission and vision, as well with the University of Split Strategy (2015-2020).

1.9. Current experiences in equivalent or similar study programmes

Faculty of Chemical Technology of Split was founded in 1960, responding the economic demands of the region with aim to satisfy its personnel and professional needs. Since 2001/2002 at graduate level there was an orientation Mediteanean cultures (Graduate study of Chemical technology), and since 2015/2016 instead of professional study of Chemical technology, orientation Food technology, started the new undergraduate study of Food technology. On the grounds of the acquired scientific knowledge and economic demands, the teaching programs have been continuously improved and up-dated. Close cooperation between the region economy and the Faculty resulted with great number of projects, expertises, elaborates and finally in opening new orientations of pregraduate study, which are direct results of the region needs.

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME

2.1. General information

Scientific/artistic area of the study programme

Biotechnical Sciences, Field: Food Technology

Duration of the study programme

2 years (4 semesters)

The minimum number of ECTS required for completion of study

120

Enrolment requirements and admission procedure

Completed undergraduate study of Food Technology or other appropriate undergraduate study

2.2. Learning outcomes of the study programme (name 15-30 learning outcomes)

After finishing graduate study of Food Technology master will:
- know the properties of raw materials and hazards that follow all processing steps from raw material acceptance to distribution of final product
- recognize environment hazards for contaminant growth in particular food product and know to apply methods of early hazard detection as well as methods for its prevention
- be familiar with all aspects of the particular production process and be able to apply a scientific approach in the prevention and resolution of problems that appear during the production process
- be able to independently plan and carry out theoretical and experimental research
- be able to critically evaluate the obtained data and use them to make appropriate conclusions
- recognize the need for information, and also know how to find and provide them
- know how to think logically and be able to recognize the incorrect information
- be able to act as a team member in different disciplines and at different levels
- be able to work and communicate effectively at national and international level
Specific outcomes are:
- knowledge on the basic processes in the food industry
- knowledge on novel technologies in food processing and benefits of their application
- distinguish the advantages and disadvantages of the specific technologies which are important for the decision on the optimal processing technology for the certain raw material
- knowledge on the mechanism that food component affect the human body
- knowledge on impact of the environmental factors, processing methods and organism gastrointestinal conditions on the stability and bioavailability of nutritive and non-nutritive food components
- methodically connect the knowledge obtained from different areas such as chemistry, food, food safety, food engineering, microbiology and biochemistry and make the appropriate conclusions
- apply engineering skills in the processing management and solve the problems during the production of foods characteristic for the Mediterranean region.

2.3. Employment possibilities

Graduates can be employed by the aforementioned business entities which have cooperation with the Faculty, as wellas in different educational institutions, inspection services at the national and regional level, etc.
The employment opportunities in the region:
- Uje d.o.o., Split
- Sardina d.o.o., otok Brač (Postira)
- Trenton d.o.o., Muć
- Herba Croatica d.o.o., Klis
- Stella Mediteranea d.o.o., Klis
- Vinarija Grabovac, Imotski
- Ledo, Čitluk (BiH)
- Puđa d.o.o., Livno (BiH), Čaporice (Hrvatska)
- Mils d.o.o., Split
- Bobis d.o.o., Split
- Pekara Babić d.o.o., Split
- Mesna industrija Braća Pivac, Vrgorac
- Petason d.o.o., Solin
- Sirana Gligora d.o.o., Otok Pag
- Pramenka- Lećevačka mljekara d.o.o., Lećevica
- Felicita d.o.o., Konjsko
- Canicula d.o.o., Muć
- Marikomerc d.o.o., Poličnik
- Dalmacijavino d.o.o., Split

2.4. Possibilities of continuing studies at a higher level

Students who finish the graduate study of Food technology could continue their education at other higher education institutions in Republic Croatia (Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology in Zagreb, and Faculty of Food Technology at the Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek), as well abroad, especially in area of European higher education system.

2.5. Name lover level studies of the proposer or other institutions that qualify for admission to the proposed study

The enrollment to graduate study of Food Technology is open for the candidates that completed the appropriate undergraduate study (180 ECTS credits).
The appropriate undergraduate studies are those from the biotechnical sciences (food technology, biotechnology and nutrition), from the technical sciences (chemical engineering) and from the natural sciences (chemistry), as well from the related studies with eventual obligation to take additional exams.
The final decision on students obligations and exams that should be attended will be established by Faculty of Chemistry and Technology Council.

2.6. Structure of the study

Modes and terms of the graduate study of Food Technology are based on Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology in Split which is in compliance with the Ordinance on study programmes and course attendance system of University of Split. The mentioned ordinance interprets in detail the conditions of enrolment the higher study year, regular and exceptional exam terms, exam dates, etc.
The duration of graduate study of Food Technology is two years; it includes mandatory and elective courses, and it is based on active participation of students in all forms of studying (lectures, laboratory exercises, seminars, field work, etc.). In general, students’ obligations include presence at lectures and exercises, independent learning, scientific literature search and analysis, presentations, field work and the preparation of the final diploma thesis; while teachers monitor and evaluate all activities in particular study course.
The programme is composed in way that students have a large number of elective courses. The accent is based on the area that discuss food safety problems, sensory evaluation of foods, and technologies that are used for processing raw materials that are characteristic for Dalmatia region (olives, grapes, seafood, herbs and spices).

2.7. Guiding and tutoring through the study system

At Faculty of Chemistry and Technology there is a teacher-supervisor model with the aim of providing advices, information and guidance to students. Also mentors help and participate the research work in order to ensure the quality of diploma thesis.

2.8. List of courses that the student can take in other study programmes

Students of Graduate study of Food technology can chose some subjects from other studies at other Departments and Faculties of University of Split (like English, Physical Education and Health Science, etc.) which could be potentially be part of the student responsibilities.

2.9. List of courses offered in a foreign language as well (name which language)

Course lectures of the graduate study programme of Food technology will be provided in Croatian, but if is necessary some courses can be realised in English for foreign students.

2.10. Criteria and conditions for transferring the ECTS credits

The criteria and requirements for the ECTS credits transfer are defined by the Regulation on study programmes and course attendance system of University of Split, by the Faculty of Chemistry and Technology Statute and its Regulation on study programmes and course attendance system.

2.11. Completion of study

Final requirement for completion of study



Requirements for final/diploma thesis or final/diploma/exam

Procedure of evaluation of final/diploma exam and evaluation and defence of final/diploma thesis

 

2.12. List of mandatory and elective courses

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 1.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTM100 Applied Mathematics 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTM101 Physical Properties of Food 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTM102 Food Safety 30 0 15 0 5.0
KTM103 Wine Technology 30 0 15 15 6.0
KTM104 Biochemical Engineering 30 15 15 0 6.0
KTM105 Mediterranean Diet 30 15 0 0 4.0
Total
180 45 60 15 29

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 1.

Semester: 2.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTM106 Sustainable Technologies in Food Industry 30 15 0 0 5.0
KTM107 Process Design 30 30 0 0 7.0
KTM108 Honey and Other Bee Products 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTM109 Novel Food Processing Technologies 30 0 10 5 5.0
KTM110 Fermented dairy products and cheesemaking 30 15 20 10 7.0
KTMOSP Professional Practice 0 0 0 0 3.0
Total
150 60 45 15 31

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 3.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Obvezni
Total
0 0 0 0 0
Elective KTM200 Olive Processing Technologies 30 15 20 10 6.0
KTM201 Fruit and Vegetable Processing 30 15 25 5 6.0
KTM202 Seafood Processing Technology 30 15 20 10 6.0
KTM203 Processing Technology of Species and Medicinal Herbs 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTM204 Alcoholic Beverages Technology 30 0 15 15 6.0
KTM205 Technology of Meat and Meat Products 30 15 30 0 6.0
KTM206 Technology of Cereals 30 0 15 15 6.0
KTM207 Corrosion and Materials Protection 30 0 30 0 5.0
KTM208 Algae Biotechnology 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTM209 Food Biotransformations 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTM210 Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTM211 Ethnobotany 15 0 15 15 4.0
KTM212 Novel Fruit and Vegetable Products 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTM213 Flavour Chemistry 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTM214 Citrus Processing 30 0 15 0 4.0
The minimum amount of credits that must be obtained from elective courses is 30. The courses KTM200, KTM201, KTM202, KTM203 could be chosen only if student did not select it at undergraduted study of Food Technology. The course Citrus processing can be chosen only if student did not select the course Fruit and vegetable processing.

 

LIST OF COURSES

Year of study: 2.

Semester: 4.

STATUS CODE COURSE
HOURS IN SEMESTER
 ECTS 
PSVT
Mandatory KTM215 Introduction to Scientific Research 15 15 0 0 2.0
KTM216 Sensory Evaluation of Food 20 15 10 0 4.0
KTMODR Diploma Thesis 0 0 0 0 18.0
Total
35 30 10 0 24
Elective KTM217 Novel Food Packaging Techniques 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTM218 Seafood Quality and Safety 30 0 15 0 4.0
KTM219 Spectroscopic Methods in Food Analysis 15 15 15 0 4.0
KTM220 Ecological Food Production 30 10 0 5 4.0
KTM221 Entrepreneuship and Management in Food and Beverage Production 30 15 0 0 4.0
KTM222 Communication Skills 15 15 0 0 2.0
KTM223 Kinesiological Activity, Fitness and Health 15 0 30 0 2.0
The minimum amount of credits that must be obtained from elective courses is 6.0.

 

 

2.13. Course description

 

Applied Mathematics
NAME OF THE COURSE Applied Mathematics

Code

KTM100

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Nives Baranović

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

20 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Student are introduced to the ideas and methods of approximate solving algebraic and differential equations, interpolation and numerical integration, to concepts of the theory of probability and statistics and their application to particular example and tasks.
By developing a positive attitude toward learning, responsibility for own success and progress, and the acquisition of competencies described above, the students are expected to build a solid foundation for lifelong learning and further education.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Students should have fundamental competencies related to the calculus.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the passing the exam, students will be able to:
- use appropriate language, symbolic notation and graphic representation to describe the ideas and methods for numerical solving equations;
- apply the methods described above in the particular tasks;
- describe the concept and define the notions of probability theory;
- understand the concepts and apply the methods described above in real situations;
- define discrete and continuous random variables and their characteristics;
- properly interpret characteristics of random variables on particular examples;
- describe examples of important distribution and identify conditions for their use in problem solving;
- describe the concept and define the notions of statistics theory;
- use a computer and appropriate software as a tool in the statistical data processing;
- understand the process of statistical testing and parametric and non-parametric sample testing.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to the objectives and learning outcomes, curriculum, methods of evaluation and assessment criteria.
2nd week: Errors of approximate values. The types of errors. Sources of errors.
3rd week: Solving equations approximately. Graphical method. Bisection method. Iteration. Secant method. Tangent method.
4th week: Interpolation and approximation.
5th week: Numerical integration. Rectangular formula. Trapezium formula. Simpson’s formula.
6th week: Numerical solving of differential equations. Euler’s method. Taylor’s method.
Written exam.
7th week: Definition and properties of probability.
8th week: Conditional probability. Independence of events.
9th week: Random variables. Discrete and continuous random variables.
10th week: Independence of random variables.
11th week: Numerical characteristics of random variables. Mathematical expectation.
12th week: Dispersion. Mode and median. Moments. The coefficient of skewness and kurtosis.
13th week: Some important distributions. Binomial distribution. Poisson distribution. Normal distribution. Uniform distribution. Exponential distributions.
14th week: Basics of statistics. Population. Sample. Displaying data. The average value of the sample. Sample variance. Sample mode. Sample median.
15th week: Statistical testing. Parametric test. Nonparametric test. Χ2 test.
Written exam.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.8

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.6

Written exam

1.6

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The first method: Engagement during semester 20% (E), written exam 40% (W) and oral exam 40% (O). During the semester, student can do additional task, write a seminar paper and express own knowledge through activities in class. The final score: z = 0.2(E) + 0.4(W) + 0.4(O).
The second method: written exam 500% and oral exam 50%; final: z = 0.5(W) + 0.5(O).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Baranović: Primijenjena matematika, materijal dostupan na moodlu Filozofskog fakulteta, 2014. https://paideia.ffst.hr/learning/login/index.php

0

e-learning

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I. Ivanšić: Numerička matematika, Element, Zagreb, 2002.
R. Scitovski: Numerička matematika http://www.mathos.unios.hr/nm/materijali/Num.pdf), 2004.
N. Elezović: Diskretna vjerojatnost, Element, Zagreb, 2008
N. Elezović: Matematička statistika. Statistički procesi, Element, Zagreb, 2008
E. Kreyszig: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, J. Wiley & Sons, New York,1999. (http://faculties.sbu.ac.ir/~sadough/pdf/Advanced%20Engineering%20Mathematics%2010th%20Edition.pdf)

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Physical Properties of Food
NAME OF THE COURSE Physical Properties of Food

Code

KTM101

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Introduce students to the physical properties of food products as well as the changes of physical properties of food which occur during food processing.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After successfully passing the course, students will be able to:
- define and describe the physical properties of food (rheological properties, thermophysical properties, diffusion, dielectric properties ...)
- explain the physical phenomena that occur in the operations and processes in the food industry,
- describe the basic principles and possibilities of application of different methods (spectroscopy, viscometry, DLS, SLS, TEM, SANS) for exploring the structure and composition of food products and thermophysical properties (DTA, DSC),
- to plan the laboratory procedures and independently to conduct an experiment in accordance with the plan of research,
- to implement appropriate computer programs for numerical processing of experimental data and graphic representation of the results obtained; discuss the results and reach a conclusion at the end.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Introduction to operations and processes in the food industry.
2nd week: Rheological properties of food. Elasticity, plasticity, viscosity.
3rd week: The viscosity of non-Newtonian fluid. Rheological properties of dough.
4th week: Experimental techniques of measuring viscosity. Transport of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.
5th week: Rheological properties of granular and powdered foods. Rheological properties of the suspension.
6th week: Application of experimental techniques to study the structure and composition of food products (spectroscopy, DLS, SLS, TEM, SANS).
7th week: Transport of granular and powdered foods and suspension. Textural properties.
8th week: Thermophysical properties. The phase transition temperatures. Freezing temperature. Defrost temperature. The phase transitions at low temperatures.
9th week: The application of experimental techniques in the study of thermophysical properties (DTA, DSC).
10th week: Definitions and determination of the specific heat, latent heat, enthalpy, density, thermal conductivity and diffusion.
11th week: The water in the food. Water activity. Absolute and relative humidity. Sorption isotherms.
12th week: Interface phenomena: liquid-gas, liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, solid-gas.
13th week: Emulsions. Emulsifiers. Aggregation. Sedimentation. Coalescence.
14th week: Foams. Mechanical equilibrium and structure of the foams. Optical properties. The influence of different parameters on the stability of the foams.
15th week: Dielectric properties of food. Diffusion and mass transfer.
Laboratory exercises:
1) The density and bulk density, 2) Refractometry, 3) Surface tension, 4) Adsorption

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over
partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam
is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is
based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied;
60-69% successful (2) 70-79% good (3), 80-89% very good (4), 90-100%
excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

John N. Coupland, An Introduction to the Physical Chemistry of Food, 2014, Springer New York

1

Ignacio Arana, Physical Properties of Foods: Novel Measurement Techniques and Applications, 2016, CRC Press

1

P. Walstra: Physical Chemistry of Foods, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York/Basel, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Sjoblom: Encyclopedic Handbook of Emulsion Technology, Emulsion Technology Handbook, C.H.I.P.S., USA, 2001.
A. Howard, A. Barnes: Handbook of Elementary Rheology, Cambrian Printers, UK, 2000.
B. A. Fricke, B. R. Becker: Evaluation of Thermophysical PropertyModels for Foods, Hvac and R Research 7 (2001) 311.
A. Sun, S. Gunasekaran: Measuring Rheological Characteristics and Spreadability of Soft Foods, Journal of Texture Studies 40 (2009) 275.
R. A. F. Cabral, C. E. Orrego-Alzate A. L. Gabas, J. Telis-Romero: Rheological and thermophysical properties of blackberry juice, Ciênc. Tecnol. Aliment., Campinas, 27 (2007) 589.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food Safety
NAME OF THE COURSE Food Safety

Code

KTM102

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

30 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Objectives of this course are to learn new knowledge in the field of food safety. It includes the knowledge on the food safety as the integral part of food chain management. Also, it includes the knowledge on the main food contaminants and method for their early identification.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Learning outcomes are the following:
- to know how to implement the concept of safe food (from the farm to the plate)
- to recognize main food environmental contaminants (microbiological, chemical and physical)
- to accept the knowledge about food safety legislation
- to accept the knowledge on the main methods for the detection of food contaminants

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Course introduction. Natural cell mechanisms and toxins metabolism.
2nd week: Biological risks (bacteria as food contaminants)
3th week: Biological risks (viruses, molds)
4th week: Chemical risks (additives, residues of pesticides)
5th week: Chemical risks (environmental toxins, microbial and processing food contaminants)
6th week: methods for identification of microbiological and chemical risks for food safety
7th week: Physical risks
8th week: Micotoxins
9th week: food traceability (the protection of food products, the protection of consumers)
10th week: the risks from animal-derived food
11th week. The mechanisms of the control of food safety
12th week: the questions of public health
13th week: the diet and its role in public health
14th week: food safety legislation
15th week: food licensing
Laboratory practices: - sampling and determination of main physico-chemical and microbiological risk: a) read meat and poultry samples; b) milk and dairy products, c) fish and sea products; d) honey, e) fruits and vegetables

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in lectures (70%) and in laboratory work (100%).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Final grade includes the success from partial written exams (2) and from the exam of the laboratory practices.
Grading: <60% not sufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Havranek, M. Tudor Kalit, R. Bažok, J. Đugum, D. Grbeša, M. Hadžiosmanović, A. Ivanković, I. Jakopović, S. Orešković, V. Rupić, D. Samaržija: Sigurnost hrane – od farme do stola, M.E.P., Zagreb, 2014.

1

I. Babić, J. Đugum: Uvod u sigurnost hrane, Institut za sanitarno inženjerstvo Slovenije, Ljubljana, Slovenija, 2014.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

B. Šarkanj, D. Kipčić, Đ. Vasić-Rački, F. Delaš, K. Galić, M. Katalenić, N. Dimitrov, T. Klapec: Kemijske i fizikalne opasnosti u hrani, Osijek, HAH, 2010

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

I.C. Schaw: Food safety – the science of keeping food safe. Wiley Blackwell, UK, 2013.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Wine Technology
NAME OF THE COURSE Wine Technology

Code

KTM103

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

15

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Enabling students for:
- Acquire fundamental knowledge of grape maturity and quality of grape, composition and quality of must and wine
- Acquire fundamental knowledge of technological processes and principles in production of different types of wines
- Acquire fundamental knowledge about the factors that affect the quality of wine
- Knowledge of chemical composition and sensory characteristics of wine

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students after successfully learning course can:
- know the chemical composition of grapes and understand how grape maturity affects on wine quality
- explain alcoholic and malolactic fermentation
- know the role of biochemical and microbiological processes in the formation of wine quality
- explain the role of pre-fermentation and postfermentation processes and their impact on the quality of wine
- apply technological processes in the production of različitih vrsta vina
- apply basic physico-chemical methods in must and wine quality analysis
- know the processes of wine maturation and ageing
- acquire fundamental knowledge of the sensory properties of wine
- provide with information about low regulation and restrictions in wine production

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Technological maturity of grapes for wine production. The effects of ecological factors on grape quality
2nd week: Chemical composition of grape and must: sugar, organic acids, phenolic compounds, nitrogen compounds, minerals and other important compounds
3th week: Harvesting and grape processing. Equipment. The role of sulfur dioxide in must and wine
4th week: Adjustments to Must. Application of enological preparations. Starter yeast culture. Enzyme addition
5th week: Predfermentative preparation of must. White wine technology
6th week: Alcoholic fermentation: biochemistry and fermentation products. Conditions of Yeast Development. Malolactic fermentation. Lactic Acid Bacteria. Factors affecting alcoholic and malolactic Fermentation (1. partial exams)
7th week: Technology of red and rosé wine. Factors affecting maceration. Fermentors
8th week: Specifics in the production of special and sparkling wines. Production of Prošek
9th week: Filtration of wine. Techniques of filtration. Centrifugation. Equipment
10th week: Stabilizing wine by physical and physicochemical processes
11th week: The basics of barrique technology
12th week: Organoleptic defects of wine. The causes of development and prevention
13th week: The chemical composition of the wine. The aroma of wine. The chemical-physical analysis methods
14th week: Selected legal regulations and restrictions in winemaking
15th week: Sensory evaluation of wine (2. partial exams)
Field work: Dating processing unit processes the grape harvest from the alcoholic fermentation of must / mash; Introduction of technological equipment and process of wine-making

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade passed pursuant to mark partial exams, seminars and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good(3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R. S. Jackson: Wine Science, 4th Ed., Principles and Applications, AcademicPress, 2008

0

DA

J. L. Jacobson: Introduction to Wine Laboratory Practices and Procedures, Springer, New York, 2006.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P. Ribereau-Gayon, D. Dubourdieu, B. Doneche, A. Lonvaud: Handbook of Enology - The Microbiology of Wine and Vinifications, Vol 1, 2nd Edition, Chapman&Hall, New York, 2006.
P. Ribereau-Gayon, Y. Glories, A. Maujean, D. Dubourdieu: Handbook of Enology - Stabilization and Treatments 2nd Edition, Chapman&Hall, New York, 2006.
C.S. Ough, M.A. Amerine: Methods for Analysis of musts and wines, 2nd edition, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1988.
A. G. Reynolds: Managing wine quality CRC Press, 2010.
Odabrani znanstveni članci.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Biochemical Engineering
NAME OF THE COURSE Biochemical Engineering

Code

KTM104

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Mastering the engineering principles in chemistry, biochemistry and food technology

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will be able to:
- differentiate homogenous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics
- describe various types of reactors and bioreactors
- differentiate chemical processes and bioprocesses
- perceive basis of biseparation
- define particularities of mixing and aeration in bioprocesses
- describe basic measurment instruments

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Similarity and differences between reaction engineering and biochemical engineering; reactor and bioreactor
2nd week: Kinetics of homogenous and heterogeneous chemical reactions
3rd week: Kinetics of homogenous and heterogeneous chemical reactions-numerical problems.
4th week: Models for ideal reactors
5th week:. Ideal reactors--numerical problems
6th week: Substrate preparation. Sterilization
7th week: Biocatalysts. Immobilized biocatalysts. Features of engineering enzymatic processes.
8th week: Enzyme kinetics – numerical problems (Partial knowledge test)
9th week: Featuresures of engineering fermentation processes Bioreactors
10th week: Bioreactors for microbial cell culture. Bioreactors for plant and animal cell and tissue culture. Enzyme bioreactors.
11th week: Bioreactors evaluation and ratings
12th week: Transport phenomena in bioprocess systems
13th week: Aeration. Mixing in bioprocess systems
14th week: Separations in biotechnology
15th week: Bioprocess control (Partial knowledge test)
Exercises: Aeration. Determination of diffusion coefficient. Crystallization. Mathcad. Enzyme kinetics – Modelling dana using Mathcad (Michaelis-Menten, Lineweaver-Burk, Eadie-Hofsteed and Hanes-Woolf model).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance and active participation at lectures, and exercises.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

A student can pass a part or the entire exam by taking two partial tests during the semester. Students who do not pass the partial exams have to take an exam in the regular examination term. During the examination terms students take written and oral exam.
Scoring: <55% insufficient;55-66% sufficient (2); 67-79% good (3); 80-92% very good (4); 93-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Z. Gomzi: Kemijski reaktori, Hinus, Zagreb, 1998 (I izdanje); 2009 (II izdanje)

10

V. Marić, B. Šantek: Biokemijsko inženjerstvo, Golden marketing - tehnička knjiga, Zagreb, 2009.

1

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. Vrsalović Presečki: Bioreakcijska tehnika II, Interna skripta, Fakultet kemijskog inženjerstva i tehnologije, Zagrebu, 2013.
Z. Findik Blažević: Bioreakcijska tehnika I, Interna skripta, Fakultet kemijskog inženjerstva i tehnologije, Zagrebu, 2013.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Mediterranean Diet
NAME OF THE COURSE Mediterranean Diet

Code

KTM105

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- The role of micro- and macronutrients in food
- The understanding of determination of energy daily intake related to various populations
- The knowledge on the principle of healthy diet regime
- The understanding of relationship between the Mediterranean diet and its role in health balance
- The knowledge on the main characteristics of the Mediterranean diet
- The knowledge on the methods of determination of the nutritive status
- The knowledge on the calculation of daily energy intake

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Learning outcomes are the following:
- To distinguish the main characteristics of the Mediterranean diet
- To know the relationship between nutrients and human health
- To distinguish main factors important for human nutritive status
- To know the role of the Mediterranean diet in prevention of chronic diseases
- To know the influence of the diet on the risk of transgenerational effect of the food components (the role of epigenetics)
- The know the role of the Mediterranean diet in prevention of cancers

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: macronutrients (sugars, proteins)
2nd week: macronutrients (lipids)
3th week: micronutrients in food characteristic for Mediterranean diet
4th week. Principles of healthy diet regime: the effect of the Mediterranean diet
5th week: Plant-derived food characteristic for the Mediterranean diet
6th week. Animal-derived food important in the Mediterranean diet
7th week: the principle of the functional food
8th week: the role of aromatic and medicinal plants in the Mediterranean diet
9th week: epigenetic and the diet (scientific proof concerning the Mediterranean diet)
10th week. Mediterranean diet and the aging process
11th week. Mediterranean diet and healthy balance
12th week: Mediterranean diet and obesity
13th week: Mediterranean diet and diabetes type 2
14th week: Mediterranean diet and osteoporosis
15th week: Mediterranean diet and cancers
Seminar work:
Determination of the adipose tissue using caliper and automatic measurement of human subcutaneous fat; to structure 24 hours dietary recall questionnaires and results validation; calculation of the body mass index and the dietary status; to compose daily and weekly dietary regimes according to principles of the Mediterranean diet; calculation of daily energy need requirements for targeted population.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all lectures (70%) and seminars (80%).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Final grade includes the success from partial written exams (2) and oral exam.
Grading: <60% not sufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Bilušić: Dijetetika, autorizirana predavanja, Kemijsko tehnološki fakultetu u Splitu, 2013.

0

Web

T. Bilušić: Osnove znanosti o hrani, autorizirana predavanja, Kemijsko tehnološki fakultetu u Splitu, 2013.

0

Web

V. Katalinić: Temeljno znanje o prehrani, Sveučilišni priručnik,Kemijsko tehnološki fakultetu u Splitu, 2011.

0

Web

G. Krešić: Trendovi u prehrani, Fakultet za menadžment u ugostiteljstvu i turizmu, Opatija, 2012.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. Živković: Dijetetika, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2002.
J. S. Garrow, W.P.T. James: Human nutrition and dietetics. 10th Edition, Churchill Livingostone, Co. London, 2000.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Sustainable Technologies in Food Industry
NAME OF THE COURSE Sustainable Technologies in Food Industry

Code

KTM106

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Application of the principles of sustainable development in the food industry and strengthening of sustainable technologies in food production and processing.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is able to:
- explain the meaning and possibilities of application of the concept of sustainability in the food industry
- describe current and expected holders of introducing sustainable practices in the food industry
- define strategic activities to achieve sustainability of the food industry in our country and in the world
- explain the life cycle assessment of products of the food industry and its impact on the environment
- apply the concept of zero emissions on selected examples.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introductory lecture: sustainability in the food-producing sector. Troubleshooting by application of sustainable technologies.
2nd week: Ecological footprint of the food industry. The impact on carbon footprint and food footprint.
3rd week: Overview of emissions from the food industry into the air, water and soil. Waste water, solid waste and air pollution.
4th week: Analysis of the sources of waste in the food supply chain, waste from agricultural production, waste from industrial food processing and opportunities provided by the introduction of sustainable practices.
5th week: Waste management of food industry throughout the life cycle assessment of the product.
6th week: Application of the concept of zero emissions in the food industry.
7th week: Harmful substances in food originating from the environment (soil, water and air, the remains of the plants treatment, the remains of the animals treatment, the remains of the action of microorganisms, harmful substances generated during food processing, residues from washing, disinfection and fumigation)
8th week: Measures for reducing harmful substances in food. Integrated management of pesticides. Organic production.
9th week: The role of the quality assurance system in achieving sustainable food industry.
10th week: An integrated approach to energy use in the food industry.
11th week: Case study: Sustainable technologies in bread production.
12th week: Case study: Sustainable technologies in production and processing in the meat industry.
13th week: Case study: Sustainable technologies in the dairy industry.
14th week: Case study: Sustainable technologies in the processing of fruit and vegetables. Sustainable technologies in the sugar production.
15th week: Case study: Sustainable technologies in the beer production.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60% -69% - satisfactory, 70% -79% - good, 80% -89% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Održive tehnologije u prehrambenoj industriji: Knjiga 2, Tehnološki fakultet Novi Sad, Novi Sad, 2013.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Održive tehnologije: Knjiga 1, Tehnološki fakultet Novi Sad, Novi Sad, 2013.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

L. Pavičić-Rogošić: Održivi razvoj, Odraz, 2010.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Strateške smjernice za razvoj prehrambeno-prerađivačkog sektora 2013.-2020., Klaster konkurentnosti prehrambeno-prerađivačkog sektora, Ministrarstvo gospodarstva Republike Hrvatske.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Lj. Matijašević, Održive tehnologije u procesima proizvodnje piva, Kemija u industriji 64 (2015) 540-546.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Održive tehnologije i kemijska industrija: Knjiga 4, M. Jašić, M. Burgić, E. Ahmetović (Ur.), Tehnološki fakultet Novi Sad, Novi Sad, 2013.
Znanstveni i stručni radovi

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Process Design
NAME OF THE COURSE Process Design

Code

KTM107

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

30

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will know the basic principles and the methodology of process equipment design. They will also acquire knowledge of the methodology used in chemical process industry to evaluate the ultimate commercial feasibility.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the student is able to:
- define the stages in the design and modification of chemical processes
- choose the optimum location of plants
- explain the research and development in the laboratory and pilot scale
- scale up of process and apparatus of the chemical process industry
- estimate of financial viability of the investment
- explain synthesis, optimization and simulation of process scheme
- carry out synthesis of heat exchanger network using pinch analysis
- dimensioned heat exchanger, the continuous distillation of a multicomponent mixture, separators, pipelines.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction. Design, optimization, sustainable development. Steps in the design and development of new processing plants. The project leader.
2nd week: From idea to product. Idea. Preliminary works . A feasibility study . Numerical examples. Process development and evaluation. Selection and design of project equipment. Project engineering. Process engineering. Construction of the plant .
3rd week: Plant location. Location factors. Methods of evaluation of location factors. Numerical examples.
4th week: The process development. Process research in laboratory and industrial scale.
5th week: Scaling up of process and apparatus of the chemical process industry. Similarity low. Models and scaling up methods in chemical engineering. Numerical examples .
6th week: The rating process. The rating of the financial performance of investments. Estimation of investment costs. Estimation of production costs. Methods for the evaluation of financial viability of the investment. Numerical examples.
7th week: Process design. Synthesis, optimization and flowsheet simulation. Material and energy balance. Numerical examples.
8th week: Synthesis and process integration. A hierarchical approach. Model of onion. A holistic approach to the integration process. Pinch analysis. Synthesis of heat exchanger network by pinch analysis.
9th week: A graphical method. Analytical method of temperature intervals . Performance of heat exchanger network above and below pincha. Numerical examples .
10th week: Heat transfer. Classification. Analysis of the processes of heat transfer. Calculation of the heat exchanger using the mean logaritam differences of temperature. Calculation of the heat exchanger using heat efficiency.
11th week: Sizing the heat exchanger. Heat calculation. Mechanical calculation. Numerical examples.
12th week. Determining the optimal thickness of insulation. A numerical example.
13th week: Sizing distillation columns. The multicomponent mixtures . The distribution of the components . Vapor-liquid equilibrium. Temperature of boiling and dew point. Calculation of Underwodova parameter  using Newton’s method. Numerical examples.
14th week: Sizing the continuous distillation of a multicomponent mixture. The heat duty of the condenser and reboiler. Numerical examples.
15th week: Sizing separators. Sizing pipelines. Numerical examples.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

2.5

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire exam can be applied over the three written evaluation during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Students who have not passed evaluation during the semester should attend at the final exam in the regular examination period. Final exam will include written and oral exam. Passing threshold is also 60%. Rating: 60% -70% - satisfactory, 70% -80% - good, 80% -90% very good, 90% -100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

R. Sinnott, G. Towler, Chemical Engineering Design, Fift Edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, Amsterdam, 2009.

1

W. D. Seider, J. D. Seader, D. R. Lewin: Product & Process Design Principles, Synthesis, Analysis, and Evaluation, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons Inc. New York, 2004.

1

R. Smith: Chemical Process Design, McGraw-Hill New York, 1995.

1

W. D. Seider, J. D. Seader, D. R. Lewin: Process Design Principles, Synthesis, Analysis, and Evaluation, John Wiley & Sons Inc. New York, 1999.

1

F. Šef, Ž. Olujić: Projektiranje procesnih postrojenja, SKTH/Kemija u industriji Zagreb, 1988.

1

E. Beer: Priručnik za dimenzioniranje uređaja kemijske procesne industrije, HDKI/Kemija u industriji Zagreb, 1994.

1

E. Beer: Destilacija, HDKI /Kemija u industriji Zagreb, 2006.

1

M. S. Peters, K. D. Timmerhaus: Plant Design and Economics for Chemical Engineers, McGraw-Hill New York, 2003.

1

A. Bejan: Heat transfer, John Wiley and Sons Inc. New York, 1993.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R.H. Perry i sur.: Perry’s Chemical Engineer’s Handbook, Seventh Edition, McGraw-Hill New York, 1997.
J. M. Douglas: Conceptual Design of Chemical Processes, McGraw-Hill New York, 1988.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Honey and Other Bee Products
NAME OF THE COURSE Honey and Other Bee Products

Code

KTM108

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The subject goal is student’s introduction to:
- main traits of honey bee colony,
- anatomy – physiological traits of honey bees and their behaviour,
- tasks carried out by the honey bees in the hive, gathering activity outside the hive, in prder to explain the honey formation process, the role of the pollen and propolis in honey bee colony,
- chemical composition and physical characteristics, as well as the specificities of bee products,
- analytics, botanical origin (melissopalynological analysis) and honey sensory analysis,
- factors affecting honey flow and honey flow resources in Croatia,
- possibility of using the apiary in touristic and educational purposes as well as the marketing and promotion of bee products through the ”Apitourism”
- differences in legal regulation in conventional and organic beekeeping,
- alternative approach in honey bee treatment.
The programme of the course Honey and other bee products will enable students in acquisition of basic theoretical and practical knowledge on bee products production and analytics which are necessary for successful management of companies as well for the households dealng with production and marketing of honey and other bee products, and provide a foundation for further upgrade of gained knowledge

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will be able to:
- to define direct and indirect honeybee benefits
- to enumerate honey bee races according to production traits
- to explain honey formation and to describe its composition and physical properties
- to recognize main types of honey
- to recognize honey defects
- to rank samples within the same honey type according to sensory characteristics
- to recognize main nectariferous plant species
- to interpret the results of the main physico-chemical honey parameters
- to determine the water content, to measure electrical conductivity and pH value of honey
- to prepare honey samples for analysis
- to plan the sequence of activities and to choose the equipment for production of honey, pollen, propolis, royal jelly, bee venom and beeswax

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Importance of beekeeping and basics of honey bee colony biology L - Direct and indirect honey bee benefits. Members of honey bee colony, basics of anatomy and physiology of honey bees and division of labour inside and outside the honey bee colony. Main traits of honey bee races.
2nd week: Honey L - Process of honey formation. Chemical composition, physical traits and property of honey. Honey defects.
3rd week: Nectariferous plants L – Factors affecting the honey flow. Nectary types. Honeydew occurrence. The most important continental and mediterranean nectariferous plant species.
4th week: Honey analytics L – Introduction to physico-chemical methods used for determination of honey authenticity.
5th week: Melissopalynological analysis LB – Determination of botanical and geographical origin of honey. Preparation of honey samples for melissopalynological analysis. Qualitative and quantitative melissopalynological analysis.
6th week: Honey sensory analysis - L Sensory traits of main continental and mediterranean types of honey. E Honey competition.
7th week: Field work I FW – Visit an authorized laboratory for honey analytics. Introduction to methods and instruments which used in honey and other bee products analytics.
8th week: Law regulation L – Introduction to law regulation which concerns honey and other bee products quality in conventional and organic beekeeping. I partial exam.
9th week: Pollen, propolis, royal jelly, bee venom and beeswax L - Chemical composition and properties of mentioned bee products and the way of their production.
10th week: ”Apitourism” L – Possibility of using the apiary in agrotourism through tourist - educational purpose, the way of bee products marketing through apitourism.
11th week: Alternative approach in treatment of honey bees L - Biotechnical methods and methods of using organic acids in varroa control. Alternative methods in control of other bee diseases and pests.
12th week: Technology of bee products production E – Colony preparation for honey extraction. Honey extraction. Ways of collecting the pollen and propolis and production of royal jelly, bee venom and beeswax.
13th week: Field work II FW – Visit to honey bottler - introduction to technology of processing and packing the honey.
14the week: Seminar I S – Seminars from previously processed teaching units according to student’s choice. Basic physico-chemical honey analysis LB – Determination of water content, electrical conductivity and pH value.
15th week: Seminar II S – Seminars presentation. II partial exam. Examination period – final exam (oral).

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

N. Kezić, D. Bubalo, Z. Grgić, M. Dražić, D. Barišić, J. Filipi, M. Ševar, D. Krakar, V. Tretinjak: Konvencionalno i ekološko pčelarenje, Interna skripta, Agronomski fakultet Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2013.

1

F. Šimić: Naše medonosno bilje, Nakladni zavod Znanje, Zagreb, 1980.

1

E. Crane: Honey. A comprehensive survey, Heinemann, London, 1975.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

The Hive and the Honey Bee, Dadant & Sons Hamilton, 1987.
H. Horn, C. Lulmann: DasgrosseHonigbuch, Műnchen, 1992.
Časopis ”Hrvatska pčela”, Hrvatski pčelarski savez, Zagreb

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Novel Food Processing Technologies
NAME OF THE COURSE Novel Food Processing Technologies

Code

KTM109

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

10

5

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

As a result of advancing technology, some novel processing techniques are nowdays used in food industry to produce quality and safe products. Some of these novel food processing technologies involve high-pressure, pulsed electric filed/light, microwaves, radiofrequency, infrared, ultraviolet, and visible light, ultrasound, etc. so the major objectives of this course are getting the basic knowledge about those processes / techniques.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
- describe the basic working principles of several novel processing technologies,
- explain how the technologies influence food material,
- evaluate the major advantages of novel techiques over conventional technologies and major limitations of their use,
- explain the effects of advanced techniques on final product quality and safety.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to novel food technologies
2nd week: High-pressure processing
3rd week: Pulsed electric filed processing
4th week: Non-thermal processing techniques (Osmotic dehydration, Membrane processes, Pulsed light, Pulsed ultraviolet light)
5th week: Non-thermal processing techniques (Oscillating magnetic field, Ultrasound, Irradiation, etc.)
6th week: Alternative thermal processing techniques (Microwave heating, Radio-frequency processing, Ohmic heating)
7th week: Alternative thermal processing techniques (Combined microwave-vacuum drying, etc.)
8th week: Refrigeration techniques, I. Colloquium
9th week: Vacuum cooling, Ultrasonic assistance of food freezing, High-pressure freezing, etc.
10th week: Minimal processing
11th week: ”Green” food processing technologies
12th week: Advancements in post-harvest management
13th week: Development of value-added products from food wastes
14th week: Encapsulation technologies
15th week: Nanotechnology in food and agriculture industry, II. Colloquium

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

2.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams, seminars and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. I. Boye, Y. Arcand: Green Technologies in Food Production and Processing, Springer, New York, 2012.

0

DA

H.Q. Zhang, G. V. Barbosa-Canovas, V. M. Balasubramaniam, C. P. Dunne, D. F. Farkas, J. T. C. Yuan: Nonthermal Processing Technologies for Food, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2011.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. Malik, Z. Erginkaya, S. Ahmad, H. Erten: Food Processing: Strategies for Quality Assessment, Springer, New York, 2014.
D. Sun: Thermal Food Processing: New Technologies and Quality Issues, Second Edition,CRC Press, 2012.
N. J. Zuidam, V. A. Nedović: Encapsulation Technologies for Active Food Ingredients and Food Processing, Springer, New York, 2010.
D. Sun: Emerging Technologies for Food Processing, Elsevier Academic Press, 2005.
G. V. Barbosa-Cánovas, M. S. Tapia, M. Pilar Cano: Novel Food Processing Technologies, CRC Press, 2005.
Odabrani znanstveni članci.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Fermented dairy products and cheesemaking
NAME OF THE COURSE Fermented dairy products and cheesemaking

Code

KTM110

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

7.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

20

10

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

30 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Objectives of this course are to learn new knowledge on the processing of fermented dairy products and cheesemaking and their nutritional and health aspects.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Learning outcomes are the following:
- to distinguish categories of fermented dairy products
- to know the processing technology used in the production of fermented dairy products
- to understand the mechanisms and interactions between human gut microflora and fermented dairy products
- to distinguish cheese categories
- to understand the process of cheesemaking
- to understand the process of cheese ripening
- to understand the role of microorganisms (bacteria and molds) in cheesemaking

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Physico-chemical characteristics of milk for the production of fermented dairy products and cheese.
2nd week: Main categories of fermented dairy products and their nutritive value.
3rd week: Processing of fermented dairy products.
4th week: Probiotics and prebiotics – their role in the production of fermented dairy products.
5th week: Deterioration processes in fermented dairy products.
6th week: Sensory characteristics of fermented dairy products.
7th week: Quality control in the production of fermented dairy products.
8th week: The history of cheese making and main categories of cheese.
9th week: Chemical composition of cheese and its nutritive and health value.
10th week: Processes in cheesemaking.
11th week: Processing in cheesemaking.
12th week. Cheese ripening.
13th week. The role of microorganisms in cheesemaking.
14th Deterioration processes in cheesemaking.
15th Trends in cheesemaking technology.
Seminars: The use of new technologies in the production of fermented dairy products, the official procedure of the protection of Croatian autochthonous cheese, new technologies in the prolongation of fermented dairy products shel-life).
Laboratory work:
- The production of jogurth and the determination of the rate of sineresis, its sensory quality and viscosity)
- The comparison of physico-chemical properties of classic and fruity jogurth
- Determination of the rate of degradation of proteins from fermented dairy products after in vitro digestion model
- Determination of diacetyl content in various fermented dairy products
- Determination of jogurth texture containing different lipid content
- The production of cheese (from casein and albumin)
- The determination of physico-chemical properties of cheese (moisture content, salt, lipid content, proteins)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in lectures (70%), seminars (80%) and in laboratory work (100%).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

2.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Final grade includes the success from partial written exams (2) and from the exam of the laboratory practices.
Grading: <60% not sufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Samaržija: Fermentirana mlijeka, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Zagrebu Zagreb, 2015.

1

R. Božanić, I. Jeličić, T. Bilušić: Analiza mlijeka i mliječnih proizvoda, Plejada Zagreb, 2010.

2

Havranek i sur.:Sirarstvo, HMU, Zagreb, 2014.

1

A. Tamime: Fermented milks, Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2006.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

M. Tunick: The science of cheese, Oxford University Press, 2014.
Lj. Tratnik, R. Božanić: Mlijeko i mliječni proizvodi, HMU, Zagreb, 2012.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Olive Processing Technologies
NAME OF THE COURSE Olive Processing Technologies

Code

KTM200

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivica Ljubenkov

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

20

10

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will acquire the basic theoretical and practical knowledge on the production of olives and their processing in olive oil and table olives.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student is able to:
- suggest appropriate procedures for planting of olive trees, selection of varieties, fertilization, plant protection, pruning and harvesting,
- demonstrate the basic steps in making olive oil and table olives production,
- independently perform basic tests of olive oil and table olives quality evaluation,
- choose the correct approach in solving the problems with waste materials from olive oil and table olives production,
- know the basic legislation in the field of olive oil and table olives.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Historic part - olives and olive oil through the history of the Mediterranean region and in Croatia
2nd week: Olive production - soil preparation, variety selection, fertilization, pruning, protection and irrigation
3rd week: Olive oil production - harvesting, transport, storage, processing methods of olive oil (2 and 3-phase systems), pressing
4th week: Filtering, packaging and storage of olive oil, refined olive oil and olive pomace oil
5th week: Physico-chemical and sensory analysis of olive oils, introduction to the methods of analysis
6th week: Health benefits of olive oil, impact of the individual ingredients
7thweek: Legislation in the field of olive oil
8th week: Table olives processing, harvesting, transport, storage,
9th week: Table olive production (preservation) methods, HACCP
10th week: Secondary table olives processing
11th week: Evaluation of the table olives quality, introduction to the physico-chemical and sensory testing methods for table olives
12th week: Microbiology of olives and olive oil
13th week: Legislation in the field of table olives
14th week: Waste materials from the production of olive oil and table olives,
15th week: Types and quantities of waste from the production of olive oil and table olives, its use and recycling methods
Practice: Olive analyses (maturity index, the yield of water and oil), Determination of olive oil parameters (free fatty acids, peroxide number, saponification number, iodine number), Table olives preservation methods (brine preparation, debittering, Greek and Spanish way of preserving, ”dry” preservation), Brine analyses (pH value, acidity, salt content), visit to olive processing factory and olive oil mils.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars 80%, laboratory practice and field work 100%) and actively participate in the teaching process. This will be recorded and evaluated in making a final assessment.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

3.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

0.5

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into two units that students take over partial exams or joining final exam at the end of the semester. The exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied; 60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

D. Boskou: Olive Oil-Chemistry and Technology, AOCS press, Champaign, Illinois, 1996.

0

DA

B. Zadro, S. Perica (ur.): Maslina i maslinovo ulje A-Ž, Naklada Zadro, Zagreb, 2007.

0

DA

O. Koprivnjak: Djevičansko maslinovo ulje: od masline do stola, MIH, Poreč, 2006. 2 Da

2

DA

S. Kailis, D. Harris: Producing Table Olives, Landlink Press, Collingwood, 2007. Da

0

DA

S. Bulimbašić: Proizvodnja maslinovog ulja i konzerviranje masline, Mediteranska poljoprivredna knjiga, 2013.

2

B. Škarica, I. Žužić, M. Bonifačić: Maslina i maslinovo ulje visoke kakvoće u Hrvatskoj, Vlastita naklada, 1996.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Fruit and Vegetable Processing
NAME OF THE COURSE Fruit and Vegetable Processing

Code

KTM201

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

25

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquiring a basic knowledge on
- fruit and vegetable storing and distribution process (control of fruit respiration, maturation, control of fruits quality during distribution)
- fruit processing (fruit juices, pectin-based products, dried fruits…)
- vegetable processing (canned vegetables, dried vegetables, fermented vegetables…)

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of fruit and vegetables processing, which includes:
- the understanding of biochemical and physiological changes in fruit after maturation process
- the knoweldge on nutritive and healthy aspects of fresh fruits and vegetables and their products
- the understanding of the influence of paramteres related to fruit shelf-life and quality during storage
- the understanding of factors influencing the change of nutritive value and chemical composition of fruit during processing
- the knowledge on control systems for food safety in fruit and vegetables processing

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Fruit and vegetables classification. Healthy and nutritive aspects of fruit and vegetables.
2nd week: The influence of maturation process on chemical composition and nutritive value of fruit.
3rd week: Biologically active compounds from fruit and vegetables and their role in fruit and vegetable processing.
4th week: Microbiology of fresh and stored fruit and vegetable.
5th week: Physico-chemical changes in fruit during storage.
6th week: Post-harvest technology of fruit and vegetable.
7th week: Thermic treatments in fruit and vegetable processing.
8th week: Enhancement of nutritive value of fruits and vegetables after thermic treatments.
9th week: Fruits and vegetables juices processing.
10th week: Pectin-based products.
11th week: Canned and fermented vegetables.
12th week: Dried fruits and vegetables.
13th week: Minimally processed fruits and vegetables.
14th week: Novel technologies in fruits and vegetables processing: vacuum technology, edible coating films, the use of high pressure, new modified atmosphere technology, the use of bioctechnology in fruits and vegetables processing.
15th week: Fruits and vegetables and their products characteristic for Dalmatian region.
Laboratory exercises:
Determination of physical and chemical parameteres, the amount of pigments (carotenoids, anthocyanins) and biologically active compounds (total phenols, flavonoids) in fruits and vegetables after thermic treatments (blanching, cooking under high temperature). Monitoring of physical and chemical parameters (water amount, amount of reducing sugars, pH, acidity) in fruits and vegetables during maturation process (climacteric and non-climacteric fruits). Determination of carotenoids content in fruits during maturarion period. Pulpes of fruits preparation. Fruits juices processing. Fruits clarification. Vegetables juices processing. Preparation of fruit compotes. Preparation of minimally processed fruits and vegetables. Fermented vegetables (sauerkraut). Pectin-based products preparation: jam, jellies. Dried fruits and vegetables preparation.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lectures attendance - at least 70% of full schedule; attendance on seminar work – at least 80% of full schedule. To design the seminar work on selected topic

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

During semester, two written exams are provided (as partical examinations). Test will be carried out within 60 minutes. Students who obtain positive mark from both exams, will have oral examination in order to obtain the final mark. During semester, students should present their seminar work on selected topic within this course. The final mark of this course will count the mark from seminar work, marks from written exams, and mark from oral exams.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

L. De la Rosa, E. Alvarez-Parilla, G. Gonzalez-Aguilar: Fruit and Vegetable Phytochemicals, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.

0

DA

W. Jongen: Fruit and Vegetable Processing-Improving Quality, CRC, 2002.

0

DA

Y. H. Hui i sur. Handbook of Fruits and Fruit Processing, Blackwell Publishing, 2006.

0

DA

N. K. Sinha, J. Sidhu, J. Barta, J. Wu, M. Pilar Cano: Handbook of Vegetables and Vetegable Processing, Blackwell, 2005.

0

DA

V. Katalinić, I. Generalić, D. Skroza: Tehnologija mediteranskog voća i povrća, skripta za laboratorijske vježbe, KTF, 2010.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

P. R. Ashurst: Chemistry and Technology of Soft Drinks and Fruit Juices, Blackwell, 2005.
W. V. Cruess: Laboratory Manual of Fruit and Vegetable Products, General Book, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Seafood Processing Technology
NAME OF THE COURSE Seafood Processing Technology

Code

KTM202

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Vida Šimat

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

20

10

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The main objectives of this course are to enable students to understand and implement good practices in seafood handling processes by understanding the principle” from catch to fork”; selection of appropriate methods of conservation and implementation of good manufacturing practice during the different seafood processing technologies.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Competence in applying knowledge of inorganic and organic chemistry and microbiology and biochemistry.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam, the students will be able to:
- identify all phases of post mortal changes in fish meat;
- identify and analyze metabolites of specific spoilage microorganisms
- implement different methods of preservation of fishery products in accordance with good manufacturing practice;
- define and implement the necessary methods of assessing the quality of raw material, technological processes and final products of fish processing industry.
- calculate the norms/yields necessary for the organization of production in the fish processing industry
- identify and eliminate problems in the technological processes
- identify critical control points in the production processes, carry out hazard analysis for different technologies and preventive and corrective measures to ensure food safety
- Independently implement HACCP plan.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introductory lecture, condition and trends in marine fisheries
2nd week: Structure and composition of fish
3rd week: Post mortal changes in fish
4th week: Ice in fisheries
5th week: Handling catch on fishing boat
6th week: Methods of transport and preparation of raw materials for processing
1st colloquium
7th week: Preservation of fish using low temperatures
8th week: Preservation of fish using high temperatures
9th week: Sterilization: production of canned fish
10th week: Preservation of fish by salting and marinating
11th week: Preservation of fish by smoking and drying
12th week: Preservation of fish eggs, invertebrates and algae
13th week: Packaging materials and packaging methods in seafood industry
2nd. colloquium
14th week: Production control, quality management and traceability in the fish processing industry
15th week: Examples of implementation of HACCP plans in the fish processing industry, legislation.
Exercises:
Calculation of yields in seafood production. Control of raw materials, introduction to freshness assessment methods used for fish and crabs. The sensory evaluation of seafood. Histamine, histamine poisoning in humans and comparison of methods for histamine analysis. Measuring the pH, dielectric properties and texture of different types of fish during storage in different storage conditions. Rating various market bought seafood products. Implementation of HACCP plan.
Field work:
Visiting fish processing plant-Conex Trade doo., Čaporice. Exercise in the laboratory: Control of the shutter, hermeticity and safety of cans during production. Visiting fish processing plant Sardina doo., Postira, Brac,
Visiting fish smokehouse Bek doo, Kaštela.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and exercises), actively participate in the teaching process and pass the exam (or 2 tests). The presence at lectures will be recorded, and absence needs to be justified. One hundred percent presence in class will be rewarded with 2 extra points at the test.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

2.0

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Continuous evaluation through two tests during the semester (*):
Class attendance, A1 (success 80 = -100%), proportion in final grade, k1 = 0.1
Laboratory and field exercises, A2 (success = 60 -100%), proportion in final grade, k2 = 0.15
Seminar + presentation, A3 (success 60 -100%), proportion in final grade, k3 = 0.15
I. test, A4 (success 60-100 %), proportion in final grade, k4 = 0.30; II. test, A5 (success 60 -100%), proportion in final grade, k5 = 0.30
Final grade (%) = 0,10A1 + 0,15A2 + 0,15A3 + 0,30A4 + 0,30A5
Final evaluation through comprehensive written and oral exams (**) is carried out at regular examination periods through four examination terms. Activities A1, A2 and A3 are measured in the same manner as above. Written exam, A6 (success 60 -100%), the proportion of evaluation, k6 = 0.20; Oral examination, A7 (success 60 -100%), the share of the assessment, K7 = 0.40
Final grade (%) = 0,10A1 + 0,15A2 + 0,15A3 + 0,20A6 + 0,40A7 (50 -64% - sufficient (2); 65-75% - good (3); 76-89% - very good (4); 89-100% - excellent (5).
If the student has passed only one test (*) during continuous evaluation he/she is required to take the comprehensive exam (**) in the regular examination periods and the passed test will be acknowledged by the end of the academic year as part of a written exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

B. Šoša: Higijena i tehnologija prerade morske ribe, ŠK, Zagreb, 1989.

0

da

Z. E. Sikorski: Seafood: resources, nutritional composition and preservation, CRC Press, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida, SAD, 1990.

0

da

T. Borresen: Improving seafood products for the consumer, Woodhead Publishing Ltd., Cambridge, England, 2008.

0

da

H. Rehbein, J. Oehlenschlager: Fishery Products: Quality, safety and authenticity. Wiley-Blackwell, UK, 2009.

0

da

H. A. Bremner: Safety and qualtiy issues in fish processing, CRC Press, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida, SAD, 2002.

0

da

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. B. Luten, T. Borresen, J. Oehlenschlager: Seafood from producer to consumer. Integrated approach to quality. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1997.
H. H. Huss: Fresh fish- quality and quality changes, Training Programme on Fish Technology and Quality Control, FAO Fisheries Series, FAO, Rome, 1988.
H. H. Huss: Assurance of Seafood Quality. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper No. 334., FAO, Rome, Italy, 1994.
H. H. Huss: Quality and quality changes in fresh fish. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper No. 348., FAO, Rome, Italy, 1995.
Važeća legislativa

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Processing Technology of Species and Medicinal Herbs
NAME OF THE COURSE Processing Technology of Species and Medicinal Herbs

Code

KTM203

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Students will know and understand the most important techniques in the processing of medicinal herbs and spices. They will acquire basic knowledge of plant families and species that are commonly used in the food industry and the main methods of preparing herbal preparations (teas and tea blends, spice powders, herbal extracts, concentrates).

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam students will be able to:
- describe basic terms, types of species and medicinal herbs, preparation of extracts and their useful application
- demonstrate basic procedures of processing species and medicinal plants and extraction methods
- determine appropriate analysis methods of the obtained extracts or plant materials and methods of determination of antioxidant and antibacterial properties
- suggest appropriate procedures of processing of species and medicinal plants considering basic postulates of extraction, analysis of extracts considering artefacts formation and impact to composition and properties of the product
- select appropriate approach in solving the problems in the area of processing of species and medicinal herbs, starting from knowledge from chemistry, technology and biotechnology

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction, history and use of medicinal herbs; Definition of medicinal herbs and aromatic plants,
2nd week: Taxonomy, nomenclature and classification; Distribution in Croatia and abroad; Wild and cultivated plants; Potential of the Mediterranean climate.
3rd week: Selected species of medicinal plants and herbs and their importance in the food industry,
4th week: Representatives of some major plant families (legumes, daisies, cloves, roses, anemones, lilies, wheat or grass, meadow grass).
5th week: Production steps: Select and Collection / Harvesting (seeds, leaves, roots),
6th week: Transportation, Quality of raw material (the determination of pesticides, mycotoxins, microbiological...);
7th week: Mulching; Drying (chamber and tunnel dryers, microwave drying, spray freeze and reverse osmosis),
8th week: Cleaning, packaging and labeling products; Preservation.
9th week: Herbal preparations (liquid and dry extracts), liquid extract (the degree of fragmentation, extraction tool, extraction);
10th week: First group of extraction methods (maceration, bimaceration, digestion, infusion, decoction, turboextraction, ultrasonic extraction);
11th week: Second group of methods of extraction (percolation, repercolation, diacolation, evacolation).
12th week: Active and effective substances, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of biologically active compounds from herbs and aromatic plants,
13th week: Analysis of plant material; Factors affecting the quality of active ingredients.
14th week: The most important products, teas and tea blends, spice powders, spice extracts and concentrates, legal restrictions.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

2.5

Research

Practical training

1.0

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Presence and activities on lectures and seminars: 5%
Laboratory exercises: 10%
First partial exam: 43%
Second partial exam: 42%

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. S. Handa, S. P. S. Khanuja, G. Longo, D. D. Rakesh: Extraction Technologies for Medicinal and Aromatic Plants. International Centre for Science and High Technology, Trieste, 2008.

1

I. Jerković: Kemija aroma, Kemijsko-tehnološki fakultet u Splitu, 2011.

1

Web

K. V. Peter: Handbook of Herbs and Spices, Volumen 2, CRC Press, 2006.

1

DA

K. Toplak Galle: Hrvatsko ljekovito bilje, Mozaik knjiga, Zagreb, 2001.

0

DA

M. Maffei: Dietary Supplements of Plant Origin: A Nutrition and Health Approach, Taylor & Francis, London, UK, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Herbs, spices and essential oils: Post-harvest operations in developing countries, UNIDO and FAO 2005.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Alcoholic Beverages Technology
NAME OF THE COURSE Alcoholic Beverages Technology

Code

KTM204

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

15

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to teach students about basic concepts and technologies used in the production of alcoholic beverages, explain them the differences in the types of alcoholic beverages based on the used raw material and production method, and to transfer them the knowledge necessary for planning and managing the technological process of alcoholic beverages production.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will on successful completion of the course be able to:
- define and group alchocolic beverages based on the origin of raw materials and applied production technology,
- prepare the basic raw material for the production of alcoholic beverages,
- describe the basic steps in the manufacturing process for different beverages,
- define basic chemical, physical and sensory parametres used in quality testing of alcoholic beverages,
- apply the knowledge in the production process.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: History and development of alcoholic beverage production; Processing technologies, Types and classification of alchololic beverges according to the raw material and processing method
2nd week: Raw materials and basic components for alcoholic beverage production (fruits, wine and wine-processing byproducts, raw material quality control...)
3rd week: Primary processing
4th week: Fermentation- chemical and biochemical changes, yeasts, alcoholic fermentation, products and by-products
5th week: Distillation - the basic principles and principles, dynamics and chemical changes during distillation
6th week: Distilation equipment
7th week: Distillate finishing (ripening, strengh correction, dilution, filtering ...)
8th week: Maturation and treatment of alcoholic beverages
9th week: Defects of alcoholic beverages
I Colloquium
10th week: Processing and production of alcoholic beverages
11th week: Brandy production
12th week: Production of distillated beverages from grapes, wine and fermented mash, production of grain brandy
13th week: Production of brandy with accessories, Liquer production
14th week: Traditional Croatian alcoholic beverages;
15th week: Quality of alcoholic beverages and its evaluation, legislation,
II. colloquium
Exercises:
Production and analysis of selected alcoholic beverage:
- determining the basic characteristics of the raw material, preparation and pre-treatment of mash, fermentation
- distillation of the fermented pomace, calculation of the potential alcohol, distillate strength measuring and distillate dilution to a defined volume, the addition of other ingredients
- determination of the alcohol content, production of natural colors
- physico-chemical methods for the determination of selected compounds in alcoholic beverages (sugar, free organic acid, flavoring agents, etc.)
- identification of the presence of some particular substances in alcoholic beverages (hydrogen cyanide, copper, artificial colors, etc.).
- sensory evaluation of alcoholic beverages
- field work - student visits to selected facilities for the production of alcoholic beverages.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Mujić: Tehnologija proizvodnje jakih alkoholnih pića, Veleučilišni udžbenik, Agrohit PZ, Bjelovar, 2010.

0

DA

E. Keršek: Ljekovite biljne i voćne rakije: Rakijska biljaruša, VBZ, 2008.

0

DA

N. Nikićević, V. Tešević: Proizvodnja voćnih rakija vrhunskog kvaliteta, Poljoprivredni fakultet Univerzitet u Beogradu, NIK-Press, 2010.

0

DA

J. H. Bryce, G. G. Steward: Distilled Spirits: Tradition and Innovation, Nottingham University Press, UK, 2005.

0

WEB

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected scientific papers.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Technology of Meat and Meat Products
NAME OF THE COURSE Technology of Meat and Meat Products

Code

KTM205

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Mladenka Malenica Staver

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The course enables students to understand the morphology of muscle, metabolic processes in meat and provides practical knowledge of the ways of preserving meat. Students are trained to understand the technology of meat processing and organization of the process in meat industry.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Passed the course of Biochemistry.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will be able to:
- define meat
- explain the chemical composition and structure of meat
- describe the maturation of meat
- determine the relationship between the morphology of muscles, basic metabolic processes and visible indicators of the quality of meat
- explain the deterioration of meat
- explain the methods of preserving meat
- understand the application of technological processes in the meat industry
- enumerate meat products and explain the related category products
- explain the quality control, safety and sanitation

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: The history of the production of meat and meat products,
2nd week: categorization and classification of carcasses and meat
3rd week: Nutritional value of meat, morphology of the muscle, basic metabolic processes in the flesh post-mortem.
4th week: Factors affecting meat quality
5th week: Types of meat products based on raw materials and the production method
6th week: The technology and preservation in meat industry (canning, salting, drying, smoking and sealing in a can)
7th week: Meat processing equipment
8th week: Production of cooked and semi-dry sausages, sausages for cooking and sausages for baking
9th week: Fermentation of sausages
10th week: Ripening of meat
1. Test
11th week: Labeling of meat and meat products
12th week: Regulation concerning meat and meat products
13th week: Analysis of meat technology through the visit to meat industry
14th week: Analysis of technological processes in visited meat industry
15th week: View of technological processes in the visited meat industry
2. Test

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

1.4

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.3

Oral exam

Written exam

1.8

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students will be evaluated based on attendance and activity during classes. Knowledge of the concepts and understanding of the technology of meat and meat products will be evaluated through tests and written exam. Understanding the processes in the meat industry will be evaluated through the written seminars based on fieldwork during visits to the meat industry.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Živković: Higijena i tehnologija mesa; I. dio, Veterinarsko-sanitarna kontrola životinja za klanje i mesa, II. dio Kakvoća i prerada, Veterinarski fakultet, Liber, Zagreb, 1986.

0

DA

S. Rahelić: Osnove tehnologije mesa, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1985.

0

DA

Đ. Roseg: Prerada mesa i mlijeka. Nakladni zavod Globus, Zagreb, 1995.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

W. K. Jensen, C. Dawine, M. Dikeman: Encyclopedia of meat sciences, Vol. 1,2,3. Elsevier Academic Press, UK, 2004.
F. Toldrá: Handbook of Meat Processing, Blackwell Publishing, USA, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Technology of Cereals
NAME OF THE COURSE Technology of Cereals

Code

KTM206

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Tea Bilušić

Credits (ECTS)

6.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

15

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to introduce the students with technological processes in the manufacture of bakery products, as well as with physical, chemical and nutritional properties of raw materials and final products. The knowledge that students acquire in this course will enable them to independently solve engineering problems related to the production of cereals and other bakery products.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, students will be able to:
- independently analyze the composition of cereals, and know the properties and role of particular constituents, evaluate quality parameters of milled products,
- explain the changes that occur during the cereals processing,
- have knowledge for indepent selection of raw materials for the production of certain products as well for new product development,
- analyze and explain the changes that occur during the processing
- organize the work and independently conduct the production of bakery products, pastas and others products from cereals,
- implement the legal framework, using scientific and professional literature for the purpose of lifelong learning.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Cereals (origin, classification, appearance, composition, nutritional value);
2nd week: Legislation; The importance of whole grains in the human diet
3rd week: Proteins, lipids and enzymes in the grains (structures, properties and role)
4th week: Wheat
5th week: Other cereals: Rice, Oat, Rye, Barley, Millet, Corn
6th week: Technology of the flour production and processing
7th week: Industrial milling, classification of grains, processing devices, flour chemical composition
I colloquium
8th week: Yeast in baking process (dough fermentation)
9th week: Other additives in baking (adjuvants, flavorings, additives, etc.)
10th week: Bread-baking tehnology (raw materials, production processes and steps, packaging, storage etc.)
11th week: The production of toast, biscuits and flat bread;
12th week: The production of cookies, wafels, crackers and sweets
13th week: The production of puff pastry (machinery, conditions, freezing)
14th week: The production of fresh pasta
15th week: The production of other pasta products; Legislation
II. colloquium
Seminars:
Application of legal regulations and standards in baking; Scientific and technical literature search for writing an essay on a selected topic; Development of new products from cereals; Presentation of seminars; Visit to industrial bakery and introduction to technological processes used in industry of baking products
Laboratory exercises:
Determination of the organoleptic properties of wheat; Production of bread and other flour products; Determination of moisture in cereals and bakery products; Determination of the amount of salt in products of flour; Gluten analysis; Sensory evaluation of bread and other bakery products; Sensory analysis and determination of pasta cooking degree

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade passed pursuant to mark preliminary exams, seminar essay and laboratory exercises.
Rating: <60% not sufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

K. A. Rosentrater, A. D. Evers: Kent´s Technology of cereals. An Introduction for Students of Food Science and Agriculture. Woodhead Publidhing, Elsevier, 2017.

0

DA

K. Kulp, J.G Ponte Jr.: Handbook of Cereal Science and Technology, Second Edition, Revised and Expanded, Marcel Dekker, INC., New York, 2000.

0

DA

S. P. Cauvain, L. S. Young: Technology of Breadmaking - Second Edition. Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. New York, USA, 2007.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Y. Liangli: Wheat antioxidants, John Wily & Sons, Inc. Hoboken, New Jersay, 2008.
The legislation on food from cereal.
Selected scientific papers

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Corrosion and Materials Protection
NAME OF THE COURSE Corrosion and Materials Protection

Code

KTM207

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Senka Gudić

Credits (ECTS)

5.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective of this course is to achieve a knowledge about fundamentals of corrosion processes and corrosion protection, and methods of corrosion testing and prevention. This course will provide student to acquire an orderly pattern of thought in solving practical corrosion problems in a critical and creative manner.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
- define and classify the corrosion processes and evaluate the resistance of metals for any given conditions
- recognize the factors that may cause materials degradation in food industry
- identify the methods of surface protection of metallic materials
- select the most effective corrosion protection system for any given conditions

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Definition and importance of corrosion. Classification of corrosion processes.
2nd week: Chemical corrosion. thermodynamic conditions. The mechanism and kinetics of chemical corrosion process. Resistance to chemical corrosion.
3rd week: Electrochemical corrosion. Thermodynamic conditions. The mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical corrosion process. Types of electrochemical corrosion.
4th week: C factors affecting the corrosion rate.
5th week: Corrosion under specific conditions.
6th week: Corrosion caused by microorganisms.
7th week: Contamination of food products by corrosion and their consequences (practices).
8th week: First test. Review methods of corrosion protection.
9th week: Corrosion protection by materials selection and proper designing.
10th week: Materials protection using corrosion inhibitors.
11th week: Electrochemical methods of protection.
12th week: The importance of inspection and maintenance.
13th week: Corrosion tests. Standards.
14th week: Maintenance of metal surfaces in the food industry (chemical cleaning).
15th week: Maintenance of metal surfaces in the food industry (disinfection, sterilization).Second test.
Exercises:
Monitor atmospheric corrosion. Examination of corrosion rate by polarization methods. Determination of the critical pitting temperature of stainless steel. Examination of corroded metal samples by optical microscopy. Protection of aluminum alloy anodizing and processing of the oxide film. Determination of the effectiveness of organic corrosion inhibitors. Cathodic protection by means of a protector.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Exercises attendance: 100 %.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

1.0

Oral exam

1.5

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The entire course can be passed by two partial exams during the semester. Passing threshold is 60%. Each partial exam in assessing participates with 40% and exercises with 20%. On examination shedule students will have oral exam. Scoring: - 60% insufficient, 60-70 % - sufficient, 71-80 % - good, 81-92% very good, 93-100% - excellent.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

E. Stupnišek-Lisac: Korozija i zaštita konstrukcijskih materijala, Fakultet kemijskog inženjerstva i tehnologije Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb 2007.

1

S. Brkić: Priručnik - Nehrđajući čelici u farmaceutskoj, prehrambenoj i kemijskoj industriji, Hrvatsko društvo za materijale i tribologiju, Zagreb, 2007.

1

B. Jarić, A. Rešetić: Korozija i katodna zaštita, Korexpres, Zagreb, 2003.

1

I. Esih, Z. Dugi: Tehnologija zaštite od korozije I, Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1990.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

M. Gojić: Površinska obradba materijala, Metalurški fakultet, Zagreb, 2010.
P. Marcus: Corrosion mechanisms in theory and practice, Marcel Dekker Inc. USA 2002.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Algae Biotechnology
NAME OF THE COURSE Algae Biotechnology

Code

KTM208

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- introduction in the basics of systematics, biology and ecology of marine algae
- introduction in significance and ways of using algae in biotechnology research and the biotech industry
- presentation of possibilities of exploitation and production of algae significant in biotechnology

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Basics of biology and/or cell biology

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon successful completion of this course, students should:
- know the basics of systematics, biology and ecology of marine algae
- have knowledge in biology and biotechnological uses of the most important algae genera
- know ways of usage of algae in biotech research and the biotech industry including uses as a green fertilizer, green insecticides, as food for humans and animals, for breeding and use of live food in aquaculture, medicine, specialized chemicals, bioremediation and biofuels
- know the technology of growing algae for a variety of commercial applications
- know the possibilities for exploitation and production of biotechnological significant algae

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Week 1: Introduction. Systematics. Anatomy.
Week 2: Reproduction. Photosynthesis.
Week 3: Systematic division: Cyanobacteria or Cyanophyta
Week 4: Systematic division: Cyanobacteria or Cyanophyta
Week 5: Systematic division: Rhodophyta
Week 6: Systematic division: Ochrophyta
Week 7: Systematic division: Chlorophyta
Week 8: Ecology.
Week 9: Biogeochemical role of algae. The importance of algae
I knowledge test
Week 10: The industrial use of micro and macro algae: green fertilizers, green insecticides, food for humans and animals,
Week 11: The industrial use of micro and macro algae: cultivation and use of live food in aquaculture, pharmaceuticals, specialized chemicals, bioremediation, biofuels
Week 12: Technology of cultivation. Growing main genera of cultivating algae. Types of culture.
Week 13: Breeding parameters. Farming methods. Determination of the density and growth of algae.
14th week: Optimization of production systems. Open systems of cultivation.
15th week: A closed photo-bioreactors. Genetic modification.
II knowledge test
Exercises:
Getting acquainted with the work, sampling and processing in a laboratory; Collection of phytobenthic material and its identification by available literature and by microscope; Microscopy of different systematic divisions of Cyanobacteria, Rodophyta, Ochrophyta and Chlorophyta and learning about the habitus morphology, basics of anatomy and reproducting structures; Drying and chemical analysis of algae; Isolation, purification and identification of bioactive compounds from algae.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature and exercises at least 85%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

0.5

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Exams are conducted through written preliminary exams (tests) through the duration of the semester and during exam periods. The difference in taking exams exists only to the extent of material. Tests consist of complex questions in which each sub-question carries a certain part of the points. For a positive evaluation is necessary to solve more than 50% of correct answers. Passed 1st Colloquium allows exit to the second colloquium, while the failure of the 1st Colloquium is directing students for taking the test from the whole curriculum.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

L. Barsanti, P. Gualtieri: Algae – Anatomy, Biochemistry, and Biotechnology, CRC Taylor and Francis, Boca Raton, 2006.

0

DA

S. K. Kim: Handbook of Marine Macroalgae, Biotechnology and Applied Phycology, Pukyong National University, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, 2012.

0

DA

FAO, Manual on the production and use of live food for aquaculture, Rome,1996.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. E. Lee: Phycology. Cambridge University Press, Fourth edition, Cambridge. 2008.
C. Van den Hoek, D. G. Mann, H. M. Jahns: Algae. An Introduction to Phycology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Food Biotransformations
NAME OF THE COURSE Food Biotransformations

Code

KTM209

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Mila Radan

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To acquire knowledge about natural way of food biotransformation in production processing (improvement of food: flavour, digestibility and/or shelf life etc.)

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After successful completion of this course students should:
- Acquire knowledge about enzyme roles in metabolic and biotransformation processes
- Be able to explain the general principles of biotransformations
- Be able to estimate the characteristics of natural ways to improve the flavour, digestibility and/or shelf life of food products as well as their possible effects and modes of action in biological systems.
- Be able to estimate the effect of well-known processes of biotransformations

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to biotransformations and biocatalysis
2nd week: Basic principles of enzymes: classification
3rd week: Basic principles of enzymes: activity and regulation
4th week: Metabolic reactions and metabolic products
5th week: Metabolic reactions and metabolic products
6th week: Microorganisms in food transformations
7th week: Other sources of enzymes
8th week: Biotechnologically important enzymes
9th week: Fermentation
10th week: Probiotics
11th week: Benefits of biotransformations
12th week: Enhancement digestibility, bioavailability and shelf life
13th week: Enhancement of flavours
14th week: Practical applications of enzymes in food biotransformation
15th week: Law regulations

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Final grade will reflect the student’s grades obtained on partial exams, seminars and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% failed, 60-70% enough (2), 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

L. Barsanti, P. Gualtieri: Algae – Anatomy, Biochemistry, and Biotechnology, CRC Taylor and Francis, Boca Raton, 2006.

0

S. K. Kim: Handbook of Marine Macroalgae, Biotechnology and Applied Phycology, Pukyong National University, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, 2012.

0

FAO, Manual on the production and use of live food for aquaculture, Rome,1996.

0

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

R. E. Lee: Phycology. Cambridge University Press, Fourth edition, Cambridge. 2008.
C. Van den Hoek, D. G. Mann, H. M. Jahns: Algae. An Introduction to Phycology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1995.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals
NAME OF THE COURSE Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals

Code

KTM210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

This course will describe functional foods and nutraceuticals, including their classification, health benefits, development, and law regulation. The main focus is on analyses, chemistry, processing, bioavailability, and health benefits of bioactive food components. Students will learn about which constituent make some food functional, and will discuss their chemistry and physiological effects.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of the course students should be able to:
- understand fundamental concepts related to functional food and nutraceuticals,
- define major nutrient components and specific functional foods,
- describe the major health benefits of functional foods and nutraceuticals,
- decribe the major biological activities,
- understand the basic regulation.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: History and definitions;
2nd week: Categories of functional foods
3rd week: Nutrition and health (Nutrition related diseases, Bioavailability, Specific health issues...)
4th week: Nutrient Components of Foods: Bioactive Carbohydrates
5th week: Nutrient Components of Foods: Bioactive Proteins, Peptides and Lipids
6th week: Nutrient Components of Foods: Bioactive Carotenoids
7th week: Nutrient Components of Foods: Plant Secondary Metabolites
8th week: Other non-nutritive components
I Colloquium
9th week: Specific Functional Foods: Soybean, Fruits and Vegetables
10th week: Specific Functional Foods: Milk and Milk Products, Fish, Meat, Miscellaneous Foods and Food Components
11th week: Biological activities (Antioxidant properties, Antimicrobial activity, Anticancer agents, Anti-inflammatory properties, Cardiovascular effects, Gastric and hepatic protective effects, Anti-obesity and anti-diabetic activities...)
12th week: health benefits of functional foods/ingredients
13th week: Current and emerging trends in the production of functional foods and nutraceuticals;
14th week: Processing technologies,
15th week: Economic aspects, public perception, law regulation and ethical issues
II. Colloquium
Laboratory exercises
- Isolation, purification and identification of bioactive components / fractions of selected foods (eg. pigments, sugars, terpenes, thiols, phenolic compounds ...), (4)
- Determination of antioxidant activity (e.g., methods ORAC, FRAP, DPPH, BR, chelating, ...) (5)
- Determination of antimicrobial activity (disk diffusion method, determination of minimal inhibitory concentration) (3)
- Demonstration: enzymatic inhibition of isolated fractions / compounds (acetylcholine esterase, butirilcholinesterase), vasodilatory effects, anticarcinogenic activity, ...)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

0.5

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams, seminars and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. I. Boye: Nutraceutical and Functional Food Processing Technology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2015.

0

DA

R. E. C. Wildman: Handbook of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Second Edition, CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, 2007.

0

DA

R. E. Aluko: Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2012.

0

DA

R. Chadwick, S. Henson, B. Moseley, G. Koenen, M. Liakopoulos, C. Midden, A. Palou, G. Rechkemmer, D. Schroder, A. von Wright: Functional Foods, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2003.

0

DA

G. Paliyath, M. Bakovic, K. Shetty: Functional Foods, Nutraceuticals, and Degenerative Disease Prevention, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2011.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Y. Mine, E. Li-Chan, B. Jiang: Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2010.
M. Skinner, D. Hunter: Bioactives in fruit: health benefits and functional foods,John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2013.
C. C. Akoh: Handbook of Functional Lipids,CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, 2006.
Odabrani znanstveni članci.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Ethnobotany
NAME OF THE COURSE Ethnobotany

Code

KTM211

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

0

15

15

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

5 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Student will get the basic knowledge on importance of plants in biosphere, on wild and cultivated plants and they role in human diet.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the passing the exam, students will be able to:
- explain the importance of plants in biosphere
- analyse the connection between human and plants since ancient time till today
- explain the importance of plant cultivation
- recognise the mail varieties of grains, their origin and explain their importance for human
- define the major pulse plants, their orignin and nutritive value
- make differences between major vegetables, know their origin and explain their use
- decribe wild plants
- analyse the differences between different varieties of fruit, define their origin and decribe its importnace in human diet
- describe some mithological data for different fruits
- describe the major characteristics of coffee, tea and coccoa and their impact on human health
- analyse the production process of different beverages and its impact on human health
- clasify major plants from different biomas on Earth, and analyse their role and application
- define major plants that are used as spices
- make differences between toxic plants and know their influence on human health
- decribe transgenic plants and their role in biodiversity

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: The importance of plants for human
2nd week: Plants as food, plant cultivation
3rd week: Plants in diet
4th week: Grains
5th week: Pulses and vegetable
6th week: Fruit
7th week: Wild but edible plants
8th week: Coffee, tea and coccoa
9th week: Alcoholic beverages
10th week: Wood and fibers
11th week: Spices
12th week: Toxic substances from plant- part 1
13th week: Toxic substances from plant- part 2
14th week: Psychoactive components
15th week: Transgenic plants
Final exam
Seminars: Selected themes connected to the lectures and discussion
Field work: Getting the basic knowledge, preparation of herbarium and photographing plants

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Regular attendance class, seminar paper, making herbaruim.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Seminars- 10%
Herbarium and plant photos – 10%
Oral exam – 80%

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

T. Nikolić: Sistematska botanika, raznolikost i evolucija biljnog svijeta. Alfa, Zagreb, 2013.

1

DA

L. Luczaj i sur.: Wild vegetable mixed sold in the markets of Dalmatia (Southern Croatia), Journal of etnobiology and etnomedicine. 9 (2013) 1-12.

0

DA

L. Luczaj i sur.: Wild food plant used in the villages of the Lake Vrana Nature Park (northen Dalmatia, Croatia). Acta Soc.Bot. 82 (2013) 275-281.

0

DA

G. Mateljan: Najzdravije namirnice svijeta, Profil, Zagreb, 2009.

0

DA

F. Ehrendorfer, K. Mägdefrau: Sistematika, evolucija i geobotanika, Udžbenik botanike. Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1984.

0

DA

D. von Denfer, H. Ziegler: Morfologija i fiziologija, udžbenik botanike. Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 1982.

0

DA

B. E. Wyk, M. Wink: Medicinal plants of the world. Timber Press. Portland, London, 2004.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. Marčinković: Božja biljna ljekarna. Školska knjiga, Zagreb, 2001.
S. Sardelić: Samoniklo jestivo bilje, mišanca, gruda, parapač... wild edible herbs-Mišanca, Gruda, Parapač, etnološka istraživanja, 1(12-13) (2008) 387-396.
Lj. Grlić: Enciklopedija samoniklog jestivog bilja. A. Cesarec, Zagreb, 1990.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Novel Fruit and Vegetable Products
NAME OF THE COURSE Novel Fruit and Vegetable Products

Code

KTM212

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the new methods and techniques for minimal processing of fruits and vegetables. In addition, they will learn about important role of the raw materials in the production of minimally processed products of high quality, about importance of choosing and performing unit operations, and how to apply appropriate preservatives (particularly against browning) and hygienic products during processing of fresh fruits and vegetables. Through the course, with the help of several case studies, they will learn about types of packaging and a variety of chemical, biochemical and microbiological changes in minimally processed food.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, students will:
- know some of the new techniques used in the processing of fruits and vegetables,
- distinguished advantages of the use of such processes compared to the conventional ones,
- be able to describe a method for producing minimally processed fruits and vegetables, starting with the selection of species, varieties and determination of the quality of raw materials in order to obtain (produce) high quality finial product,
- know the purpose of effective detergent for raw material cleaning, understand the importance of maintaining hygienic conditions, select the appropriate method of packaging and explain its impact on product sustainability.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction and definition of the new products from fruits and vegetables, fresh-cut fruit and vegetables
2nd week: Minimal processing of fruits and vegetables (MPVP) - unit processes and phases
3rd week: Minimal processing of fruits and vegetables by thermal and non-thermal techniques
4th week: Processing methods and their main characteristics
5th week: Packaging methods; Modified atmosphere packaging
6th week: New trends in packaging of the processed food
7th week: Active and intelligent packaging
I colloquium
8th week: The role of raw material (species, variety) and its quality (level of maturity, health, etc.) on the production of high-quality MPVP.
9th week: The role of raw material (species, variety) and its quality (level of maturity, health, etc.) on the production of high-quality MPVP- extension
10th week: The application of hygiene agents in the processing of fresh fruits and vegetables
11th week: The use of natural preservatives in processing of minimally processed food
12th week: Browning prevention
13th week: The effect of minimal processing on the microbiological contamination of products
14th week: The impact of minimal processing on the quality and life-time of the final product.
15th week: The impact of minimal processing on nutritional and phytochemical composition of the final product
II. colloquium
Seminars:
- from raw material to final product - planning and design of new products, each phase of production
- Novel fruit products (fresh cut apple production, watermelon, pineapple, etc.).
- Novel vegetable products (production of fresh cut lettuce, cabbage, carrots and etc.)
- Super fruits and nutritional supplements based on super fruits
- Biologically active compounds and their function - Functional Foods
- Legal requirements and the HACCP system in minimally processed foods
- Presentation of students’ seminar papers on selected topic

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.5

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade passed pursuant to mark preliminary exams, seminar essay and laboratory exercises.
Rating: <60% not sufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. M. Alzamora, M. S. Tapia, A. Lopez-Malo: Minimally Processed Fruit and Vegetables, Aspen Publishers, Glyndon, 2000.

0

DA

V. M. Gomez-Lopez: Decontamination of Fresh and Minimally Processed Produce. John Wiley & Sons. USA, 2012.

0

DA

M. W. Siddiqui, M. S. Rahman: Minimally Processed Foods: Technologies for Safety, Quality, and Convenience. Springer, New York, 2015.

0

DA

T. Ohlsson,N. Bengtsson: Minimal Processing Technologies in the Food Industry. Woodhead Publishing, England, 2002.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected scientific papers.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Flavour Chemistry
NAME OF THE COURSE Flavour Chemistry

Code

KTM213

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Igor Jerković

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Acquisition of basic knowledge of flavour chemistry, understanding of the activation of receptors of smell and taste, knowledge of the structure of organic compounds of the typical flavours and their division, knowledge of the basic mechanisms of flavour formation and the flavour isolation methods.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the course, students will be able to:
- describe the basic concepts, types of flavours, gustatory active molecule, legal regulations related to the flavour toxicological assessment and allowed concentration of biologically active substances
- illustrate ways of flavour perception (smell and taste), the mechanisms of development of natural flavour, the division of flavouring substances based on the chemical structure
- demonstrate basic procedures of flavour isolation from solid and liquid samples (headspace, volatile, semivolatile and nonvolatile substances)
- identify appropriate mechanisms of flavour origin by specific patterns, particularly flavourings derived from carbohydrates and proteins and lipid oxidation flavours
- propose appropriate methods of the sample processing taking into account the fundamental principles of distillation and extraction and the possibility of artefacts formation, structural linkage between aromatic compounds and suitable mechanism for their origin
- choose the correct chemical approach to solving problems in the field of flavour chemistry, starting from the acquired knowledge in organic chemistry and biochemistry

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to the chemistry of flavour. Classification of flavours. Natural, natural identical and artificial flavouring substances. Flavouring preparations. Thermal process flavourings. Smoke flavour. Blends of flavours. Review of the quality of flavour.
2nd week: A short overview of the development of flavour chemistry. Legal regulations. Natural, natural identical and artificial flavours – differences between the United States and the EU. New EU legislation.
3rd week: Croatian law on flavourings (NN) with emphasis on chemical specifications of flavours and maximum allowed values of biologically active substances in flavoured food. Croatian regulations on food additives (NN). Sweetening agents. Flavour enhancers.
4th week: The sense of smell. Activating receptors of smell. The sense of taste - basic taste qualities. Activation of taste receptors. Example of aromagram.
5th week: Molecules with sensory effects - examples of chemical structures: stinging molecules; molecules for cooling; strong, sharp molecules with heating and hot stimuli, the molecules with the contraction, shrinkage. The taste active molecule - examples of structures: sweeteners (nutritive, nonnutritious sweeteners, natural carbohydrates, noncarbohydrates, artificial sweeteners), salt, acid, bitter and umami substances (monosodium glutamate, inosine monophosphate).
6th week: The division of the flavour substances according to the chemical structure: flavouring substances I (C, H, O compounds: alcohols, phenols, acids, ketones, carotenoids, ionones and related compounds, hydrocarbons) - examples; the flavouring substances II (heterocyclic compounds with oxygen: oxiranes, furans, hydrofurans, pyrans and oxepines; heterocyclic compounds with nitrogen and/or sulphur) - examples, flavouring compounds III (compounds containing sulphur: thiols, thioethers, sulphides, heterocyclic compounds with sulphur) - examples
7th week: Mechanisms of flavour formation from the starting compounds. Terpenes (biosynthesis through MVA and DXP). Norisoprenoids (the mechanism of degradation of carotenoids). Phenylpropanoic derivatives (shikimate biogenetic pathway).
8th week: Flavours derived from carbohydrates and proteins. Maillard reactions. Aldol reactions and retro-aldol reactions. Strecker degradations (cysteine, methionine). Comparison of Strecker degradation and Amadori rearrangement.
9th week: Independent pathways occurrence of Strecker aldehydes. Amadori rearrangement by transamination and Strecker aldehydes formation by decarboxylation of α-oxocarboxylic acids. Strecker degradation and Amadori modelling in the development of flavour and colour.
10th week: Heterocyclization (formation of furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, 5-methyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone, formyl furol, isomaltol, pyrazine, oxazole and thiazole). Flavours of thermal degradation of vitamin B1.
11th week: Flavours of lipid oxidation. Triplet and singlet oxygen. Lipid oxidation by radicals (initiation, propagation and termination). Hydroperoxides and hydroperoxides breakup. Lactones.
12th week: Non-radical lipid oxidation. Enzymatic lipid oxidation (lipoxygenation). Flavours caused by enzymatic reactions and by microorganisms (diacetyl from lactose, the flavours of onion and garlic).
13th week: Isolation methods for flavourings. Solvent extraction. Accelerated solvent extraction. Supercritical fluid extraction. The fractionation of the extracts. Concentration of the extracts.
14th week: Distillation methods. Headspace isolation techniques (static, dynamic). Thermal desorption. Sorption techniques: headspace solid-phase microextraction; headspace extraction and extraction from the stirring stick.
15th week: Examples of chemical flavour profiles of selected food products: Honey flavour. Flavour of roasted coffee. Flavour of wine. Flavour of meat products. Cheese flavour.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and seminars) and actively participate in the teaching process, which will be evaluated in the final assessment by the weight coefficient of 5%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

3.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Students can take two partial tests during the lectures. If not pass partial tests, students will be evaluated by written exam. Rating at partial tests and the final examination is formed as follows: 51-60% sufficient (2); 61-75% good (3); 76-88% very good (4); 89-100% excellent (5). The total score is formed by summing all activities (for each activity % success multiply weigh coefficient): 5% x the presence and activity in lectures and seminars + 10% x success in experimental work + 40% x performance on the first test + 45% x performance on the second test.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Jerković: Kemija aroma (recenzirana interna skripta), KTF-Split, 2011.

0

Web

D. Rowe: Chemistry and Technology of Flavours and Fragrances, Blackwell, 2005.

2

C. Fisher, T. R. Scott: Food Flavours: Biology and Chemistry, Royal Chemical Society, 1997.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

K. A. Smith: Advances in Flavours and Fragrances, Royal Chemical Society, 2001.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Citrus Processing
NAME OF THE COURSE Citrus Processing

Code

KTM214

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Student will acquire the basic practical knowledge on citrus fruits, their nutritive value, processing technologies and know main citrus products

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After passing the exam the student will:
- know main characteristics of citrus fruits (taxonomy, morphology and physiology)
- be able to demonstrate basic steps in citrus juice processing
- know chemical composition and properties of citrus essential oils and ways of their production
- know some other citrus products and basic steps in their production and by-products

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Citrus: origin and history
2nd week: Development of the citrus industry
3rd week: Citrus fruits: chemical composition and properties
4th week: Citrus processing
5th week: Citrus juices technology. Standards (Codex)
6th week: Steps and procedures in the production of citrus juices.
7th week: Chemical reactions in the juice production
8th week: Other citrus products
9th week: Nutritive value of the citrus fruits
10th week: Citrus essential oil production
11th week: Citrus by-products
12th week: Quality control. Legislation
13th week: Characterization of the citrus essential oils by HPLC-MS
14th week: Present and future application of citrus essential oils.
15th week: Therapeutic properties of citrus essential oils

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Admission to the lectures and seminars of at least 70% of the times scheduled. Students are required to attend laboratory practice and field work 100%.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.3

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.2

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course content is divided into three units that students take over partial exams (**) or joining final exam at the end of the semester (*). The exam is considered passed if students achieve at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams. Grades: <60% not satisfied; 60-70% successful (2) 70-80% good (3), 80-90% very good (4), 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Z. Berk: Citrus processing, 1st Ed.,Academic press, Elsevier Inc, 2016.

0

DA

I.A. Khan: Citrus Genetics, Breeding and Biotechnology, CAB, UK, 2007.

0

DA

G. Dugo, L. Mondello: Citrus Oils Composition, Advanced Analytical Techniques, Contaminants, and Biological Activity, CRC Press, 2011.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

G. Dugo, A. Di Giacomo: Citrus The genus citrus, Taylor&Francis, London, 2002.
B. S. Patil, N. D. Turner, E. G. Miller, J. S. Brodbelt: Potential Health Benefits
of Citrus, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC 2006.
D. A. Kimball: Citrus processing. A complete guide, Sec. ed. C.H.I.P.S., 1999.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Introduction to Scientific Research
NAME OF THE COURSE Introduction to Scientific Research

Code

KTM215

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Marina Trgo

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Asst Prof Marin Ugrina

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to train students for the organization of scientific research, to master the principles and methodology of data collection and literature, the way of processing and data analysis and presentation of results according to the principles of ethical responsibility in the natural, technical and biotechnological sciences.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

It is expected that the learning outcomes provide knowledge about:
- understanding of the importance of science and scientific research
- types of scientific fields and branches of science, scientific institutions and professions
- legislation in science
- way to search and use bibliographic databases and other sources of scientific information
- organization and implementation of scientific research
- understanding of the structure and meaning parts of scientific work
- analyse scientific issues and interpretation of results
- independent design of scientific work at writing, technical processing, presentation, and presentation
- ethical responsibility in scientific research.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introductory lecture. The historical development of science. Scientific knowledge.
2nd week: Science and legislation (fields and branches of science, scientific institutions, organizations, programs, declarations, scientific degrees)
3rd week: Classification and type of papers. The aims and purposes of scientific paper. Differences between the scientific and professional paper.
4th week: Components of scientific work (spot the problem, study the problem, set up a hypothesis, design research, conduct research and process the results, confirm or reject the hypothesis, to publish the results)
5th week: Sources of information. The literature search. Database.
6th week: Experiment. The organization of work in the field and in the laboratory. Planning, implementation and testing.
7th week: Processing the results: sorting, statistics, modelling.
8th week: Writing an article (scientific, professional, review, scientific and popular).
9th week: Presentation of research. Poster presentations.
10th week: Presentation of research. Oral presentation. Basic principles in the presentation of work.
11th week: References. The use of computer technique in the citation.
12th week: Keywords. Graphical abstract.
13th week: Applications for the expert and scientific conferences. The publication of the article. Reviews of scientific papers.
14th week: Measure the value of articles (citations, indexing, impact factor).
15th week: Scientific research ethics.
Seminar: writing seminar paper, making poster presentations, making a PowerPoint presentation of the paper and oral presentation.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

0.5

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Final written exam or two partial exams (50% of the total evaluation).
A written essay (25% of the total evaluation).
Oral presentation of written seminar paper (20% of the total evaluation) and poster presentation based on a written seminar paper (5% of the total evaluation). Passing threshold is 60%. Grades: successful (60% – 69%), good (70% – 79%), very good (80% – 89%), excellent (90% – 100%).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Marušić i sur.: Uvod u znanstveni rad u medicini, 5. izdanje, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2013.

1

V. Silborčić: Kako sastaviti, objaviti i ocijeniti znanstveno djelo, Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2003.

1

J. Kniewald: Metodika znanstvenog rada, Multigraf, Zagreb, 1993.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

A. Tkalac Verčić, D. Sinčić Čorić, N. Pološki Vokić: Priručnik za metodologiju istraživačkog rada, M.E. P. d.o.o., Zagreb, 2010.
M. I. Miljević: Metodologija naučnog rada, Univerzitet u istočnom Sarajevu, Filozofski fakultet, Sarajevo, 2007.
Z. V. Popović: Kako napisati i objaviti naučno delo, Akademska misao, Beograd, 2004.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 Suggestions and reactions of participants during the semester.
Student survey.

 

 

Sensory Evaluation of Food
NAME OF THE COURSE Sensory Evaluation of Food

Code

KTM216

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

20

15

10

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The objective is to learn students about sensory perception of food and its organoleptic properties, and their aim in the evaluation of food quality and general acception from consumers.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After student pass the exam he will be able to:
- define tha basic terms from the laws on sensory evaluation of food
- explain anatomy and physiology basics of organoleptic food analysis
- know and distinguish sensory characteristics of different food products
- find the connection between sensory evaluation of food and its quality control

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to sensory evaluation (definition, historical overview and application)
2nd week: Olifactory system - mechanism, properties
3rd week: Legislation in sensory evaluation of food
4th week: Food properties (taste, smell, sight, texture, hearing)
5th week: Physiological elements of sensory evaluation - smell
6th week: Physiological elements of sensory evaluation - taste
7th week: Organisation of the sensory evaluation - factors that have impact on the evaluation process
8th week: Tests in sensory analysis (analitical and customers test)
9th week: Test of differences, Affinity tests
10th week: Descriptive sensory evaluation
11th week: Training
12th week: Sensory evaluation in the detection of quality of different products - olive oil
13th week: Sensory evaluation in the detection of quality of different products - wine
14th week: Sensory evaluation in the detection of quality of different products - milk and cheese
15th week: Sensory evaluation in the detection of quality of different products - fermented milk products (jogurth, kefir...)
Practice:
Learning about basic smells and tastes. Aplication of different tests.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.
Attending lectures is 80%, while seminars 100% of the total hours.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

0.5

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

1.0

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Written exam after the final lecture.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

H. Stone, J. L. Sidel: Sensory Evaluation Practices 3rd Ed., Elsevier Academic Press San Diego, California, USA, 2004.

0

kod predmetnog nastavnika

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

H. T. Lawless, H. Heymann: Sensory Evaluation of Food, Principles and Practices, 2nd Ed., Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, New York, NY, USA, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Novel Food Packaging Techniques
NAME OF THE COURSE Novel Food Packaging Techniques

Code

KTM217

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To provide an understanding of novel techniques of packaging in accordance with the characteristics of the food product and market requirements.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After the successfully passed exam student should be able to:
- explain the main functions of packaging
- describe the various forms of packaging materials in use at the present time
- describe the risk associated with potential food contamination
- describe the developments in food packaging materials
- explain the principles and processes involved in novel packaging techniques: aseptic, active and intelligent packaging, packaging in modified atmosphere

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction in food packaging systems. Functions of food packaging. Packaging materials and forms.
2nd week: Aseptic packaging of food. Sterilization of packaging material food contact surfaces.
3rd week: Aseptic packaging systems. Integrity testing of aseptic packages.
4th week: Packaging of microwavable food.
5th week: Vacuum packaging.
6th week: Active packaging. Historical development and definitions. Active packaging systems. Self-heating and self-cooling packages;
7th week: Active packaging materials. O2-absorbing materials; ethylene adsorbers; antioxidant packaging; antimicrobial packaging; flavor/odor absorbers and releasers; microwave susceptors
First test.
8th week: Intelligent packaging. Indicating product quality: quality or freshness indicators; time–temperature indicators; gas concentration indicators; radio frequency identification; biosensors.
9th week: Edible packaging materials: polysaccharides, lipids, proteins, composite materials. Film additives. Bionanocomposites. Commercialization.
10th week: Biobased and biodegradable packaging materials, Classification and degradability definitions. Oxo-biodegradable polymers. Starch, hemicellulose, chitosan, poly(lactic acid), biopolyethylene, biopoly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(hydroxyalkanoates)
11th week: Properties of biobased packaging materials: barrier and mechanical properties. Current limitations and methods to improve functionality; food packaging applications
12th week: Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP): introduction, history and principle. Gases used in MAP. Methods of creating MA conditions: passive and active MA
13th week: Equipment for MAP. Packaging for MAP Applications. Microbiology of MAP. Safety of MAP. Applications of MAP.
14th week: Modified atmosphere packaging for fresh meat and seafood; horticultural products
15th week: Food packaging and sustainability: trends and innovations. Life cycle assessment.
Second test.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Lecture attendance: 80 %. Laboratory exercises attendance: 100 %. The preparation and presentation of seminar essay (team work).

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

1.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

CONTINUOUS EVALUATION
The complete exam can be passed through two partial tests during semester.
Attendance on lectures, A1(successfulness =70-100 %), share in grade, k1 =0,1
Seminar essay+presentation, A2(successfulness =60-100 %), share in grade, k2=0,20
1st test, A3 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k4 =0,35
2nd test, A4 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k5 =0,35
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,20A2 + 0,35A3+ 0,35A4
FINAL EVALUATION
Students who did not take or pass partial tests have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods.
Activities A1 and A2 are evaluated in the same way as indicated above.
Written exam, A5 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k5 =0,30
Oral exam, A6 (successfulness =60 -100 %), share in grade, k6 =0,40
GRADE (%) = 0,10A1+0,15A2 + 0,30A6 + 0,40A7
FINAL GRADE: successful (60% – 70 %), good (71% – 80 %), very good (81% – 90 %), excellent (91% – 100 %).
In the case that student passed only one test (**) during continuous evaluation, he/she have to attend to written and oral exam in the regular exam periods(*). The passed test will be recognized by the end of the academic year as a part of the written exam.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

I. Vuković, K. Galić, M. Vereš: Ambalaža za pakiranje namirnica, Tectus, Zagreb, 2007.

1

G. L. Robertson: Food packaging, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2013.

1

R. Ahvenainen: Novel food packaging techniques, Woodhead Publishing Limited, Cambridge, 2003.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

N. Stipanelov Vrandečić: Ambalaža, recenzirana interna skripta, Kemijsko tehnološki fakultet, Split, 2010.
Pravilnik o ambalaži i ambalažnom otpadu, NN/2005.
Pravilnik o zdravstvenoj ispravnosti materijala i predmeta koji dolaze u neposredni dodir s hranom, NN/2008.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Seafood Quality and Safety
NAME OF THE COURSE Seafood Quality and Safety

Code

KTM218

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Vida Šimat

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Seafood is a high-value food group and an important part of the human diet. Due to its chemical composition seafood falls into easily perishable foods. In the last 20 years there is an increase of infections caused foods and marine origin food poisoning are very common. The presence of biological (bacteria, viruses, parasites) and chemical (residues, biotoxins) hazards in fish and other marine organisms is very difficult to control since they are present in the their natural habitat, thus these organisms presents a risk to consumers and require a control through analytical methods for the detection parameters quality in seafood. This course deals with the quality parameters in seafood. In addition to introducing quality parameters and their role in the quality and food safety, particular attention will be paid to the understanding of the overall functioning of the distribution chain in the food industry. The emphasis of the course is to understand the factors that affect the safety of fishery products, recognition of quality parameters as well as knowledge of the principles and analytical procedures in assessing the quality and safety of fishery products.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

Competence in applying knowledge of inorganic and organic chemistry and microbiology and biochemistry.
Passed exam in Seafood processing technology.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Upon completion of the course and passing the exam, students will be able to:
- assess the seafood related hazards that pose a risk to consumers.
- recognize and analytically determine specific quality parameters for a particular seafood product.
- identify risks of a certain products based on the characteristics of the products (NaCl, aw, pH, temperature).
- determine the shelf life of a specific product using relevant sensory, microbiological, biochemical and chemical methods.
- assess the risks in the supply chain of fishery products.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Trends and problems in the seafood production, the concept of food quality.
2nd week: Spoilage of seafood.
3rd week: Postmortem changes in fish.
4th week: Postmortem changes in fish - continued.
5th week: Freshness degradation and freshness parameters.
6th week: Bacterial degradation of fish.
7th week: Sensory evaluation of fish quality.
8th week: Chemical indicators of freshness and spoilage of fish.
9th week: Volatile amines.
10th week: Biogenic amines.
11th week: Histamine.
12th week: Changes in lipids, lipid deterioration.
13th week: Changes in physical properties of fish meat.
14th week: Bioresiduals and preservatives in fishery products.
15th week: Practical application and usage of quality parameters in practice, risk assessment.
Exercises:
Sensory evaluation of seafood. Distillation method for determining the quantity of TVB-N and TMA-N. Measuring the pH of fish meat, dielectric properties and texture during storage of different species of fish in various storage conditions. Determination of NaCl share in various fishery products. Visit to the Laboratory for quality control of animal origin, Veterinary Institute in Split. Determination of histamine. Measurement of the lipids oxidation parameters during processing and / or storage of seafood, determining the secondary products of lipid oxidation eg. malondialdehyde (MDA), thiobarbituric acid assay / or TBARS TBK. Introducing quality parameters of fish oil. Determination of anisidine value, peroxide value, acidic value and TBARS test for fish oil.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Students are required to attend classes (lectures and exercises), actively participate in the teaching process and pass the exam (or 2 tests). The presence at lectures will be recorded, and absence needs to be justified. One hundred percent presence in class will be rewarded with 2 extra points at the test.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

1.0

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The class materials are divided into two parts. Students pass the exam separately through two written tests, each carrying 50 points, consisting of materials given in both lectures and exercises. For one part to be considered passed it is necessary to achieve at least 60% score. If a student repeatedly outputs on individual examination, the result will be taken as an average of all previously achieved results (example: first date on Exam A: 15 points (33.3%), the second taking the Exam A: 30 points (66.7% ); result of examination: (15 + 30) / 2 = 22.5 points (50%)). At the end of the semester, if the student is satisfied with the grade, it will be entered in the index; otherwise, student can take an oral exam for a higher grade.
The final score will be determined according to the criteria: <60% - insufficient, 60% - 70% - sufficient, 71 - 80% - good, 81 - 90% - very good, 91 - 100% - excellent.
Additional points (maximum 2) a student can achieve if they show a high degree of interest in the subject, if they are always prepared; if they ask questions and actively participate in discussions, meet all field tasks ect.
The requirements for a signature: Class attendance 80% and exercise attendance 100%.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. B. Luten, T. Borresen, J. Oehlenschlager: Seafoodfromproducer to consumer, Integrated approach to quality, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1997.

0

DA

H. A. Bremner: Safety and quality issues in Fish Processing, CRC Press, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida, SAD, 2002.

0

DA

T. Borresen: Improving sea food products for the consumer, Woodhead Publishing Ltd., Cambridge, England, 2008.

0

DA

I. Martinez, D. James, H. Loreal: Application of modern analytical techniques to ensure sea food safety and authenticity, FAO, Rome, Italy, 2005.

0

DA

J. Havranek, M. Tudor Kalit, R. Bažok, J. Đugum, D. Grbeša, M. Hadžiosmanović, A. Ivanković, I. Jakopović, S. Orešković, V. Rupić, D. Samaržija: Sigurnost hrane od polja do stola, M.E.P. d.o.o., Zagreb, 2014.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Methods of Analysis of AOAC International, 2000.
S. Duraković: Moderna mikrobiologija namirnica, Udžbenici Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagreb, 2002.
F. M. Garfield: Quality Assurence for Analytical Laboratories, AOAC International, Gaithersburg, Md., 2000.
S. E. Mortimer, C. A. Wallace, C. A. Cassianos: HACCP, Blackwell Science, Oxford, 2001.
V. Turčić: HACCP i higijena namirnica, Zagreb, 2000.
M. J. Juran: Planiranje i analiza kvalitete: od razvoja proizvoda do upotrebe 3. izd., Mate, Zagreb, 1999.
B. Petz: Osnove statističke metode za nematematičare, 3. izd., Naklada Slap, 1997.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Spectroscopic Methods in Food Analysis
NAME OF THE COURSE Spectroscopic Methods in Food Analysis

Code

KTM219

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

15

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Knowledge of separation and identification methods for organic compounds found in foods important in the food, agricultural, and other industries using the spectra obtained by the modern spectroscopic techniques (MS, UV / Vis, IR, NMR)

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, the student will become familiarized with the major concepts of organic food analysis, which includes:
- choosing a suitable chromatographic method for separation of components of the mixture of substances that have been isolated from food,
- select appropriate spectroscopic methods for qualitative analysis to identify food organic compounds of interest,
- combining individual spectroscopic methods for structure elucidation;
- application of acquired knowledge in research projects.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Chromatographic separation (TLC, GC, HPLC). Sample preparation.
2nd week: Chromatography of volatile (essential oils, pesticides,...) and non-volatile (flavonoids, amino acids, sugars, ...) compounds.
3rd week: Mass spectrometry (MS). Methods of ionization and mass ionizers. MS / MS methodology.
4th week: Examples of different classes of organic compounds.
5th week: The analysis of compounds in wine, liquor, juices, essential oils, and the like. (terpenes, norizoprenoids, flavonoids, glucosinolates, pesticides, ...) ..
Spectroscopy analysis methods. Electromagnetic spectra. Spectroscopic techniques used in organic compound structure elucidation.
6th week: Ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis): What is a chromophore. Effect of conjugation.
7th week: Examples of different classes of organic compounds in food analysis (phenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, pigments,...).
Partial exam (written, 1 hour 15 min)
8th week: Infrared spectroscopy (IR) Introduction (IR, NIR, Raman).
9th week: Examples of spectra of different classes of organic compounds.
10th week: Examples of FTIR spectrum in qualitative analysis and control of various foods (meat and meat products, fish and related products, fruits and vegetables, dairy products and cereals).
11th week: Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Basic principles.
12th week: 1H NMR Chemical shift. Spin-spin coupling. Quantitativity.
13th week: 13C NMR. and 2D NMR.
14th week: Examples of spectra of different classes of organic compounds.
15th week: Application of NMR (examples of spectra) in the quality control of vegetable oil, determining the fat, moisture and sugar in the natural products (ripeness and quality of fruit and vegetables), oil content and moisture content of the grains, authentication of fruit juices and wines, characterization of protein and sugar, and etc ...
Partial exam (written, 1 hour 15 min)
Laboratory exercises
Chromatography (TLC, GC, i/ili HPLC) (Separation of complex mixtures of volatile and non-volatile compounds - essential oils, flavonoids, pigments etc.) and mass spectrometry. (4)
UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy analyses (essential oils, terpenes, flavonoids, glucosinolates, etc.). (4)
IR spectroscopy. Analyses of solid, and liquid mixtures and pure compounds (essential oils, terpenes, flavonoids, glucosinolates, etc.) (4)
NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of NMR spectra (1H i 13C NMR) by using SPINWORKS software. Analysis of obtained IR, MS, NMR spectra and comparison by databases available on Internet (SDBS, NIST,...). (3)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

0.5

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

0.5

Written exam

2.0

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Course is divided into three sections that students take over 2 partial written and 1 oral exam or by final exam at the end of the semester. The student pass the exam if he/she achieves at least 60%. The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5)

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. Mohan: Organic Analytical Chemistry, Theory and Practice, Alpha Science International Ltd., Pangbourne England, 2003.

1

R. Flamini, P. Traldi: Mass spectrometry in grape and wine chemistry, Wiley, 2010.

0

DA

D.W. Sun: Infrared Spectroscopy for Food Quality Analysis and Control, Academic Press, 2009.

0

DA

A. Spyros, P. Dais: NMR Spectroscopy in Food Analysis, The Royal Society of Chemistry, Thomas Graham House, Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0WF, UK, 2013.

1

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

E. Pretsch, P. Buehlmann, C. Affolter: Structure Determination of Organic Compounds, Tables of Spectraldata, Third Edition, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2000.
H. Günzler, H. U. Gremlich: Uvod u infracrvenu spektroskopiju, Školska knjiga Zagreb, 2006.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Ecological Food Production
NAME OF THE COURSE Ecological Food Production

Code

KTM220

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

10

0

5

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The concept of ecological food production do not cover only the production of healthy food (food which production does not include artificial fertilizers, chemicals and pesticides or hormones), but is actually the concept of sustainable management, which involves growing plants, animal food and raw materials by the principles of environmental, economically and socially justified production and technologies with aim of maximal exploitation of particular economy. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the Republic of Croatia and EU legislation for the ecological production and processing of food. Through several examples for food ingredients and/or products they will get the basic knowledge on the selection of varieties/breeds, control of diseases and parasites, growing conditions, storage conditions, processing methods, packaging and presentation of ecological food products.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, students will be able to:
- know the principles of ecologic food production and food control in the framework of legislative,
- be able to analyze and control the process of cultivation, processing and control,
- have basic knowledge about the introduction of new methods, ideas and achievements in organic production,
- be able to develop new products.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Ecological agriculture (Ecological production and products)
2nd week Ecological food production - definition, comparison with conventional production, objectives, legislation
3rd week: Ecological food production - principles of processing, storage, packaging and presentation of the product
4th week: Ecological production in Croatia and abroad
5th week: Legislation on organic production in the Republic of Croatia and EU (legislation, regulations, amendments and changes to the law, etc.).
I colloquium
6th week: Ecological production of medicinal herbs
7th week: Ecological production of herbs
8th week: Ecological production of fruits and fruit juices
9th week: Ecological production of vegetables
10th week: Ecological production of olives
11th week: Ecological production of cereals and bakery products
12th week: Ecological production of mushrooms
13th week: Ecological viticulture and wine production
14th week: Ecological production of animal products - beekeeping, production in fisheries and aquaculture
15th week: Ecological production of animal products - meat, milk and dairy products
II Colloquium
Seminars:
Food handling after harvesting and preparation for processing; Safety in food production (HACCP, Hazard Analysis ...); The fermentation and enzymes in ecological production; Packing and declarations; Legislation related to the ecological production of the selected products; Presentation of students’ seminar papers on selected topic

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

0.5

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade passed pursuant to mark preliminary exams, seminar essay and laboratory exercises.
Rating: <60% not sufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Zakonski propisi iz područja ekološke proizvodnje hrane u RH i EU

0

Web

S. Wright: Handbook of Organic Food Processing and Production, First Edition, Springer Science + Business Media, B.V., London, 1994.

0

DA

J. G. Brennan, S. Alistair: Food Processing Handbook, Volume 1, Second edition. Wiley-VCH, UK, 2012.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected scientific papers.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Entrepreneuship and Management in Food and Beverage Production
NAME OF THE COURSE Entrepreneuship and Management in Food and Beverage Production

Code

KTM221

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Prof Nikša Alfirević

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

10 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

To conceptualize entrepreneurial project and propose implementation of management functions (planning, organizing, staffing, leadership and control) in food industry context.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By completing this course student will be able to:
- shape alternative entrepreneurial project proposals
- evaluate and judge entrepreneurial project proposals
- asses company’s environment (organization)
- recommend flow for managerial planning
- conceptualize organizational structure through organization chart (organigram)
- determine approaches to human resources management
- assess work effects and compensations management
- prearrange leadership and employees motivation approaches
Develope proposition of managerial control process by using basic control methods and techniques

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction to business. Legal aspect of business (company, organization). Entrepreneurship and management terms.
2nd week: Models, approaches and determinants of contemporary entrepreneurship.
3rd week: Entrepreneurial incentives and risks. The forms of entrepreneurial support.
4th week: Introduction to management. Management functions. Entrepreneur management relationship.
5th week: Organizational environment. Environment analysis methods. SWOT and PEST analysis.
6th week: Business planning basics. Business plan types and content.
7th week: Nature of organizing. Working places and organizational structures.
8th week:Basic forms of organizational structures.
9th week: Introduction to stuffing. Work place description. Recruiting and employees selection.
10th week: Compensational management. Employees costs planning.
11th week: Basic determinants of leadership. Leadership in entrepreneurship and management.
12th week: Motivation and interpersonal relationship management.
13th week: Basic determinant of control. Term, process and control areas.
14th week: Entrepreneurial venture control.
15th week: Repeating and determining of course materia.
Seminars:
Organization and company, Legal aspects of business organizations, Food industry specifics, Business ideas generation, Business ideas evaluationg, Introduction to marketing aspect, Marketing aspect elaboration, Organizational aspect of business ideas (working places and organizational structure); Stuff planning in new business venture; Elaboration of selected financial aspects (for business ideas); Motivation for starting new business venture; Leadership; Presentation and discussion of elaborated business ideas; Repeating and determining course materials.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

*Two test will be organiyed during semester. Positively graded first test is precondition for second test. Total grade will be formed as a mean of (positive) grades from tests. Positive grade of student’s individual work is suptitute for teoretical part of oral exam (in examination period).
**Work in gorups, related to business idea development, will be presented and elaborated during semester.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. Buble: Osnove menadžmenta, Sinergija, Zagreb, 2006. (dijelovi)

0

DA

D. Kružić: Obiteljsko poduzetništvo, EF Split i EF Mostar, Mostar, 2016. (dijelovi)

0

DA

I. Matić, I. Pavić, Ž. Mateljak: Menadžment – priručnik za nastavu, Ekonomski fakultet Split, Split, 2009.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Communication Skills
NAME OF THE COURSE Communication Skills

Code

KTM222

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

15

0

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

- understand the basic concepts related to verbal and nonverbal communication, as well as the factors that influence these concepts;
- develop the skills of presentation planning, presentation structure, and presentation performance in the Croatian language;
- develop pragmatic language competence;
- adopt the basic principles of written communication.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Students will be able to:
- describe the theories and models of communication;
- employ active listening techniques;
- demonstrate questioning skills;
- give a technical presentation;
- critically evaluate their own communication skills;
- recognize disfluent speech;
- negotiate and demonstrate the skills of assertive communication.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Definitions of communication; Overview of the theory of communication; Cross-cultural communication
2nd week: Verbal and nonverbal and paraverbal communication
3rd week: Questioning as a communication skill
4th week: Active listening and Barriers to active listening
5th week: Persuasion skills
6th week: Written communication; Project reports - I. part
7th week: Written communication; Project reports - II. part
I. colloquium
8th week: Presentation skills (systematic guide)
9th week: Technical presentation
10th week: Technical presentation and peer evaluation
11th week: Assertive communication and Critical thinking
12th week: Public speaking skills
13th week: Types of speech disfluencies
14th week: Group and Team communication - I. part
15th week: Group and Team communication - II. part
II. colloquium

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature, individual work.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.7

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

0.3

0.7

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

0.2

Oral exam

Written exam

0.1

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade is determined as the average of:
- assessment of oral presentation and peer assessment of oral presentation;
- assessment of written communication skills,
- written and oral assessment.
There are two midterm exams and two examination periods. The first midterm exam is after 7 weeks of lecturing, and the second one is after the next 6 weeks. The lowest passing point is 50% in each midterm exam. The students who do not pass the midterm exams write the exams. The final grade for the course is calculated as a percentage of points earned. The final grade is determined applying the absolute ECTS grading system in accordance with the Rules of the Studying System of the University of Split.
At the end of the semester the grades are averaged to form a grade Point Average, according to this scale: 50% - 61% - sufficient (2), 62% - 74%- good (3), 75% - 87% - very good (4), 88% - 100% - excellent (5).
Students who fail the two exams in the first examination period take the exam in the autumn final examination period. The final exam consists of the material covered in both midterm exams.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

M. M. Kovač, N. Sirković: Presentation, Writing and Interpersonal Communication Skills, FESB, 2014.

20

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

J. W. Davies: Communication skills: A Guide for Engineering and Applied Science Students, Pearson: Prentice Hall, 2001.
T. E. Harris, J. C. Sherblom: Small Group and Team Communication, Pearson Education/Allyn & Bacon, 2010.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Kinesiological Activity, Fitness and Health
NAME OF THE COURSE Kinesiological Activity, Fitness and Health

Code

KTM223

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Mladen Hraste

Credits (ECTS)

2.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

15

0

30

0

Status of the course

Elective

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The first objective of the course is to help students in understanding and implementation of a healthy way of life. Another goal of the course to over kinesiology operators maintain and improve their health and raise their quality of life and study.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

There are no requirements for subject enrolling.
There are no entry competences required.

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course students will be capable:
- to implement independent participation in fitness programs
- to implement physically active lifestyle
- to apply learned knowledge and skills needed for further independent learning and the acquisition of new motor competence
- to promote the value of an active and healthy lifestyle
- better mental and physical health

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: concept and definition of kinesiology;
2nd week: development and structure of kinesiology
3rd week: term and definition of equation specifications in the sport
4th week: the impact and importance of individual factors to success in sports
5th week: management and process stages of exercise
6th week: kinesiology and health
7th week: review of scientific research on the effects of kinesiology to human health I
8th week: review of scientific research on the effects of kinesiology to human health II
9th week: structure and characteristics of modern aerobics programs
10th week: structure and features of the cardio fitness program
11th week: structure and features of the weight program
12th week: the weight program for the muscles of arms and shoulders
13th week: the weight program for the muscles of abdomen
14th week: the weight program for the back muscles
15th week: the weight program for the muscles of the pelvis and legs
The exercises:
program of modern aerobics (Pilates 1), a program of modern aerobics (aerobics 1), a program of modern aerobics (zumba), a program of modern aerobics (Pilates 2), a program of modern aerobics (aerobics 2), cardio fitness program on a bicycle ergometer and treadmill (manual and fatburn program), cardio fitness program on a bicycle ergometer and treadmill (interval training high intensity), cardio fitness program on the treadmill and rowing ergometer (manual and fatburn program), cardio fitness program on the treadmill and rowing ergometer interval training high intensity ), the weight program for legs, the weight program for glutes, the weight program for the abdominal muscles, the weight program for arms, the weight program for shoulders, the weight program for back.

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

1.0

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

1.0

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The course is rated as the arithmetic mean score of the practical exam and the theoretical exam.
The student will get a grade excellent (5) of the practical part of the exam if motor movement performed flawlessly, easily and harmoniously.
The student will get a grade very good (4) of the practical part of the exam if motor movement performed flawlessly, easily and harmoniously, but a little ”harder”.
Students will get a good grade (3) of the practical part of the exam if motor movement performed with minor errors and with less difficulty.
The student will get a grade sufficient (2) of the practical part of the exam if motor movement performed with major mistakes and with great difficulty.
Students will receive an unsatisfactory grade (1) of the practical part of the exam if you can not perform a motor task is not in the elemental form.
The theoretical part is taken by written test.

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Skripta iz kolegija Kineziološka aktivnost, fitness i zdravlje, http://www.pmfst.hr/~mhraste/

0

Web

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Dennison, P. E., Dennison, G. E. (2010). Brain Gym: Teacher’s Edition. Ventura, CA: Hearts at Play, Inc.
F. Delavier: Anatomski vodič za vježbe snage. Medicinska naklada, Zagreb, 2009.
D. Milanović i sur.: Fitness, Fakultet za fizičku kulturu Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, Zagrebački velesajam, Zagrebački športski savez, Fakultet za fizičku kulturu, 1996.
M. Mišigoj-Duraković i sur.:Tjelesno vježbanje i zdravlje. Fakultet za fizičku kulturu Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 1999.
M. Mraković: Osnove sistematske kineziologije. Priručnik za sportske trenere (ur. Milanović D., Kolman M.), Fakultet za fizičku kulturu, Hrvatske olimpijski odbor, Zagrebački sportski savez, 1993.
B. J. Sharkey, S. E. Gaskill: Fitness andhealth, Vježbanje i zdravlje, Beograd: Subcom, 2008.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Diploma Thesis
NAME OF THE COURSE Diploma Thesis

Code

KTMODR

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

18.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

Professional Practice
NAME OF THE COURSE Professional Practice

Code

KTMOSP

Year of study

1.

Course teacher

Credits (ECTS)

3.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

L S E F

0

0

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

 

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

Research

Practical training

Experimental work

Report

Essay

Seminar essay

Tests

Oral exam

Written exam

Project

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

 

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)

 

 

 

3. STUDY PERFORMANCE CONDITIONS

3.1. Places of the study performance

Buildings of the constituent part (name existing, under construction and planned buildings)

Identification of building

Zgrada tri fakulteta

Location of building

Ruđera Boškovića 35

Year of completion

2015

Total square area in m2

29500

Identification of building

Zgrada u Kaštel Sućurcu

Location of building

Kaštel Sućurac

Year of completion

1961

Total square area in m2

3000

3.2. List of teachers and associate teachers

 

Course Teachers and associate teachers

Alcoholic Beverages Technology

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Algae Biotechnology

 

Applied Mathematics

Nives Baranović

Biochemical Engineering

Assoc Prof Sandra Svilović

Citrus Processing

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić
ScD Danijela Skroza

Communication Skills

 

Corrosion and Materials Protection

Prof Senka Gudić

Diploma Thesis

 

Ecological Food Production

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić
ScD Danijela Skroza

Entrepreneuship and Management in Food and Beverage Production

Prof Nikša Alfirević

Ethnobotany

 

Fermented dairy products and cheesemaking

Prof Tea Bilušić

Flavour Chemistry

Prof Igor Jerković

Food Biotransformations

Asst Prof Mila Radan

Food Safety

Prof Tea Bilušić

Fruit and Vegetable Processing

Prof Tea Bilušić

Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Honey and Other Bee Products

Prof Igor Jerković

Introduction to Scientific Research

Prof Marina Trgo
Asst Prof Marin Ugrina

Kinesiological Activity, Fitness and Health

Asst Prof Mladen Hraste

Mediterranean Diet

Prof Tea Bilušić

Novel Food Packaging Techniques

Prof Nataša Stipanelov Vrandečić

Novel Food Processing Technologies

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Novel Fruit and Vegetable Products

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić
ScD Danijela Skroza

Olive Processing Technologies

Asst Prof Ivica Ljubenkov

Physical Properties of Food

Assoc Prof Vesna Sokol

Process Design

Prof Nediljka Vukojević Medvidović

Processing Technology of Species and Medicinal Herbs

Prof Igor Jerković

Professional Practice

 

Seafood Processing Technology

Asst Prof Vida Šimat

Seafood Quality and Safety

Asst Prof Vida Šimat

Sensory Evaluation of Food

 

Spectroscopic Methods in Food Analysis

Assoc Prof Ivica Blažević

Sustainable Technologies in Food Industry

Prof Marina Trgo

Technology of Cereals

Prof Tea Bilušić

Technology of Meat and Meat Products

Asst Prof Mladenka Malenica Staver

Wine Technology

 

 

3.4. Optimal number of students

The optimal number of students in the graduate study of Food Technology in terms of space, equipment and number of full-time teachers is 24 and represents the proposed admission quota.

3.5. Estimate of costs per student

Average annual tuition fee per student amount about 31,500.00 kunas.

3.6. Plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance

In keeping with the European standards and guidelines for internal quality assurance in higher education institutions (according to “Standards and Guidelines of Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area”) on the basis of which the University of Zagreb defines procedures for quality assurance, the proposer of the study programme is obliged to draw up a plan of procedures of study programme quality assurance.

Documentation on which the quality assurance system of the constituent part of the University is based:

Regulations on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if existing)
Handbook on the quality assurance system of the constituent part (enclose if it exists)

Description of procedures for evaluation of the quality of study programme implementation

  • Fore each procedure the method needs to be described (most often questionnaires for students or teachers, and self-evaluation questionnaire), name the body conducting evaluation (constituent part, university office), method of processing results and making information available, and timeframe for carrying out evaluation
  • If procedure is described in an attached document, name the document and the article.

Evaluation of the work of teachers and part-time teachers

The process of student evaluation of the teaching quality is conducted by the Quality Enhancement Centre (at the level of the University) and the Quality Enhancement Committees (at the level of constituents). The procedure consists of informing students and teachers, student survey questionnaire, the processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results, the adoption of measures to improve quality. The procedure is described in detail in the Regulations on the procedure for student evaluation of teaching at the University of Split. The processing of the questionnaires and reporting on the results are under jurisdiction of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Summary results for the each constituent are submitted to the Dean and the leader of the Quality Enhancement Committee.

Monitoring of grading and harmonization of grading with anticipated learning outcomes

Procedures, rules and criteria for grading of students include: method for taking the exams, requirements for taking the exams, method of evaluation through colloquia, seminars, active participation in classes, exams and other obligations, conditions for signature, a list of references for exam preparation, and data about the teacher, assistant, etc. Informations about procedures, rules and criteria for grading students can found on the website of the Faculty and at the introductory lectures.

Evaluation of availability of resources (spatial, human, IT) in the process of learning and instruction

The Faculty provides adequate and appropriate educational resources for the study program and support for teaching and non-teaching activities of students, which are consistent with the specific programs and student needs and readily accessible to students (equipped classrooms, library, computer classrooms, and support for students with disabilities.

Availability and evaluation of student support (mentorship, tutorship, advising)

Student evaluation of the teaching quality, student survey questionnaire.

Monitoring of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole

Analysis of student success at the study is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre of the University of Split. The analysis is carried annually by survey questionnaire at the beginning of the academic year for the previous academic year. The results of the analysis and measures to improve student success are presented to the Senate of the University of Split by leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre. Likewise, ISVU system allows the student service and ISVU coordinator to keep track of student pass/fail rate by course and study programme as a whole.

Student satisfaction with the programme as a whole

Quality Improvement Centre of the University of Split has defined the procedure for conducting a survey on the evaluation of the overall study. The student survey questionnaire for evaluation of the study is conducted by the platform Evasys but after the student has passed the final exam. The aim of the survey is to hear the opinion of students on various aspects of the study which they have completed and to determine flaws in order to increase the quality of the content and implementation of the study. Data is conducted by Quality Enhancement Centre and results are submitted to the Head of Department and to leader of the Quality Enhancement Centre.

Procedures for obtaining feedback from external parties (alums, employers, labour market and other relevant organizations)

Former students are contacted in order to express their assessment of the qualifications for the professional requirements. Selected employers can be contacted as well in order to assess their satisfaction with students which have been studing at this the study program. Regular exchange of information at conferences organized by the ALUMNI of the Faculty (AMACTFS).

Evaluation of student practical education (where this applies)

Evaluation of student training is conducted orally by the course teacher. At the same time the student must submit the log and seminar about selected topic of professional practice.

Other evaluation procedures carried out by the proposer

Formal and informal consultation with colleagues in the profession at the Faculty level and beyond.

Description of procedures for informing external parties on the study programme (students, employers, alums)

Results are available on the official web site of the Faculty (https://www.ktf.unist.hr) Brochure (revised annually) The University review. Universitas – supplement of the Slobodna Dalmacija about the University of Split. The participation of staff and students ot the Faculty at the Science Festival and similar events.