Novel Fruit and Vegetable Products

NAME OF THE COURSE Novel Fruit and Vegetable Products

Code

KTM212

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

ScD Danijela Skroza

Type of instruction (number of hours)

P S V T

30

15

0

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the new methods and techniques for minimal processing of fruits and vegetables. In addition, they will learn about important role of the raw materials in the production of minimally processed products of high quality, about importance of choosing and performing unit operations, and how to apply appropriate preservatives (particularly against browning) and hygienic products during processing of fresh fruits and vegetables. Through the course, with the help of several case studies, they will learn about types of packaging and a variety of chemical, biochemical and microbiological changes in minimally processed food.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

After completing the course, students will:
- know some of the new techniques used in the processing of fruits and vegetables,
- distinguished advantages of the use of such processes compared to the conventional ones,
- be able to describe a method for producing minimally processed fruits and vegetables, starting with the selection of species, varieties and determination of the quality of raw materials in order to obtain (produce) high quality finial product,
- know the purpose of effective detergent for raw material cleaning, understand the importance of maintaining hygienic conditions, select the appropriate method of packaging and explain its impact on product sustainability.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Introduction and definition of the new products from fruits and vegetables, fresh-cut fruit and vegetables
2nd week: Minimal processing of fruits and vegetables (MPVP) - unit processes and phases
3rd week: Minimal processing of fruits and vegetables by thermal and non-thermal techniques
4th week: Processing methods and their main characteristics
5th week: Packaging methods; Modified atmosphere packaging
6th week: New trends in packaging of the processed food
7th week: Active and intelligent packaging
I colloquium
8th week: The role of raw material (species, variety) and its quality (level of maturity, health, etc.) on the production of high-quality MPVP.
9th week: The role of raw material (species, variety) and its quality (level of maturity, health, etc.) on the production of high-quality MPVP- extension
10th week: The application of hygiene agents in the processing of fresh fruits and vegetables
11th week: The use of natural preservatives in processing of minimally processed food
12th week: Browning prevention
13th week: The effect of minimal processing on the microbiological contamination of products
14th week: The impact of minimal processing on the quality and life-time of the final product.
15th week: The impact of minimal processing on nutritional and phytochemical composition of the final product
II. colloquium
Seminars:
- from raw material to final product - planning and design of new products, each phase of production
- Novel fruit products (fresh cut apple production, watermelon, pineapple, etc.).
- Novel vegetable products (production of fresh cut lettuce, cabbage, carrots and etc.)
- Super fruits and nutritional supplements based on super fruits
- Biologically active compounds and their function - Functional Foods
- Legal requirements and the HACCP system in minimally processed foods
- Presentation of students’ seminar papers on selected topic

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

0.0

Practical training

0.0

Experimental work

0.0

Report

0.0

0.5

Essay

0.0

Seminar essay

1.0

 

 

Tests

2.0

Oral exam

1.0

 

 

Written exam

0.0

Project

0.0

 

 

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade passed pursuant to mark preliminary exams, seminar essay and laboratory exercises.
Rating: <60% not sufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

S. M. Alzamora, M. S. Tapia, A. Lopez-Malo: Minimally Processed Fruit and Vegetables, Aspen Publishers, Glyndon, 2000.

0

DA

V. M. Gomez-Lopez: Decontamination of Fresh and Minimally Processed Produce. John Wiley & Sons. USA, 2012.

0

DA

M. W. Siddiqui, M. S. Rahman: Minimally Processed Foods: Technologies for Safety, Quality, and Convenience. Springer, New York, 2015.

0

DA

T. Ohlsson,N. Bengtsson: Minimal Processing Technologies in the Food Industry. Woodhead Publishing, England, 2002.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Selected scientific papers.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)