Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals

NAME OF THE COURSE Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals

Code

KTM210

Year of study

2.

Course teacher

Asst Prof Ivana Generalić Mekinić

Credits (ECTS)

4.0

Associate teachers

Type of instruction (number of hours)

P S V T

30

0

15

0

Status of the course

Mandatory

Percentage of application of e-learning

0 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course objectives

This course will describe functional foods and nutraceuticals, including their classification, health benefits, development, and law regulation. The main focus is on analyses, chemistry, processing, bioavailability, and health benefits of bioactive food components. Students will learn about which constituent make some food functional, and will discuss their chemistry and physiological effects.

Course enrolment requirements and entry competences required for the course

 

Learning outcomes expected at the level of the course (4 to 10 learning outcomes)

By the end of the course students should be able to:
- understand fundamental concepts related to functional food and nutraceuticals,
- define major nutrient components and specific functional foods,
- describe the major health benefits of functional foods and nutraceuticals,
- decribe the major biological activities,
- understand the basic regulation.

Course content broken down in detail by weekly class schedule (syllabus)

1st week: Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: History and definitions;
2nd week: Categories of functional foods
3rd week: Nutrition and health (Nutrition related diseases, Bioavailability, Specific health issues...)
4th week: Nutrient Components of Foods: Bioactive Carbohydrates
5th week: Nutrient Components of Foods: Bioactive Proteins, Peptides and Lipids
6th week: Nutrient Components of Foods: Bioactive Carotenoids
7th week: Nutrient Components of Foods: Plant Secondary Metabolites
8th week: Other non-nutritive components
I Colloquium
9th week: Specific Functional Foods: Soybean, Fruits and Vegetables
10th week: Specific Functional Foods: Milk and Milk Products, Fish, Meat, Miscellaneous Foods and Food Components
11th week: Biological activities (Antioxidant properties, Antimicrobial activity, Anticancer agents, Anti-inflammatory properties, Cardiovascular effects, Gastric and hepatic protective effects, Anti-obesity and anti-diabetic activities...)
12th week: health benefits of functional foods/ingredients
13th week: Current and emerging trends in the production of functional foods and nutraceuticals;
14th week: Processing technologies,
15th week: Economic aspects, public perception, law regulation and ethical issues
II. Colloquium
Laboratory exercises
- Isolation, purification and identification of bioactive components / fractions of selected foods (eg. pigments, sugars, terpenes, thiols, phenolic compounds ...), (4)
- Determination of antioxidant activity (e.g., methods ORAC, FRAP, DPPH, BR, chelating, ...) (5)
- Determination of antimicrobial activity (disk diffusion method, determination of minimal inhibitory concentration) (3)
- Demonstration: enzymatic inhibition of isolated fractions / compounds (acetylcholine esterase, butirilcholinesterase), vasodilatory effects, anticarcinogenic activity, ...)

Format of instruction:

Student responsibilities

Active participation in all activities: lectures, consultations, searching the literature.

Screening student work (name the proportion of ECTS credits for eachactivity so that the total number of ECTS credits is equal to the ECTS value of the course):

Class attendance

0.5

Research

0.5

Practical training

0.0

Experimental work

1.0

Report

0.0

 

 

Essay

0.0

Seminar essay

0.0

 

 

Tests

0.0

Oral exam

0.0

 

 

Written exam

2.0

Project

0.0

 

 

Grading and evaluating student work in class and at the final exam

The final grade is based on the evaluation of partial exams, seminars and laboratory exercises.
Scoring: <60% insufficient; 60-70% sufficient (2); 70-80% good (3); 80-90% very good (4); 90-100% excellent (5).

Required literature (available in the library and via other media)

Title

Number of copies in the library

Availability via other media

J. I. Boye: Nutraceutical and Functional Food Processing Technology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2015.

0

DA

R. E. C. Wildman: Handbook of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Second Edition, CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, 2007.

0

DA

R. E. Aluko: Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2012.

0

DA

R. Chadwick, S. Henson, B. Moseley, G. Koenen, M. Liakopoulos, C. Midden, A. Palou, G. Rechkemmer, D. Schroder, A. von Wright: Functional Foods, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2003.

0

DA

G. Paliyath, M. Bakovic, K. Shetty: Functional Foods, Nutraceuticals, and Degenerative Disease Prevention, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2011.

0

DA

Optional literature (at the time of submission of study programme proposal)

Y. Mine, E. Li-Chan, B. Jiang: Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2010.
M. Skinner, D. Hunter: Bioactives in fruit: health benefits and functional foods,John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2013.
C. C. Akoh: Handbook of Functional Lipids,CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, 2006.
Odabrani znanstveni članci.

Quality assurance methods that ensure the acquisition of exit competences

Quality assurance will be performed at three levels:
(1) University Level;
(2) Faculty Level by Quality Control Committee;
(3) Lecturer’s Level.

Other (as the proposer wishes to add)